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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, November 24, 1868, Image 1

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VOLUME VT.-NUMBER 940.]
CHARLESTON, S. C., THURSDAY MORMNG, SEPTEMBER '?t 1868.
EIGHTEEN CENTS A WEEK
BY TELEGKAPH.
WASHINGTON.
FILIBUSTERS-AMERICANS ARRESTED EH SYRIA
DECREASE IN EXPENSES.
WASHINGTON, November 23.-Caban filibus
terism bas not become eufficiently tangible to
warrant a proclamation, but it is understood
tbat the marshals and district attorneys have
been ordered to be watchful.
The weather is delightful.
A party of Englishmen and two Amciicans
have been arrested in Syria, charged with
smuggling arma into the inteiior for the pur?
pose of overthrowing the government. The
prisoners claim that they were snrveying a
railroad, and that the arms were for the de?
fence of their employees. The American Con
BUI is active* in behalf of the Americans, but
the English Consul seems indifferent concern?
ing the fate of his countrymen.
AU the government offices will be closed on
Thursday. *
McCulloch's cstimatos for the cominp fiscal
year will show a decrease of from $40,000,000
to $50,000.000._
Condensed Sew? hy Telegraph.
Mrs. Mary E. Hill, a wealthy lady of Phila?
delphia, was brutally murdered yesterday. Her
brains were beaten out with a poker, and her
body thrown from a second-story window.
Her son-in-law was arrested on suspicion.
General Waddy Thompson died yesterday
afternoon, at Tallahassee, Florida, aged 70.
The New Orleans Tribune, owned, edited
and published by colored men, reappeared yes?
terday after a suspension ot six months. Its
salutatory was conservative in tone, and the
paper received favorable comments from the
evening press.
The Tamaulipas revolution in Mexico is still
unsuppressed. Eseobedo has been disgrace?
fully defeated, the government troops reiusing
to fight.
Chief Justice Chase arrived in Richmond
yesterday, and will preside in the Circuit Court
to-day.
TSE CONTESTED ELECTION.
Proceedings ot the Board of Aldermen.
SEVENTH DAY-MONDAY, NOVR 23, 1868.
The Board met at ll o'clock, A. M.
Present-The Mayor, and Aldermen Potter,
Cunningham, Dereef, Wall, Olney, Honour,
"Whilden, Voigt, Howard, McKinlay, Moore and
Marshall.
The Mayor announced that the board was
ready to hear the examination of the managers
who bad been sent for.
Thomas J. Knauff, of the second precinct of
Ward 5, deposed as to the organization of the
board of that precinct : He said that no person
wau required to subscribe to au oith, and that
an oath was only required from those who had
not registered previously; he i don ti tied the re?
turn shown bim, looking upon it as correct.
. A. V. Eanapaux. chairman of managers of
eecond precinct, Ward 6, deposed, that there
was no regular organization, but a clerk was
appointed and sworn in; be acted under verbal
orders from Mr. Corbin, and never saw a writ
of election oran order from the Governor di?
recting the election; an oath was only required
in cases of doubtful persons offering to regis?
ter; the ballots, rr heming counted, weie
thrown on the floor, and were gathered up
when witness heard about a protest; witness
identified tho return shown him and believed
it to be correct.
In reply to Alderman Olney witness said :
On the second or third day of registration,
s colored man with a red badge on his coat,
armed with a club, came to the precinct and
handed me a printed paper signed by the Sher
iff, appointing him a special constable, telling
me that it was bis authority; I replied tn at I
did not recognize his authority; on the day of
the election he and several'others crowded
around the polls and interfered with voters
Mr. Marx E. Cohen came up in company with
a colored voter,when this man snatched the vote
from the hands of the latter; an excitement en?
sued; Ibo man subsequently voted; there, was
special policeman there; he wore abroad badge
with the -vords "special police"inscribed there?
on; be also interfered; don't know his name
Mr. Martin told him that he was a nuisance.
In reply to Mr. Bowen, witness said: I don'
recollect the name of the voter who came up
with Mr. Cohen; the badge I saw on the
deputy constable was red; am certain it was
not white; I did not see any letters on it; the
man interfered with voted.
The Mayor then called B. Arnold, W. F. Car
maud and W. F. Barnett, neither of whom
answered, whereupon the clerk was ordered to
send for those persons.
The Mayor then stated that it would, per
haps, be as well to proceed to examine the
ballots under the resolution of Alderman Hon
our, adopted the day previous. He also stated
that he had received a note from Alderman
Geddings, informing bim that he was unwell,
and appointed Alderman Moore m bis stead
on the committee.
The committee proceeded to tho examination
of the boxes, pending which tho examination
of managers was continued.
W. F. Barnett, manager first precinct, Ward
5, testified that his board organized and ap?
pointed a clerk. An o'ath was required from
every man, but no one subscribed to an oath.
The box was sealed up when the votes had been
counted.
William Oliver, clerk of the managers of the
first precinct, Ward 5. testified that Mr. Be?
rner acted as manager in the place of Mr. Ar?
nold during the last day of registration. Wit?
ness did not know whether he was sworn.
W. F. Barnett vas recalled and said he did
not know that Renier was sworn.
James B. Patrick was recalled. He did not
know what became of the box of his precinct
after the ballots had been counted. Did not
know if the box shown bim was the box or not.
The committee charged with tbe examination
of the boxes here made the following report :
The committee appointed to examine the
boxes that have been identified, respectfully
report their condition and contents as follows:
Box Ward No. 1-Contains ballots.
Box Ward No. %- Contains ballots.
Box Ward No. 8, First Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 8; Second Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 3, Third Precinct-Not identi?
fied.
Box Ward No. 4, First Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 4, Second Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 4, Third Precinct-Contains
ballets.
Box Ward No. 5, First Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 5, Second Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. 6, First Precinct-Contains
ballots.
Box Ward No. G, Second Precinct-Not iden?
tified.
Box Ward No, 7-Not identified.
Box Ward No. 8 -Both boxes locked, and no
keys to open them.
(Signed) H. JUDGE MOORE, )
R. E. DEREEF. I Committee.
WM. G. WHILDEN, J
The report was, on motion, adopted.
Alderman Potter then moved that the same
commiitee who had examined the boxes that
had been identified should also examine those
that had not been identified, which was agreed
to.
The result of the examination was as fol?
lows: One tin box locked, marked electors,
contained papers relative to tho Congicssional
election; enc tin box. no sark, locked and
sealed, contained balkis for the Municipal
election and a paper signed Eanapaux,
Martin and Glover; oue tin box marked Julius
Brown, unlocked and empty; one tin box not I
marked, unlocked and empty; one tin box not |
marked and emptv, supposed to bo thc box I
mentioned by Mr. Winthrop in his testimony.
Some ti ne was consumed in discussion by
the opposing counsel with a view of susgesting
some plan by which a termination of the pres?
ent investigation might be expedited, but their
efforts proved ineffectual,
Alderman Whilden said that, as there might
be found, OD examining the boxes, some dis?
crepancy in the returns themselves, that they
might not be made out according to the man?
ner prescribed by law, he therefore offered the
following resolution, which was adopted :
Resolved, That this board now proceed to
compare the ballots and returns of such boxes
as have been identified, and that i*- bo done in
the presence of the board, one box and ono re
turii being assigned to every two Aldormen,
and that they report tho condition of the bal?
lots and returns, first as far as those f r the
Mayor, and next as to tho Aldermen.
Robert Howard, Jr., was recalled, and shown
a box, which he identified as one belonging to
Ward No. 3, Third Precinct.
In reply to questions by Mr. Barker, he
stated that all of the ballots of his precinct
we re put back into the boxes, which were de?
livered into tue hands of the clerk, with in?
structions that hs should take them to tho
Mavor's offico, to which statement he was pre?
pared to swear; Paul Willerson was the clerk.
Aldorman Wall suggested that as it only
lacked a quarter of an hour to the period of ad?
journment, it would not bo proner for Council
to commence action upon thc last resolution,
to which there should necessarily be no in?
terruption, and moved that Coaucil adjourn
to ll o"cbck A. M. to-morrow, which was
agreed to. Council then adjourned.
FROM TUE RATIONAL CAPITAL.
Ine Alleged Outrages at the South
Thc Object of the Outcry-Fresh Pains
and Penalties Proposed-Thc Itadical
Programme-Shall we have a .\ationul
Constitutional Convention ?
We make some interesting extracts from tho
politial gossip contained in the Washington
(November 20) correspondence oi the Balti?
more Gazette :
As had been anticipated, the trumped-up
charges of fresh outrais at tho South and
election frauds at tho .North were not made
without special motive. They wero apparently
useless (in public estimation) after the close of
the election, but the rerf, hidden objects of
these attacks are rapidly becoming developed.
I have already adverted to the purpose of Afri?
canizing the border States, and of upsetting
the elections in New York and Philadelphia.
It is now proposed to punish tho people of
Georgia an I Louisiana for their votes against
the Radical party, and those of Virginia, Mis?
sissippi and Texas for failing to put themselves
in a position to ewell Grant's majority. "Let
us have peace." in the Radical vocabulary,
means let us have abject submission every?
where to the behests of the Radicals, under
new and more stringent edicts prescribing new
and severer punishments ? Look at the pro?
gramme as cautiously disclosed by the chosen
Radical organ at this poiat :
"Very few members of Congress are in tho
city, but it is easy to gather from those
present, as well as from resident and visiting
Republicana, that there are two subjects upon
which there will be quick action and determin?
ed uni ty-the protection of life and property in
the South, alike of the Union people as of the
Union traveller, and the punishment and pre?
vention of frauds upon the ballot-box."
This plainly threatens new legislation. The
pretext is profoundly and palpably ridiculous.
The character of tho legislation intended may
be gathered from the following excerpt from
the same sheet; it is evidently additional pains
and i en al ties :
"Let Democratic violence in the South go
unchecked and unpunished, and at the next
election the rebel uniforms of New Orleans
and Georgia will have mido their example so
contagious that not a Uuion citizen eau live,
much less vote, in tho South; and let Demo?
cratic fraud in the North go unchecked aud
unpunished, and at the next election tho re?
peaters and roughs of New York City will not
only carrv New York Stato by their frauds, but
will overflow, as before, into Connecticut, New
Jersey and Pennsylvania, and submerge the le?
gal majorities of all these States."
Such are tho terms of reconciliation to bo of?
fered by Congress, which the South, aud, in?
deed, the wuolo couutry, are invited to accept
as a condition of "Letting us have Peace."
In the meantime thoughtful men are turning
their eyes toward every point to fiud a means
of extricating the country from impending
ruin. I referred yestorday to thc suggestion
of an eminent Radical, tn at a National Con?
stitutional Convention offered the swiftest,
surest and only solution cf our difficulties.
Unexpectedly, I find nim supported by a very
prominent gentleman on the other side. Hon.
S. S. Nicholson, ot Kentucky, has written and
published a letter recommending such a move?
ment, and suggesting an abridged enumera?
tion of tho numerous important questions
which have arisen, or which, ac: ?rding to the
test of the practical working of Ibo great gov?
ernment machine since it loft the hands ot its
makers, will arise hereafter to mar its success?
ful action in accordance with its inspired the?
ory, and then submits the following proposi?
tion and comments among others :
"If President Johnson, with thc concur?
rence of either House, should recommend ihe
call of a condition for the accomplishment ot'
such objects as these, the requisite Legisla?
tures would make tho call, and tho convcution
could be held aud its action ratified before the
end of the tlrst session of tlie next Congress.
Then, and not till then, a solid, permanent
peace and prosperity wouH bo restored to the
nation, and the halt of tho army disbanded,
with an annual saving to the nation of from
forty to sixty millions of dollars. The evil ef?
fects for the future ol tho bad war precedents
would bc materially if not entirely corrected
.by this sort of legalizing saving against their
alleged .invalidity, wituout any ex, licit con?
demnation. Tho" constitution 'would be rein?
stated in its supremacy, with an implicit com?
mand from the nation tnat hereafter it should
be obeyed; that all future action ol' governm tnt
functionaries fhould bo withi 1 and never out?
side its limits."
THE ALASKA PURCHASE-RUMORS OF BRIBERY
AUD CORRUPTION-HOW MUCH MONEY IS SAID
TO HAVE BERN DISTRIBUTED AMONG ?EMBERS
OF CONGRESS.
When the Alaska purchase had been com?
pleted aud the bill appropriating $7,200,000 had
passod Congress, there was much speculation
over the country an to what portion of this
purchaso money had been used in feeing mem?
bers of Congress and subsidizing tho press. Cn
the bustle of politics and under pressure of
events these speculations cease.-1, and both
Alaska and the "lobby" were soon forgotten.
A few weeks ago the subject was again revived
by a mysterious whispering around that cer?
tain parries had, by some means, cither fair or
foul, p jpsessed themselves of an accurate and
detailed l?t of the several sums ot money paid
out here to secure the passage of the Alaska
appropriation, and the names or the par?
ties receiving the same. The payments, it
was said, amounted to $2,200 000. and that only
five millions of dollars would be paid over to
the Russian Government. A single member
of Congress was reported to have received for
his share of the booty a quarter of a million,
while each of the leading journals of New
Yolk was put off with $10,U00. This report
had its day and was also soon forgotten, but
the cable dispatch staling that the Barings
had drawn a draft in favor of Russia for ?1,
000,000 sterling in payment for Alaska, has re?
vived the story, and this draft being the exact
amount which it was alleged Russia would re?
?oive, has given strong color co the charge
that the other $2,200,000 was distributed on
this side of the Atlantic. It may bo that a
committee of Congress will be raised to inves?
tigate tbese charges, aud determine how much
it cost tho Russian Goverumcut to secure ber
money for the sale of her North American pos?
sessions.
THE PRINTING BUREAU-A RUMORED SURREP?
TITIOUS ISSUE OF BONDS.
As the Congressional Committee on Re?
trenchment nave at last workod their way into
the Pnntiug Bureau of tho Treasury, it might
be well for them to examine into a transaction
which, although never before mada pub.ic, ex?
hibits the loose way iu which matters have boon
conducted in tho Treasury Department. About
a year since, more or less, it was considered
necessary to have the platos from wuich tho
$1000 bouda were printed retouched by an en?
graver, and for this purposo these plates were
sent to Philadelphia, where th y remained
twelve days, although it was suppose! the
work ol repair would not occupy as many
bonn. Where these plates wero during their
twelve t ays' absence, or who h id them in spe?
cial keeping, is perhaps known III the Treas >i ry
building; but tue belief of BMoy is that during
those twelve days eighty millions of bonds
were printed, many of which havo siuco
found their way back here, and some of them
havo been redeemed, as. i? shown by the dupli?
cate numbers,
THE CABINET MAKING-THE SOBAMELE FOE THE
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTF.RIOB-ALLEGED
CONDITION OF THE PACIFIC BAILBOADS.
In tho organization of General Granta Cabi?
net the scramble for the Interior Department,
it is understood, will be a decided feature. The
Secretary in charge of this portfolio has hcrc
to.'ore ranked fifth ra the President's Cabinet,
but bia intimate relations with thc great 1 ail
road monopolies of the West will materially
change bia relative position. Millions of dol?
lars havo been paid tho aoveral Pacifie railroads
as a government bonus for work which bas
been dono so temporari y that tho wnole road
will require "reconstruction;" anti many mil?
lions are yet to be drawn, under thc several
railroad acts, provided thu interest of these
roads bo considered in the organization of thc
new Cabinet. Theso Western monopolies
PTO said to favor Senator Conness as
the successor of Judge ?towning, and as Mr.
Conness is a Pacific coast man, he may draw
a "Cabinet" prize, lt is all important for the
private interests of thoso concerned in thc Pa?
cific Railroad that the new secretary should
sympathize with them in their gigantic under?
takings and not allow their work to oe too
closelv examined, bu t always be ready to re?
spond* to the demand for more "government
bonds."
THE PARAGUAYAN HUDDLE-THE TBUE STATE OF
FACTS.
The report that "decided and effective in?
structions have been given to oui- new Minis?
ter. General McMahon, and to Admiral Davis,
to proceed with an adequate naval force to
Asuncion to vindicate the national honor and
redress the wrong said to have boen commit?
ted by President Lopez on American citizens,"
is the merest nonsense, in view of the fact that
no ouo ia authorized to issue any such in?
structions. The President is an powcrleaa to
redress the wrongs of our citizens in Paraguay
as waa Minister Washburn. Suppose an
adequate naval force should appear be?
fore Ascuncion, could a single gun bc fired
without direct authority from Congress ? Tho
President baa no power to declare or make
war, as waa lately decided iu the case of tho
Alta Vela claimanta. If an outrage bo com?
mitted on American citizens by President Lo?
pez, all that President Johnson can do ia to re?
port the facts to Congreas and recommend
auch action as his judgment may approve. In
this particular case the President is not in pos?
session of tho facts officially, but should tho
reports which have reached him be corrobo?
rated by official dispatches, there ia authority
for stating that a special message will be
promptly sent to Congress recommending that
he be authorized to demand ampio redress, and
to enforce that demand if necessary by the na?
val power of the country. Such are tho facts
ot the case as obtained from a proper official
source.
WHAT SPOON BUTLER SAYS.
How He Accounts for thc Easy Tri ump lt
of Ute Republicans- The Democratic
Party Sold Out-.Thc Policy of tho New
Administration towards the South.
The following is an extract from a conversa?
tion with General D. F. Butler, reported in tho
New York Herald :
Roporter-Well, General, what do you think
of the election ?
Gen. Butler-it has turned out precisely as
it was intended it sh mid by the Democratic
leadera from the beginning. It waa what thc
horse jockeys would call a " thrown race;" for
no political party waa ever so completely, ao
thoroughly sold oat by the leaders as tho De?
mocracy.
Reporter-How was that ?
Gen. Butler-I will tell you. The rank and
file aud tho Western Democracy were pledgad
against the national debt, and agaiuat its pay?
ment in gold and the high rates of interest.
The chairman of thc Democratic National
Committee, Mr. Belmont, was tho United States
agent for foreign bankers. There is hold
abroad some six hundred millions of do lara of
the Uiiited States bonds; payment in gold
would make more than two hundrod mil?
lions difference in value. Tho Democratic
Convention was managed by Belmont in con?
junction with other New York politicians. I
have long kuowr their tactics. It his always
been of more consequence to them to save the
City and State of New York than to save the
general governmout election. If they muat
lose either they alwava prefer the Utter.* There?
fore they determined"against Chase, Hendricks
and Hancock, fearing that with them the De?
mocracy would w in iu tho nation, and they
took up Seymour in order to savo tho Stato of
New ?brk. They ma.de no fight for Maine, the
result of which would have been tho index of
tho contest, but sent Pendleton thore, whoso
notions were distasteful, at loast to the Repub?
licans, from whom alono they could bavo made
gains. They had already placed a Western
man on tho ticket (Blair), who of all men ia
the most obnoxious to Western Democrats,
he having been an Abolitionist and a vio?
le nt Republican goneral in tho Union army,
although a man of acknowledge ! ability. They
arranged their plattorm so as to revive all tho
issues of tho war and thus overshadow entire?
ly all questions of finance and fixation, on
which laot issuea they never got a hearing du?
ring tho whole campaign. Of course thia
threw the voto of every truo patriot and lover
of bis couutry agaiutt thoso who had over
been opposed to them during the war. While
the contest-the only actual contest of tho
campaign-waa going on in Ohio, Pennsylva?
nia aud ludiana, it will bo observed Seymour
did not lako tho stump, although in the two
last named States leaa than G'OOU votes would
have changed the result. When these elec?
tions were found uncomfortably close, ibo
New York World and the National Intelligen?
cer, ono owned and tho other purchased by tho
Democracy, entirely demoralized tho party by
tue impossible proposition to change tho can?
didates. It thus being made sure that tho
Democrats had no chance of carrying tho gcu
oral ciection, Seymour immediately took the
stump to save New York, .Mr. Belmont issued
an address, and the played for result was ob?
tained. New York was saved to bor politicians,
and the value of thc bonds ot Belmont's foreign
clients was enhanced.
Reporter-In view of theae facts, Goneral,
what do you think Grant's course will be to?
ward the Democrats ?
General Butler-Thoso samo mon areuow
patting Central Graut on the snrmldor, and
endeavoring to win bim to their purposes, but
General Grant is bound by every principle of
honor that bolds men in their action to carry
out tho Reconstruction measures of Congress,
and to givo auflVage to the negro aud fully
protect him in its enjoyment. Tho very fact
that Louisiana has gone against bim by 55,000
majority, whole paiiahea not giving him a Bin?
gle voto under the reign of terror which exist?
ed there, where thousands of Republican votes
were thrown before, will impel bim and tho Ra
Eublican party to do this. The New York and
elm ant Democrats will get some comfort from
the financial policy to which the new adminis?
tration is pledged. I look to see the action of
the new administration radical upon all points
raised and settled by the war, but conservative
upon finance.
Reporter-What do you thick. General, will
be doue by Congress in relation to thoso States
where Ibero have been disorders in thc late
elections ?
General Buller-I cannot doubt that in every
such case prompt and vigorous measures will
be taken to correct tho evil as well in overrul?
ing what baa been done as Ul preventing 6ucli
occurrences iu the future. Wo nre obliged to
g.ve every State a repa 'hean form of govern?
ment, and that government is neither republi?
can in form nor fact where every elector can?
not discuss nia politx-al opinions and cast bis
vote uuawed and uncontrolled either by vio?
lence, intiiuidat.ou, thre.ita or purchase. 'Ibo
conti acts even where mado in tho South for
the employment of negroes ou tho ooudilion
thal they will abstain from voting it their mal?
ters so desired, arc as much purchases of men
as were the purchases from thc auction block a
few years before. No member ol Congress
elected in any district where such means wero
used will ever bo admitted to his seat by my
consent, or any electoral vote Iroia such" dis?
tricts counted.
Do uh leaded Colored Girls?
Tho New Orleans Picayune I hus describes a
wonderful natural curiosity, to bo seen in that
city :
Wo p.-.id a visit on Fridav to lli.it most wnn
dcv.'ul of Nature's ?reaks, lite double-headed
colored girl, or perhaps It would be more cor?
rect to say, the two girls in one. For eot.ve
uieuce, we shall speak ot thtiu in the plural.
They aro citirely distinct, aa far aa mind is
concerned, laughing and chatting with each
ottley and being apparently upon ibo most iu
t?mate terms, and one may have a headache or
a cold without the other being affected, but any
fever, or olher serious disease, affects both
equally. Their bodies are separato from the
small of the back up, each having a perfectly
formed bust and head, two arms, <ic, and each
has two legs, but there is only one trunk. Both
are remarkably intelligent, reading and writing
with ease, while their manners are really re?
fined. In quite a lengthy conversation, they
did not make a single grammatical error, aud
their language was unusually select. Upon
questioning them as to their education, thev
ropliod that they had been carefully taught by
their formet mistress, Mrs. Smith, in Colum?
bus, North Carolina, in which village thev were
born. They aro now fifteen years old, and mote
than ordinary bright for girls of their age,
having had the advantage of foreign travel.
They both sing very sweetly, ono having a
soprano, and the other a contralto voico, and
wo have rarely heard two voices that blended
so perfect in a duet. Amonq their other ac?
complishments is that of dancing, : nd the
mauner in which they manage to execute a
waltz is truly wonderful. When standing at
ease the Mt foot of one and tbo right foot of
the other do not lie flat upon the flour, but rest
upon tho toes. In walking, however, they step
with all their feet alike, though thoy can bold
up two feet and walk with perfect ease with
the olher two. In speaking of them as one,
they aro called Mdlie-Uhrissic, but in address?
ing them separately, one ipplies the distinc?
tive appellation, she on tho left being called
Millie, and she on tho right Chrissie; though
Chrissie, in addressing her other half,.calls her
"Sister." There is a striking resemblance be?
tween their taces, and the conformation of
their heads is much tho same-Chrissie being
perhaps a shade brighter than her sister, and
rather more talkative. Before seeing these
strange girls we had fancied that we would ex?
perience a feeling of repulsion, but tho first
glance at their bright, cheerful faces dispelled
that idea effectually.
TUE GORILLA.
His Physique as Compared with tbat of
.- man-Interesting Facts. ""7i^?
A lecturo recently delivered in New York, by
Dr. Lemercier on, ''The Gorilla," contained an
olaborato and interesting comparison of tho
gorilla with man.
Though not quite so tall as thc average man,
the gorilla is far more powerful than Heenan,
having, according to Du Chaillu, tho strength
of eight able-bodied men. Only two ot these
creatures have been dissected in Europe, one
by Professor Duveruoy, and the other by Dr.
Auzoux. No live gorilla has been brought to
Europe or America. Tho differences between
man and the gorilla are very striking. The
latter cannot stand upright, owing to the
structure of his spinal column; his arms
are longer, and his legs aro shorter than
those of tho human species; in walking
ho commonly uses the backs of his hinds,
placing them flat upon thc ground ; ho
has thirteen pairs of ribs, and thc female
fourteen, whereas man has but ten ; he
has several muscles which aro not found in
man ; hu has "bagpipes''under his arms, con?
necting with his windpipe and glottis, and by
compressing ihcso with his arms be can make
a noise moro terrible than the uproar of a
thousand ragmon, and which can bo heard,
according to tho testimony of M. Du ChaiUu,
at a distance oft throe miles and more. His
hand is greatly inferior to tho human hand,
and, besides, there exists a multitudo of minor
differences in other organs. But what places
man fur above the gorilla is the vast superi?
ority of tho human brain and hoad. Tho go?
rilla has a bettor developed head than the
lion, and when young his cranium has a
groat resemblance to that of a child.
lint afterward, though there is an im?
mense growth of the bone, there is no
expansion of tho cavity of tho skull, and con
pr . jeutly none of the bram. The lecturor ex
ur -sed himself at considerable li ngth on this
point, and ia such a mauner as to make it evi
d' >t that he was no believer in the hypothesis
?I Darwin. All animals have beon made to
meet tho wants of their materid lifo, and aro
wonderfully contrived for th)so purposes. Tho
gorilla has been made a savage inhabitant of
tho forost, and is adapted for rapidly ascending
trees. His chost and muscles aro marvellous,
and if tho animal had had tho wisdom and cun?
ning of man, the African race would long since
have been swept from their native soil. In
connection with tho gorilla's chest, Dr. Le?
mercier said that tho strength of any animal
whatever is according to tho development of
the chest, and took occasion once moro to im?
press "lpon Iiis audience the benefit which re?
sulted to children from strengthening their
Jungs by gymnastic exercises.
CHERAW AND DARLINGTON RAILROAD.-The
procecduigs ol tho recent meeting of stock?
holders, including tho reports of thc presi?
dent aud superintendent, are beforo oar read?
ers. It docs not appear that tho road is doing
a very profitablo business, but ii is gratifying
to find it in good condition, with a roasouablo
prospect of greater success during tho next
yoar. This road ha-i boen peculiarly exempt
Irom accident, or failuro to comply" with the
requisitions of its schedule, and as its very
efheient president remarks, "tho community
owes much to this company" in tho facilities it
has furnia::ed to trade and travel and the
promptness of their sorvico, though "the
stockholders have never received one dollar of
interest on their capital." Wo hopo there is a
better time coming for both the community
and the stockholders.-V/teraw Democrat.
ASTOUNDINO RAILROAD SPECULATIONS.-For
somo weeks past tho directors of tho Erie Rail?
way Company havo been secretly issuing mil?
lions upon million? of dollars' worth of riPW
stock, and selling it for whatever price they
could get. A number of other stock gjmblers
hive been buying this stock, with a viow lo
obtain thc 'control of the company, and make
their own men directors in placo of tho pres?
ent boaid. As, however, tho new issues kept
coming on tho market, the price of tho shares
kept sinking lower and lower, until on Friday
last thoy touched $35 each, a ho buving party,
in tho meanwhile, many of them being Eng?
lishmen, had sont their purchased stock to
England as fast as they could; but their friends
there, when they found out that ibero was no
limit to thc quantity manufactured by tho
printing press, got alarmed and telegraphed to
their broksrs here to sell at any price, snipping
tho stock back at s .me time by the steamer.
The brokers on this side, thinking to turn an
honest penny, and knowing that they would
receive plenty of tho stock in ten days, the
permd required by the steamer to cross the
Atlantic, undertook to sell ahead, borrowing,
in the meanwhile, to make their deliveries.
But suddenly tho speculators who had been
selling the new stock, having plenty of money,
turned about and bought up all the stock act?
ually herc; and as the steamer canuot arrive
with the stock from Eugland for a week to
come, they havo compelled the foolish brokers,
who have made Halos at 40 and thereabouts, to
buy in at 55 and GO to moet their contracts.
The amount lost and won by individuals in this
way within three days past is estimated ai
sums ranging from $150,000 to $500,000 each.
But tho public will have, wc presume, as little
sympathy with the losers as with tho winners.
[Mio York Sim.
-? ?? -
"WICKEDEST."--The word "wickedest ' is be?
coming moro and more popular--so popular,
iu tact, thar it bids fair lo supplant the usual
personal names which ligure iu shop windows.
We havo all road about the "wickedest bill?
poster m New York." Wc i:ow see tho "wick?
edest necktie" offered fur sale in a Broadway
window. We studied il some time and thought
we discovered some semblance of thc hang?
man's knot in tlio very neatly folded silk, but
arc not certain that the inventor had uuy such
brilliantly appropriate idea. Thc "wickedest
hat in New York" was first offered ju an up?
town fashionable hat btorc yesterday. It is
rather jaunty in appearance, with the brim
well turned up and the crown a little inclined
toward a sharpened cone, though narrowly
round. Tho "wickedest paper collars" arc not
yet out-when (hoy appear they arc to be worn
a littic too sinai, for the neck, with a tciiuOJCV
to choke, 'lhc "'wickedest puir of pauls" iu
New York have not yet appeared in pv.iilic.
They are worn by a la ny on Filth avenue, but
she always I ea vea them ?it home when she ap?
pears in society With her husband. Tho "wick?
edest" i rand of cigars havd b; en offer, d in the
mar'tct os rc:: I .injjerled Havanas. They* aro
made in Connecticut. It is not true, aa re?
ported, tnat Geueral Gran! ha-- mada arrange?
ment for ti.e entire product of tho factory, at
wholesale rates, lor bis private use-though
the proprietor has arranged for un enlarge*
ment of his establishment after the fourth of
Muich.-X Y. Hail.
/ancrai Wins.
#5-Thc Relatives, Friends and Ac.
quaintances of Mr. and Mrs. JOBS REDMOND, and of
Mrs. ANN FLEMING and family, are respectfully in?
vited to attend tho Funeral Services of .dr?. Juli S
REDMOND, at No. CC St. Philip-street, at Three
o'clock This Afternoon. 1* November 24
Special Mires.
SS- CONSIGNEES PER STEAMSHIP
MANHATTAN, are Donned to re?oive their Goods
This Day, at Adger's Wharf.
Storing commences at sunset.
JAMES ADGER i CO.,
November 24 1 Agents.
J(ST ALL PERSONS ARE CAUTIONED
against giving Credit to any of the crew of the
British ship N. Mo-ber. as such debts will not
be paid by Messrs. STREET BROTHERS & CO.,
or myself. H. MOSHER, Master.
November 24 1
SS- IS SICKNESS AVOIDABLE ?-THOU
SANDS toss on sick bed* to-day, who might have boon
well and hearty had they taken due precautions for thc
preservation of th it most precious of earthly bless?
ings, a sound mind in a sound body. Sickness, to a
greater exfcut than most people suppose, is avoid?
able. When thc body is lauguiJ, the spirits de?
pressed, and thc nervous system unnaturally sensi?
tive, it should bo taken for granted that misc'iief is
brewing. Those hints and warnings, vouchsafed as
such by a kind Providence, ought not to be disre?
garded. It thev arc slighted, as is too generally the
case, the next thing may bo a fever, a severe bilious
attack, or some other iona of acute disease. They
indicate as clearly as if thc intimation wcro given in
articulate language, that the animal functions are
disordered, and the system debilitated. Under
those circumstances, thc only thing to bo done is to
regulato and restore, and tho best regulating and
restorative preparation ever used for thc picvontion
of sickness ii HOiTliTTER'S STOMACH BITTERS.
In this way, bilious remittent fever, chills and
fever, spasms, nervous paroxysms, violent attacks
of indigestion, and all the ordinary epidemics, may
almost certainly bo averted. They aro usutlly pre?
ceded by the symptoms described, and surely lt is
wisdom to forestall them by resorting to an antidote
at once harmless, agreeable and invigorating. Most
assuredly, it will soon dissipate the unpleasant feel?
ings referred to; which, of course, is desirable, even
if thay were net likely to lead to something wo ree.
The close of the fall is usually accompanied by un?
healthy fogs and violent atmospheric changes, and
it is thei cf ore a season when invigoration is particu?
larly needed. 6 November 23
?S-BUY YOUR TEA AND COFFEE FROM
KRIETE k OHAPMAN, corner King and Radcliffe
streets, and get a better article for thc same money
than at any other establishment in the city.
November 14 3mos
JOS-ELECTRO-CHEMICAL BATHS ARE
now ready at No. 70 HASEJL-STREtfT, at the office
of Dr. HERVEY M. CLECKLEY, for the cure of all
inveterate chronic affections, which have resisted
tho treatment of all medication.
Gentlemen will be accommodated during office
hours, from 7 to 10 A. M., from 2 to 4, and 7 to IG P.
M. Lartisai at any other hour, when they will find
an experienced Lady to attend them.
Or. CLECKLEY will be glad to seo any of hie pro?
fessional brethren (who arc favorable to medical pro?
gression), and will take pleasure in exhibiting thc
operation of the baths.
Certificates of remarkable cures could bo furnish?
ed, but it is not requisite.
November ll Imo
. ?3" BRIDE AND BRIDEGROOM.-ESSAYS
FOR YOt'NG MEN on the Interesting relation of
Bridegroom to Bride in the institution of Msrriass
a guide to matrimonial felicity and trus happiness.
Sont by mail in sealed letter envelopes freo of charge.
Address HOWARD ASSOCIATION, Box P., Phila?
delphia, Pa. 3mos September'.^
OS- BATCHELOR'S HAIR DYE.-THIS
splendid Hair Dyo is thc best m the world; the
only true and pcrfoct Dye; harmless, reliable,
nstantaneous; no disappointment; no ridiculous
tints; remedies the ill effects of bad dyes; invigo?
rates and Icavus the hair soft and beautiful black or
brown. Sold by all Druggists and Perfumers; and
properly applied at Batchelors Wig Factory, No
Boml-strcct, New York. lyr Jauuory 3
G
/itu ?Uti.
HEAT ATTRACTION
AT
QUINSY'S & CO.S PHOTOGRAPH AND
FINE ART GALLERY.
NOW ON EXHIBITION IHK LARGEST AND
finen Collection of CUllOMU LITHOGRAPHS ever
seen in Charleston. They are perfect copies of cel?
ebrated Works of Art, both anciont und modern.
Among thc collection may bo found SALVATOR
RuSA'S HEAD OF CHRIS!, Correggo'a Magdalene,
A. Delacroix's Tide Going Out, A. Delacroix's Tide
Coming lu, Turner's Vonice, Jackson's English
Scenery, Rowbottom')* English Scenery, Baxter's
English and Irith Scenery, Views on the Rhiuo, The
Jungl'raud, Tho Wetterhorn, Matine Views, and
many others.
The public aro respectfully invited to call and sec
these beautiful Works ol Art. They are offered for
sale at New York prices.
PORCELAIN PICTURES.
Great reduction m thc price sf PORCELAIN PIC?
TURES. Recent improvements in producing these
pictures enable us to now offer the at at nearly one
half the former prices, and tar superior. Call and
exammi spedmSM.
OUR CARTES DE VISITE AND OTHER
PLAIN PHOTOGRAPHS ARE UNSUR?
PASSED.
Especial attention given to children. Also to copy?
ing old Daguerreotypes and ether pictures. Sa?sfac
(iou in all cases guaranteed, and at price** to corres?
pond with thc times.
STEREOSCOPIC PICTURES
AND
OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHARLESTON,
FORT SUMTER AND MAGNOLIA
CEMETRRY
At Reduced Prices.
A fine collection of
STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS OF THE MOUN?
TAINS IN NORTH CA BOLINA AND THE
FRENCH BROAD RIVER.
These ire tho first and only Photographs ever taken
in that locality.
<( V I O B Y A: CO.,
No. 201 KING-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
November 12 3?oos
gotrls.
N
ICKER SON ilOUSIfi,
COLUMDIA, S. C.
First-class Hotel.33 Per Day.
WiT. A. WRIGHT,
HAVING ASSUMED THC MANAGEMENT Ol?
Ibis House, respectfully soiici'.s a share ot publie pa?
tronage
?'.co Uranibus to a'.id ?rom thoHolcL
November 13 imo
^HJ.MOK HOUSES,
MONUMENT SQUARE,
BALTIMORE, XARYLA2f?,
KIRKLAND & CO., Proprietors.
April 27 Jyr
gate un?) (Caps.
A Hil? IND CAPS.
MEN'S FELT HATS, ti, $150, S2 50, $3, $3 50
BOYS' SO PT BLACK HATS, 50 eta, 75 eta, SI, 8150
MCCLELLAN, FATIGUE AND FORAGE MILI?
TARY CAPS. STEELE'S "HAT HALL."
No. 313 King-street,
Sign of the " Big Hat."
November 24 2
Jusinfss (Curbs.
TT OYT ??GARDNER,
BANKERS & BROKERS,
No. 5 NEW-STREET, NEW YORK
BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION GOLD,
STOCKS, GOVERNMENT AND OTHER SECDRI
TIES and STERLING EXCHANGE. GOLD. STOCKS
AND BONDS bought and carried, and sold short on
margins.
Interest allowed on margins. Interest allowed on
deposits, subject to check at sight
November 24 3*
JOHN D. ALEXANDER,
ACCOUNTANT
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
No. IO Broad-stre?-*
RESPECTFULLY SOLICITS dOSlNESS IN THE
WRITING UP AND ADJUSTING OF BOOKS AND
ACCOUNTS of Merchants and others. Also, ute
SELLING AND RENTING, AND COLLECTION OF
REN T9 OF HOUSES. kc. October 1
Qt II. SASS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND
SOLICITOR IN EQUITY.
93- Office No. 38 BROAD-STREET, north side
between King and Meeting. May 8
J T. HUMPHREYS,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER ANB COMMIS?
SION MERCHANT.
SALES OF REAL E8TATE. STOCKS, BONDS, SE?
CURITIES AND PERSONAL PROPERTY
ATTENDED TO.
No. ? 7 B RO A D-S T RE E T ,
CHARLESTON, 8. C.
REFERENCES.
Hon. HENRY BUIST, W. J. MAGRATH, Esq.,
General JAMES CONNER, T. H. WARING, Esq.
October 1
yy'ILBUK di SUN,
REAL ESTATE BROKERS * AUCTIONEERS,
No. 59 Broad street, Charleston, S. C.
Borrow and loan money, attend to collection of
rents, and all manner of claims.
July 13 mwfC-iio
J OG AN dc SEABROOK,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND SOLICITORS IN
EQUITY,
No. 33 BROAD-STREET.
ROSWELL T. LOG AN:.. E. BAYNARD SEABBOOK
September
yyiLLis At CH1SOLM.
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS
AHO
Sn IT PING AGENTS,
WELL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AND
8HIPMENT (to Foreign and Domestic Ports) ot
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER AND NAVAL STORES,
ATLANTIC WHARF, Charleston, S. C.
E.WILLIS.A. R. CHISOLM.
October 25
Gr
EO. H. HOPPOCK,
FACTOR
AMD
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
ACCOMMODATION WHARF,
Charleston, S. C.
P. GADSDEN HASELL. timos September 21
JKisifuantoos.
A D V A N C E S
ON
COTTON.
TO PLANTERS AND OTHERS
WISHING TO
HOLBCOTTONIN ENGLAND,
Where STORAGE. INSURANCE, and other expenses
for holding are LESS than m the United States, we
will advance
TEN CENTS PER POUND
ON
MIDDLINGS,
Shipped to our friends in Liverpool, charging the Eng?
lish commercial rate of interest, walch at present is
FIVE PER CENT.
And hold as long as desired.
CLAGHORN, HERRING k CO..
Accommodatiou Wharf.
November 13_2 mos
Q^EO RGI A YARNS
AND
DOMESTICS.
ATHENS FACTORY YARNS,
ASSORTED NUMBERS.
MONTOUR MILLS 7-8 SHIRTING.
For sale by
CLAGHORN, HERRING * CO.,
November 13 12 Accommodation Wharf.
JTORTH, STEELE & WARDELL,
wnouttAiE DF.At.itna m
FANCY GOODS,
STA TIONER Y, PERFUMER Y, C UTLER Y,
HOSIERY, FURNISHING GOODS,
WHITE GOODS, EMBHOIDERY, kc, &c,
No. 107 Aleeting-strcct,
CHARLESTON, S, O.
J. B. STEELE. 0. C. NORTH,
A. W. WARDELL, JR. New York.
Scptcorber 15 Smos
Encourage Homo Manufacture !
PALMETTO HOP YEAST CARES.
HAVING REC5XVBD THI3 AGI-NrY FOR
tlies? celebrated YEAST OAKES, manufactur
. d by .Mrs S.II. L. Price, of t:umnierviilc, s. C.,
wc resp ctlu'.ly ask for tn uni thc attention of the
trade generally, an.1 house espers e<poei.>Uy. 'ihi>y
aro exclusively of southern niluul'actnre. entirely
free from auy injurions properties Mi|?6rior to thone
ot Northern make-, answer ?ill tito purpose of and
are far more economical thm, Y.-ant Powder? All
we asa for them is a 'air trial Direcdons for use
aci-ornpanv ea h packatro.
Tho trade supplied at MANUF AClORKR'S
PRICES.
PALMETTO PIOSEEB CO-OPERATIVE
KSOiEUX hi ORE,
Foufhwest 03rcr;r Meeting ami Mar?et-streets.
Novi-uiii. r 7
Sicmi?D??s._
Dit. J. S. MlTt'-HKlili HAS .iKMOVF.D
his oiik-e and residence to the SOUTHEAST
C?KN..H OF KING AND JU11N STREB ff.
November 2
Shipping.
FOU LIVERPOOL,.
THE FJNE BBI1ISB SHIP N. M03HEB,
'AfciSHEB alaster, hiving two-thirds of
4ber cargo engaged, will be disp itched for
?theabove port.
For Freight engagements, apply to
November 24 STREET BROTHERS kCX
POR LIVERPOOL,.
THE FINE BRITTS H SHIP .' SCOIS
WOOD." XBAKM Master, is now loading
for tho above port, and having a portion
of her cargo engaged, will mset with dis?
patch.
For Freight engagements, apply to
ROBERT HUBE k CO.,
November IC Boyce's wharf.
SE W ?OKK A ?ED CHARLESTUM
STEAMSHIP LINE.
FOR NEW FORK.
#va THE SPLENDID SIDE WHEEL
[???STEAMSHIP CH ABL E 8 T O N ,
BEERY Commander, win leave Ad -
_. ger's Wharf on Tuet Jay, 24th In?
stant, at One o'clock.
Insurance can he obtained by these Steamers at
}i per c nt.
For Freight or Passage, having splendid Cabin ac?
commodations, apply to
JAMES ADO EB lc 00.,
Corner Adger's Wharf and East Ba- (Up Stain).
The Steamer MANHATTAN will follow on Satur
day, the 28th, at - o'clock. 2 November 23
FOR NEW YORK.
REG ULAR LINE EVERT THURSDA T.
PASSAGE REDUCED TO ?13.
,/?Sr*2rn THE 8TEAMSHIP 8 AB AGO? SA,
?,"#3?^ jf? Captain CBOWELL, will leavo Yan
<-t?fim?Xwi(r^ dcrhorst's Wharf, on Thur.day,
??3B9H9&-J November 28. at Two o'clock P. M.
Bills Lading must he presented before Six o'clock
on Wednesday evening.
November 24._BAY EN EL & CO.. Aaenti,
FOR PHILADELPHIA.
A&dZxvn THE STEAMSHIP PBOME
vfHPHSIHBUl), Captain A. B. GHAY. wiU
<&??W?MWK^ loave North AtlanUc Wharf on Satur
aaS^^^Smmday, 28th inst., at Three o'clock P.M.
For ? rei ght apply to
JOHN i THEO. OE TTY,
November 23_North Atlantic Wharf.
FAST FREIGHT LINE TO ANO FHOM
BALTIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, WASHINGTON
CITY, WILMINGTON (DEL), CINCINNATI lO.),
ST. LOUIS IMO.). AND OTuER NORTH iVE-j?
EBN CITIES.
si**-*:-?* THC FAVOBITE AND SWIFT
y^CT^Xto 8, r6W 8teamshiP FALCON, JESSE
??ZvJlidlmt^ D. HORSEY Commander, will sail for
gar" JMI-^?? Baltimore on Thursday, the 20th
of November, at Three o'clock P. M., irom Pier No..
1, Union Wharves, making close connections, and
delivering freight to all points in connection
promptly and at lem rata.
Tbrocgh Bills Lading given on Cotton to Boston.
Insurance on Cotton, Klee, Domes: les and General
Merchandise, hy the steamships of this lice, % per
cent.
The steamship CARROLL will follow on regular
day.
For Freight or passage, apply to
COURTENAY k TRENHOLM.
November 23 mwth3 Union Wharves.
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP DUMPY*!
THROUGH Ll>? TO
CALIFORNIA, CHINA AND JAPAN.
FREIGUT AND PASSAGE AT GREATLY RS
D?CED RATES I
?^i-w- SIEAMEBS OF TH li ABOVB
y???tt*'?Zl Une !eavc Pier No. -12, North Rive?,
??cfnlidv?f?i foot of Canal-street, New York, a
-j~=gfe=^- 12 o'clock noon, of thc ls:. 9th,l?te
and 24th of every month (except when these date;
fall on Sunday, then the Saturday preceding).
Departure of 1st and 24th connect at Panama wira
steamers for South Pacific aud Central Americio
ports. Those of 1st touch at Manzanillo.
Departure of 9th ot each month connects with
the new steam line from Panama to Aastralia and
New Zealand.
Steamship CHINA, leaves San Francisco, fe
.Thlsa and Japan. December 3.
No California steamers touch?t Havana, bm go
direct from New York to AspinwalL
One hundred pounds baggage free to each adult,
Medicine and attendance tree.
For Passage iiekots or lurthor information m,,:) j
at the COMPANY'S TICKET OFFICE, on the wr>a:i
foot of Canal-street, North River. New York.
March 14_lyr F. B. BABY, Agent.
STEAM TO LIVERPOOL..
CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN.
.fc/feS^a tiiE INMAN LINE, SAILING
yjKfiSgg SEMI-WEEKLY, earryin? the U.
???1?A%M? s- Mai!H> counting of tho tallowing
cxar?B^L steamers:
CITY OF PARIS,
CITY OF BALTIMORE,
CITY OF WASHINGTON,
CITY OF BOSTOW
Sailing every Saturday and every alternate Monday.
at 1 P.M., from Pier No. 45 North River, New York.
BATES OF PA&AGE,
BI THE KAIL STEAMERS SAILING EVERY SATUBDAX.
Payable In Gold. | Payable in Currency,
1st Cabio.$100 Steerage.SS
1st Cabin to London.. 105 steerage to London... S
1st Cabin to Paris ....115 Steerage to .Parin.4
Passage by thc Monday ste '.mars-First Cabin 990-1
gold; Steerage $3(1; payable In U. S. currency.
Bates ofouBsage from New York to Halifax; Cabin,
$20, Steerage, $10; payable ic geld.
Passenger* also forwarded to Havre, Hamburg..
Bremen, kc, it moderate rate.?.
Steerage passaee from Liverpool and Queenstown,
.-40 currency. Tickets can be bought here by per?
sons sending for their friends.
For further information apply at the Company'
offices. JOHN G. DALE, Ager:,
No. 15 Broadway. New York.
Jone 4 (mo
TH AV K LL K!CS PASSING T Ht: O UGH
CHARLESTON EN ROU I'ETO FLORIDA, AIKEN
C/TPifXI A,,tl other placed, should not fal
st'?%*?? ?2?? 10 l*yin their supplies of PROVIS .
^?mfimW^ IONS.CLABE-IS. CHAMPAGNES,
-CORDIALS. BRANDIE-. WHIS -
KIES, WINK*, CANN LD MEAT*, hOUPS. ic.
Pates of Wild Gamo and Devilled Ham for Sand?
wiches and Luncheon*,
jggrdend for a catalogue.
WM. ?.. CORWIN (t CO.,
No. 275 Kmg-itrcet,
Between Woutwortu ami Bcaorain,
Charleston, ?. C.
Branch of No. 903 Broadway, comer 20tn street,
New York. Oo:obcr28
FOU liltnsWM K, G \
r *xSE^S THE STEAMER "DICTATOR,"
JBESHBC Captain CHARLES WILLEY, will touch
at tins point ever,, Wednesday, leaving .-avannah at
Nine A. M., and on her return trip will touch there
on Saturday Afternoon, arriving bick at Savannah
on Sunday Morning. J. D. AIKEN k CO.,
November 24 Agents.
PUK ST. AUGUST NE, FLORIDA.
_ g-tpp?^ THE STEAMER CITY POINT, Cap
??????32 tain WM. T. MCNKLTY will sail
tTonicTiarleiton for St Augustine, on Friday Even?
ing at eight o'clock, touching at havannah. Fer?
nandina, Jacksonville and Palutlia.
For freight or pa-sage, apply ou board or to
J. D. AIKEN k CO., Agents,
November 24 4 Atlantic Wharf.
FOH PALATKA. PhOKiUA,
VIA SAVANNAH, FI-BNANDJNA AND JACKSON
VILLE.
i- . ?ff"**??. THE FIR?T-OA8S STEAMER
?sSS??EaC DICTATOR, Captain CHAS. WILLEY,
will SEI trom Charleston ever 'tuesaay Evening, at
Eight o'clock, tor the above points.
lhe flrstc'aiB ?earner CITY Poi ST, Captain Wat
T MCNELTY, will i ail from Chirleston every Friday
Evening, al Eight o'clock, lor above point?.
tonn^cUng with the C-ntral railroad at -avannah
for Mobile and Ne < Orleans, and with tue florida
Railroad at Fernandina for Cedar lie., s at which
point steamers connect with New Orleans, Mobile,
PcuBaco a. Ke^ 'Vest and Havana.
Thromih bili* Lndio- given for Freight to Mobile,
Pensacola and New Orleans.
Both steamers mil connect with tho "Oclawata"
fte .mer? a' Palatin.
Ali fr?-ig> '. u rattle on the wharf.
Goods not removed at su; set will be i'.oro-J at risk
ard expense ol owners.
For Freight or Passjge engagcract t, apply to
J. ?J. ALK.E* ? CO" iofOTs,
-outh All .ulii 1 barf.
N. R.-No extra charge for Meals aud staterooms.
November 21
\ONE TRIP A WEEK.\
CHARLESTON A \ O SA VA- > i\n STEAM
PACKET LI NV,
VI \ BEAUiOB r. nil TON HEAD ANO BL?K?TO?I
STEAMER PILOT BOT.Cap;. V. A. VATJEH,
STEAMLRFAN.- IE..Cent, fasa PECK
r-a.. CN. OF TEE A.UOY"*' MaVAttEBS
?-^sLfc^?,will leavj \,'lnxiestua e. J , Ttttidca
Morning, ;:t 7 o'clock, .-mc *jTa;m.i'i ever Thurtiaf
Morning, at 7 0*1'. k
Tor Fragt? or ;?wf, Rpi !y "o
j ur: f i i'.cj-uN.
Junga_ ?tCMBU ri fir-. 7" M
TOWAGE -.EHVil ii
f***"*, THE FIB>T-CLiS-> rOWBO*T
?JS??SSSSI-?'AMS?/X,Cap: ?n..- Is now
i!: ni;, e'. ? I-.-. ? ur.tiou to LO'?? v . of aay
tciiuagctoa oui uh.rc?'?vi S?"
il rrtiueliu UtLIEe'. Capt. i. i Mts* ei.-om
,..: . .der. Will take Towage onaagoavaw ....jin
the Harbor, or io pia--cs on Ashia.- i.n? Cooper
Blvers, at reasonable rates.
JOHN FERGUSON,
October'?7 tuff mo Accommodation Wharf.

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