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The Charleston daily news. [volume] (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, March 21, 1867, Image 1

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VOLUME IV.NO. 495. CHARLESTON, S. C., THURSDAY MORNING-, MARCH 21, 1867. PRICE ETVE.^ CjENlB. |
TELEGRAPHIC.
Our Cable Dispatches.
LOUDON, March 20.-Consols 91. U. S. Bonds
74*.
LIVERPOOL, March 20-Noon.-Cotton quiet at
lSJd. Estimated sales, 8000 bales. Tallow 34s 3d.
LIVERPOOL, March 20-Evening_Cotton closed
easier. Middling Uplands, 13Jal3?d; Middling Or
leanB, 13J. Sales 8000 bales.
PABIS, March 19.-It is officially stated that Na?
poleon favors tho partition of the Papal debt be?
tween the Catholic Powers.
Congressional.
WASHINGTON March 20.-In the U. S. Senate, a
petition from the Ohio women, asking for suffrage,
was referred to the Judiciary Committee.
A Bill prohibiting Federal Diplomatists from
wearing uniforms, unauthorized by Congress, was
The Territorial Committee reported favorably on
A Bill for tho admission of Colorado.
The Senate discussed Indian affairs and then ad?
journ iii.
In tue House, the Committee on Foreign Rela?
tions were instructed to report means for the release
of the Reir. JOHN MCMAHON, sentenced to impris?
onment fer life in Canada ; also to report means
for enforcing the claims of citizens of the United
States against Oreat Britain, pending in '58 and
accrued since.
A resolution instructing the Committee on Pub?
lic Lands to roport on the expediency of providing
for the forfeiture of the bonds granted tho South?
ern Stat es in 1856, to complete Southern railroads
was offered and postponed.
A resolution, instructing the Committee on
Rules to consider the propriety of constituting a
Standing Committee on Labor, was adopted.
AB attempt was made to introduce a Bill to pay
Southern Treasury agents, who could not take the
oath; but Mr. BTJTLER objected.
The House wont into Committee on the Million
Belief Bill, and tben adjourned, without action.
Washington News.
WASHINGTON, March 20.-General SPINNER re?
ceives let;ers from the South inquiring when tho
short ourreujy will cease to be valuable. He fears
the people are imposed upon, and gives assurance
that all issues of fractional currency will be re?
deemed.
The following papers have been selected to pub?
lish the laws, treaties, ?tc: The New Nation,
Bichmond, HUNNICUTT, editor; the Baleigh Stand?
ard and Henderson Pioneer, North Carolina; tho
Savannah Republican and Augusta Royal Stand?
ard, Georgia; the Mobile Nationalist and Hunts?
ville Advertiser, Alabama; the Fort Smith New
Era, Arkansas, and the Austin Intelligencer, Texas.
It is semi-officially announced that the remain?
ing selections win be from tho same class of
journals.
Gen. Sheridan's Order.
NEW ORLEANS, March 20.-Gem Sheridan has
issued an order saying that thero will bo no general
removals unless circumstances require i*.. It is
desirable, during the proc?s -i of ri-orgamzation,
to change as little as possible the machinery of
the Provisional Government.
Expected Fenian Movement*.
NEW YORK, March 20.-Nine car lo ids of Federal
troops passed over the Hudson Boad yesterday,
destined for uswego, for the supposed purpose of
operating against the suspected Fenian move?
ments.
New Torie Market*
NOON DISPATCH.
NEW YORK, March 20.-Stocks excited and very
active; 5-20's of ?62 coupons 9j ; Virginia State 6's
59a60 ; Sight Exchange 9jj. Gold 344. Flour firm
and q net. Wheat dull and unchanged. Com
dull and drooping. Pork heavy, mess $23 60a23 68.
Lard quiet. Cotton a shade lower at 32 for Mid?
dling Uplands'. Freights quiet.
EVENING DISPATCH. _
Cotton heavy, and declined $ cent; sales 1000
bales, at 81}. Flour active, and advanced 10al5?.
Cora quiet and declined 2a8c; Mixed Western, $1
19aj. 20. Mess Pork, $23 50. Naval Stores firm.
Tnrpentino, 77a79. Texas Wool, 24aS0- Freights
dull. Gold, 134j}. Stocks excited and lower; Five
twenties '62, coupons, 109J.
Baltimore Market.
BALTIMORE, March 20.-Flour firm and higher.
Howard Street Extra 13$al4L Corn active. Wheat
$112all3. Mess Pork $24- Bulk Shoulders^;
Sides llalli. . . . .
Cincinnati Market.
CINCINNATI, March 20.-Flour quiet ; Superfine
$9 75al0 25. Corn irregular and higher; in sacks,
84a85c Mess Pork less firm at $27 50. Bacon in
good demand; Shoulders, 9?c; olear Sides, 12?c.
Lard, 124c.
State Items.
KILLED ET LIGHTNING-REMARKABLE FACT.-On
Wednesday, 13th March, James Cloud, a son of
Mi*. James F. Cloud, of this District, was killed by
lightning. It was during the exercises of the
school, while the little boy was just walking up to
tho teacher with slate in hand, that he received
the fatal st*, eke.
Several of the other pupils received severe
shocks ; but one of the most remarkable facts is
that the teacher (a lady whose name we have not
learned,) was badly stunned, the firery fluid burn
in; her breast, ana melting one of her ear-rings.
. [ Winnsboro News.
ICE, SNOW, SLEET AND FROST.-These emissaries
of the Winter Ring have all very lately visited this
section. On Fridav, the 15th, ice was seen. That
same day snow and sice'* fell, a~d on Saturday
morning the ground was white and the trees sil?
vered wi: h the frozen elements. Yesterday (Mon?
day) morning a white frost covered the ground,
and serious apprehension is felt in regard to tho
safety of the fruit crcp.-Ibid.
COHN, CORN, CORN.-Never do we remember to
have seon the trade in corn so vast as it now is.
Cur streets are alive frequently with wagons haul?
ing corn to the country.-J. b ?"d'.
The long spell of rainy weather broke up with a
big freeze on hut Saturday morning, to the great
dismay of all who were looking anxiously for heavy
r3 turns this season from the mit trees. We have
heard, however, very different opinions expressed
as to the resu-t. Some say that che fruit is gone,
and others othorwise. Timo will show. Tho
icicles were thick and heavy, and we saw a good
many limbs broken off by the weight of the ice.
Sunday turned out, though, to bo really a Sun?
day, and we hope the clouds are satisfied for some
time to come.-Orangeburg Times.
RATIONS.-We are highly gratified at being able
to state that the immediate wants of a few of the
sufferers m this vicinity were relieved, yesterday
morning, by the distribution of rations by the
United State- officers at this post. All you that
have surplus provisions, distribute it, for there is
sore need in our very midst.-Phoniec.
Our Court convened on Monday last-Judge
Aldrich presiding with Lis usual ability and
courtes y. Tho judge made amable and eloquent
charge to the Grand Jury, in which ho advised
them to submit with passive obedience to the pow?
ers that be, and to adhere strictly to the orders of
the military authorities in order that confidence
might speedily be restored.-Marion Star.
THE WEATHER-Since our last issue, has been
equally as cold and unpleasant as any that we ex?
perienced during thc mid-winter. Last Friday
morning large snow flakes fell thick and fast. To?
wards noon, it beear:i: colder, the snow ceased, it
be .a'' to rain and fez, and ere sun doun, the
trees and shubbery, though beautiful to behold in
many instances, broko down under their burden of
ice. We have seldom if evor witnessed a moro se?
vere spell of weather at this season of the year, iu
this climate. Doubtless tho fruit crop has becu
seriously injured, but persons of more experience
and observation than wc, think it is musetative of
a good crop. Time-will tell. We hopo it may be
true.
We learn that on Thursday night last Gen. Wil?
liam Evans had two of his finest horses, veiy val?
uable and highly prized animals, a mule, a buggy
and harness, stolen from his stables. OD thu
same night, and no doubt by thc same parties, Mr.
Asa Godbold had a buggy and harness stolen from
his carriage house. Tho thieves made their way
off in the direction of Fayetteville, N. C., and pur?
suit of them was promptly made early on Friday,
but np to tho present ama it is not known whether
they have been overtaken or not.-Marion Orescent.
We are pleased to see in our village, P. G. M., ll.
Rush Campbell, Grand Lecturer of South Caro?
lina. He is visiting tho various Lodges of A.*. F.*.
M.* * for the purpose of instruction, and in older to
cause a uniformity of work throughout the Statu.
llki I.
THE COLUMBUS FACTORY.-The Columbus En?
quirer, of tho 16th, Bays: "It gives us pleasure to
learn that thia cotton factory-located three miles
above the city-has commenced operations, and is
turning out superior work. The thread manufac?
tured there is said to be quito even and fine. We
have not heard that it has yet commenced weav?
ing. May it have a prosperous career of long du?
ration, and prove one of the most useful and
profitabl? of our industrial establishments."
ROHE -The Commercial says: Rome improves
slowly but permanently. There has been seventy
five nous s erected ia the city and suburbs during
tha past twelve mouths. This has been done by
our own citizens, and not from borrowed or for?
eign capital. As our city was damaged but very
little by the Federals, it shows what we may expect
when things become settled and good crops aie
made.
.oni?
THE FEAST OF ES THEE.
Yesterday, the 13th day of the 12th Jewish month,
Adar (or this being a leap year, of tho 13th month
Veadar), was the fast of Esther; and to-day is
known as Purini, or tho Feast of Esther. The
institution of tho festival is thus chronicled in
Esther ix. 20 :
"And Mordecai wrote these thing?, and sent let?
ters unto all the Jews that were in ail the provinces
of the King Ahasuerus, both nigh and far. To
stablish this among them, that they should kecj?
the 14th day o? the month Adar. and tho loth day
. of tho same yearly. As the da? s wherein thc' J ewe
rested from theirenemies, and the month which
was turn.d unto them from sorrow to joy, and
from mourning into a good day: [ Yom Too, 'good
day,' is the Hebrew expression for festival or holi?
day] that they should mako them days of feasting
and joy, and of sendiug portions one to another
and gifts to the poor. And the Jews uudortook to
do as they had begun, and as Mordecai had written
unto them : Because Haman the son of Hammc
datha, tho Agagite, tho enemy ol" all the Jews, had
devised against the Jews to destroy them, and had
cast Pun, that is, tho lot, to consumo them, and to
destroy them. * * * Wherefore they called
these days PURIM, after the name of Pur."
Purim, the name by which thia festival is uni?
versally known, we thus seo, signifies "the feast of
lots," and is the anniversary of national deliver
anco. It has over : cen a season of rejoicing with
the children of Israel, through all the centuries of
their dispersion and persecution. Tho leading
features of the ceremonies connected with its cele
bration are the same everywhere, however it may '
differ in minor details. Tho day preceding Purim, ^
tho fast of Esther, is one of the six regular fast .
days of the Jewish year. It is rigidly observed by j
all the devout and orthodox membors of the con- ?
gregation of Israel, and neither meat nor drink is ,
tasted on that day, from the rising of tho sun
until after tho stars havo become visible to the | j
naked eye. In .tho evening all repair lo the syna?
gogue to hear the minister road the Megillah [tho
Book of Esther], which is read in its original He?
brew, from a parchment scroll, in a chanting reci?
tative. The congregation, with their books before | ^
them, follow tho precentor, repeating certain
versos after him, according to a timo honored cus?
tom.
Next morning [i. e. to-day] thcBO services at tho
Synagogue are again repeated, and the remainder
of tho day is thon spent in rejoicing. Thcro is
not a member, perhaps, anywhere, of the house?
hold of ABRAHAM who on this day sits down to a
poor dinner. This were against his principles.
Jinner partiesjmlls and masquerades aro very
much in vogue on Purim, Mindful of the injunc?
tion of Holy Writ, each sends presents to his
neighbors, whether rich or poor, and with a deli-, g
cacy worthy of all praiso, and of imitation, tho ?
thoughtful and benevolent Jew takes this oppor?
tunity of sending substantial aid to him who is *
loss blessed in this world's goods. On Purim this *
may be dono under the plea of "sending portions
one to another."
In deeds of charity, inactive, thoughtful, cal
culating benevolence, the Jews not only preced- _
ed every other people, but probably still main
tain this pre-eminence. Benevolent sosie JCS for
various purposes date far back into thc Middle .
Ages among many of tho Hebrew congregations ^
?f Central Europo, long before the birth of tho g
much vaunted nineteenth century philanthropy. .
Those charities, both private and public [i.e. ^
through agents or organizations], are looked upon
is mattors of course, and not horalded ?broad as
munificent acts of "princely liberality,"
To tho young people, tho masquerades aro gen- j
3rally tho most attractive part of tho customs con
?ected with Purim. It is the only ? y of the
??oar when all of set pnrposo intent to bo merry g
md gay. "Tho feasting and gladness" aro pro- e
scribed in tho book of ESTHER, but, we think, tho ?
nasquorades are n juper-addition derived t om tho ?
Christian carnival, tho two festivals very frequent
y being syflchror.oun. Masquerades appear to ^
lifer great attractions in time of general rejoicing,
ts witness the carnival in CathoUc Europo, tho ^
laturnalia of Ancient Borne, and the nrniiim?11 - y
Tiiilulaiu, ir. Enr^-^ -?L ^?S, U-^?ure, natural
br the more hilarious of tho younger Jews to on
jraft this custom, copied from the surrounding
tatiana, upon the foast o? ESTHER.
There is a story, we boliove, of a Babbi who was
?o carried away in his zeal for tho proper (?) ob
lervance of Purim, that ho said (but this was long
igo, before Father MATTHEW', and boforethe invon
ion of whiskey,) that persons on Purim should
Lrink until they shall be unable to toll the difference
JO tween tho blessing of ? IORDECAI and tito curse of
IAMAN. But tuis custom, we aro pleased to be
.ble to say, is of thoso more honored in t .o
?reach t aan ia tho observance ; and there is, por
laps, no peoplo on tho globe loss addicted to
trong drink than aro the Jows. Of course thcro
rill bo found individual oxcoptions, but as a rule
mr assertion holds true the world over.
PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS.
In tho Senate on Monday the credentials of Hon.
\ F. Thomas, Senator elect from Man land, wore
.resented and a motion was made that bo bc per
?itted to take tho oath of office, i bo credentials
rere then read, and Mr. Howard moved that they
ie referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.
long discussion ensued, in which a number ul'
numbers participated, on tho question of Mr.
Phomae' lovaltv to the Union. A full report of
ne debate will be found elsewhere The further
consideration of the subject was finally postponed
until to-day. In the debate, Messrs. Johnson,
rrumbull, ?'essonden and Saulsbury advocated tho
inmediate admission of Mr. Thomas, and wcro op?
posed by Messrs. Howard, Nye, Sherman, Steward
md Conness, who favored the motion to refer. Tho
oint resolution authorizing tho Secretary of War to
'urnish to Governor Brownlow, of Tonnesseo, arms
ind equipments for twenty-five hundred militia was
nen mk on up. Mr. Fowler stated that Governor
Brownlow wanted these artrs to protect Union men
?rom assassination. Mr. Patterson asked if "reb
2ls" badnotbeen murdered^ Mr. Fowler replied that
'.he hoped so-hoped some of these arms would
bo used for that purpose 1" The ro?olutiou was
idoptod-yeas thirty-five, nays five. Ibo Bill sup?
plementary to the Military Becoustruction Act was
then taken up, the question being on concurring
in th? House amendments tberolo. The first of
the House amendments was adopted, but the sec?
ond, which requires a majority of tho registered
voters to adopt tho Constitution, was disagreed to,
aftor a long discussion, by a vote of yeas twenty
one, nays tweuty-four. Tho Bill now goes buck co
tho House. The Senate then went into executive
session, and at its closo adjourned.
HOUSE OE BEPBESENTATIVES.-The credentials
of Messrs. Ela and StevoLS, Representatives clr-ct
from New Hampshire, were presented and the
gentlemen appeared and took che oath of office.
Under the call of the States and Territories for
Bills ?nd joint resolutions, a number of each wero
introduced and referred to appropriate commit?
tees. A resolution was passed authorizing the
appointment of a Joint Committee ou Ordnance.
The President was requested to furnish tho H use
with information in his possession relative to tho
trials of Fenians in Canada, and also relativo to
tho withdrawal of French troops from Mexico.
The House agreed to the Senate couourront reso?
lutions prohibiting the salo of liquor in tho Cap?
itol building or grounds. The House also con?
curred in the Senate joint resolution directing
the Joint Committee on Retrenchment to inquire
into the method of printing United States cur?
rency and to report what guards are necessary to
prevent frauds therein. Tho House then pro?
ceeded to the consideration of tho Se.iate subs-ti
tute for the Bill supplementary to tho Act to
pr?vido for tho more efficient governmont of
the Southern States. Tho following amendments
were adopted: an amendment requiring all persons
before being registered to take oath that they have
never been members of any Stato Legislature
or held auy judicial offico in uny State and after?
wards engaged in war against tho Federal Gov?
ernment; an amendment recognizing tho ratifica?
tion of a constitution when it shall have received a
majority of tho votes of qualified registered
electors; and an amendment making it perjury
to falsely subscribe to any oath prescribed
in tho bill. The substitute as amended was
th?n passed. The House concurred in tho
Scnato amendment to tho resolution in relation to
tbo coin on deposit in tho Treasury which is claim?
ed by tho ViiN?iia bunks. Tho resolution was then
auopted. The^Benate joint r?solu ion amendatory
of tho ninth BCction of the act providing fur the
greater security of passengers on steam vessels
was taken up and passed. A resolution was adop?
ted allowing tho suspousiou of thu nil s cn
any day during the continuance of tl.c
present session tho samo na on Monday. A
resolution was passed providing lhat, the testi?
mony taken by tho Committee on (ho Judiciary of
the fast House iii reference to affairs in Maryland,
and whether the governmont of ?hat State is re?
publican in form, shall be committed to thc santo
Committee of the present House, with instruc?
tions to prosecute tho inquiry. A resolution was
passed suspending for the present tho operation of
tho act awarding compensation to tho loyal owners
of slaves drafted into the Uuited Stutcs service. A
bill was passed exempting wrapping paper and
paper made of wood or corn stalks from internal
revenue tax. Several othor joint resolutions of
minor importance were also passed, which will bo
found mentioned iu tho proceedings elsewhere.
Tho House then adjourned.
The Newborn Journal of Commerce is in ecsta
cies over the departure of company C. 4.?LB U. S.
colored infantry, from that city for Kati ens. 0:;r
coteinporary says : Tho company made quilo a
tine appearance'as Black Guards-being strong in
numbers, odors and spirits (bad whiskey). May
the 6pot which now knows them, continuo to know
them forever,
Oar Washington letter.
FSPECIAL COEEESPONT-ENCE OF THE DAILY NEWS ")
WASHINGTON, March 18th, 18G7.-There has been
no debate in the Senate, where alone of the two
branches of Congress, tho ethics of party finesse
is studied with any depth that has brought in
such plain relief tho petty dissensions rankling in
tho Radical breast, as tho discussion of Saturday
upon tho Supplementary Reconstruction Bill. It
look until tho toll of midnight to gee a vote and
pass thc Bill, notwithstanding there were only two
Democrats present during the evening session.
Tho quibble was wholly confined to tho Republi?
can side of tho chamber, and, in fact, the entire
proceeding had more the air of a Radical caucus
than aught concerning cons?mate statesmanship.
Thc fight was mainly waged between SUMNER, NYE,
DnAKE and HOWARD, on the one sido, and TBUM
BULL. MOUTON, WILSON and FESSEKDEN, on the
ather hand.
Neither HOWARD or NYE could see any reason
for haste in declaring an ultimatum looking to
anal requirements of the Southern States, and
promising admittance to Congress whenever the
otter of such propositions had been complied
?vith. Notwithstanding tho fact of its being plain
y evident that he wa3 ready for no definite recon?
structive aciion, HOWABD became quite indignant
it Mr. TRUMBULL for speaking of him as an enemy
af the Bill under discussion, and demanded with
io little heat, " By what authority does the Sena
or from Hlinois assert that I am an enemy of this
Jill?" and when TBUMBULL proceeded to show in
J is arrogant, biting way, how tho nervous old
ilichigander was nothiner, if not opposed to every
:onceivable form of legislation that could come up.
?OWABD was too lull for utteranco, and hobbled
iff lo a retiring room looking very red and
holeric.
As for HENEY WILSON, SUMNER'S colleague, ho
/as fairly chiven "beside himself' by some cold
ilooded remarks of NTE, who persistently nettled
'the cobbler," until it was not in the nature even
t a long-suffering, recently converted proselyte to
ho paths of peace, to stand more, and so WILSON
lured up, and then, astonished at his own heat,
ndouvored to retract-was met 1-7 another succes
ion of taunts from NYE and DRAKE-which again
trove him to anger and ?oyal utterance. Being a
aan of simple craft, loss of temper invariably suf
icos to draw from WILSON confessions of con?
dones, from which, in his own cooler moments,
0 shrinks abashed, and not unfrequently utterly
isclaims. And so it was in tho j resent instance.
?tung by tho castigation administered by NYE,
VTLSON gavo impetuous vent to a series of
iroguoslications, to the effect that delay in
construction was fraught with danger to
he country, but cspoeially to the Radical
arty. The pcoplo, he said, demanded re
onstruction 0 n pome basis, and tho Radicals
ould not r 0 into the Presiden tal canvass in the
ear to como-four years after the war ended-and
cknowlcdgo their failuro to reconstruct the Gov
rnment by keeping the South out. If they failed
1 their duty, tho country would find leaders who
id not. WILSON continued to contend that che
outh would go heartily into the movement about
J> bo inaugurated under the Bill and chat che Rad?
ials had a fair show for controlling ail the States,
avo Virginia. Ho was confident of South Carolina
ud Louisiana, and rebuked SUMNER for haggling
ver minor points when the great object of bring
ig in those States with Radical Senators was
?thin their grasp.
Tho next sensational feature of the debate was
UMNER'S impassioned remark-unwittingly utter
(1, it is true-in which ho dono u: iced the S catos
bout to be constructed under tho Bill os "born of
lie bayonet." Soveral Senators sprang co their foot
pon tho conclusion of the spooch, and were about
7 take tho immaculate gentleman from the "Hub*'
jveroly to cask for such libel upon their party in
jgritv, but fortunately BUCKALEW, che cool, well
eTbca I'eunsyn ania senator, was awuruea tno
oor, and tacceeded in making a striking and
ilroit uso of Mr. SUMNER'S characterization, osten
ibly in that learned gentleman's defence, against
10 ovident ill-feeling of his colleagues on the
thor sido of tho Chamber. SUMNER, he claimed,
as tho pioneer of. his party*, advocating a policy
>r which he was ever denounced one
ear by his friends, only to seo them support
t the next by their votes. He averred that SUM?
ER was perfectly correct in characterizing these
tacos as '-born of the bayonet." Civil authority
id exist there. It protected life. It regulated
roperly; it performed fully all the functions of
overnmect-BB fully as elsewhere. Now, military
uthority was reared above tho civil. Neither pro
orly, nor liberty, nor lifo wero secure, savo by the
ermit of a soldior; and this seato of things was to
?dst until conditions were acted upon by tho
outh which were extremely repulsive, and could
cly bo extorted by power. Verily, this 'was the
ffspring of the bayonet, os admitted by Mr.
U1TSEB.
The Bill was then pass ed, and now goes to tho1
[ouse for the appointment of a committee of con
?ieuco to consider the real nut ol' disagreement,
hijh is, whether a majority of all registered votes,
r of all tho votes cast at an election, shall be re
uBite to ratify the Constitutions that may bo
dopced. VIDEX.
Our ?New York Letter.
[FROM OUR REGULAR CORRESPONDENT.]
NEW YORK, March 18.-St. Patri ;k's Day in the
loriiihg-and in the afternoon-was unduly cele
ratod yesterday by ono of the heaviest snow
torms we have experienced thia season, and in no
thor manner, except in tho churches, for as it
ill on Sunday-as did the snow-and as tho excise
lw forbids indulgence in tho national beverage on
hat day, all of tho festivities were postponed till
o-day. To-day, howovor, will duo honors bo dono
0 Ireland's Saint in a grand civic and military dis?
play, in a grand banquet at the Astor Houso, in a
;rand banquet at Dclmonico's, and in spoeohes,
larties, bulls, whiskoy-punch-imbibings, and a
1 ipping, in more senses than one, of tho light fan
ostic Irish toe. The religious portion of tho cele
iration yosterday was particularly imposing, and
n the Church of Immaculate Conception a most
leautiful and appropriate discourse was delivered
>y Archbishop MCCLUSKEY. Tho members of the
Temperance Society, who aro also members of the
hurch, wore the regalia of the order, and the
liscourse was listened to with the marked atten
ion it merited. The procession to-day will be
i much moro imposing display than any similar
mo on any formor occasion, and tho Archbishop
rill ride at tho head thereof in compliance with
ho invitation tendered by tho va; ions associations.
Che late news received from Ireland will tond to
?oighten the interest of tho entiro colobration, and
ho Fenians will enjoy tho festivities ae they have
lever enjoyed them before. People who are neither
irishmen nor Fenians are beginning lo feel and
ixprcss souio sympathy for the Green-above-che
Lted cause, and T?o far as sympathy alono will go
?ho Feniai^star here may bo said to be in the as
?ondoncy.*
Arrangements have been made hero by the fire?
men who had purchased tho engine intended to be
presented to then* brethren in Columbia, to replace
tho ono which was lost on the ill-fated steamer
Andalusia. The engine will be ready in about two
wrecks, and will bo sent to Columbia without delay.
The regular annual ball of tho Purim Association
will he given at the Academy of Music on thc 28th
inst. This is always the most magnificent masked
and laney dress ball of the season; but arrange?
ments havo been made that will render this one
particularly gorgeous and brilliant. Gold and
silver medals will bo awurdod to such ladies and
gentlemen as may bo distinguished for the ologanco
and originality of their costumes, and for these
medals will thousands of the lords and ladies of
fashion contend. Thc tickels are placed at ton
dollars each, admitting a gentleman and two
ladies; but your correspondent will appear in the
character of a dead-head subscriber, thanks to the
courtesy of the president of the association, who
has presented him with a complimentary cord of
admission. It is probable that from three to four
thousand ladies and gentlemen will attend the ball
this ye ir.
Tho Herald, though often the exponent of public
opinion here, is not always so. In the matter of
the passage of thc hill by the State Legislature
authorizing ;he contraction of an ou-.he-grouiu.
railway to nm through Broadway, the Herald or
poses the measure and hopes that it will bo vetoed
by Governor FENTON ; but so far as I can judge
the public looks upon it as a good move that can
result in injury to none but tho stockholders of the
Third Avenue Railroad Company. The old idea,
that a railroad through Broadway would spoil the
beauty of this thoroughfare has been exploded
long ago, and nine-tenths of the people here would
prefer riding up Broadway in a car than through
any of tho other Avenues, or in the old-fashioned
stages that charge ten cents instead of six, and
crawl along at a snail's paco into the bargain.
Thc bridge across Broadway, at the comer of
Fulton street, will soon bo completed-probably in
about ten days hence-and, no doubt, in the course
of a year at least a half dozen more will be con?
structed at other points ; meanwhile at this point,
always the most crowded spot rn tho city, there is
always a perfect jam caused hy the gaping crowd
of idle lookers-on who seem to have naught to do
but to inspect the public works without receiving
any compensation for their trouble.
Tho manager of Nihlos' Garden has sen'? on to
Europe fer new ballot dancers to appear in the
Buck Crook, retaining the entire corps now
here-wherefore a rich treat is in store for such of
ybur readers cs cont?mplate coming on hore in the
approaching summer to see the great sights in the
ever gay metropolis.
BOOTH ran the Merchant of Venice for two j
months, every night consecutively, and succeeded
in making it a great pecuniary success. He failed,
however, in the endeavor to make tho mark in
Shylock that he has made in Hamlet, as the Mer?
chant of Venice is a play that never takes well 1
with tho public. Thia week he will appear in '
Hamlet, Richelieu, Romeo, and other popular j
rvles, and then close his long and successful en- i
gagement.
The regular theatrical season is fast drawing to 1
a close, but RISTOBI will appear again in April and 1
reign supreme for a fow weeks. MOULTRIE. (
Tne Reconstruction Debate in til o United
State? Senate. 1
[From the National Intelligencer.)
The Supplemental Reconstruction Bill was taken i
up in the Senate on Saturday, a little before 2, and |
occupied that body till midnight. Tho BUI, as rc- 1
Sorted by the Judiciary Committee of the Senate, I
iffered but slightly from that which passed tho 5
House. The oath was modified so as to exclude -<
tho phrase "sincerely attached to the Govern- i
ment," and some other unessential amendments 1
were offered. The debate in the Senate took a i
wide sweep, embracing tho whole question of re?
construction. A number of amendments were i
offered and rejected. The question which elicited
the warmest discussion was wincher tho vote
which ratified the Constitution should bo one re?
quiring a majority of all the registered voters or t
of all the votes 'ase. Tho House Bill requires tho ?
former, as did the Bill of the Judiciary Comm itt oe-, ;
in the estimation of some of the members, bat not i
in that of others, and several votes were bad upon .
it, and any quantity of debate.
The alterations finally made wore by modifying
tho form of the oath, and by inserting the third ,
section, which provides for a vote being taken at <
the election for delegates for and against tho con?
vention, yhich shall not be held ii a majority op?
pose it, or if a majority of the registorod voters j
fail to vote upon tho question. The same provi- 1
sion, requiring one-half the registered voters, is
applied to the ratification.
Mr. Howard's amendment respecting tho oath
specifies the condition of disfranchisement, in?
stead of referring in general terms to the Act of ,
March 2d. This elicited a warm discussion, which
developed a marked diversity of opinion. Some *
srentlcmen thought the oath of but little conse- 1
queuce. Some thought it unfair to ask a mau to :
?wear to that to which you could apply no test, ?
such as a feeling of attachment to the Union. Some .
thought rebels would not be deterred ly oaths,
and a lew agreed with Mr. Sumner in thinking 1
that the terms were not harsh enough. He wanter <
the affiant to swear to the insolubility of the
Union; that he would hot countenance the Con?
federate debt, but uphold the national, and opposo
all discrimination of rights in regard to color. Mr.
Howard's amendment was lost in committee, but
adopted in the Senate.
The question that was most persistently debated
was, whether a majority of the r gisterod voters -
or of thc votes cost should bo sufficient to call a i
convention and ratify tho constitution. Messrs. j
Howard, Sumner, N)6, Fessjndon and Conkling ,
contended for tho former. The speechos of
Messrs. Howard and Nye wore especially bitter 1
against rebels. Accordingly to their statements, :
the Southern people are not fit to live in a ropub- "\
hean country, or, indeed, any other. They are t
unworthy ol trust, full of hostility to the Union {
and free institutions, and are only kept from uni?
versal massacre mer of tbe negroes by Federal 1
Boir1frro,rfemutfto7j^ -i
Both thought the negroes too ignorant aud too
slavish to bo trusted to vote against their masters. ]
Mr. Howard, too, hod a great horror of minority
governments. Strange to say, he protested
agaiust a negro government, and was apprehen?
sive that these contumacious rebels would stay
away from tho polls and leave tho poor blacks, 1
who required guardians and aro unfit for self- -
government, to make a negro government, t
Mr. Nye was afraid tho masters wo old keep t
their late slaves in leading strings, and so early
reconstruction would be simply restoring rebels to
power. So that both are, in fact, opposed to any
focon traction for some time to como, though Mr. "
Howard became quito indignant at Mr. Trumbull
for speaking of him as an enemy of tho Bill, and <
demanded with no little heat, " By what authority ]
does the Senator from Illinois assert that I am an j
enemy of the Billi"' and when Mr. Trumbull show?
ed why he was, took the chairman of Judiciary
uomuiittee to task, lecturing him vehemently, prc?
claimed his independence, and announced with
moro force than modesty that ho "recognized no
superior, aud would submit to no dictator." Tho J
very temper of the gentleman showed tho truth of I
the charge. So, too. Mr. Nye flared up at a re?
mark of Mr. Wilson's about charging him with j
demasoguism. by appealing to the passions en?
gendered by tho war, instead of pouring oil on the
waters, the Senator from Nevada proceeded to put 1
on the cap by indulging in the very strain of talk
which validated the charge.
Mr. FoBsenden had considerable to Bay about t
leaving the people of the South to their own
choice. He was unwilling to compel them into the
Union. Ho was in favor of the military bill puro
and simple, and did not want ic clogged with any
terms ot' reconstruction. He wanted them to have 1
no chance of saying they were forced in, but .is
they took their own way ( ut, ho would havo them t
take their own way bark, and let Congross say
whether they would "recognize that way or not. He
was- perfectly willing to defend that position be?
fore his own constituency or any other, aud did
not share the apprehension of Mr. Morton and
others that tho nation would tire of tho delay.
Mr. Conkling made a couple of very forcible
speeches, one especially, insisting that the people
of the South should be bound by tho work dene,
and unless a majority of them voted, they might ?
repudiate it os the act of the nunority. ' 1
Du i he other band, tho proposition was shown (
up very thoroughly. by Messrs. Wilson, Morton,
Trumbull and Brake. The two former insisted
that delay of reconstruction wns fraught with '
danger to tho country, but especially to tho Radi- i
cal party. Tho people demanded reconstruction, i
and Mr. Morton pertinently suggested that the
Radicals could noe go into tho Presidential can?
vass next year, four years atlcr tho war was
anded, and acknowledge their failure to recon- ,.
struct the Government by keeping tho South out.
If they failed in their duty, tho country would
find leaders who didn't. Mr. Wilson couteuded 1
that tho South w?*?d go heartily into this \
movement, and that tho Radica s had a fair t
show for controlling all the States exci'-pt. .
Virginia. Ho was confident of South Carolina
and Louisiana, and rebuked his colleague
for haggling over minor points whon the '
great object of bringing in tho South wita Radi?
cal Senators was in their grasp. Mr. Fowler in?
terrupted to ask a question. But it was moro than
tho Massachusetts Senator could stand. Ho warm- t
jy assured hun that he wa? tho last man who i
dhouidbb found making any opposition to this j
policy, for ho (Mr. Wilson) had fought this san e
fight and had to meet the samo arguments to get
lum (Mr. Fowler) into tho Senate. It was crush?
ing. Mr. Fowler stood convicted and no longer in- ^
corrupted tho impetuous flqw of tho gentleman's .
roaeato prognostications. That part of Mr. Wil?
son's speech relating to welcoming the South was 1
very flue, but Mr. -Nye's subsequent partisan ap?
peal drove h.rn into stating that ne d.d not mean i
rebels, but negroes and loyalists. The argument ]
thal to require a majority of the regis-ored voters
to count the absentees ought to be conclusive.
Mr. Trumbull had groat difficulty in hooping
his friends from loading down tue Bill with amend- ;
meuts relating to the details, and twico thoy were
tacked on, but removed on reconsideration. He
insisted that the whole question of detail was left
to tho commanding general, who mr.st devise and
employ his own machinery. He can uso the oxist- ,
iug election laws, adap.ing them to the changos 1
required by the act of Congress, but ho protested
repeatedly igainst any effort to convert this into :
an election law. declaring that, if that was the in?
tention of th3 Senate, the Bill must be referred,
and ampio timo be giveu to the committee.
Perhaps tho most interesting part of the diB- :
cussion grew out of the proposition of Mr. Sum- ,
-er to require each Stato to establish and main?
tain a system of common schools. It was contended
by the Senator that they had power to lay down
any conditions of reconstructs J they thought
wisc, aud that auftrage without knowledge was .
bootless, and ho read u classic eulogy on educa?
tion. In tho course of his remarks kb dcuoujicod
tho States to be created under this bill as "born of
the bayonet." This expression seemed particularly
obnoxious to his friouds-we suppose because they
secretly acknowledged its truth. Several Senators
sprang to their feet on tho conclusion of his
Bpeech, and Mr. Frelinghuysen was recognized.
He protested against such an idea going forth to
tho country. It was grossly unjust, and the gentle?
man ingeniously sought to evade its force by ex
Elaining that the governments to be creatod would
e the work of the people.
Mr. Conness scornfully disclaimed it, and re?
minded the Senator that California sprang into
the Union from a military ordor, but he forgot to
stato that California bad no conditions affixed t^
her corni g, with the alternativo of accepting them
or being kept under the bayouot.
Mr. stewart protested against any man's voting
fur a Bili and denounci g il. ti? would vote
against a Bill or he would dcie.ul it, uoid he cuiimed
t.?it it was grossly unfair to d.inou..ce a measure
a. d go t o credit iur standing on a higher eleva?
tion 'than others, w?ile really supnurting it wich
bis vote. They would be met on thc stump with
this speech of tho Senator, and it was unjust to
his friends.
Mr. Hendricks denied the power of Congress to
institute governments for the South, or to pre?
scribe any other condition than those imposed by
the Constitution. He very briefly, but forcibly
and conclusively, destroyed all the foundation of
Mr. Sumner's ai-gument on the power of Congress
to prescribe governments for the S?rth, which he
derived from necessity, from military govern?
ments, and from that clause in the Constitution
guaranteeing a republican government. Necessity
knows no law, but we were governed by a Consti?
tution, and have no powers save what were con?
ferred. There is no war, and the gentleman
knows it. There was no excuse, then, for appeal?
ing to tho war power; but if thore was, that did not
justify such interference with the rights of Ameri?
can citizens. Governments already existed in the
South; they are republican in form, and there is
not the shadow of an excuse for congressional in?
terference.
Mr. Buckalow made a very striking and adroit
argument, ostensibly in defence of Mr. Sumner,
who, he claimed, was the pioneer of the party, ad?
vocating a policy for which ho was denounced this
year by his friends, only to support it the next by
their votes. He claimed, too, that the Senator was
perfectly correct in characterizing these States as
born of the bayonet. Civil authority did exist
there. It protected life. It regulated rroperty; it
performed fully all the functions of governmen.
as fully as elsewhere. Now military authority was
reared above the civil. Neither property nor lib?
erty nor Ufo were secure, save by the permit of a
soldier; and thia state of things was to exist until
conditions were acted upon Dy the South which
were extremely repulsive, and could only be ex?
torted by power.
Mr. Sumner's proposition was lr.st by a tie vote.
Ono point of this debato ?re must reserve, as we
bavo not space to do it justice. "We refer to the
question whether Congress is committed at all to a
pl"n of reconstruction by the act of March 2d of
the last Congress. On this the difference of opin?
ion was very decided.
The bill now coes to the House, and it is difficult
ko sa in what shape it will come out, and there is
i> marked difference between the two Houses on the
question whether a majority of all tho registered
rotors, or of all the votes cast at the election, shall
De requisite to ratify the constitutions that may be
idopted.
FBOST AND IOE.-On Sunday morning there was
ice and a thin frozen crust on lat'dy ploughed
jround-we saw both; and on Monday morning
?hero was a heavy white frost. No doubt some of
;he fruit was killed, and more of it injured-but
ve still hope that there will be a sufficiency of the
jnrly-blooming fruit, such as peaches and plums.
Ct is hardly probable that the apple crop has yet
7ocn much injured. All tender garden vegetation,
lot specially protected, must have suffered.
Yesterday was milder, and we trust that there
viii be little or no frost this morning.
[Columbus Enquirer.
THE FRUIT.-The weather is again beooming
nild and pleasant. Wo do not think that the late
levere "snap" has generally injured anything be?
yond tho Apricot crop-a small one, invariably, in
?his ch?nate.-Raleigh Sentinel.
OBITUARY.
DIED, on Sunday, the 19th of March. 1867, after a long
md protracted illness, MARTA LOUISA, wife of J. W.
Z AIIMAIT, of this dry. *
DEPARTED THIS LD7E on the 17th instant, at his
.esldonce In Beaufort District, S. O., T. H. SPAHN, Esq.,
n the 66th year of his age.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
J83- A CARD. - ON BOARD STEAMSHIP
MANHATTAN.-We, the undersigned, passengers of
ho elegant and commodious steamer Manhattan, desire
:o return our most sincere thanks to Capt CUAS. COL
.?NB and officers, .or tho great attention and kindness
mown us during her last trip from New York to Charlesi
on, and would also mention that her accommodations
ind sea worthiness are certainly unsurpassed by any ves
iel on this route. [Signed,]
J. C. BRANNTES, GEO. H. DENNIS,
JOHN WEHR, JOHN R. MORTIMER,
JOHN T. ADAMS. E. MAGUIRE,
JOSEPH HIESOHMAN.
March 20th, 1807. March 21
ESTATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA-COLLE
?ON DISTRICT-By R. ALLAN WILLIS, Esq., Ordi
iary.-Whureas, BENJAMIN STOKES, Commissioner in
?qui ty, made snit to me to grant him Letters of Admln
stration of the direlect estate a_d effects of WILLIAM B.
KEEKS: These aro, therefore, to cite and admonish all
ind singular tho kindred and creditors of tho said
tVILLI \M B. MEEKS, late of Colic ton District decease d,
hat they be and appear before me in the Court of Ordinary
o be held at Waltcrboro, on 27th April next, after
publication hereof, at .1 o'clock ba the forenoon, to show
Given under my hand, this 18th day of March, Anno
Domini 1867. R. ALLAN WILLIS,
March 21 3 O. C. D.
^TREASURER'S OFFICE, CHERAW AND
DARLINGTON RAILROAD.-CHER AW, March 22, 1867.
-Holders of Coupons of the 1st MORTGAGE BONDS of
his Company, due on the 1st April, sro notified that
hey will be paid upon presentation at the office of tho
Company in Cheraw. J. H. MoTVEB,
March 21 G Treasurer.
?.THE PEOPLE'S NATIONAL BANK
MARLESTON, S. C., January 28, 1867.-The Board of
Directors have determined to increase the Capital of thin
Sank.
Stock can be had on application to
January 29 ruth H. G. LOPER, Cashier.
*T HALL'S VEGETABLE SICILIAN HAIR
1ENEWER has proved itself to be the most perfect pre?
paration for the hair ever offered to the public.
It is a vr-. uiblu compound, and contains no injurions
properties whatever.
IT WILL RESTORE GRAY HATE TO ITS ORIGINAL
UOLOR.
It will keep the hau* from tailing out
It cleanses the scalp and makes the hair soft, lustrous
md silk cul
It is a splendid hair dressing.
No person, old or young, should fail to use it
IT IS RECOMMENDED AND USED BY THE FIRST
dEDICAL AUTHORITY.
SGT Ask for Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer,
ind take no other. B. P. WATT, A CO.,
Nashua, N. H., Proprietors.
For sale by all Druggists. Wholesale by
BOWIE & MOISE,
SUCCESSORS TO KING A: D CASSTDEY,
Marchi_tilly*_Charleston, S. 0.
US? THE HEALING POOL AND HOUSE OF
JERPY-HOWARD ASSOCIATION REPORTS, for
i'oimg Men, on the CRIME OF SOLITUDE, and the
2RROR8, ABUSES and DISEASES which destroy the
nardy powers, and create impediments to MARRIAGE
ri th sure means of relief. Sent in sealed letter en
'elopes, free of charge.. Address Dr. J. SKULLEN
IOUGHTON, Howard Association, Philadelphia, Pa.
January 16 3mo
US' NOTICE TO MARINERS.-C A P T AI NS
IND PILOTS wishing to anchor thou* vessels in Ashley
tiver, are requested not to do no anywhere within direct
ungo of tho heads of the SAVANNAH RAILROAD
VHARVES, on tho Charleston and St Andrew's side o.
he Ashloy River; by which precaution, contact with the
Submarine Telegraph Cable will be avoided.
h. C. TURNER, H. M.
Tarbor Master's Office, Charleston, February 6, 1866.
February7_
43-AWAY WITH SPECTACLES.-OLD EYES
nade new, without Spectacles, Doctor or Medicino,
.'ampule! mailed free on receipt of ton cents. Address
?. B. FOOIE, M. D., No. 1130 Broadway, New York.
November 9
??* SPECIAL INTELLIGENCE.-WE PRO?
POSE to furnish LABORERS of all classes for Farmers,
?ailroads, Shop, Garden, Store, Hotel or general House
vork.
Persons desiring employment wiU call at No. 6 Cannon
lear Kin street; and all orders for Laborers will be
promptly me , and sati-factory reference given.
February 23 Imo _S. B. HALL & CO.
tSrVTE ARE AUTHORIZED TO ANNOUNCE
E. M. WHITING, Esq., aa a candidate mr Sheriff ol
Charleston (Judicial) District at tho next election.
September 10
SSW ARTIFICIAL EYES-ARTIFICIAL HU?
MAN EYES made to order and inserted by Dre. F.
BAUCH and P. GOUGLEMANN {formerly employed by
R0I8S0NNEAU, of Paris), No. 699 Broadway, New York.
April 14_ lyr
~A3- BAT CHELO R'S HAIR DYE-THIS
SPLENDID HAIR DYE is the bost in the world. The
only true and perfect Dye-harmless, reliable, instan?
taneous. No disappointment No ridiculous ants.
Salural Black or Brown. Remedies the Ul effects of Bad
Dyes. Invigorates thu hair, leaving it sort and beautiful.
The gonuino is signed William A. Batcfielor. Ah others
aro mere imitations, and should bo avoided. Sold by all
Druggists and Perfumers. Factory, No. 81 Barclay
street, Now York.
/fi?- BEWARE OF A COUNTERFEIT.
Decomuer 10_lyr
"?STBEAUTIFUL HAIR.-CHEVALIER'S
LIFE FOR THE HAIR positively restores gray hair tc
Ita original color and youthful beauty; impart? Ufo and
strength to tho weakest hair; stops ito tailing out at
once; keeps the head clean; is unparalleled os a hoi.
dressing. Sold by all Druggists and laBhiouabie hair
dressers, and at my office, No. 1123 Broadway, New
York. SARAH A. CHEVALIER, M. D.
DQWIE & MOISE,
No. 151 Meeting street
Opposite Charleston Hotel.
.January 4 ?mos
OFFICE OF CHIEF *'F DETECTIVES
FEBRUARY 7, 1867-Recovered aud now at this
office, - yards COTTON GOODS. The owner is re?
quested to come forward and provo property.
..J. C. CAMPBELL,
February t? Lieut In Charge.
SHIPPING
FOR HAVRE DIRECT.-THE
first-class American Clipper Packet Sehr. HOB?
EST CALDWELL, John Mccormack master,
haring one-half ot' her cargo engaged, wi 1 be
promptly dispatched. For balance of Freight engage?
ments apply to WILLIAM ROACH,
Corner East Bar and Adger's South Wharves.
March 19 tuthsS
FOR LIVERPOOL.-THE Al AMER?
ICAN SHIP "80UTHEBN RIGHTS," L. E.
Ross, Master, having a portion of her cargo en?
gaged, will have dispatch for the above port
For balance of freight engagements, apply to
WILLIS A CHISOLM,
March 19_tnths3 North Atlantic Wharf.
FOR LIVERPOOL.-THE STRICT?
LY Al American Ship B. G. KIMBALL, Dear?
born Master, having a Lurge portion of her
cargo engaged and going cn board, will hare
dispatch for the a. ove port
For balance of Freight engagements, apply to
STREET BROTHERS V CO.,
March 13 No. 74 East Bay. ?
NEW YORK AND CHARLESTON
Steamship Line.
FOB NEW YORK.
CABIN PASSAGE FIFTEEN DOLLARS.
THE NEW AND ELEGANT SIDEWHEEL STEAMSHIP
"MANHATTAN,"
CHARLES COLLINS, Commander.
WILL LEAVE BROWN A CO.'P SOUTH WHARF
on Saturday. 23d inst, at 5 o'clock.
For Freight or Passage, haring the most superior
accommodations, apply to
STREET B ROTHERS A CO.,
March 18
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
OFFICE OF CHIEF FJRE DEPARTMENT.
COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE CHIEF OF FIRE DE?
PARTMENT can be left at the office of the Clerk of
Council, City Hall, np stairs. M. H. NATHAN,
March 18 10 Chief Fire Department
NOTICE TO SAILORS OR IMMIGRANTS,
HOTEL OB BOARDING-HOUSE irr.ttPRRfl,
OFFICE CLERK OF COUNCIL, )
_ March 13,1867. I
Pi ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING ACT OF
the Legislature, passed the- 20th day of December,
1866, all persons concerned are hereby notified to call at
this Office and take ont the required license immediately.
W.H. SMITH,
derk of Corm di.
AM ACT FOB TEX BETTBB PBOTECTION OF SEAMEN AND
IMMIGRANTS TN TBE POST AND BABBOB OF CHARLES?
TON.
L Be it enacted, by the Senate and House of Representa
tines, nov met and sitting in General Assembly, and ??y the
authority of' the sams, That it shall not be lawful for any
person, except a pilot or public officer, to board or at?
tempt to board a vessel arriving in the port or harbor of
Charleston, before such vessel ahab have boen made fast
to the wharf, without first obtaining leave from the mus?
ter or person having charge of such vessel, ST from her
owner or agents.
H. It shall not be lawful for any owner, agent, master,
or other person having charge of any vessel arri vi ag or
being in tba port of Charleston, io permit or authorize
any sal. orb, hotel or boarding house keeper, not licensed
as hereinafter provided, or any agent, runner or em?
ployee ot any sailor's, or immigrj.it'a hotel or boarding
house, to ooard, or attempt to board, any vessel arriving
in, or lyiug, or eing bi tho harbor or port ot Charlee ton,
bel ore tuen vessel snail hare been made last to the wharf,
or anchored, with intent to invita, ask or solicit the
boarding of any of the crew employed on such vessel.
UL It shah no. be lawful for any sailor's or immi?
grant's hotel or boarding house keeper, or the employee
of any sailor's or im igrant's hoto!, or ooar?hxi house
keeper, havmg boarded any vessel wade fast to any wharf
in the port ol Charleston, to neglect or refuse to leave
Bald vessel, after havi. g been ordered so to do by the
master or person having charge of such vessel
IV. It shall not be lawful lor any person to keep, con
duct or carry on, either as owner, proprietor, agent or
otherwise, any Bailor's or immigrant's board!ag house,
or sailor's or immigrant's hotel. In. tpp ?jjftv m nhT
V. It shall not bo lawful ter any person, not having the
license in this Act provided, or not being the regular
a"ent runner or employee of a parson having such li
cense, to invite, ask or solicit in the city or harbor of
Charleston, the boarding or lodging of any of the crow
employed on any vessel, or of any immigrant arriving m
the said city of Charleston.
VL The City Council shall take the application of any
person upplyi?g for a license to keep a Bailors' or immi?
grant's boarding house, or sailor's or immigrant's hotel
to tho city of charleston, and upon satis toe to ry evident e
to them of the respectability and competency of such ap?
plicant, and of the suitableness ol' his accommodations,
?hall issue to him a license, which shall t e good for ono
year, unless sooner revoked by said City Council, to
keep a sailor s or immigrant's boarding house in the city
of Charleston, and to invite and solicit boarders lor the
same.
VIL The City Council may, upon satisfactory evidence
of the disorderly character of any sailors' pr immigrants'
hotel or boarding house, licensed as hereinbefore pro?
vided, or of tho keeper or proprietor of any such house,
or of any loree, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation, In in?
viting or soliciting boarders or lodgers for BUCH noose,
on the part of such keeper or proprietor, or any of his
agents, runners, or employees, or of any attempt to per*
suadb or entice any of the crew to desert irom any vessel
ia the harbor of Charleston, by such keeper or proprie?
tor; or any of his agents, runners or employees, revoke
the license for keeping such house.
YUL Every person receiving thu license hereinbefore
provided lor shall pay to the city Council aforesaid the
sum of twenty uoilars.
Li. The said City Council shall furnish to each sailor's
or immigrant's hotel or boarding house keeper, licensed
by them as aforesaid, one or more budges or shields, on
which shad bo printed or engraved the name of such
hotel or boarding house keeper, and the number and
street of his ho el or boarding house; and which said
badges or shields shall he surrendered to said City Coun?
cil upon the revocation by them, or expiration of any
license granted by them, as hereto provided.
X. Every sailor's or Immigrant's hotel or boarding?
house keeper, and every agent, ronner or employee of
such hotel or boarding-house keeper, when boarding any
vessel in the harbor of Charleston, or when inviting or
soliciting the boarding or lodging of any seaman, sailor
or person employed on any vessel, or of any immigrant,
shall wear, conspicuously displayed, the shield or badge
referred to in the loregolng section.
XL lt shall not be lawful for any person, except those
named in tho preceding section, to . ave, wear, exhibitor
display any such shield or badge to any of the crew em?
ployed on any vessel, or to any Immigrant so arriving m
the city of charleston, with tho intent to invite, ask or
solicit tue bo Arding or lodging of such immigrant or of
any of the crew employed os any vessel being in the
harbor of Charleston.
TfTr Whoever shah offend against any or either of the
provisions contained in section 1,2,3,4, 5,10 and ll, In
this Act, shall be ucemed guilty ol a misdemeanor, and
shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by imprison?
ment for a term not exceeding one year, and not less
than thirty days, or by a fine uot exceeding two hundred
and fifty dollar , and not less than one hundred do lars,
or by both such floe and imprisonment
.xtrr. The word "vessel," as used in this Act, shall in?
clude vesse.s propelled by steam.
In tho Senate House, the twentieth day of Docemtx r, in
the year of our Lord one thousand ei/ht hundred and
sixty-six. W. D. PORTER,
Presiden ot the Senate.
CHAS. H. SIMONTON.
Speaker Horwc of Representatives.
Approved December 20, 1866 :
JAMES L. Oas, Governor. .
March 14
AMERICAN
LEAD PENCIL COMPANY,
NEW YORK.
Factory, Hudson City, N. J.
WHOLESAL?SALES ROOM
NO. 34 JOHN STREET, AE W YORK.
ALL STYLES AND GRADES OF LEAD PENCIL.
of superior quality are manufactured and offered
at fair terms to the Trade. The public are invited
to give the AMERICAN LEAD PENCIL the pre
! terence.
THE PENCILS ARE TO BE HAD AT ALL THE
PRINCIPAL STATIONERS AND NJ* ION
DEALERS.
ASK FOR THE "AMERICAN LEAD PENCIL. "
TESTIMONIAL.
SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL, )
ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, >
YALE COLLEOE, November 16, 1866. )
I have always recommended the Faber Polygrade
Lead Pencils as thc only pencils fitted for both ornamen?
tal and mathematical drawing; but, after a thorough
trial of the American Polygrade Lead Pencils, man
ulacluredby tho Amorican Lead Pencil Company, New
York, I find them superior to any pencil in use, even to
the Faber or the old English Cumberland Lead Pencil,
being a superior pencil for sketching, ornamental and
mechanical drawing, and all the ordinary uses of a lead
pencil.
These pencils are very finely graded and have a very
smooth lead; even the sottest pencils hold the point web;
thoy are all that can bo desired in a pencil. It gives'me
great pleasure to bo able to assure Americans that they
will no longer be compelled to depend upon Germany or
any other loreign market for j>encila.
LOUIS BAIL,
Professor of Drawing, Ac
ALL PENCIL ABE STAMPED:
4?? "AMERICAN L '.AD PENCIL CO. N. Y."
None genuine without t ie exact name of thc firm :
look to lt_Gmo_Decemhit 3
STRASBURGER & NUHN,
IMPORTERS OF
TOYS, CHINA, SLATES AND SLATE
PENCILS.
STRASBURGER & NUHN, FORCED BY THE RAPID
increase of their business and their present inade?
quate accommodations, have made arrangements to re?
move fro.n No. 65 Maidon Lane to the extendve lofts ol
No. 394 BROADWAY, near Canal street New York, on
tho 15th of March; offering there to buyers better in?
ducements than ever before. thstuSmes February 28
SHIPPING.
FOB BALTIMORE.
THE FAVORITE STEAMSHIP
IF ALCO
. E. C. REED COMMANDEE, _
TT7TLL HAVE IMMEDIATE DISPATCH FOB IR*1
W ABOVE PORT, sailing Tc-Morrow,:-11it, at 6
o'clock P. M., from Pier tc. ,, Union Wharves.
For Freight or Passage apply to_' &53?
COURTENAY it TRENHOLM. Anote,
March 20 .2 . - ? Union waarre
FOB ,GEOBGETOWNT
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISL AND, WIFKH?
LY MULLS, AND LANDISGS :ON tTBM
WACCAMAW AND BLACK RIVERS.
THE SPLENDID STEAM PACKET .
E M. I L I B,
CAPTAIN.ISAAC DAVIS, ..J
TT7TLL LEAVE ATLANTIC WHARF AS ABOVE ON
Vf Friday Morning, 21st inst, at 7 o'clock. Re?
turning, will leave Georgetown ca Monda* Mom*
mg, 24th inst, at 7 o'clock. 1 . - *u
For freight or passage apply to
MOTTE A PRINGLE, Agent '
South Atlantic Wbiri.
N. B.-All freight must be prepaid, and none 'r-oen ad
after sunset Freight received daily and stored fr? T '
chary._ a . Maren 20
NEW JOBK STEAMERS. g?
, ??? - - ... 'V
RE3ULAR U. S. MAIL- LIKE OF SIDE-WHEEL
STEAMERS. ' I f
QXJAKJBJR O?T?ZV
W. H. WEST,.....:....;..?.Oonmi?al86
SOUTH AMERICA
' . " '"..*" ':Vir i; ?7.'V-';.
.-.Command sr
ONE OF THE ABOVE MAGNIFICENT 8IDE-WHF SI
ST AMERS will leave Adger's Wharf every SATUR
DAY for New York. . . - Yr ?12
Cabin P ssage Fifteen Dollars. .
For freight or passage,' apply to ? '
BAVENEL itoOC?..
QUAKER CLY, Captain W. H. West, will leave.on
Saturday, March 23<L, at - o'clock.
March 18_,?; -, y '
FOR FLORIDA, I
VIA SAVANNAH, BRUNSWICK, ST
MARYS, FERNANDINA, JACKSONVILLE, AND ALL
THE LANDINGS ON THE ST. JOHN'S RIVER AS
FAB AS PALATEA. - ... >; .>..
THE FINS ' - ''.-'ip >
' u; CAPTAIN T. J. LOCKWOOD, ''
TTTIlI- LEAVE NORTH ATLANTIC WHARF ??
VV VH-l) Wednesday Morning, at 8 o'clock prectetly
43?Frei -ti received dally and stored tree of charge.
For Freight ar Passage- apply on board, br at the 'afr
floe of JOHN MAHONEY,-Ja., 48 East Bay,
November 18_. Above Craig, Taomey^Co'a.-^
POE 8A^NKiB;
THE STEAMER . . . . <-, . ;
"DICTATOR,"!'
1000 TONS BURTHEN,
CAPTAIN L. M. OOXETTEB,.
WELL LEAVE MIDDLE ATLANTxO WHARF EVER?
VV FRIDAY NIGHT, at 10 o'clock, for thia port
For Freight or Passage, apply on board, or to office ot
J. D. a TREN A CO; Asente, * -
January'5 S nth Atlantic ^Dan.
FERNANDINA. -^AC?SONVTLLE, AND T?LL""!?HB
LANDINGS ON THE ST. JOHN'S BITER.
_ VIA
SAVANNAH, GA?,
THE NEW AND SPLENDID STEAMSHIP
'?DICTAT OR???
1000 TONS BURDEN,
CAPTA? LOUTS M. OOXETTEB.
ON AND AFTER THE 26TH OCTOBER, THIS FIN a
8HD? wDl sall from Middlo Atlantic Wharf, every
Friday Might, at 10 o'clock, for the above places. . . ?
All freight must be paid here by shippers.
Gangs oi egroes wU be t?keh to the abo e pomtsoa
the St John's River at $6 each. ChUir n un .er ted
years of age free. Horses and Mules at re uced ratea,
33-Country papers advertising "the DICTATOR" WiU
please discontinue their notices and send account to th?
Agents. . ' ..
For Freight or Passage apply os board, or totas
^gencv. 8 uta Aila -tlc // _ JannaTT^C
Charleston and Savannah Steam
Packet Line.
VIA BEAUFORT AND HILTON HEAR.
Steamer PILOT BOY.Captain W. T. UcNxttr
Steamer ELIZA HANCOX,,. .Captain J. E. ?wp'm? j
LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF, CHARLESTON
and Charleston Wharf, Savannah, Monday, Wednes?
day, Friday and Saturday mornings, st 7 o'clock. .
The PILOT BOY leaves Charleston every Monday situ
Friday, and Savannah every Wednesday and Saturday.
The ELIZA HANCOX leaves Charleston every WednfV
lay and Saturday, and Savannah every-Monday ama Tn.
aay.
The Pilot Boy will touch at Bluffton on her Monday
trip rrom Charleston, and her Wednesday tito from Sa?
vannah.
Freight received dally and stored free of charge.
Freight ta all points except Savannah must be prepaid.
No Freight received after sunset
For Freight or Passage, apply to
FERGUSON A HOLMES. Agente,
Charlee ton, s. O.
CLAGHOBN k CONINGHAM, Agents ;
Savannah, Ga.
N. B.-The Steamers ot this Line connect at Charles to J
with South Carolina and Northeastern Railroads, and i.
Savannah with Central and Albany and Gulf Railroads an i
Florida steamers._March I
CHARLESTON & GEORGETOWN
STEAM PACKET LINE.
SEMI-WEEKLY.
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND, WA VERL r
DULLS, AND LANDINGS' ON THE WAO*
CAMA W AND BLACK RIVERS.
STEAMER FANNIE..Capt D. B. Vacase
TT7TLL LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF EYiuR V
V V TUESDAY AND FRIDAY MORNING, at 7 o'doci.
Returning, will leave Georgetown every THCRSDA ?
and SUNDAY MORNING, at 7 o'clock.
Freight received daily, and stored free of charge.
N. B. All Freights must be prepaid. No Freight ro?
ceived after sunset
For Freight and Passage, apply to
FuiGUSON A HOLMES, Agaa ts, .
March 1_Accommodation Wharf.
NEW YORK AND BREMEN S TE A MS RI 1*
COMPANY.
THE FIRST-CLASS U. 8. MATT. STEAMSHIP?
AT J_ A NTIC,
CHAS. HOYER, Master,
W?1 leave Pier Na 46, N. R.. on Sat rday, Andi 6, for
Southampton and Bremen, taking passengers to Soutiu
ampton, Loudon, Havre and Bremen, at the following
rates, payable m gold or its equivalent in currency :
First Cac In, WIG; Second Cabin, %6C; Steerage,
From Bremen, Southampton "and Havre to New Yoi .*,
First Cabm. M10; Second Cabin, *76; Steerage, ?43.
EXCURSION TICKETS OUT AND HOME-Flirt
Cabin, $210; Second Cabin, Si30; Steerage, *70. 3
To be followed by the BALTIO, Capt A G. JONFt*.
April 20. ?
F??EHTEH DEPABT?BES TEOM SEW TOBI:
May 4. June 1, Jone 16, June ?fl, Joly 20:
For Freight or Passage apply to
ISAAC TAYLOR, President
February 27 ?T. No 40 Broadway? N. Y.
CF. vom
NO. 108 MARKET ST., :
Books, Peri J., i cals and Stationery?
JUST REC rVED
A lar e supply of STATIONERY
1H0T0GRAPHS, PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS 3
POCKET BOOKS, DIARIES for 1867, Ste. -
ALSO, '%r
A fine and large selection of NOVELS, by the most
celebrated authors. 80NG BOOKS, BOOKS for Horse
Amusements, Sc _ >
All the MONTHLY MAGAZINES, WEEKLY PAPERS.
DAILIES constantly on hand, and subscriptions re.
ceived for the same.
Orders from the country are respectfully solicited.
TERMS LIBERA'*, November 8,

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