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The Charleston daily news. [volume] (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 27, 1865, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026994/1865-09-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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paiiiY Nsryrs.
"~Q?H^Sl2B?TO-?r:..
WEDNESDAY MORENO.'SU l'TKMBElt 27, 1{??5.
The Hon.'__ C___-? ?aid to be "a citizen of
influence and pO_tUon in Georgia," pnblisbO- a
lottor in Hi'.- Augusta papal-, in which he m_l-M
ihe following roni.irki.blo declaration : "Tho Gov
ernment of the United Slates according to the
law of-?mtioiif?, h.w acquired'the right to rofuuo to
ub ??continuance of -Ucll political organisation in
ihe Stale as has show?.?tBolf hostile to the conquer
or and ha? aided tilo wir, and so much of our Con
stitution and li.uvs n.i . oulravfiie the fundamental
policy of thii couxiU'jror." "? . _ , .."".
This ?8 what tho ltcpuiiiicaii- claim?what they
Jiavo manifested .very intention to carry out; and
it become?"intor..?tit?s to.pa to inquiro upon [wfiat
foundation of right thoy can premium to build iu
advocating a doctrino oonoiv audalartliug,. There
Jia-'hlways been In. tho Government tho power t_
maintain inviolate the Constitution and Laws of the
United Slates, and it has repeatedly been rccog
ni-od and exerciat d by tho Judiciary in declaring
VoitTall act?, whether of states or individual-, re
pugnant to thorn, and in punishing all oll'o-cee
agaiiiBt them. But tbo Itepublicans, in claiming
sucirn right, claim another and .different power
from thin?a powor given by tbo law? of war, and
Independent of tho Constitution?a power to sub
stituto the policy of party for the Constitution. Ib
there any basis for euch a claim ? . '
Tho question presenta itself to ua in two phases.
In one aspect, the Southern States and the General
Government auataiu to each other tho relation of
independent powors, tho one conquerod by the
other. Of courao, in this caso, tho law of nations
npplioa, and to tho conquoror belong tho epoila.
But thia is certainly inadmissablo. The war was
undertaken and aupporier! by tho nation for th?
purpose of putting down any such aasumption. In
ihoother aspect, these States bear to tho Govern
ment the relations accorded by the Constitution.
Tboeo are the only features that sho can have. If
the States are not under the Constitution, and are
not independent, thon they aro nothing. Tho lat
ter is the only view at all admiseable in consistence
with the true sense of the poople and tho propriety
of tho war, and tho error of those who advocate the
right in question lies in applying to thia atato of
the caae principles only applicable to tho circum
stances of tho other. VTe aro not astonished at
tho Republicans seizing upon any pretext to fur
ther their 6nds, but we are surprised that a South
ern man should maintain euch a position. For he
roforB to a right acquired by war and by tho law
of nations, a right different from what before ex
isted; he must, therefore, allude to rights acquired
by the Government, entirely outside of and inde
pendent of tho Constitution; in other words, the
right of tho party in power to substitute their own
mil for the fundamental law.
Some difficulty in the question arises from the
peculiar structure of our system of government,
under which tho States exoreiso so many attri
butes of sovereignty; heneo the relations of the
fioccding Statea to the General Government at the
cIobo of the war was moro analogous, in re
spect to the matter before us, to tho caso of an
independent nation,conquered by another, than to
tho caso of revolted subjects quelled and subdued.
Por in the latter case the questions would be such
only as related -to individuals?their pardon or
punishment, the losa or restoration of property,
&c; while in the former they are Buch aa portain
to tho condition.of a uation; they aro questions of
political organizations, of constitutions and. of
lawa. One may be inadvertently led, therefore, to
draw concluaioua from the principles which govern
tho rights and duties of different nations, rather
than from those which pertain tot ouo nation in a
atato of civil war. But while wo admit tho analo
gy, w? must recollect that there is only an analogy,
and not a direct resemblance. If the Constitution
means anything at all, tho groat fact of its exis
tence creates at once a distinction between the
two cases which it is folly to disregard. "VYbile in
both the question is regarding tho offoct of suc
cessful war on affairs of fitatc, in ono cabo there is
no other tribunal, and the decision must be con
trolled by the law-of-nations; in the other there is
aif established tribunal, and that is the Constitu
tion." To this mu3t tho appeal bo made, and tono
other. For wo hold, that while.hotwc.cn tho United
States and other nations those-principles of natur
al justice which enlightened States havo sanction
ed and adopted in their dealings with each other
folly apply; yot in our structure of government
tho law of nations has no place as rogards the re
lations of tho States to each other and to the
General Government. If that had been a sufficient
guaranty for the welfare, tranquillity, improve
ment and happiuesa of tho jieoplc of tho United
States, there! "wou?d ha v? been no need to estab
lish a Union and to frame a Constitution for the
better securing of those ends. 3\'or upon any of
the great questions of domestic concern touching;
tliosc relations have tho rights and duties of tho
Statea been argued to flow from any other b?ui.o,
except iu the matter of secession, and that has
been decided against by tho uprising of the nation.
Tho right to malic war upon a State was never
claimed or exorcised as one resulting from the law
of nations, but as one in accordance with tho pro
vision of the Constitution which gave to the Gov
ernment the power to suppress and punish insur
rection. All.tho acta of tho Government, with ref
onde to tho conduct of the war, were dono as acts
under the authority of tho Constitution. The Gov
ernment in no case looked outsido of that for its
power. Can it bo with reason assortod, then, that
a .power which dorived its right to inako war and
to conduct war from tho Constitution, upon tho
completion of its duty suddenly acquires new
rights which its authority never contemplated.?
It would bo just as reasonable to say that an agent,
after successfully performing tho duties, relating
to.his trust, thencebecomesat once endowed-with'
higher rights and privileges than hi? princiDal.
If tho Constitution wore sufficient for all tho ab
normal circumstances of insurrection, much moro
should it be suuiciout when that has boon quelled,
for. tho natural and usual condition of peace.
Consider some, of the offcets and: consequences
of tho allowance and " exercise" of " this cfaim of
tight outsido of tho Constitution?of right by tho
law of nations.
First, we arc struck with tho astounding fact,
that in times of peace, whon the encroachments of
a Government on tho liberties of a pcoplo arc less
to be dreaded than at any oth?r timo, tho Consti
tution can only bo changed by tho people of three
fourths of the States by express provision, whilo
in 'limo of war or domestio disturbance, where tho.
Government, with the military powor in its hands,
should bo most jealousiy watched, the Govern
ment alono is allpwcd to occasion thej?anio rosult.
In the noxtplace, no nation governs itself by
thq VCof ! QJtiona. T_-B.-law. only ope. atoaio
tweon different and independent powers. Hence
if wo conoedo that the United States has right?
accruing' frond the law of nations, they must opo
rato hi relation to independent States; and to ad
mit that thoy' oxist with refoiOhee to the Southern
8k-to_, is to admit tbo full and complete sov-r
rolgnty of tho States a_d-__ewli_?- extomt"Vt'.li?7
doo_S_-,6?'_.cc_-{o-!" 'tifia certainly a ou-lo?s re- \
alt of tho present position of the ultra Republi
cans, that th'?y stand upon tho same platform as
did tho Swcssi-mititu. Truly, extreme? have met.
Again, who is to interpret this law of liationt*?
Cloarly, the dominant parly, and mitt, too, ac
cording to it? own will niul pleasure- Hence a
party having not even a majority of tho poopU of
tb?rUnion?having not oven the authority of mob
law?may 3t<H; to to States, never allowed to have
been without the palladium or tho Union, in the
most vital"maltern;- und those dictate.-*, too, sub
jeet to all the change-*] whieh tho caprice or
changes of party may occasion.
Can such a right in any way ho deduced in con
fidence with t!n> stability and fundamental prin
? iploH of a Republican Covcrnmohl? Can any claim
bo more inimical to tho vital interests of the Con
stitution ;tud tho Union? -
These opinions make a direct issue with tho ba
sis of the policy of the Administration, and wc feel
assured receive no tolerance at the hands of the
Frcai<Jent. Ilojias taken his stand hpon tho Con
stitution, titra that nlonn ns tlio tfuo and excln&ive
foundation of all tho'rights and all the duties of
tho Government.
Duty In (lie l'ri>idi-ul, Norlli uml South.
[From the New York World, September 1!).]
It is ou alj hands agreed that the next sesaion.pf
Congress is likely to bo the most important jn o?ir
annals. More skill, sngaeity and wisdom arc re
quisito for'dealing with tho questions that follow
tho war, than wero needed in conducting tho war
itself. Whethoy, reconstruction,.; in tbo senso in
which President Johnson 1ms initiated it, shall be
come an achieved fact, or whether the President
shall be thwarted and humiliated, depends on tho
action of a Congress in which a strong, determined
and inilueiitial faction will make a vouement oppo
sition to his plans.
In a question of such magnitude, and so far
reaching in its consequences, neither the individ
ual judgment and preference of Andrew Johnson,
nor of Charles Suinncr, Thaddens Stevens, nud
thoir coadjutors, are entitled to prevail. A ?juea
tion bo largo and so vitally affecting every public
interest, ought to be decided by tho public roason
and the general voice of tho country. This Con
' gross waB not eloctod with any reference to this
question. It neods instruction by the poonle; and
the elections about to tako place, all over tho coun
try? afford an opportunity for Buch general expres
sion of pubUc opinion as ought to be deomoct au
thoritative.
Tho courage and aggressiveness of tho Radi
cals, when the sossion opens, will depend very
much upon whether the olectious shall amount to
an unequivocal endorsement of tho policy of tho
President. If it shall clearly appoar that he is
supported by tho people, that the popular tide
runs strongly in his favor, tho negro suffrage
leaders will lind hut a feeble followiug. In view
of the new Congressional election to tako place
next autumn, members w?fl not bravo their con
stituents and the general house of tho country, if
the elections this fall sanction the plan of the Pre
sident.
But thorc is another set of ciroumstances which
will prove eren more influential than the North
ern elections. It depends, after all, mainly upon
tho people of the South whether the President,
shall be defeated and humiliated, and their section
be kept for a long period under tho iron heel of
military authority. Their bearing is, thus far, ad
mirable. But if they should do anything, or ,allow
nuything to bo done, by which tho explosive and
passionate Radicals could rekindle.public indigna
tion in tho North, and caiiso a reaction, -their con
dition will bo sealed for a long time. The Presi
dent is powerless against Congress, unless
supported by a public sentiment too strong for
Congress to resist.
The South is therefore bound in self-protection,
ns well as by every motive of duty and patriotism,
to aid the President and their frieuds hi tho North,
oi/ the unobjectionable character of the men they
elect to Congres?, and the unequivocal snbn?issivo
ness evinced in thoir State management. If, im
mediately after reorganization, they will get their
State Legislatures together, and ratify the pend
ing Constitutional Amendment,' thev wdl thereby
groatly aid their oaUBO. As they all acquiesce iii
the destruction of slavery, there can be no serious
objection to their taking this action, whieh will
finally fehut tho ?loor against tho aspersions of the
Radical* on their sincerity in submitting to eman
cipation, and prevent the reopening of doubts as
to its constitutional validity. Their failure to do
this would, of course-, be no reason for the rejec
tion of their representativos to Congress, but their
ratification of tho Ameiidment would increase the
moral power of the President, and his control over
the subject.
Tho most important tiling of all, in its bearing
on the diff?rence between tho President and the
Radicals, is tho character of the men elected by
the South to ropreaent them in Congress. This is
not a subject for ingenious reasoning 'and hair
splitting distinctions. Tho South must face the
facts. If thero ho anything certain, it is thot
members who have been identified with tho rebel
lion will bo rejected. The new oath, which until
repealed, has the forco of law, requires all mem
bers of each house to swear that they have never
rendered voluntary aid to the enemies of the Uni
tod States. At some future day, when confidence
is moro fully re-established,. this law may bo re
pealed; but certainly not at present, and probably
not until after the Southern soats are all filled.
The South inuat not be foolishly blind to tho in
surmountable nature of this barrier. Even if tho
Clerk of the House of Representatives should read
the'n?r?eH "?f members claiming seats'from tho
South, they could not act until sworn in;- and tho
oath is such that no active participant in the re
bellion can tako it. This fact so narrows the field
of selection, that in some few Southern districts
competent men cannot be found. vI5ut it would be
bettor to take a man ignorant of. politics, who had
boon conscripted, against his will, in the Southern
army, than tue ablest man in the South, if ho has
been* prominont in tho rebellion. There will be
etiob a deafening hullaballoo raised by the Radi
cals over Inen who, nie not sound, such a raking
up and parading of antecedents, such charges of
a readiness to commit perjury, that evon a few
blaok sheep in the Southern delegations would
greatly prejudice the policy of the Presidont. The
South ought to tako warning by tho avowed oppo
sition to the President, which is at present so
rapidly developing among tho Northern Radicals.
The contest in Congress is likoly to bo fierce and
passionate, and wo trust tho South will so act as
to aid their frionds, not their enemies.
Tut. Commebce of Enoland.?The London Daily '
NewsB&yB: - ' '..':
Tho Board of Trado roturna for tho 'mouth of
July show a falling off in the estimated valuo of
our exports, hut the decrease, ?280,954, on tbo
present occasion is less than two por ceut. below
tho samo period of last yoar. Taking tho whole
seven mpi ths, a decline has taken place of ?4,199,
902, or moro than four and one-half por cent.,
the total for 1805 having been ?88,242,018 against
?92,441,950 in 1884. Although at ?rst sight this
result may/appear tliscouragipg, it is easily ex
plained by the fact that tho reduction is in a great
degree duo to tho lower prices now prevailing,
and not lo any actual depression in irado. If,
howevor, it could be proved that tho estimated
valuo accurately represents tho real position of
cur foreign commerce, thero would still be no
ground for apprehension, since the present doolin?
is at most temporary. If our exports were four
and a half per cont. below last year, .they were at
all events seventeen per cent, higher than 1.863.
The host comparison, however, that can bo mado
is to look at the actual quantities of goods
shipped, and in this respect it will bo found that if
traue ?b not progressing very rapidly, at any rate
it is not going back.
The most striking alteration is tho Comparative
cessation of imports from the United States
owing to the unfavorable harvest ladt year, a?a
explains the roason for our oxports thither having
correlatively fallen off. -Egypt baa also for tho
time ceased Ui be a corn supplying country, but
Russia has mado a considerable advance
Indian Railroads.?The through Une from La
boro to Moult an, on the Indus, is now in operation.
Tho Branch Lino of .the Great Bombay and Cal
cutta, which piorces tho cotton country to Nagporo,
in making great progress; and the contractors
who h_v_ this* Uno i?roig Lahore or Umxitoirlo
Moerufa?d Donii in hand; aro hard at work. Tho
only broak which remaiim to be considered is that
along the desert "side of tha-Indds, from Mooltan
to Ivotrco, tho terminus of the' Uno from Kurra
choo: and this will soon have to ho connected by
iron linkfl. Then Culcutia wdl *be l/i direct'-com
munication by rail with Kurrachee, 2000 miles off;
with Bombay, 1000 miles .off; aijd with Nagporo,
1100 miles off. Whether wo. look at tho magnitude
and solidity of theao .works, or -ut-tho. .(bataneo
whioh they traverso* the railroads of India will far
surpass any like works in Europe, and cloeoly.c-qni?
?pote with tho ereateat projected works in Anierlr
_b> ??SU*!? t?6v<ir ?v0 thousand ?n?os, and cos?
?70,000,000 ($350,000,000). ???T!
A writer in tho Washington Chroniclo under
stand- "it is the e-xprpss-d Opinion of lioads of bu
reaus that, an a wholt, tho employment of women
iu the dopartuionts isa failure. '. Turn them out,
e6)rtainly:(-t?y h.ivo n> votes.
HEADQUARTER-, HlL. DlgT. CHARLESTON. 1 ?
FllKT BEFA-ATE BniOADE,
: e;i_-lu:?TO>-, H. c., Sflit. _3, 18G5. J
[O-SRnAL OnDBB/-, No. 101.1
I. Before u Military timinik.sion which convened at
Cbiirlcrtton, 8. C pursuitit to Special Orders No. IM,
dated Hotulipiartern MLliUry..District of Charleston, De
partment of South Carolina, lir.it Separate Brigade,
CbnrlcRton, S. C. August 10, l?-C"., and of wliicll Cant.
ADOLPH DENNIO, lTtli Pennsylvania Volunteer*, lu
Presiden?, were arraigue,and tried:
1.?HENRY WEATHEIUIOUN (civilian).
CilAUOK?"Aidiriy awl Melting in Forgtry."
Si-KCIi-iCATlON?In this; that he,-the said HENRY
WEATHERHORN, of the Cityor Charleston, In the? Mate
of South Carolina, citizen, ?HI aid and abet ouo Frank
Mazye-k in forcing and causing; to bo forged the uame < _
one John W. Mn/.yck as an c-dt-wmeul to a certain draft
for the payaient ?f certain nioii'ys, to wit : Two Hundred
Dollar?, which said draft In tojthc tenor following, that
is to say :
No. 700. ' .' ; -kwYoBK, Aug't., 1_C3.
GOOd. .:...,::
CITY NATIONAL BANK,
PAY TO .THE ORDEROF JOUKW; MAZTC-,
{stan?p } "-wo Hu.vpnED DotL-ns." ..
$200 ' (.Signed) WILSON k CARMAN,
and which said draft belonged to and was payable to the
order of the said John W. Mazyek, with the inteut and
purpoHO to defraud tho ?aid John W. Mazyek of tho said
moneys. AU this In the siid City, on or ubout the lGth
of August, 1805.
To which Ohargoa aud Specification.? 11??? accused plead
ed as follows:
To tho Specification of the Chargo?"Guilty."
To the Charge.?"Guilty."
findings.
The Commission, having maturely considered the evi
dence adduced, flud the accused, tho said HENRY
WEATHERHORN. as follow? :
Of the Specification of the Charge?"Guiltt."
Of the Charge?"Guilt.."
SENTENCE.
And the Commission docs, therefore, sentence him,
tho said HEKRY 'WEATHERHORN, "to be confined at
hard labor for tho period of one year, at such, place as
tho Commanding General may direct."
2.?WILLIAM BAYNE, Private Company "I", 47th
Pennsylvania Veteran Voluutecrs.
CiiAitoE?"Forgery. "
Specification?In this, that he, Private WILLIAM
BAYNE, Company "I", 47th Pennsylvania Veteran Vol
unteers, did, on or about the Kith of August, 1805, felon
iously forgo the uame of Fratik Mazyek upon a stolen
check of Two Hundred Dollars, belonging to Mr. F. W.
Mazyek, he, BAYNE, knowing at tho time that eaid check
wns stolen, with promise of receiving Fifteen Dollars of
its value, when cashed. AU this hi tho City of Charles
ton, S. C.
To which Charge and Sp?cification the accused pleaded
as follows :
To the Specification of the Charge?"Nor Guilty."
To the Charge?"Not Guilty.'-'
The Commission, having inaturcl y considered the evi
dence adduced, find the accused, the ?aid WILLIAM
BAYNE, Privato Compauy "I", 47th Pennsylvania Vol.
mitccr?", as follows:
Of the Specification of tho Charge?"Not Guilty."
Of the Charge?"Noi Guilty."
And the Commission does, therefore, honorably acquit
htm, the said WILLIAM BAYNE, Private Company "I",
47th Pennsylvania Volunteors.
a?JAMES ROBSON (civilian).
Charoe?"Robbery."
Sr-Ci-i-ATiO-.?In this, that he, the said JAMES
ROBSON, of Savannah, Ga., did, on or about the 27th
day of August, 18G5, while on excursion on tho bay of
Charleston, S. C, take from the ponan of Lieut. G. A.
Kiinball, :1-th t\ S. C. T., a Gold Watch and two valuable
Rings, valued at throo hunAt-cti OoUnrs. Bald lltiiga were
found upon the- person of JAMES ROBSON. AU this on
or about the 27th day. ;of August, 18?5, In the bay of
Charleston, S. C.
To which Charge and Specification the accused pleaded
as foUows:
To tbo Specification of tho Charge?"Not Guilty."
To tho Charge?"Guilty."
-INDIKliH.
Tho Commission, having maturely considered tho evi
dence adduced, finds tho accused, the said JAMES ROB
SON, as follows:
Of the Sp?cification of tho Charge?"Guilty."
Of the Chargo?"Not Guilty of Robbcryj1' but "Guil
ty of Larceny."
sentence.
And the Commission does, therefore, sentence him,
the said JAMES ROBSON, "to be confined at hard labor
for tho period of ono 7*_r, at such place as tho Com
manding General-may dire..* " ..... T
II. The proceedings, flndin m, and "sentences In the
foregoing oases of HENRY "W lATHERHOHN (clv?ia'i),
and JAMES ROBSON (elriUarj , are approved. Tho sen
tences w_l bo carried luto execution. Castle Plnckney,
Charleston Harbor, 1b designated as tho place of confine
ment, where tho prisoners w_l be scut with a copy of
this Order. The Provost Marshal Is charged with Its ex
ecution'. ' *
The "proceedings and findings in the case of Privater
WILLIAM BAYNE, Company "I", 47th Ponnsylrania
Veteran Volunteers, arft approved- He wiU be. released
from arroBt and roBtorcd to duty. - ; . ..,
By.command of Brevet Brig.-Gen. W. _. Bennett. ,.,
GEO. \V. HOOKER,
Assistant Adjutant General.
Official:
Geo. W. Hookeb,
Assistant Adjutant General.
September 27 - 3 :
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF SO. CA., 1
Hilton Head, S. 0., 8opt. 21,1865. )
{General Orders, No. 37.]
L OAPT. W. E. MORFORD, A. Q. M., D. S. A. VOLS.,
Is hereby announced as Acting Chief Quartermaster of
this Department, during tho temporary absence of MaJ.
O. W. THOMAS, Chief Quartermaster.
II. Major E. 0, ODLP,. 25th Ohio Vet. VoU., Acting
ABBistant Inspoctor-Oonoralfor. the District of Port
Royal, is hereby announced as Acting Inspector-General
of tho Department, in addition to his other duties, dur
ing tho temporary absonco of MaJ. J. P. ROY, 6th UY 8.
Infantry, Acting Inspector-Gonora! of the Department.
By command of Brevet Major-General Chas. D_v_ns.
Official: . - W. L. M. BURGER,
September 2Q .3. , ABsUttaat'AdJutaUt-Goaoral.
HEADQUARTERS, PinST 8D_-DB3TRICT, j
MlLITABY Dl?TBI<5- OF Charleston,
Charleston, 8. O., Scptombor 23, 1865.
(Special Orders, No. 437.] < -
PAB. I. THE FOLLOWING-NAMED CIVILIANS ARE
hereby appointed Pilots for Charleston Harbor, subjoct
to tho examination and approval of tho Board to bo
convened under Captain Boutellk, Ohlof of Ooast Sur
voy :
SAMUEL 8. HANCOOK.
T. BURROWS.
THO-T?S DANIELS. '' ' j
THOMAS POTNAM. " "
H. BUBKOW8.
John oarnighan:
GEORGE O. GLADDEN.
W. J. B?RKB. . - (
OHABLES e: lea: ' -- -.-'
T. W. DAVIS.
R. 8. Wl?H. ! - /
F. MIDDLETON.
ISAAC MoDONALD.
Ty-LL-??flL MoD?WAIJ). "
B; G. BRINGdOE.
BT>WARD L. DAVBNPOBT.
BENJAMIN 8.- Aid) K UT.
J. B. ALDEBT. "=' ' '
EDWARD, MORBE. -
t 8_rn_i_l V- 0 L ..?__
0T,? .
-r- - ?^miT?L-r 7 . - - - r-.7
By order of ?revit Brig. Otttt. 'Wr?ft BatW-TT.- - -
. , First Lieutenant N. Y. V. V. m^??juj^afl?
8eptoml>or_5 - * ".81
F
'IIOAKD OF FIREHASTEIIS.
A MEETING OF THIS BOARD WILL ?E HELD
* This Evening, at the Hop? HughM House, at half
pant 7 o'clock, Punctualattondiiin*e is requested.
September 37 B. M. BTROBKL, 0 and H.
LOST, A III,.\('K MOROCCO POCKET
BOOS? containing panera iiiid.iiicmorautia <>f no
value to uny one but the owner. A Bberal rawitrd will
he paid for its rocovery. Apply at No. G<; Chureh-st.
September 20 _ 2*
I7IOINI?, IN TUB POSSESSION OF A NE
1 ORO, a lot of PLATED AND SILVER WARE,
marked "-I. Vf. K." The owner can have the Maine by
proving property, paying expenses, and rewarding the
BCgro. Apply ut this otllee. September 25 j
?_vT)?r A DAY! AGENTS WANTED TO
W*u *f ?ell a new ami wonderful SiAVINO MACHINE,
tue only cheap ?me licensed Address SHAW _ cLAltK,
Blddeford, M;iin. ?linon September l".
d_Qi*VA0IOISTI?I AGENTS WASTEDFOtt
HP ? F\J six entirely new articles just ?>ut. Address ?. T,
OAHEY, City Building, Biddcford, Maine.
September 15 Bmoa
rpO KENT.?THE UPPER PAKT OF STOKE
_L No. Ill Meeting-street, oppositeHnync?a Hue staud
fur wholesale buelson. Inquire on tho premises.
September 36 -|
OK SA_E?-A LOT OF OLD PAPERS.
Apply at thin office. Seiiteuiber.lt
PRIVATE KOAKDINO.?A FEW GEN
TLEMEN can be accommodated e.t the corner of
King und Trudd-stivcts. Aleo, a pleeHailt ROOM, mtita
ble for man and wife. DAY BOARDEIIS taken.
September 10_
SCHOOL NOTICE.
THE MISSES MA?SHALL WILL OPEN A 8CH00L
ou the 0th of October, at the residence of their
father, Bar. Alex. W. MursuaU, No. 18 Amherst-strcet,
for children and young ladies. The Elementary as well
as tho liii?her branches of uu English education will be
taught, iueludiug French and Music. For terms, apply
us above. fmw'15 September li5
iiii.i.siiomr, \.< ., .ii i i.i i 'A in a? \ m; ui .
THE EIGHTH ACADEMIC YEAH, OF THI8 IN8TI
TUTION will begin on Monday, the 2d of October,
1HI?5. . '_._-.'
Excepting the military feature, the general plan of the
Academy, discipline, course of study, _c, will bo as
heretofore.
Teiims?One. hundred and five (?105) dollars for the
first three mouths of the term, payable in ailvance. This
charge will cover all expense? for board, fuel, lights,
washing, instruction, use of text books and medical at
tendance. Euch student must furnish clothing for a
sUigle bed.
Circulara furnished on application to Captain H. 8.
THOMPSON, at tho Male Academy, Columbia, 8. C.
J. B. WHITE, Superintendent H. T_. A.,
Lato Superintendent of the 8. C. Military Academy. .
: September 20 wb 6
?COPARTNERSHIP NOTICE.
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVE FORMED A COPART
NEKS. IIP iu this city, under tho namo and firm of
TAFT k HOWLAND, for tho purpose of transacting A
GENERAL COMMISSION BUSINESS.
Particular attention given to tho PURCHASE OF COT
TON AND SALE OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC MER
CHANDISE.
A. R. TAFT...TV. E. HOWLAND.
Charleston, Sept. 12, 1865. mwrfI2 September 18
COPARTNERSHIP NOTICE.
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVE THIS DAY FORMED A
COPARTNERSHIP for tho purpose of carrying on
a GENERAL COMMISSION BUSINESS IN THE CITIES
OF NEW YORK AND CHARLESTON, under the name
and firm in each city of Vf. B. k T. E. RYAN. WILLIAM
B. RYAN will be tho partner resident in Charleston, and
THOMAS E. RYAN the partner resident in New York.
Consignments of all kinds of Produce and Manufac
tured articles are respectfully solicited.
WM. B. RYAN....THOS. E. RYAN.
Place of business In Charleston at No. 09. West sido ol
East Bay-street, and three doors north of Tradd-street
September 5 lmo
ESTATE NOTICE.
ALL PERSONS HAVING ANY CLAIMS AGAINST
the Estate of the lato EPHRAIM 8. MIKELL, of
St. .Innies' Goose Creek, planter, will present thcin pro
perly attv sted to WM. E. MIKELL, Attorney at Law, No.
40 Jlroad-strect; and, all person? indebted thereto will
make payment to the same. ELIZA Y. MIKELL,
September 's Hwl?i Qualified Administratrix.
ITCH! ITCH I ITCH!
SCRATCH I SCRATCH! SCRATCH 1
"|T7"HEATON'S OINTMENT WILL CURE THE ITCH
T* IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS. Also cures SALT
RHEUM. ULCERS, CHILBLAINS, and all ERUPTIONS
OF THE SKIN. Price B0 cents. . F?u- sale bv all Drug
gists. By sending 00 ceuts to WEEKS _ POTTER, 8olo
Agents, No. 170 Washington-street, Boston; Mass.,- it will
be forwarded by mail, free of postage, to any part of the
United States. lmo September 21
THE UNDERSIGNED
IS PREPARED TO FURNISH DESIGNS. SPECIFI
CATIONS AND DETAIL DRAWINGS for Buildings
of every description, anil in crory style of architecture
that may be desired. Orders from any* part of the Uni
ted States will receive prompt attention, with moderate
charges. WALTER S. WEST, Architect.
Corner 4th and Broad-streets, Richmond, Va.
September 5 3mos
TO THE_PUBLIC.
CHANGE OF TIME FOR OMNIBUS LINE.
HEREAFTER THE TIME OF STARTING FROM
Spring-street, up town, and Broad-Btrect, down
town, will bo as follows:
Omnibus wUl leave Spring-streot precisely at 7 A. M.,
and will continue to leave the abovo named point every
twenty minutes throughout the day.
Omnibus will leavo Broad-street at 7.20 A. M., and will
continue to loavo that point every twenty minutes (lur
ing the day. Last 'Bnaa leaving Spring-street at 7 P. M.
for down town; leaving Broad-street 7.80 I?. M. for up
town.
Faro 10 cents. Tickets Issued only redeemable on the
lino. LORING k CO..
September 16 Proprietors.
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, S. C,
SEPTEMBER 20. 18?5.
THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNOR OF SOUTH CARO
LINA has appointed tho following named gentle
men as Special Aids for the purpose of assisting him in
tho discharge of his official duties in reconstructing the
State, and restoring her to all her civil and political
rights in the Federal Union : .
WILLIAM L. TRENHOLM, of Charleston City.
STEPHEN ELLIOTT, of Beaufort District
WADE HAMPTON, Jn., of Columbia.
ROBERT L. McLAW, of YorkviUe.
WILLIAM H. EVANS, of Soctoty Hill.
JAMES H. .HARRISON, of Anderson Village.
The above-named gentlemen will receive and comma
nlcato to the Provisional Governor, BENJAMD? FRANK
LIN PKRBY, all Information which they may deem ad
vlsublo as to tho condition of the State, tta citizens, tho
freed?iun, tho home police, and the military garrisons.
They will llkowlso report to him by letter, at bis h?3?d
quarters, at GroonviUu Court House.
By order of tho Provisional Govornor.
WM. H. PERRY,
September 25 3 Private Secretary. 4c.
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF SO. OA., ?
Hixtok Head, 8. C, Sept. 22, 1865. j
[G?nerai, OncEns, No. 38.]
I. ALL PROVOST, SUPERIOR OR OTHER MILITA
RY COURTS, will, on tho last day of this, and each suc
ceeding month, render an account of all fees, fines or
sums of monoy which shall have in any way oomn into
their posscBflion, and of all expenditures which the y shall
have'lnourred. Said' accounts will bo rendered- by tho
Olerk or Treasurer of tho Oourt, audited and approved
by the Judge or Judges, and forwarded through theSub
Dlstrlct and District Commanders to the Headquarters
of tho Department.
IL Tho Commanding Officers of all Districts or 8ub
Districta, in which any funds are raised, will causo an
account thereof tobo rendered and forwardod to Depart
ment Headquarters on tho last day of this and every
succeeding month, by the Treasurer of such fund. Said
account should bo audited and approved by the Com
manding Officer of each Sub-District or District, and If
possible, tho two officers, highest in rank, on duty with
him aa a Council of Administration. No oxpend?turo
should be mado a charge on these funds, which are
of a strictly military nature, but only such as are incur
red for the benefit of the oitlzona, from whom the fond
Is raised, in tho absence of complote civil government
HI. AU accounts, referred to in Paragraphs I and II,
should be rondered -fully and by items, so that Command
lng Officers may see that fees, fines and taxes are suit
able, and that expenditures aro for legitimate object?.
Groat care will be taken that all funds are in safe custody,
and that any balan ce can be paid over at once.
By oommand of Brevet Kajor-Geo. Clluii.es D_v_ks.
Ofilo?d : W. L. M. BURGER,
September 30- 8 * Aasjat-nt AdJnt-pt-Oen&r_.
mm NOTIOB IS HBREBY OIVEN THAT iCTMOa
TION wlU be made at the next-cssicm of tho Legislator o
for an AMHHDMENT OF TUB CHARTER OF THE
CHARLESTON GAS LIGHT OOKPANT. ; ,,u...... ...
Au_n*t a into
THE BOOKS FOR SUBSCRIPTION
TO
"The P-oplc's Steamship Company?-*,
ARB NeiW OPEN AT THE OFFICE OF TUB AOKNTg.
Sharesv f 100 each. WILLIS ft CUISOLH,
-?cpteinbir 23 Uno ; Mill? HousO.
.>r7?lI!H>LI?rO\ DliniEL
RESUMI?S 'lili: PRA-CTUB OF MEDIOING AND
BURGBBY. oiti.c, at present, eoraer of MEETING and
fiOClKTYSl 1U.ETS?icHi.l.ii.-e of Dr. RODRIGUES.
September _ ; li,?>
I}. < )"XK11_lI Aj SOXs7~"
MANIIAiri ItClls ANO DKAT.KUS IN
BOOTS AND SHOES,
.:No;. 1875 Kin^-^ii'oot,
CH.VKI.K.STOiV, S. V.
CONSTANTLY ON'HAND A LARGE STOCK OP
FINE FUR AND WOOL HATS,
FOU MEN AND BOYS.
September 2t 2mo*
HARINE., FIRE ARD LIFK INS. RINCE
GREAT WESTERN
Marine Insurance Company,
OF ViEW YORK,
WILL TAKE RISKS OK MARINE AND INLAND '
TraiiHpor-itiou on COTTON and MERCHANDIZE, oe
favorable terms.
_
Merchant's Fire Insurance Company-.
OF HARTFORD, CONN.,
WILL TAKE RISKS ON DWELLINGS, STORES
MILLS, BIERCHANDIZE, COTTON. _c, and on ton__
ivltich cannot fail to plcaso those who look for real so?
curity In Insurance . ,
ATLANTIC FIRE
AND
Inland Transportation -,
INSURANCE C0MPAN?,
BROOKLYN.
OFFICE IN NEW TORE.
WILL COVER ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF MERCHAN
DIZE, COTTON, BUTL-D-GS, FA0T0RIE9, _C, 0*
their well known liberal ratea.
National Banking and Insurance
COjVCP-A-jNTY",
OF ST. LOUIS,
PRESENTS ITSELF FOR A SHARE OF SOUTHERN.
BUSINESS, anil by its liberality and promptitudes will
provcitsolf to be worthy of patrouago.
New York I_ife
INSURANCE COMPANY,
Assets, 03,658,705.55,
WILL ISSUE POLICIES ON LIFE. WHICH MAY
(secure _U___?I comfort anil ease when the husband and
father may be removed forever.
Do not Neglect your Life Iitsuraucct
British Commercial Life Insnrance
CO-VCP-AJNTY,
UNITED WITH THE
British Nation Life Assurance Company,
No. 31? Regen?.street I.uihIdii,
THESE COMPANIES HAVE "PAID PROMPTLY
OVER SEVEN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS, thereby pro
viding for many families who otherwise would havo boon
left destitute." Call and gut hooka, which coat nothing;,
and aro interesting.
Our INSURANCE DEPARTMENT being partly ar
ranged, wc are able to offer to our frlonda ampio security
lip to such amounts as we can safely take.
GEO. ?. WILLIAMS k CO.
September 22 fmw3
JOB PRINTING
Neatly and Expeditiously Executed
AT THIS OFFICE, '
.A.t Reasonable Hates,
Bf PRACTICAL PRINTERS.
Soptomber 22 ;
HOLDERS OF MERCHANDISE
WSiO WI8H TO REALIZE IMMEDIATELY, WILL
consult their j-tereata -f consigning the eatno to
JAS. B. CAHELL,
Oeaeral Commission Merchant,
8optember 11 3mos Augusta, Gs.
ADVANCES MADE ON
WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, DRY
GOODS AND PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
EVERY DESCRIPTION.
'WILLIAM H. DEVLIN,
No. 6 BEA?FAIN-8TREET.
4E3- Cheap Watches for Sale, -fc?
August 25_lmo*
Told id silver,
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
y raits on New York, Boston and Philadelphia*
AT
P. H. KEGLER'S
BANKING OFFICE, No. 255 K_NG-8TB-_3T# '
August 18 _ Cornor of Beaufahx,
DOUGLAS & MILLER,
House) Sign and Steamboat Paitters,
(?I.AZIKllH, _C?
No. 21 STATE-STREET, NEAR CHALMERS.
I718TIMATES GIVEN FOB ALL KINDS OF PAINTINU.
Li SIGN PAINTING at the shortest notlco. inilMInga
Reglazed. Ail work promptly attended to, and done la.
the boat manner at the lowest possible rates for caah.
WM. DOUGLAS.'..W.O. MILLEB,
Late with Oarmalt k Briggs.
8optez_ber 13 lmo
W. BROOKBANKS,
PRACTICAL ?A- FITTER _. PLUMBER?
No. 67 Hasel-street,
ONE BOOR FROM' KINO-STREET.
August It_ '
CHARLES LOVE,
MAKER ANO IMPORTER
OF ' ,
SADDLES AND HARNESS,
H A3 RECEIVED BY RECENT ARRIVAL- SADDLE^
FBOM THE BEST TO THE PLAINEST
SINGLE AND DOUBL- HARNESS _, . ?
OOLLABS OF AH, SIZES ?"HD Q?AL?T-ttS' ", .
ENGLISH MOUNT INOH AND STBRL OB?PWBX sMTt%
And all the other utlolcs n?a__jr found In a Saddlery
c_tnbllahmont. '.,... , ; ; nu ...
Peraon In mat of tho abo ?. will find it ?dnaUgeafft
to o_U at hin Store ?a ,i ,.._ ) B-ttAI^BXRT,.. ,^
,., ill )He-tJ_U Old fl__j_?t tho corn** o^

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