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The Charleston daily news. [volume] (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, March 20, 1867, Image 1

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VOLUME IT.NO. 494.
CHARLESTON, S. C., WEDNESDAY MORNING-? MARCH 20, 1867.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TELEGRAPHIC.
Our Cable Dispatches.
LIVERPOOL, March 18.-Cotton closed firm. Mid?
dling Uplands 13?al3Jd. Sales 15,000 bales.
LONDON, March 19, Noon.-Consols 91. Bonds
74*.
LIVERPOOL, March 19, Noon-Cotton firm. Mid?
dling Uplands 13|<L
Congressional.
WASHINGTON, March 19.-In tte House, a resolu?
tion suspending tho iasno of Agricultural College
Scrip to insurgent States passed by a vote of 103
to 23.
A joint resolution authorizing the publication of
laws and treaties in three Louisiana papers
passed.
Mr. STEVENS called np the Confiscation Bill, and
proceeded to read his speech. He soon broke
down, however, and the Clerk finished the read?
ing. The farther consideration of the Bill was
postponed to the 2d Tuesday in December.
The Hoise then wont into Committee on tho
Million Belief BUL BUTLER offered his amend?
ment as a substitute-that ail owning 160 acres of
land, or enjoying an income of over $600, be taxed
by the General for the support of the poor. The
Committee rose, after a leng debate, without ac?
tion.
The Supplemental Bill passed as reported by tho
Committee of Conference, and goes to the Pre?
sident. The House then adjourned.
In the Senate a joint rosolution suspending pay?
ment for enlisted slaves was postponed.
The credentials of Senator THOMAS, of Mary?
land, wera referred to the Jud'oiary Committee.
A Bill excluding- from either House persons
tainted wi th rebellion, was referred to the Judi?
ciary Committee.
The Conference Committee reported the Supple?
mental Bi ll, that a majority of voters be sufficient
to ratify the Constitution, provided a majority of
the registered voters vote-with the additional
clause that Congress must be satisfied that the
registered voters had tmrestra '.ned liberty to vote,
and that the Constitution meets with tho approval
of a majority of the qualified electors of the State.
The Bill passed.
The Senate then went into executive session and
adjourned.
Washington News.
WAsmNOTcr, March 19.-Tho Supplemental Bill
will be presented ta the President to-morrow. IL
is thought that Congress will probably adjourn as
s non as Chis BUI shall have become a law.
J MLES J. BARTLETT has been confirmed Minister
to Stockholm, and PETER J. SULLIVAN to Bogota.
From British America.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 18.-The British Colum?
bia Council has voted unanimously for admission
into the dominion of Canada.
Reconstruction in Alabama*
SELMA, March 18.-The largest meeting ever
held in ;hia eily took place last night, and resolu?
tions wore passed recognizing the right of Con?
gress to prescribe terms of re-admission to the
seceded States, and urging prompt acceptance of
the terms offered.
Baltimore Market. >
BALTIMORE, March 19.-Flour has a better feel?
ing. White Corn $108. Mess Pork $28 50a24 00.
Bacon Shoulders lOfallc. .
. New York; Market. .
NOON DISPATCH.
NEW YORE, March 19.-Stocks active ; 5-203 of '62
coupons 109al09f. Virginia Stato 'Sixes 54a59.
Exchange, 60 days, 8f ; sight, 9$. -~-oney Ca7 per
cent. Gold Si, Flour lOal?c. better. . Corn la2c.
better. Pork lower; New Mess $23 94a24 00.
Lard steady; in obis 12?al3?c. Whiskey quiet.
Cotton firm and quiet at 82a32?c for Middling Up?
lands. Frdghta dull.
. EVENING DISPATCH.
Gold 1S4?. Five-twenties of '62, coupons, 109$.
Cottpu steady ; sales 1800 bales, at 82| for Mid?
dling Uplands. Flour firmer ; Western and State
advanced 10al5c.; Southern a shade firmer.
Wheat advanced 2aSo., but leas active. Corn ad?
vanced 2a3c. Mess Pork lower, at $23 50. Naval
Stores firm ; Turpentine 74a75 ; Rosin $4 25a8 50.
Cincinnati Market.
CryoiNNATi, March 19.-Flour firm, trade mark,
$13 50. Corn advanced Sa?c, and in good demand;
sacks Sic. Whiskey 26. Mess Pork $22 50. Bulk
Meats in good demand, advanced 4c. Bacon
Shoulders 9?.
War in Pennsylvania.
SERIOUS RIOT BETWEEN CITIZENS AND SOLDIERS AT
CARLISLE.
CARLISLE, PA., March 16.-An affray occurred
yesterday, during the election, between the citi?
zens and United soldiers from Carhse barracks,
resulting in one on each side being killed.
Last evening two soldiers came into town, and
when near the court house were attacked by A.
Hammil and C. P. Gilmore Neither party were
hurt, and the Belchers left for the garrison.
At 8 o'clock fifty soldiers came into town armed
with carbines, revolvers and sabres, and halted
near fhe Court House and fired into a crowd of
citizens, who were standing near where the polls
were located. The citizens then drew revolvers
and fired, when a general riot ensued. Tho sol?
diers run and the citizens pursued them, the sol?
diers firing back. They finally halted at tho edge
of the town. '
Guards came in from the post, and firing was
kept: up some time. The guards an.s ted several
citizens a\d started for the garrison, when they
met Hammil, who had a gun, and was ordered to
lay it down. He refused, and was shot. He died
in about three hours.
The following citizens were shot: Mrs. Stuart,
who was standing in the door of her house, was
shot in the left foot. Thomas Zimmerman was shot
\through the r ght arm, crushing the bones. Jacob
Small was shot through the right hand.
Two soldiers were shot, one m the bead and one
in the leg: the former was mortally wounded.
The soldiers, for several nights past, have been
in town, creating much disturbance. Ibero arc
about four hundred now at this post.
North Carolina Items.
ii MINISTER VICTIMIZED.-We find the following
in ?he Bichmond Enquirer of Friday: A minister
of the North Carolina Methodist Conference was
a victim of the confidence game, on the cars be?
tween Baltimore and Annapolis Jur c tion, on his re?
cent return from a visit to the former city. A person
of gentlemanly appearance, resigning his own seat
to Borne ladies that came in, politely naked to share
that of the minister. Entering into conversation, he
represented himself as a Charleston merchant, on
his way home with his pur chas os as extra baggage.
Soon alter a clerkly looking man appeared
with bills of lad inc:, and demanded pay for the
merchant's extra baggage, stating the amount at
& considerable sum. The latter produced a noto
of large ?mount, which the clerk could not change.
Then came the old story. Would the clergyman
oblige him by the change ? He would return it
au soon os he could get his money broken. He
thus got seventy-five dollars-nearly all that the
minister had. Meantime the cars reached An?
napolis Junction, and just aa they moved off again,
the merchant stepped out, and never stepped in
again !- W?minglon Dispatch.
THE DISMAL SWAMP CANAL.-The Dismal Swamp
Canal, which penetrates and passes through the
inmost recesses of the grout Dismal Swamp and
connects tho harbors of Norfolk and Portsmouth
. vith the sounds and inland waters of North Caro?
lina, is in the process of great improvements.
Colonel Walton, tho engineer of the projected im?
provements, with a number of assistants, is on
ged in surveying the canal and taking out tho
e. The whole course of tho canal is to be
dredged and deepened, and the width is to be in?
creased twenty feet, making the canal sixty feet
broad. The locks ore also to be removed and ex?
tended twenty-five feet. The excavation will com?
mence next month, and when finished will place
the canal in a condition to accommodate ton times
the amount of business it is capable of doing at
present.-IbidL. -
The Election in Germany.
The recent eleotions for the North German Par?
liament show that there is at least a population of
1.000,000 within the territory of tho new Confedera?
tion who desire above all to have their connection
with Germany severed, and to be reunited with
another nationality. The Parliament, wo are inform?
ed contains eleven Poles aud two Danes, who, at thc
rate of one Deputy for 100,000 people, represent an
aggregate population of 1,300,000, of which the
German minority may bo about 300,000, leaving
1,000,000 of Danes and Poles.
On account of tho bitter conflict of the Danish
and German nationalities in the Duchy of Schles?
wig, the Danes are naturally jubilant at their vic?
tory in two of the Schleswig districts. In the first
their candidato received lo,028 votes against onlv
3702 given io his German opponent, while in the
second diutrict the Danes polled 9927 votes, and
the Germans 9610. There has been hitherto a
great difference- of opinion among the Danish and
ermah writers as to tho extent oi each nationali?
ty. The result of the recent election clearly estab?
lishes the frontier of the nationalities, at least :<&
far as the preferences of the people aro concerned.
The Danes must have seen that tho majority ot
the people of Schlewswig really {refer a separation
from'Denmark, and tho Germans and the Prussian
Government can have no doubt that tho northern
districts of Schelswig desire au incorporation with
Denmark. A partition of the Duchy of Schleswig
in accordance with the result of tho universal suf?
frage would forever terminate the nationality con?
flict between Danes and Germans.
Logical exercise for ladies-jumping to conclu?
sions.-Punch.
STERLING'S SCHOOL BOOK SERIES.
We have roceived copies of this excellent series
of text books, and perused them with something
more than cursory attention. The compiler, Mr.
RICHARD STERLING, Principal of Edgeworth Female
Seminary of Greensboro', N. C., is a practical and
successful teacher of many years' experience. In
the preparation of the booka before us, the aim of
the author was to meet the special wants of South?
ern schools. From his own long connection with
ihe work of education, he knew precisely what
those wants were; and wo think ho has been ve.;
successful in his efforts to furnish useful and ac?
ceptable text books. The books aro printed on
good paper, and altogether proaont a rory neat ap?
pearance, equal in this respect to almost any ot-er
series.
Tho Readers, of which there are five, hare been
admirably compilod. There is much instruction
in elocution, something f rhetorio, and a groat
deal in orthography and etymology, scattered
through these Readers; tne greater part prefixed
to the selections and "examples." The selections
are very judicious, and afford a great variety of
excellent models rn ovory conceivable stylo, both
of prose and verse. We are glad that Mr. STER?
LING has had the good taste to omit a number of
most excellent "pieces," that have been worn
threadbare by the j'spcech book" elocutionists,
and substitute in their stead new ones, by living
writers and orators: not that a sufficient number
of examples have not been retained of tho best
English writers, but greater space is allotted in
these books Lo the teachers of our own day, than
is usual in "Readers." Thus we have represented
in the Fifth Reader fhe following authors from
Souih Carolina: T. S. GBUIKE, (Sacred Litera?
ture;) Hon. R. H. WILDE, (The 14th Congress;)
?cn. JAKES H. HAMMOND, (Intellectual Power;)
T. S. GRTMKE, (Tho Natural and Moral Worlds;)
Dr. W. GILMORE SIMMS, (The Eye of the Rattle?
snake;) Hon. W. C. PEESTON, (Eloquence and
Logic;) Hon. JOHN C. CALHOUN, (Liberty tho Meed
of Intelligence;) Hon. HUGH SWTNTON LEGARE,
(Characteristics of Lord ETEON.) In verse we havo
;-Ihe Voice of Years," by LOUISA S. MCCORD;
"Hayne-Let tho Death-bell toll," by W. CILMOEE
SIMMS; "To Harry," by W. H. TIMEOD, etc.
In tho caso of young and obBcuro authors it may
be vory well to give tho habitat, as "FANNI KU>
? HOT, rt Virginia," or "MARY A. MILLEE, North
Carol id.;" but it looks odd to seo "YOUNG, Eng?
land," "Sir WALTEB SCOTT, Scotland," MILTON,
England," "COWPER, England," "BYEON, England,"
and "LAMARTINE, France." However, we presume,
Mr. STEELING thought it best to adhere rigidly to
the rule he had adopted.
How blessed are children in these latter days to
have so many and such excellent books given thom
for their entertainment as well as instruction. It
was otherwise when ourselves trod tho thorny
path to the hill of science. Few and dry were the
books that fell to our lot. Every "Reador" was
"dog-eared" from end to end, dozens of times,
before its successor came to our relief; by which
time we used to know almost every piece, both
prose and verso, by hoart. There was Utile of
system in those books, and the compilers never
appear to have had any idea of combining the use?
ful with the agreeable-of teaching tho rules of
elocution and composition, for instance, at the
same time with an incipient knowledge of litera?
ture. However little they may be disposed to ap?
preciate it, the youth of our day are far moro
privileged than were the many generations of their
antecessora; ondit is to be hoped they will make
a suitable return to the spirit of the age which
has thus favored them by devoting themselves
more diligently than ever to their studios.
The following are the books wo have received :
1. Sterling's Southern Primer.
2. Sterling's Southern Elementary Spelling Book.
3. Sterling's Southern Pictorial Primer.
4. First Reader. ?
5. Second Reader. >
6. Thira Reader.
7. Fourth Reader.
8. Fifth Reader.
Mr. STERLING has in press :
9. Tho Southern Orator, a complete manual of
elocution, containing all the ruled necessary to cul?
tivate the art of oratory, without encumbering it
with those minuto instructions which properly be?
long to the teacher; or those useless directions
which are never learned and never should bo.
'There are about 200 choice exercises in declama?
tion selected from authors of distinguished merit.
10. Sterling's Southern High Sohoox Speller.
This book is designed for the middle classes in
schools. It contains the rules for forming deriva
lives with copious illustrations under each rule,
and the definitions; a selection of words derived
from the Saxon, Latin, Greek and other languages,
with both root and derivatives defined. ? lull list
of words of irregular pronunciation-of words of
the same orthography, but differing in pronuncia?
tion and moamng-of words of d?neront ortho?
graphy but similar pronunciation. Al:.o a full
vocabulary of foreign phrases in common uso in
our language; and lastly, a hst of abbreviations
use .1 in writing and printing.
After saying this much of these books, it will bo
scarcely necessary for us to commend thom to tho
special attention of teachers, and all others inter?
ested in the subject of schojltext books.
?Two Sides to Every Picture*"
The following paragraphs commenting on the
passage of the Territorial Bill aro both taken from
t?te Houston Telegraph, ot thd 7th inst. :
NO. 1-BY THE FIGHTING EDITOR.
"That the passage of tho bill for tho govern?
ment of the so-called rebel States was a crimo-^o
sin against every cannon of truth aud duty in
which the American people havo been educated
a crime committed consciously ondwilf Hy, for the
gratification of <t hate which shames christian his?
tory, for the unlawful maintenance of power, and
for the acquisition of illicit wealth-is a tact so
clear to ns that we feel bound to denounce it in
terms as strong as our convictions of its enormity.
Wc are compelled to denounce it, or else stand
convicted before the world of having taken leave
of all honesty and manhood. In so doing wo rep?
resent no party, but speak in the name and behalf
of the Federal Government, and of the govern?
ments of all the States, all of which are revolu?
tionized by this bill. It is a monstrosity without
a parallel.
NO. 2-EY THE PEACE EDITOR. .
We do not think there is any just ground for
this fear. The course of industrial and commer?
cial affairs will proceed just as th ugh the now
regime had not gone into operation. Corn and
cotton will grow just as well, and ti ade and com?
merce will thrive just as much as though there
were no nulitary government. There will be
neither physical resistance on the one hand, nor
practically injurious interference on tho other;
consequently there w?l be no collision or con vu.
sion, aud therefore no reason for damage to mate?
rial prosperity. * * * Really, tho "re?
construction" strife in the so-called Congress,
hav??g come to an end, there will be a moro set?
tled state of antara than before. Confidence will
become stronger, and prosperity will revive. So
wo think.
SENATOR WADE.-In tho utterance of secession
doctrino Ben. Wade has not been found wanting,
and Congress should exerci o caro in framing test
oaths, lost they enact ono whi h tho President of
the Senate could rot take without choking. In
18C0, in the Senate of the United States, Mr. Wade
declared, when alluding to thc then threatened ac?
tion of tho Southern States:
"I am not one of those who would ask them to
continue in Buch a Union. We havo adopted tho
Old Declaration of Independence as tho basis of
our political movements, which declares that mon,
when their Government ceases to protect their
rights, when it is so subverted from tho true pur?
poses of Government as to oppress them, havo thc
right to recur to fundamental principles, and, if
need be, destroy the Government under which
they live, and to erect, on us ruins, another more
conducive to their welfare. I hold that 1 hey havo
this right, whenever they think that this c:ntiu
gent v has come.
"You cannot foroiby hold men in this Union; for
tho attempt to do so, it seems to me, would sub?
vert the first principles of the Government under
which we live.
AN ECCENTRIC ENGLISHMAN.-Tho Vienna pa?
pers record tho death of an eccentric Englishman
in that capitol. His name was William Derby; his
tall statut of nearly seven feet often exposed him
to annoyances from idlers in tho streets of Vienna,
hut all of which he boro with tho utmost gravity.
He had long since attracted public attention by
his extraordinary conduct. Last year he sold tho
reversion of his gigantic body to a museum of
natural history, and with that ob'cet had himself
photographed" in a nude state; although wealthy,
ho received, without hesitation, tho mouc> for the
sale. Ito was accustomed to take a walk alway* at
midnight in all woathers. In winter his favorite
pastime was skating, and he choso in preference
the slopes of steep places and difficult spots. Xii
ttiat pastime, according to tho Austrian journals,
ho met with hiB death, as in descending a hill ut
Dernbach, be fell over a heap of stones, and Irac
tured his Bkull so severely that ho died four days
after.
RELIEF FOE THE SOUTH.-At noon to-morrow a
meeting of the citizens of Philadelphia is to bc
held at tho Board of Trade rooms, to toke some
measures towards aiding hi thc relief of tho Buffer?
ing peo tile of tho South. The call for this meeting
has been signed by some of the most respected
and prominent or the mercantile community oi
that citv. On Wednesday, in the New York State
Scnato,*Mr. Benjamin Wood moved that tho fi?
nance Committeo be instructed to report a bill ap?
propriating $50,000 for tho relief ot; tho destitute
in tho rebel States.
Negro 8uflrage is no go in Michigan.
MASS MEETIN G OP NEGROES UV COLUM?
BIA.
[From the Columbia Shamix of Yesterday.]
In pursuance cf a notice published in Sunday's
Phoenix, tho colored citizens of the District as?
sembled in large numbers at the African M. E.
Church, yosterday morning, at 9 o'clock, and after
forming a procession of their Tarions societies,
marched through the principal streets, headed
by a band of music, to the vacant square
on Plain street, just beyond Nickerson's
Hotel, whero addresses were delivered by
Gen. Wade Hampton, the Hon. W. F. DeSaussure,
-ol. W. H. Talloy, Hon. E. J. Arthur and James
G. Gibbes, Esq.,' (who had been specially invited
by thc committee to address the colored people),
and Beverly Nash and the Kev. D. Pickett, (freed?
men). We should like to give a full report of the
remarks of tho different speakers, but, as tha? is
impracticable, wo shall content ourselves with an
abstract. The proceedings were opened with
prayer by Eov. Simon Miller, (freedman).
Gen. Hampton spoke of the vast importance of
the present movement-not only to the colored,
but to tho white man. Ho advi ;ed the freedmen
to give their friends at the South a fair trial, and
if they were found wanting, it was then time
enough to go abroad for sympathy. It was to their
interest to luild up the South; for as tho co .ntry
prospeied, so would they prosper. The present
stato of affairs was not brought about by the action
of the Southern people-white or black; therefore,
neither was responsible for it.
Hon. E. J. Arthur Baid he was unable to deliver
a lengthy address, as he was not prepared for such
an undertakin .> . He was surprised at being called
on for a speech, and could .only give a few words
of counsel. The occasion of this celebration is
one in which you havo had no agency. It is not
the act of the white mon of your country. It has
been conierred upon you by the Northern Con?
gress; and ho hoped that it would be the
moans of enlightening and improving their
mental and moral condition. Ho, in con?
junction with tho whito citizens of the
South, would endeavor to assist them, by all
tho means in their power, to accomplish that end.
They had tho right of franchise, and ho advised
them to oxercise it with good judgment. To learn
to fully appreciate these great privileges which are
being conferred apon them, they should educate
themselves and thoir children. It is tho duty and
tho interest of tho whito men to help the colored
men in their educational and moral training. If
we wore actuated by interest alone, we should
rather contribute to than attempt to retard their
advancement. They aro pohtically tho equals
of the whites, ona education will go far to
make them morally and mentally so. Let there be
no war of races among us-lot us look to each
other's welfare. It id true that many of the whites
aro deprived of the political rights which the
colored men will enjoy, but that should not, and
will not, create envious and unkind feelings. He
concluded by advising them to regard tho white
men, who havo been born and reared among thom,
as friones. Lot no harsh feelings exist between
us ; look to each other's welfare and happiness ;
and last, though not least, look to your educational
and moral improvomout.
Wm. H. Talley, E?q., said he fully appreciated
the confi enco and respect manifested in the invita?
tion to address bis colored friends in relation to tho
condition of tho country; and would, under other
circumstances, havo attempted a full discussion of
the subject. But the subject itself was one BO vast
in importance, and the notice of such a meeting so
brief, that he did not purpose doing more than to
indicate his heart's concurrence in some of the
views already presented, intendin? thereby to
add his testimony or their correctness's.
He said that they had heard that the inter?
ests of the white man and the colored
man of the South wore one and the same. They
are parts of the same society, inhabiting the same
land, under tho same sun, breathing tho same
atmosphere; and if tho lessons of history and rea?
son taught anything, they taught that, under such
circumstances, the two races must prosper or
perish together. Diff?rences of soil, climate and
government, are the principal causes of difference,
and consequent conflict of interest. In a vast
country, with a wide range of climate and
almost inimit? variety of soil, there must na?
turally, perhaps necessarily, arise such conflict.
Legislation which may be productive of gooa
results to ono portion of such a country, may bo
utterly disastrous to another. But with the same
soil and o lima to, and surrounded by circumstances
the same in all essential particular*;, the whito
man and tho colored man of the South have the
same interest, tho same destiny. It was impossible,
at this time, to mark out and recommend any par?
ticular line of policy. Everything was in
doubt and confusion. Trade, 'the mechanic
arts, every department of industry, were
palsied by the uncertain, unsettled condition
of affairs. The country can know no prosperity
without peace, and that end can be attorned only
by discarding all elements of strife, and promot?
ing harmony and concert of action. Tho advice
which common sense gives to the colored popula?
tion of tho South in the present emergency
is, to tiy thosj of tho community whom you
havo known-those who have hitherto proved
themselves worthy of confidence-tboso who
have tho same interest. Unite with tboso.
If these deceive you, it will then be time enough to
experiment on the sympathies of strangers. He
said ho knew he expressed tho feeling of th? in?
telligent white men of the South, when he said
that they cherished no semblance of hostility to?
ward the colored man, on account of his altered
circumstances: The enemies of toe South will en?
deavor to foment dissensions and j ea! o uni ea, for
the purpose of still farther tearing, weakening and
plundering our already desolated land ; but if the
Southern people, white and colored, stand united,
there is ground to hope that our children, if not
ourselves, may enjoy a long period of tranquility
and peace, of prosperity and happiness.
Beverly Naen replied to the generally expressed
statement of the white speakers, that they were
disfranchised, by stating that tho colored people
would j. resent such a strong and unanimous
petition tc Congress, that attention would bo paid
to it-in fact, tho colored men would not rest until
thu whites had boon enfranchised. He had respect
for a man who uphold his principles at the point of
the bayonet; whereas skulkers and so-called Union
ni'jn at tue South, ho could designate ?is nothing
bettor than traitors. Ho advocated universal suf?
frage-believing that tho drivor of a one-horse
cai t was us much ontitled to that right as the
owner of a block of bu?diugs. He quoted freely
from history to show tho importance of the right
of suffrage, and advised tho colored people, in the
selection . of their candidates, to look to merit
alone. As to not knowing who or what they would
be callod tin to vote for, tho candidates would take
caro of that, and by speeches and conversations
post them thoroughly.
Tho Kev. D. Pickett stated that ho wanted it
distinctly understood that he was no offico-seeker.
Tho good of hi? people waa Iiis first consideration.
He was o oposod tot universal suffrage, for two
reasons-the want of education and a property
qualification. The first was readily attained, and
the last, by industry and cconomj', would surely
come. Speaking of elections, he said that the
question should not be whether a candidate was
black or whito. but waa he honest?
Tho Hon. W. F. DeSaussure and Jas. G. Gibbes,
Esq., dclivorcd short addroeses, after which the
procession was reformed and marched back to the
church.
The strictest order prevailed, whiob is partially
duo to the excellent management of Chief Marshcl
William Simons and other influential members of
tho various associations. Taken in all its bear?
ings, the pleasant feelings ongonderod by this
gathering cannot bc too highly appreciated,
nor its importance over-estimated. Disfran?
chised whites were invited to uddress enfran?
chised blacks, and tho advice given was received
in tho spirit in which it was extended; while tho
remarks ot the colored speakers woro of such a
character as to give general satisfaction.
In.tho evening a torchlight procession waa
formed, and calls were made npou Chancellor Car?
roll, W. K. Bachman, Esq., and other prominent
oitizono, who delivered impromptu addresses, when
the cdebratiouists returned to their rendezvous
and were dismissed.
WHEKE THE MONE? GOES.-Tho following table
gives the amounts appropriated at the second ses?
sion of the Thirty-ninth Congress:
Postofllce bill. 18,233,000 00
Pensions bl 1. S3,2s0,000 00
D plomatic bill. 1,425,456 00
Military Academy hill. 268,913 00
Kiver und Harbor bul. 4,712.781 7U
Naval b?l. 16,794,244 01
Legislative, Executive and Legislative bill. 22,950,091 99
Fortifications hill. 1,290,000 Ol
Inlianbill. 3,017,255 8il
Civil Servite bill. 6,086,863 88
Army bill. 23,881,054 OG
Deficiencies and sundry minor bills. 12,752,779 17
Totol.$144,793,037 61
Tho above includes neither private bills nor such
bills as authorize expenditures without making
definite appropriations.
FEAT IN OEATOEY.-A member of the Legisla?
tive Assembly of Vancouver's Island Bpoko ic
that House roccntly for seventeen hours in ordei
to prevent a bill of much local interest from pass?
ing before thc close of a particular day, which bael
been appointed as thu limit of the time for malting
certain payments. Tho last twenty-four hours oJ
thu twolvo-month alono romaincd when this gou
tloman, Mr. M'Clnrc, began his speech. The Ex?
aminer says : ' "Every effort was made by the ma?
jority to put him down and tire h im out. With a mer?
ciless unanimity thoyrefusod to allow bim to le l
against t..o table, lo put his loot upon a chah' for i
moment, to relievo himself from the irksomonesi
of hit* position by resting his handupun anything
or to speak, in short, jn any other than a rigidly
erect and unsupported attitude
During thc whole of tho timo they rclioved eacl
other at intervals, going out n t procuring sucl
rcfro.-bments as they needed, and always lcavi .?
a quorum in the House. When M'Clur? sank ox
hausted into his seat, Mr. Do Comosfc rose, nnc
for th:> remaining aovun hourn of tho twenty-fou
talked against time. On rising, amidst tho groant
and hisses of tho disgusted ai:d infuriated ma
jority, he exclaimed, with more forco than refine
mont, that it was useless for honorable member
to evinco thoir malice in that manner, for ho hat
got ?j) with tho determination to talk, if neces
sar}', 'until tho angel Gabriel sounded tho las
trump.1 Hin powers of endurance-were not quiti
so severely tested; but the end was achieved, ant
when the dock struck twolvo the worn and weariei
champion of honesty looked rouudwith pardon
ablo exultation upon"tho blank faces of a Dough
and beaten assembly."
No recusant Democrat in Washington now wouli
daro to go on such a "filibustering expedition."
BELIEF FOR THE SOUTH.-Bishop ODENHEIME
has issued" a pastoral lotter to the Diocese of Not
Jersey recommending collections to bo taken u
in the churchos throughout'ihat State for the rt
liof of the Southern poor.
LITERARY ITEMS.
Among the books recently iairaed we note a new
edition of "The Artist's Married Life," a delightful
biographical romance founded on the personal
and domestic history of Albert Durer, translated
from the German of Leopold Schefer, by Mrs. J.
R. Stodart.
"Famous Americans of Recent Times," by James
Paxton, is a collection of biographical papers con?
tributed by tho author to various periodicals of
the day, including his memoirs of Henry Clay,
Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun, John Randolph,
John Jacob .Astor, Stephen Girard, and other po?
pular celebrities. Ur. Parton appears to be very
popular in the North. Wo are not among his ad?
mirers.
Longfellow's translation of Dante's "Divine
Comedy ' is in the hands of the printer. It will be
published in three volumes royal octavo. It is in?
tended to make it a model of Boston workman?
ship. The Inferno will be pu lished next month :
the Purgatorio in May, and the Paradiso in Juno.
The price of each volume will not be less than five
dollars.
Tlje Market Assistant, by Thomas F. DE VOE
(Hurd & Houghton), contains a brief description
of every article of human food sold in the public
markets of New York, Boston, Philadelphia and
Brooklyn, including the various domestic and wild
animals, poultry, game, fish, vegetables and fruits.
The author prides himself not only on wearing an
honest white apron, and serving out steaks find
roasting pieces with an impartial hand, but on
being able to contribute to the historical and anti?
quarian literature of the country.
A library edition of Chapman's Homer is an?
nounced, which will be put to press as soon aa a
sufficient number of subscribers are obtained to
warrant so costly an undertaking. This work will
be in five volumes, uniform with Pickering's edi?
tion of the worsB of Milton, in eight volumes,
octavo, 1851. Fifty copies aro to be issued on small
paper, and only five hundred copies of tho small
paper edition will.be printed. The edition will not
be stercopt.ved.
Back Bono: Photographed from fcbe "Scalpel,"
by Edward H. Dixon, M. J)., is a new volumo of
selections from the saucy medical journal in which
the author has run a tilt for many years against
the usages and pretensions of the regular profes?
sion, as well as against every variety of quackery,
charlatanism, and pedantic assumption in geueral.
We are confident that the character of the contents
is not indicated by the motto on the ti tlc-j. age:
"Light and darkness: maj ea ty and mud; nectar
and poison, in one goblet.''
Bishop Colenso is at last in smooth water. An
extract from a letter from the Bishop now circu?
lating in England, show? that he is in excellent
spirits, that the decision of Lord Romilly ?B having
its practical effect, and that the hostility of tho
colonial clergy is slightly giving way. "I am glad
to say," writes Bishop Colenso, "that by the last
mail the Rev.-" (a clergyman in high posi?
tion in another colonial diocese) "bas written to
accept a proposal which I made to him after some
months of correspondence to como and holp mo in
che cathedral. I am to guarantee him two hun?
dred pounds per annum, and house rent for three
yoars. Ho is a thoroughly good man, and on very
good terms with his present bishop." Tho laity,
too, in various places, especially in Durban, Ad?
dington, Borea and Finetown, are coining zealous?
ly forward with resolutions protesting against tho
despotism of Bishop Gi ay; and at the last named
place they have formally repudiated tho niergy
iiian, wbo raruses to acknowledge Bishop Colenso
as his diocesan.
A new edition of a Complete Mirnn?i of English
Literature, by Thomas B. Shaw, is published by
Sheldon & Co. It ia reprinted from the recent
London edition, with notes and illustrations by
William Smith, LL. D., and is accompanied b> a
valuable sketch of American literature, by Hanry
T. Tuckerman. Tho volume presents a succinct
view of the progress of English Lit or a tur o from
the age of Chaucer to the writers of tho nine?
teenth century, illustrated with critical remarks
on the principal . author? in the language,
i with an' estimate of their genius and .influ?
ence. As an introduction to the literary trea?
sures of our mother tongue, it- is entitled to
high commendation ; the fruits of careful and ju?
dicious study are manilas .< on every page; it
evinces a spirit of catholic and generous apprecia?
tion: no personal or party pr?judices are permit?
ted to vitiate its judgment?; it is always impartial,
always showing wide intellectual sympathies,
though just and discriminating; while its perspi?
cuous and polished, though unprotend ng, style i
attests the cultivation ana good taste of- the au?
thor. Mr. Henry Tuokerman's sketch forms an
important addition to the original work, skiUfnJJy
gronping the chief American writers in their dif?
ferent departments of thought and study, and fur?
nishing an instructive illustration of tbe devotion
to letters in this country. His essay, we notice,
has been taken as the ground work or an elaborate
Gorman treatise on the history of American litera?
ture by Professors. Brunnemann, of Berlin.
Bennett on & High Horse.
The Herald, ever fertile in, sensation projects,
now delights its readers daily/:'with a new scheme
for settling tho Eastern question. The impeach?
ment of President JOHNSON has given place to the
new crusade. It says:
Let the Holy Father invoke the Catholic Powers
to aid him in a new and grand crusade. The idoa,
if encouraged by Napoleon, the eldest, son of the
Church, will give unity to Catholic Christendom.
Austria, Italy, Spain and Portugal will all heartily
follow his lead, and volunteers by thousands will
swell their ranks from all tho. ends of the earth.
The grandeur of tbe enterprise would startle and
astonish the world. Success would bo insepara?
ble from the undertaking. The results, both im?
mediate and remote, in their variety and in their
magnitude, would exceed all, even the most san?
guine expectations. The internal disorders of the
nations would be healed. Fenians and reform:rs,
absolutists and republicans, Carliste and Christ.
nos, abandoning their paltry platforms and ?
forgetting their party names, would rise to
tho lovel of a grander cause and enter
upon a nobler struggle. Tho trembling infidel, j
abandoning houses and lands, mosques and mina?
rets, would disappear forever from Eui opean soil.
The long-dethroned emblem of Christianity would
again surmount and adorn the dome of Sr. Sophia.
With Constantinople- again for its centre, the lower
empire might arise fresh and vigorous from the
ruin of centuries. The year of the Papacy's great?
est humility might prove to be the year of its
greatest glory. Napoleon would have established
his claim to thc honored name he bears and would
havo fixed his throne on firmer and broader foun?
dations than ever. Pi? Nono, having ace - mpliahed
his mighty task and restored the fortuna? of the
Church, would go to his rest leaving behind him a
reputation more brilliant- and enduring than that
of any of his many illustrious predecessors. And
when the great work should nave been done, it
would be found that it was not tho loast important
of its many results that it had given an impulse
and an energy to human thought and?enterprise
suca as had not been felt since the timo ol the
groat reformation.
THE NEGBOES OF RICHMOND.-Tliis class of our
Eopuhtion, as a general thing, manifest a disposi?
on to prepare themselves for the altered political
condition in which the events of tho past two yoiirs
have placed them. The sudden abolition ol'
shivery did not, as most persons expected, turn
their heads. They have been, in tho maiu, order?
ly and well behaved. They havo not presumed,
upon their newly acquired freedom, to commit
breaches of the peace, or De guilty of any a"ts cal?
culated to sow dissension between tho two
races. The utmost good feeling ?B felt by thc
white people of this city towards tho negroes, and
whilst they may be amused at somo of their at?
tempts at display on all occasions, whether pro?
per or improper, there is not one partido of bitter?
ness felt for thom. Our best citizens deplore* thc
mischievous influences that have been at work on
thom for somo timo past, but more particularly
since tbe passage, by Congress, of tho bill giving
thom tho right of suffrage. They see that design?
ing men are endeavoring to fill their hoads with
wrong ideas, and to use them for furthering thcir
owu schemes of advancement.
Wo suggested a day or two since that it
would be well if means were u ed to counteract
these infiuenc--s ; if some of our citizens, who arc
well known to tbe negro population, in whoa, they
have confidence, and whom they know to bo their
friends, would take the trouble to bow them what
their rights and duties wore in their present con?
dition. It is a matter that should not bo dolayod.
If tho evil influences to which they aro subjected,
arc to bc o?ercomo, it is important that means bc
taken immediacy, to do so. Several gun.lernen
of this city have signified thoir willingness to ad?
dress them, and we hopo that meetings will be
called, and that they will do so without further
procrastination. The most respectable ncgroos of
the city aro unanimous in the wish that gentlemen
whom they know will make speeches to thom and
enlighten them as lo their rights and duties.
Richmond Examiner.
Women.
A Paris correspondent writes:
Ono would imagine in Paris that wemen had
only just boon created, so incessantly tho Parisian
mind busies itself with their do.cription and an?
alysis and classification. Balzac writos chapters
and Michele1, books about thom, whose influence
crossos the Channol and unhappily inspires Charles
Reade; Laboulayc lectures about their history,
and tho reporters at the opening day of tho Cham
bor of Deputios find no topic BO important as thc
description of their dresses. Following the gene?
ral fashion, a Parisian journal i.ropounded, as an
intellectual exercise for its subscribers, tho inven?
tion of a suitable definition for "the sex," and re?
ceived an immense quantity of answers. I select
some of them :
"A woman is a necessity, which Providence hae
converted into au enjoyment."
"Definition geometrical-woman is a polygon,
for ?he has many aides, good and bad."
'.It is a being who has not thc BOUI in tho body,
but the body in tho soul."
"A woman ia a be.ng capable ol' oxporiencing
sensations, but sentiments novor."
"At a distance, a rose without a thorn; ap
proached, a thora without a rose."
"Women fiil up tho intervals in conversation ant
in life Uko the down placed in glass boxes; w<
reckon the down as nothing, yet everything, woult
break to pioces without it." *
"Tho woman of the world is a woman who know
how to be distinguished with a toilet of two ?OU?H
and simplo with ft toilot of a thousand crowns."
"The woman of tho worlu is she who is cnougl
so never to?>e obliged to annouueo in what cu'ctei
?ho moves.
"It is Bbc who fools al homo wherever oho find
herself."
Shortly to be published, "Flirtations for th
Season, or thc new Rollo's Life inLonuon."
[Punch.
PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS.
In the Senate on Saturday resolutions were pre?
sented for the improvement of the Mississippi
River, and for aid in ;he construction of the North?
western Pacific Railroad. A resolution waa adopt?
ed instructing the Committee on Retrenchment'to
make an examination into the methods adopted
by the Treasury Department of printing bonds,
notes and securities. The resolution directing
that the coin of the Richmond banks shall be paid
into the Treasury waa passed. A resolution to de?
fine the meaning of an act relative to property lost
was passed. The Supplementary Reconstruction
Bill was then taken np and debated at length. An
amendment to alter tbe oath of allegiance to he
taken by electoi s was lost by a vote of 18 to 19.
Another amendment to make it necessary that
the Constitution Bhall be ratified by a. majority of
all the votes registered was also rejected. Mr.
Edmunds' amendment that one-half of the regis?
tered electors shall vote on the question of ratifi?
cation was agreed to. The amendment of Mr..
Drake that the votes of the people should decide
whether a convention should be held or not, was
agreed to. Several other amendments were dis?
agreed and agreed to, and upon the question being
taken the bill was passed bv 88 yeas to 2 nays, Mr.
Johnson voting yea and Messrs. Buckalow and
Hendricks nay. The other Democrats were absent.
The Senate then adjourned at 12 o'clock.
The House held no session on Saturday.
RAID ON THE STILLS AND DIBTTLLEBS.-Captain
Armer, Inspector of Internal Revenue fr South
CaroUna, has been in our midst for a week. He
has captured during that time thirty-eight stills
and several barrels of liquor, all of which will be
confiscated. Assessments have also been materi?
ally enlarged and a few diminished. It is tho part
ot prudence, as well as duty, to,, obey the laws of
the ?and.-Keatpee Courier..
The amount of national bank currency issued
from the Treasury Department during toe week,
w.s $283,150, making the total amount issued up
to dato $302,139.226. From this is t o be deducted
the currency returned, including worn-out notes,
amounting to $3,233,442; leaving in actual circula?
tion at this date $298,903,784.
There were one hundred and eleven divorces
granted in one county in Indiana last year.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
i -i-?
?5- CONSIGNEES BY THE STEAMSHIP
MANHATTAN from New York, are notified that abe ia
discharging cargo *t ?rown A Co,'s South Wharf. All
goods remaining ou tho wharf at sunset will be stored at
owner's risk and expense.
STREET BROTHERS h CO.,
March 20 1 / Consignees.
HS-IN EQUITY.-COLLETON DISTRICT.
EXP ARTE M. W. KENYON.-PETITION TO PERPET?
UATE TESTIMONY IN RELATION TO LOST TITLES
to DOO acres of Land situate on St George's Pariah
formerly belonging to ANDREW MEYERS, deceased,
and sold to M. W. KENYON, oy the Conunisaioner in
Equity for Colleton District on the first Monday in Sep?
tember, 1869, under proceedings in Equity entitled,
"Susannah Myers M. D. L. McAmaney et cd." lt is or?
dered that all persons in any wise interested in the said
Ladds, be and appear before me at my office in Walter
boro' on MONDAY, the 22d day of April next to shew
cause, if any they have, why the prayera of petitioner be
not granted.
Commissioner's Office, Walterboro', 11th March, 1867.
March 20_w8 R. STOKES, C. E. C. D.
SOT IN EQUTTY-CHARLESTON DISTRICT
o ANDS k CO. vs. ADMINISTRATRIX CAREY.-Pursu?
ant to the decree o ' Chancellor Lxsxsss, the creditors bf
*ba estate of E. M CAREY, deceased, are hereby called
upon to provo their claims before the undersigned athis
Office, Court House, Cha.leaton, on or before the 1st day
of May, 1867, or \>i debarred from the benefit of the de?
cree to be hereafter made in the cause.
JAMES TUPPER,
February 18 lamo31 ? Master ip Equity.
XST CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, OHARLES
TON.-The Memlxrrs (colored) o this Church were reg?
ularly dismissed ,'xom the three White Baptist Churches
of this City, to form a separate Church. They are wor?
shiping tor the present at Bonum's Hau, John street
between Meeting and King. They have purchased a lot
and are soliciting contributions to enable them to erect a
House of Worship. .
Thoy are believed to be pious and worthy persons, and
their object is respectfully oommonded to all who have
the ability and disposition to aid such enterprises.. The
following members of the said Church have been author?
ized to mako collections i CHART.ES SHAXU, THOMAS A
DAVIS, EDWABD HAIG, DANIEL D. MCALPIN, JOBK BEE,
and SAMUEL STEWARD.
Charleston, S. C., Juno 37, 1866. _
Rev. LUCIUS CUTHBERT,
Pastor Citadel Square Church.
Rev. E. T. WINKLER,
_. Pastor United Church.
W^LIAMTSNEBY. j ^??K1^
WILLIAM G. WBTLDENJ unuroa.
January 4_fmw3moe
SO- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AN
application will be made to the Court of CommoL
PleuB. at its next session for Charleston District for a
Charter of Incorporation of "THE HOMESTEAD BUILD.
LNG AND LOAN ASSOCIATION."
February 27 _w8
to- THE HEALING POOL AND HOUSE OF
MERCY.-HOWARD ASSOCIATION REPORTS, for
Young Men, on the CRIME OF SOLITUDE, and the
ERRORS, ABUSES and DISEASES which destroy the
manly powers, and create impediments to MARRIAGE,
with BOTO means of relief. Bent in sealed letter en?
velopes, freo of charge. Address Dr. J. SKILL EN
HOUGHTON, Howard Association, Philadelphia, Pa.
January 16 8mo
SST NOTICE TO MARINERS.-C A P T AI NS
AND PILOTS wishing to anchor their vessels in Ashley
River, are requested not to do so anywhere within direct
range of the heads of tho SAVANNAH RAILROAD
WHARVES, on the Charleston and St Andrew's side o?
the Ashley River; by which precaution, contact with the
Submarine Telegraph Cable will be avoided. \
b. C. TURNER, H. M.
Harbor Master's Office, Charleston, February 6,1866. -
February 7_
flS-AWAY WITH SPECTACLES.-OLD EYES
mado new, without Spectacles, Doctor or Medicine.
Pamphlet mailed froo on receipt of ten oents. Address
E. B. FOOTE, M. D., No. 1130 Broadway, New York.
November 9_-?- -_
"asrSPECLLL INTELLIGENCE.-WE PRO?
POSE to furnish LABORERS of all classes for Fannors,
ltailroads, Shop, Garden, Store, Hotel or general House?
work.
Persons desiring employment will call at No. 6 Cannon
near Kin: street; and all orders for Laborers will be
promptly me", and satl-factory reference given.
February 23 Imo_S. B. HALL & CO.
WE ARE AUTHORIZED TO ANNOUNCE
!. M. WHITING, Esq., as a candidate for Sherill ot
Charleston (Judicial} District, at the next election.
September IQ_
J9ST ARTIFICIAL EYES.-ARTIFICIAL "HU?
MAN EYES mado to .order and inserted by Dra. F.
BAUCH and P. GOUGLEMANN (formerly employed by
BOISSONNEAU, of Paris), No. 599 Broadway, New York.
April 14_lyr
?S- BATCHELORS HAIR DYE.-THIS
SPLENDID HAIR DYE ls tho best m the world. The
only true and perfect Dye-harmless, reliable, instan*
taneous. No disappointment No ridiculous tints.
Natural Block or Brown. Romedies the iU effects ot Bad
Dyas. Invigorates tho hair, leaving it Boft and beautiful.
Tho gonuino is signed William A. Batchelor. AU others
are mere imitations, and should bo avoided. Sold by all
Druggists and Porfumcra. Factory, No. 81 Bartley
street, Now York.
JBSy BEWARE OF A COUNTERFEIT.
Declmuer io_lyr
?jr BEAUTIFUL ILvIIL-CHEVALIER'S
LIFE FOR THE HAIR positively restores gray hair tc
Its original color and youthful beauty; imparts life ano
strength to the weakest hair; stops its falling out at
onco; keeps the head clean; is unparalleled as a halt
dressing. Sold by all Druggists and fashionable hair
dressers, and at my office, No. 1123 Broadway, New
York. SARAH A. CHEVALIER, M. D.
DOWIE & MOISE,
No. 161 Meeting street
Opposite Charleston Hotel.
January 4 6mos
G. F. VOUER,
NO. 108 MARKET ST.,
Books, Per?3iiicals and Stationery.
JUST RECcTVED
Alar c supply of STATIONERY
xHOTOGEAPHS, PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS
POCKET BOOKS, DIARIES for 1867, Etc.
ALSO,
A fine and largo selection of NOVELS, by the most
celebrated nuthors. SONG BOOKS, BOOKS for Home
Amusements, Ac.
AU thc MONTHLY MAGAZINES, WEEKLY PAPERS.
DAILIES .ebustarKly on hand, and subscriptions re?
ceived for thesame.
Orders from the country are respectfully solicited.
r-'uvv.y:. November8
SfRASBURGER & NUHN,
I~rPOE-EB3 OP
TOYS, CHINA, SLATES AND SLAT
PENCILS.
STRASBURGER & NUHN, FORCED BY THE RAPID
increase of their business and their present inade?
quate accommodations, havo made arrangements to re?
move tro ?i No. 66 Maiden Lane to thc extendive lofts oi
No. 394 BROADWAY, near Canal street New York, on
the 15th of March; offering there to buyers better in?
ducements than ever before. tbstuSmos February 28
SHIPPING.
FOR HAVRES DIRECT.-THE
first-class American Clipper Packet Sehr. ROB?
BERT CALDWELL, John Mccormack master,
sharing one-half of her cargo engaged, wi.l be
promptly dispatched. For balance of Freight engage?
ments apply to WILLIAM EOACH,
Corner East Bay and Alger's South Wharves.
March 19 _ ruths*
rrrv FOR LIVERPOOL_THE A1AMER
rlHg^ICAN SHIP "SOUTHERN BIGHTS," L. R.
4ffii3Sy Eosa, Master, having a portion of her cargo en
"'?"gagod, -will have dispatch for tho above part
For balance of freight engagements, apply to
WILLIS t CHI60LM,
March 19 tuthBS North Atlantic Wharf.
FOR LIVERPOOL-THE 8TRICT
VLY Al American Ship B. S. KIMBALL, Dear?
born Master, having a large portion of her
.cargo engaged and going on board, win have
dispatch for the a . ove port
For balance of Freight engagements, apply to
STREET BROTHERS Ar CO.,
March 13 No. 74 East Bay.
NEW YORK AND CHARLESTON
Steamship Line*
FOR NEW YORK.
CABIN PASSAGE FIFTEEN DOLLARS.
THE NEW ANT) ELEGANT SLOE WHEEL STEAMSHIP
CHARLES COLLINS, Commander,
WILL LEAVE BROWN A CO.'S SOUTH WHARF
on Saturday, 23d inst, at - o'clock.
For Freight or Passage, having the moat superior
accommodations, apply to
STREET BROTHERS & CO.,
Marah 18
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
OFFICE OF CHIEF FT RE DEPARTMENT.
COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE CHIEF OF FIRE DE?
PARTMENT can be left at the office of the Clerk of
Council, City Hall, up stairs. M. BL NATHAN,
March 18 10 Chief Fire Department
CHARLESTON ALMS HOUSE.
ESTIMATES WILL BE RECEIVED FOR THE RE?
PAIRS TO ALMS HOUSE, and most be handed in
to the Chairman by 12 o'clock on Wednesday .next 20th
inst Specifications can be seen at Office of Alms House.
The work to be done comprises Brick and Carpenters'
work, Icon work, Painting, Ac T. D. EASON,
Chairman Committee Repairs C. A. H.
Morah 16 4
-!-1---*
NOTICE TO SAILORS OR IMMIGRANTS,
HOTEL OB BOABDXNG-HOUSu. TngftPflRfl,
OFFICE CLERK OF COUNCIL, I
, ? .Marah 13,1867. j
Pf ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING ACT OF
the L?gislature, passed the 20th day of December,
1866, all persons concerned are hereby notified to caU at
this Office and take out the required license immediately.
W.H. SMITH,
Clark of CouncJL
AH ACT FOB THE BETTEB PBOTKOTIOH OF SfibUN AMD
naaoBurrs rx TUE POET AKD HAKBOB OF OHABLBS
TOH..
L Beit enacted, by th? Senate end House of Representa?
tives, now met and titting in General Assembly, and by Oe
authority of the tame, That it shall not be lawful tor .any
person, except a pilot or public officer, to board or at?
tempt to board a vessel arriving in the port or barbar of
Charleston, before such vessel aoah have been made last
to the wharf, without first obtaining leave from the mas?
ter or person having charge of such vessel, or from her
owner or agents.
H. It shall not be lawful for ?ry owner, agent master,
or other person having charge ci any vessel arriving or
being in the port of Cnarleston, io permit or authorise
any aaLors, hotel or boarding house keeper, not lloensad
as hereinafter provided, or any agent, runner or sm
plnyoe ot any sailor'e or immigrant's hotel or boarding
house, to board, ar attempt to board, any vessel arriving
in, or lying, or eing in the harbor or port ot Charleston,
befare ?nen vessel shall have been made Hut to the wharf,
ox anchored, with intent to invite, oak or solicit the
boarding of any of the crew employed on such vessel.
UL lt shall no. be lawful for any Bailor's or immi?
grant's hotel or boarding house keeper, or the employ?e
of any sailor's or lm igranf a hotel or Donrdiru .house
keeper, having boarded any vessel made fast to any wharf
in the port ol Charles ton, to neglect or refuse to leave
sato vessey ofter mm. g neon cSoer ea - so to uv uj -
master or person having charge of such vessel.
TV. It snail not bu lawful for any person to keep, con?
duct or carry on, either aa owner, proprietor, agent or
otherwise, any sailor's or Immigrant's boarding house,
or sailor's or immigrant's botet in the city ot Charl* stan,
without having a license from the City Council thereof, .
V. It shall not be lawful for any person, not having the
license in this Act provided, or not being the regular
a .;ent, runner or employee of a person having auch li?
cense, to invite, ask or solicit in the city or harbor of
Charleston, the boarding or lodging of any of the crew
employed on any vessel, or of any immigrant arriving in
the said city of Charleston.
VL The City Council shall take the application of any
person applying for a license to keep Mailors' or immi?
grant's boarding house, or sailor 'a or immigrant's hotel,
in the city ol Charleston, and upon satisfactory evidence
to them of the respecta bul ty and competency of such ap?
plicant and of the suitableness af his accommodations,
shall issue to him a license, which shall co good for one
year, unless sooner revoked by said City Council, to
keep a sailor s or immigrant's boarding house in the city
of charleston, and to invite and solicit boarders for the
VTL The City Council may, upon satisfactory evidence
of the disorderly ensracter of any Bailors' or immigrants',
hotel -or boarding house, licensed aa hereinbefore pro?
vided, or of the kejper or proprietor of any such house,
or of any forced-fraud, deceit or misrepresentation, In in?
viting or soliciting boarders or lodgers for sucu house,
on the part of such keeper or proprietor, or any of bis
agents, runners, or employees, or of any attempt to per?
suade or entice any of the crew to desert lrom any vessel
in the harbor of Charleston, by such keeper or proprie?
tor, or any of his agents, runners or employees, revoke
the license for keeping such house.
VIII. Every person receiving ihn license hereinbefore
provided for shall pay to the city Council aforesaid the
sum of twenty dollars.
IX The said City council shall furnish to each sailor's
or immigrant's hotel or boarding house keeper, licensed
by them as aforesaid, one or more badges or shields, on
which shall be printed or engraved the name of such
hotel or boarding house keeper, and the number and
street of bis ho el or boarding house; and which said
badges or shields shall be surrendered to sold City Coun?
cil upon the revocation by them, or expiration of any
license granted by them, as herein provided.
X. Every Bailor's or immigrant's hotel or boarding?
house keeper, and every agent runner or employee of
such ho tel or boarding-house keeper, when boarding any
vessel in thc harbor of Charleston, or when inviting or
soliciting the boarding or lodging of any seaman, sailor
or perron employed on any vessel, or of any immigrant
shall wear, conspicuously displayed, the shield or badge
referred to in the loregoing section.
XL it shall not be lawful for any person, except ihoso
named in the preceding section, to -ave, wear, exhibitor
display any such shield'or badge to any of the crew em?
ployed on any vessel, or io any immigrant so arriving in
the city of Charleston, with tho intent to invite, ask or
solicit the boarding or lodging of such immigrant or of
any of the crew employed oa any vessel being in the
harbor of Charleston.
XXL Whoever shah offend against any or either of tho
provisions contained in section 1, 2,3, 4, 6,10 and ll, in
thin Act, shall be ceomed guilty ol a misdemeanor, and
shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by imprison?
ment for a term not exceeding one year, and not lesa
than thirty days, or by a fine not exceeding two hundred
and fifty dollar , and not lees than one hundred do lars,
or by both such fine and imprisonment
Tf ITT. Tho word "vessel," as used in this Act shall in?
clude vesse.s propelled by steam.
In tho Senate House, the twentieth day of December, in
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
Bixty-six. W. D. PORTER,
Presiden of the Senate.
CHAb. H. SIMONTON,
Speaker Jlouwi of Representatives.
Approved Decembor 20, 1866 :
Jams L. Ons, Governor.
Marchi*_
OFFICE OF CHIEF ??F DETECTIVES
FEBRUARY 7, 1867.- Reco var od and now at this
office, - yards COTTON GOODs. Tho owner ls re?
quested to come forward and provo property.
J. 0. CAMPBELL,
February 8 Lieut in Charge.
MACHINE SHOPS.
1W MK MM I??.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
ENGINE LATHES, PLANEES,
IMPROVED CAE WHEEL BOXES,
BOLT CUTTEBS,
UPRIGHT DRILLS,
AND
MACHINISTS' TOOLS OF ALI DESCRIPTIONS
Works at Worcester, Mass.
OFFICE AND WAREROOM, No. 222 PEARL ST.
NEW YORK.
December 18_6m o
TODD & RAFFERTY,
ENGINEERS AND FOUNDERS,
Office and Works, Paterson, New Jersey
WAREHOUSE, No. 4 DEY STREET, N. Y.
MANUFACTURERS OF STATIONARY AND PORT
ABLE STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS; Flax
Hemp, Tow, Oakum and Rope Machinery; Shafting
Mill Gearing, Iron and Brass Castings ot all kinde
Latches, Planing Machines, Drills; Shaping, Slotting an
corin? Machines; Gear Cutters; Centreing, Muling an
Bolt Catting Machines; Chucks of all kind?; Leatae
and Rubber Belting; Lace Leatu r, Belt Hooks, an
General Suppli s lor Rai.roads and other Machine Shopc
Judson & Snow's Patent Governors. Saw MiBs, Coito
Gins, Presse;, Ac, constantly ou hand.
TODD & RAFFERTY,
March 20_ly_No. 4 Dey street N. Y.
THE1 SUMTER NEWS,
DARR & OSTEEN, Proprietors.
"PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, AT SUMTER. S. (
2. Subscription $4.00 per annum. To Clubs of foi
?3.00 uer annum,
ad vertf?ements inser ui? on Uber il terms.
Decembers
?
SHIPPIHfl.
FOB BALTIMORE.
TEE FAVORITE STEAMSHIP
FAI/??N,
_ E. 0. REED COMMANDES, -. .V>??'??
Il/ILL HAVE IMMEDIATE DISPATCH FOE TUE
VT ABOVE POST, sailing To-Morrov, '?let, at &
o'clock P. M., from Pier .?c. i. Union Wl?Toir':7-wi
For Freight or Passage apply to
COUBTENAY & TBENHOLM, Agent?,
March 20 3 Uid<m wharves
FOR GEORGETOWN,
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND, WA VIS t?
LY MILLS, AND LANDINGS OM THE
WA CC AMA W AND BLACK RIVERS- . %
THE SPLENDID STEAM PACKET ~ &
EMILIE,
I CAPTAIN ISAAC DAVIS, \ ?
11/ILL LEAVE ATLANTIC WHAEF AS ABOVE Ofr
TT JViday Morning, 21st inst, at 7 o'clock. Bs
turning, will leave Georgetown on Monday .Mot *-,
lng, 21th Inst, at 7 o'clock. "
For freight or passage apply to '-^--'.>
MOTTE A, PRINGLE, Agent- ?*
. South Atlantic Wharf. * -
H. B.-All freight must bo prepaid, and none received
after ?onset Freight received dany and stored free r >
chargt. _ 2 ' , " Marca 20
NEW YORK AND CHARLESTON
People's Steamship Company. '
SAILING DAYS.....WEDNESDAY
THE STEAMSHIP'
EMILY E. S?TTIDE?
CAPTAIN n.W.rAXSKW?OtP:?/f^ ^'
-WILL LEAVE NORTH ATLANT TO
WHARF on Wednesday, March 20,' st
3 o'clock P. M.
Line composed of Steamers "MO'
NEKA" and "EMILY B. SOUDEE." - ? ?:>;?? ."
WILLIS k CKEBOLM, '? :
March 18 mtaw " . Harth Atlantic Wharf. > ?
NEW TORE STEAMERS.
REGULAR U. S. MAIL LINE OF SIDE-WHEEL
STEAMERS. ii -, . .
QUAKER OITYi
W. H. WEST.Ckmtmaodar.
SOUTH AMERICA
?.........?m ...Commander?
ONE OP THE ABOVE MAGNIFICENT SLDE-WHEEt
ST AMERS will leave Adger's Wharf erery 8AT3JB
DAY for New York. ' Ir^r *'
Cabin Passage Fifteen Dollars.: j . : ^n; .
For freight or passage, apply to -:: . :j . ,v,-r,??i
liAVENEL 4; CO, .
QUAKES OUT, Captain W. H. West wffl gararra'
Saturday, March 23<L, at - o'clock. Irsi&iZ-i
March 18 . ,, , ' . ../I; ^
FOR FLORIDA/..
VIA SAVANNAH, BR UNS WICK, ST
MART'S, FERNANDINA, JACEEONVTLLE, AND ALL."
THE LANDINGS ON THE 8T. JOHN'S EJVEB Ai
FAB AS PALATKA. " " /
THE FINE STEAMER
CAPTAIN.I. J. L?CE^?Oft ^J'V,^c
TITI IE LEAVE NORTH ATLANTIC WHARF .OS
TT ova; fE<dn<?day Morning, at 8 o'edaok pieulssly -
?B-Fi?-b i received dally and stored free of ehskfja.!. . '
Ear Freight or Pawsage apply on board; or at the Of?
fice of J0B5TMAHONEY, JB., i8Es^B?7^~
November 13 Above Craig. Tnomey A Co's.
FOE 8AV?J^^f?L
' 1000 TONS BURTHEN,. - ^15
CAPTAIN L. M. OOXBTTEB.; ? *
TITTLE LEAVE MIDDLE ATLANTIC WHARF EVERY
YV FRIDAY BIGHT, at 10 o'clock, for this port. -
For Freight or Passage, appiy on board, or to office ot
J. D. AIKEN k CO., Agents,
Januarys - B -nih Atlsatto Waar/J'^
FOR PALATKA, FLA., l i
FERNANDD7A. JACKSONVILLE AND ALL THE
LANDINGS ON THE ST. JOHN'S RIVER. ?3&?j?0?
VIA
SAVANNAH, GA.,
THE NEW AND SPLENDID STEAMSHIP
;c D I C T A T 0 3R, *?
MOO T0N8 BURDEN,
CAPTIN LOUIS M. COXETTEB.
ON AND AFTHB THE 26TH OCTOBER, THIS
SHIP will sail from Middle Atlantic Wharf,
tYidax Nigld, at 10 o'clock, for tho above places. ~
All freight must be paid here by shippers. . x?&Z'?i
Gangs ot egroes w ll be t'ken to the abo ? potnts<H,
the St John's River at $5 each. ChUartn unoer te?
years of age free. Horses and Mules at re lured rates, 5 ?
j9S?Country papers advertising "the DICTATOR" W?
please discontinue their notices and send account to fh?
Agents. SS?3 -
. For Freight or Passage apply on board, ar tot^s
ageu'-v. S nth Atla itie ?> ? ._ Jannary'JS^
Charleston and Savannah Steam
Packet Line.
VIA BEAUFORT AND HILTON HEAD. -
Steamer PILOT BOY.Captain W. T. McNrxrt;;
Steamer ELIZA HANCOX... .Captain J. K. RICHARDSON'
LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF, CHARLESTON,
and Charleston Wharf, Savannah, Monday, Wed ne?- ,
day, Friday and Saturday mornings, at 7 o'clock.
The PILOT BOY leaves Charleston every Monday .sn.
Friday, and Savannah every Wednesday and Saturday. >
The ELIZA HANCOX leaves Charleston every Wednes .
day and Saturday, and Savannah every Monday and Fr J '
day. '. t3
The Pilot Boy w?l touch at Bluffton on her Mondar
trip rrom Charleston, and her Wednesday trip from Sa
yannan. . ?
Freight received dally and ste -d free of charge.
Freight ta all points except Su -icnah most be prepaid.'
No Freight received after sana?.. -; 1
For Freight or Passage, apply to . ' , :
FERGUSON et HOLMES, Agents, .
Charlestoo, S, 0.
CLAGHORN & CUNTNGHAM; Agent* . fr
Savannah, Ga. .
N. B.-The S team on of this Line connect at Charleston
with Sonth Carolina and Northeastern Railroad?, sud ic
Savannah with Central and Albany and Gulf RaQroada ant
Florida steamers. - March Y '
CHARLESTON & GEORGETOWN
STEAM PACKET UNE. ;
SEMI-W EEK LY. ;
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND, WAVERLY
MILLS, AND LANDINGS ON THE WAC<
CAMAW AND BLACK RIVERS.
STEAMER FANNIE.Capt D. B. Vareare.
TX7ILL LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARE E7J&K ?T?
VT TUESDAY AND FRIDAY MORNING, at7o*dne*i
Returning, will leave Georgetown every THURSDAY
and SUNDAY MORNING, at 7 o'clock.
Freight received daily, and stored free of charge. *
N. B. All Freights must be prepaid. No Freight re.
ceived after sunset
For Freight and Passage, apply to
FERGUSON k HOLMES, Agents,
March 1 Accommodation Whari.
NEW YORK AND BREMEN STEAMS HI A.*
COMPANY.
THE FIRST-CLASS U. 8. MAIL STEAMSHIP
ATLANTIC,
CHAS. HOYEB, Master,
Will leave Pier No. 46, N. E., on Sal rda*, April % te
Southampton and Bremen, taking passengers <0 Boot i*
ampton, London, Havre and Bremen, at the following
rates, payable m gold or ifs equivalent m currency: .
First Ca. in. s.110; Second Cabin, SSC; Steerage, SiA.'
From Bremen, Southampton and Havre to New xot Z
First Cabm, ?110; Second Cabin, ?76; 8tc-raga,4?.. , .
EXCURSION TICKETS OUI ?ND HOME-?r?t
Oabin, $210; Second Cabin, $180; Steerage, ^70. ^??t >
* To be followed by the BALTIC.. Capt A G.. JONE<V
April 20. .
FDBTHEB nEFABT?BES FBOK HXW TOBJC :
May i. June 1, June 15, June 29, July 20.
For Freight or Passa^o apply to _'
ISAAC TAYLOR, President .
February 27 ?I No 40 Broadway, H. Y, .

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