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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, August 09, 1871, Image 1

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VOLUME XI.-NUMBER 1671.
CHARLESTON, WEDNESDAY" MORNING, MAY 3, 1871.
EIGHT DOLLARS A YEAR.
THE GENTIE POISONER.
FRES Fl 'DE VEL OF1IEXTS IX THE CASE
OF TBE WIDOW WIIABTOy.
Borrowing Stoney from Her Friends
and Poisoning them to Escape Pay?
ment-How a Baltimore Capitalist
Lost $3000-Dosed with Poisoned Pills
and Brandy.
[From the Baltimore American.]
The interest In the Wharton case remains
unabated, and each day develops some new
fact or rumor which affords material for specu?
lation and conjecture. While the unhappy
woman ls brooding over the misery ot ?
blasted reputation in the tower of the city jail,
the outside world is busy with her past per?
formances In the way ot getting rid of her
creditors, and If the half that is told is true,
there has not been such an expert in her pe?
culiar line since the days ot che Countess
of Boissons. That there should have been no
detection until the 29th of June, 1371, ls one of
those unfathomable mysteries that cannot be
.explained on any rational basis. Leaving out
; lox. the question the skill and acumen and pro?
fessional experience of the eminent physicians
who treated some of the supposed victims, lt
would seem that, under the ordinary doctrine
of chances, there would have been some indis*
cretlon. or blunder, orlauure,that would have
aroused suspicion and led to an investigation.
But never in all the world before did polished
manners and high social position comer such
absolute impunity. Suspicion was disarmed
in her presence. When one poor heart-broken
woman, inconsolable over the loss ol' ber hus?
band aud daughter, charged Mrs. Wharton
with hs vlng caused their death, she was de
. dared to be a lunatic, and by eome of the
" friends of the'accused has been so regarded
.ever since.
A PERSISTENT BORROWER.
As is well known, Mrs. Wharton had a pas?
sion for borrowing money from her friends.
She was profuse in her hospitality,' and had a
way of making her home exceedingly pleas?
ant to her guests; but whoever formed an in?
timacy with her tamlly (if a person of means)
was likely to be importuned for a pecuniary
favor either by way of loan or endorsement.
Sometimes her promises were kept and re?
payment promptly made, but, in a majority ot
-cases, the confiding creditor had abundant op?
portunity of regretting the good nature that
yielded to her persuasive entreaties. There ls
some difference of opinion as to her circum?
stances. Some of her Int?mate friends sup?
posed her to be wealthy, hut the opinion
seemed to be founded upon her extravagant
use of money rather than any knowledge of
her resources. The house In Mcculloch street,
purchased by Major Wharton, was conveyed
to Mrs. Wharton, but shortly a .1er Major
Wharton's death she Conveyed lt to. her
daughter Nellie, In whom the title to the prop?
erty is now vested. She did not own -the
house In which she lived on Eutaw street.
Since Major Wharton's death Mrs, Wharton
?*fcas been in the recelotof a pension of twenty
five dollars per month from the United States,
which she* drew quarterly, the last payment
being made June 4th. She may have other
resources than these mentioned, but if she
has they are not generally known.
THE INSURANCE MONET.
Part of the $30,000 which Mrs. Wharton re?
ceived from the Insurance companies after the
death of her son"; was no ?loubt expended in
the payment of debts previously contracted.
Fourteen thousand dollars of this sum seems
to have been secured to Miss Nellie on the poli?
cies; at least that sum was invested in United
States bonds, and deposited at the banking
house of Alexander Brown Jt Sons in her
narrie^ . United States bonds, representing
-S?uOfMkere also deposited to the credit of Mrs.
WrrtB?. This money she appeared to be sav?
ing tijpfo rainy day." With persistent credit?
ors pressing her on every side, and her trip to
Europe In imm?diate.prospect, (forwhich she
was trying to borrow money,) she appears to
have made no promises founded on a hypothe?
cation of the bonds, nor any offer to deposit
them as collateral security with the gentlemen
whom she aakecLk) endorse for her."
I
CT1TI0U3 HOUSE.
Whatever may be. the result of the charge
.of poisoning, there 'ls one statute offence of |
which, rumor says, Mrs. Wharton has been;
repeatedly guilty, namely, "misrepresentation
of existing lac ts," In her efforts to borrow
money. The devlcesjand subterfuges to which
she resorted are by ?means consistent with
that simplicity and amiability and loftiness of ?
-Character which her friends claim for her. To
a gentleman well known In financial circles,
she applied,, about ten months ago, for the
loan or five thousand dollars. Although a
personal friend,- be did not care to make such
Inve?ment, and at' first declined. She
I told him such a plausible, story, to the
ithat she waa about to purchase afine
? on Walnut street, fn Philadelphia; that
lad twenty-two thousand, and only need
Ive th ?usan cL?p ore tc make np the balance
ofthe whole BU rr asked for the property; the
house was'being sold by a trustee, who was
a friend of ber's, and she did nat want to
.?miss the opportunity, of buying lu- The
. reluctant capitalist then suggested that, .If j
sh? had twenty-two thousand dollars ready
: to pay "flown, there would be no difficulty
in getting au accommodation for ?ie balance,
or If that could not jj e done there would-be
no difficulty in raising- five thousand dollars
in Philadelphia on a house worth twenj^-ser
-en thousand. The borrower still persisted^!
UQ-ft last got the money, giving her noteVfofl
th<ramount, payable in lour months. Eon
some time the credulous capitalist supposed 1
that the house had been purchased, and he
had no apprehensions about the safety of his
money. The note became due,' but there were
Buch positiv? promises of payment at the end
of the ' next ensuing four months that Mrs.
Wharton was permitted to renew it, upon
stating two separate and distinct sources from
which the money was to be derived (neither
ofohichhad any existence.) In the mean
tim^ptheMender began to make some inquiry
about the Philadelphia house, and to his utter
astonishment he learned that the whole story
wa#a pure. Action. He was informed there
was no house for sale in the locality mention?
ed-no trustee appointed. to sell, and, of j
course, no purchase by Mrs. Wharton.
? THE PLEA OE INSANITY.
It i/understood that Mrs. Wharton's friends
utterly reject tile very suggestion that a? plea j
of insanity ought.to be interposed in her case,
and it has also been asserted that she herself
Bhowed great Indignation when she read in
the newspapers that such might be'the line of
'defence, if, then, this charitable mantle which
tbs community is ready to throw over these
>?nany moral idlosyncracles is discarded, all
Who l?jHftibe woman and believe her Innocent
of thwaBfckcrlme of which she ls accused are
bouadTWffcept tho Judgment which the pub?
lic pA upon these misrepresentations and de?
ceptions which she practiced upon her credi?
tors. If they are the acts of a sane person,
there can be no complaint if she is Judged as a
sanacerson. A very good Vornan, no matter
how pressing the necessity, would scarcely
make iv Buch a story as that related above for
the purpose of obtaining a loan. It seems,
to8, that at this particular time there were
other friends that might have been made avail?
able. ;
MRS. WHARTON PRESCRIBES FOR A VISITOR.
Menti Ahas already been made in the Amer?
ican of ifcase in which Mrs. Wharton.under?
took to prescribe for one of her creditors, who
was suddenly-taken ill In her house. In the
west end di the city there lives an "unmarried
?lady, ln^he enjoyment of competence, which
sometimes permits her to lend money to her
friends. At one time the Wharton's lived in a
house which Jjelonged to this lady's brother,
?nd from this circumstance an Intimacy sprung
mp between the families, which culminated In
:a lban-of two thousand dollars to Mrs. Whar?
ton after-she became a widow. The relations
of the parties were most friendly, and the lady
had no apprehensions about the safety of her
money. The notes, were tor different sums
.amounting to two thousand aoliars in the ag
Segat?. Upon Mrs. Wharton's suggestion
at lt would be more convenient to have the
whole amount pot Into one note, the lady in?
nocently delivered np the notes which she
lield and took Mrs! Wharton's promise to pre?
pare her a note for two thousand- dollars,
which, on some pretext, she pretended it was
notojust then convenient for her to do. The
lady" called repeatedly at Mrs. Wharton's for
the note, but she was always put off- with some
plass?ble excuse. One day she called and was
/tiakjK suddenly Ul. Mrs. Wharton gave ber
three pills, and in a short time she was in con?
vulsions. A young physician, now practicing
Jn a?aeighboring State, was first summoned,
and after him a distinguished professor of
medical science, who still resides la the city.
"TAKE THIS WOMAN HOME."
When the last named gentleman came lo the
patient's bedside, he peremptorily said, "Take
this woman home; there has been quite enough
of trouble, sickness and death in this house."
Although exceedingly lil, the lady was taken
home in a carriage. The next morning, lt ls
alleged, Mrs. Wharton dispatched a messen?
ger to inquire for her health, and further
showed her solicitude by sending the lady a
bottle of brandy. The'patient lasted a mouth?
ful of the brandy, and presently went into
convulsions. She Las partially recovered her
health, but she still suffers from what she sup?
poses to be the effects of the medicines ad?
ministered at Mrs. Wharton's house. The
bottle o? brandy was preserved, and is now
being analyzed. If poison ls discovered In lt,
this case would seem to be the strongest and
most conclusive ol all that have yet been de?
veloped, but at thia late day lt is highly nrob
able that there can be no satisfactory "test.
The two thousand dollars, principal and in?
terest, was paid on the day that she was sent
tojalL Mrs. Wharton owed a sister-in-law of
the lady referred to $1000, $225 of which has
been paid. . .
SEARCHING FOR POISON.
It is understood that the analysis of the con?
tents of the jars brought from Norristown,
(stomach of Mrs. Wharton's son,) began yes?
terday. Mrs. Whuton's friends have telegraph?
ed to Professor Charles Mayer, of Washington,
asking him to assist In the examination. Pro?
fessor .Aiken, it ls rumored, his no objection
to having Professor Mayers assistance, but
can enter into no arrangement to that effect,
without the State's attorney's consent. Mr.'
Knott will return from Cape May on Saturday,
when lt is probable that the matter will be
finally decided. Professor Miles, of Baltimore,
will, lt ls understood, assist Professor Aiken in
the examination.
FOREIGN NOTES AND GOSSIP.
-The ex-Emperor Napoleon recently took a
short pleasure excursion upon the Thames in
the cigar-snip yacht of the Messrs. Winans, of
Baltimore, and expressed himself as being
I highly pleased with the novel vessel.
-The sermon trade in England, according
to a writer in St. Paul's, ls very extensive,
though not strikingly remunerative to the
I authors. The average price of original (?)
i sermons is quoted at one shilling and three?
pence to one shilling and sixpence, postage
paid.'
-During lae Commune the battalion of Na?
tional Guards belonging to the Bank of France
remained at their postB. In the distribution
of rewards and punishments following the fall
of the Commune, the government permitted,
this battalion to retain their arms. The bank
now Intends to make each man a present ofJ200
francs of rentes, which is equal to a capital ot
4000 francs, besides giving them a sliver com?
memorative medal.
-Mr. John Francis Maguire, M. P., and a
sympathizer with the Irish Nationalists, writes
to the London Times that he purposes to sub?
mit a resolution at the next session, of the
House of Commons, looking to the establish?
ment of aa Irish Parliament to legislate upon
all matters ot a purely Irish nature, while re?
serving to the Imperial Parliament complete
control over e". questions of an Imperial char?
acter. Mr. i. '.gulre further states that the
measure will receive a considerable amount of
general support,
-Bismarck recently told a story concerning
his enjoyment of a cigar, which he did not
smoke. It was at the battle of Konnlggratz,
and he had biit one cigar in his pocket. This
he determined to reserve until after the vic?
tory over the Austrians, which he saw rapidly
approaching. As he rode over the battle-iield.
however, he observed lying upon the ground
a wouuded dragoon, who was murmuring for
something wherewith to refresh him. He be?
thought himself of his solitary cigar, lighted
lt, and held it between the wounded man's
teeth while he smoked. Relating this anec?
dote, the. German Chancellor concluded with
these words : "I never enjoyed a cigar so much
as that one I did not smoke."
-Bismarck understands the art of diploma?.,
cy In all Its phases, At' the annual festival,
recently held * of the Osterburg Marksmen, a
master shoemaker. Otto Bismarck by name,
was elected King of the Marksmen. With a par?
donable vanity, and some degree of assurance,
he telegraphed in thia wise to the Imperial
.Chancellor: "Otto Bismarck, of Osterburg,
King of the Marksmen, sends his greeting, on
the present festival day, to bis Excellency
Prince Bismarck, as his countryman and
namesake. To the great delight of the people
of Osterburg, Bismarck the great thus replied
to Bismarck the little: "I return my hearty
thanks to my distinguished namesake. Herr
Otto Bismarck, of Osterburg, for his friendly
compatriot saluation." *
-Acorrespondent thus speaks of Queen
Victoria's court breakfasts In Buckingham
Palace Park : "On these occasions tbe Queen
walks about very smiling and chipper, with a
white cap that looks like a French bonne's o vei?
ner head, apd the widow's weeds a thought
IL'h tened ?j a suspMon here aid there of the
white lace or crape.. Tberfbreaklasts take
place in the afternoon at half-past four o'clock,
and the ladles tutend In a costume gotten up
expressly for tnt occasion. They gossip and
chatter ln.gtofjps on the sward, while the gen
tie meo, in uniform and stars and garters quiz
them in a highly arlaba eratic- way, or discuss
politics'in the arbors. The little Princess of
Wales, iii particular, ls very lively and popu?
lar on these ocoteious, and has a sprightly air
wTiich neither the well-known propriety and
?htlness-oi her royal mamma, or the indi?
ce of her big lazy husband, seems to have
lened." i?W *.
'he. German CorrespondenajBKaffts some
curlew lacte about the manneaJBrwhich the
French war Indemnity ls palcLn&s lt would
take the entire loree of clerks In all the vari?
ous German treasuries .several years to count
the money, the correctness of the amounts is
ascertained, by counting the contents of a few
ba?3 and chests' only, and by weighing the
rest to see lt they correspond with those
counted. The packing, such as bags and
boxes, is to be paid for by Germany at the
rate of two sous per bag; thus, of the first in?
stalment, she will have to return 50,000 francs
for the bags. The house of Rothschild has
undertaken the payment ol the bills of ex?
change for the French Goveru ment, which are
to be made payable In ready money, and with?
out loss, at not more than two months' date.
This transaction will take place in London,
between the Rothschilds and the German Con?
sul. The latter will also rec-.-ive the sums
which France pays in English balk notes,
while the silver and other loreign, but not
-French, notes will be sent direct from Paris
to Berlin by rail. It is probable that the
French will pay part of the amount in gold
and silver bars, instead of coined money,
which would greatly facilitate the business of
receiving the Indemnity. In all cases, France
hrs to bear the whole expense ot transporting
the money tb the German frontier.
-The recently reported earthquakes give to
the theories ol' Professor Fred. Mohr, of the
University ot Bonn, published in 186G, a re?
newed Interest. Unable io receive the popular
theory that the earth was once a melted moss,
because the silicates found in many of the
olden rocks, if once melted, possess certain
chemical and physical properties which they
never after lose, and which do not distinguish
them in nature in their crystalline form, he
supposes that the interiors the earth is simi?
lar to its surface, except that lt ls more
thoroughly saturated with water. The moun?
tains, he says, are continually growing from
beneath the inorganic matter in the water,
slowly crystallizing and pushing the range up?
ward. Sometimes, according to Professor
Mohr, the water dissolves away the earth,
making a cave miles, perhaps, in extent; the
roof ol this not being strong enough to uphold
the mass of earth above, gives away, and this
causes one of those great convulsions which
we call earthquakes. The friction caused by
this falling produces heat enough to melt the
rocks and convert the water into steam, and
this accounts for the volcanic phenomena
which generally attend earthquakes. The
Professor thinks his theory ls sustained by the
fact that earthquakes move in concentric and
ever-increasing circles, and also because the
water of the sea on such occasions has been
seen to-recede, flowing- toward the centre of
the -convulsion and then return, overflowing
the highest marks.
TUE NATIONAL LAROR CONGRESS.
ST. LOUIS, August. 8.
At thetoeeting of the National Labor Con?
gress to-day, the president read the annual
message. Delegates from the Southern, West?
ern and Middle States reported, but none from
New England.
GLIMPSES OF GOTHAM.
BAD FEELING BETWEEN THE RIVAL
RADICAL ORGANS.
Greeley Jealous of Jones-Remarkable
Newspaper Success-Tammany Courts
' an Investigation-The News from tho
Charleston Electlo n-What was
Thought of It In New York-South*
Carolina Black Statesmen Enlighten.
lng the Northern Mind-Three New
Theatres.
[PROM Ont OWN CORRESPONDENT/
NEW YORK, August 5.
Tue New York Times has achieved such a
newspaper success with its so-called "ex?
posures" that the jealousy of the older Radical
paper bas been aroused. The Tribune affects
to sneer at the performances of its rival.* I
"What a fuss this fellow makes over his elev?
enth hour discoveries," says the Tribune;
"why we have been exposing these frauds of
Tammany for years. They are no new things
to u3 or our readers. If there ls any credit to
be given to anybody for showing up th?'wick- i
edness of the 'ring' lt belongs to us." To (
which the Times replies that its contemporary ?
ls not only green with envy, but that it is in- i
fluenced by the value of its share of the city
printing to make a covert deience of the' j
"ring." The Tribune protests that lt ls zealous |
In opposing Tammany, but that it believes the '
charges ought to be Investigated In a spirit of !
deliberation and coolness. "The Times flies ;
into a rage," complains the Tribune. "Who, i
that is honest and true would not be in a rage <
at the discovery of so ranch, villany," retorts '
the Times. It seems probable from the heated
manner in which the rival Radical papers dis- <
cuss their differences that they will- soon be <
denouncing each other as charlatans and con- i
sorts with swindlers. <
The Times has,'made a good thing ont of Its 1
.sensation. Ever since the death of Mr. Ray- <
mond lt had been running, down hill. Its <
. editorial page had become dreadfully dull and 1
stupid, and there was an evident lack of en- (
terprise in its news department. Purchasers 1
dropped off, until Just -before Its recent coup
Us circulation had fallen below 20,000. I am t
credibly informed that the "exposures" ran i
its daily circulation up lo65,000. The Tribune (
suffered badly by the success of its rival, and c
lt ls not strange that Mr. Greeley growls. The t
average New York newspaper reader is a t
creature of Impulse. He buys the Times Just y
now because everybody is talking about it, c
and is inclined to believe the paper Is intent t
upon doing a great work of reform. And yet I
there is nothing plainer than that the Times y
bas only selfish motives. It hopes to benefit (
itself drat, and the Radical party (Grant and
Gonkling wing) afterwards. Ic pays no at- t
tentlon whatever to the constantly repeated 1
suggestion that it should prove its sincerity in <
the cause of reform by exposing the notori- t
ons Radical frauds in the customhouse and t
naval office. To show up how Radical officials t
rob the merchants and citizens would "hurt 1
the party." - t
Meantime, Hail and Connolly have been i
forced to take the bull by the horns. They t
are not only having the so-called "secret 1
accounts" printed for public' inspection, but *t
they have addressed a note to the president of 1
the Chamber of Commerce requesting him to, (
convene that body and the appointment of a t
"large and influential committee of well- t
known and upright citizens to make a full and c
exhaustive examination of the public ac- {
counts," and report the result when complet- c
od to the people of this city. This certainly
will bring the matter to a head, and it ls but
just to the mayor and comptroller .to say that
their readiness to throw the accounts, open to
searching investigation, ls the best evident
they have yet given of their Innocence. t
"?"Tn^gra?fyiffg result of the municipal elec- c
tlou In Charleston excited editorial remark \
In most of the daily newspapers. Outside
of the newspapers, I have heard a num?
ber of 'people, express their satisfaction
among them a couple of influential German
born New Yorkers, whose national vanity
was tickled by the elevation of their distin?
guished countryman to tte chief magistracy t
of one of the most renowned cities In history. >
Two of your statesmen appeared on the c
platform of Cooper Institute, last evening, to t
enlighten the citizens of New York as to the ,
condition of the colored race lu the South, t
Although-the meeting had been extensively v
trumpeted in the Radical newspapers before- v
hand, an audience ol barely one hundred peo- a
pie assembled. Yon, ban Imagine what a hand- ,.
ml they appeared to be la an auditorium cana- J
ble of seating three or four thousand peo pm ?
The colored Inhabitants of New York appa- (
rent ly took no 1 n teres t lu the condition of their a
Southern kinsfolk, for they did not come to 0
the meeting. A wheezy band attempted to ,,
attract a crowd by playing such airs as "Rule Jj
Britannia," but it was of no use. Horace
Greeley presided, and throughout the session
looked as if he was bored nearly to death. He
Introduced R. B. Elliott, trie Congressman,
who entered - Into a bitter tirade against the r
white people of South - Carolina. He went ou li
at great length "to describe the hardships, t
oppressions and lniustl:e to which the colored \
race had been ana still were subjected to by t
the whites ot the South, and contrasted it with 1
the forbearauce of the colored race. God S
grant that all danger of conflict may be avoid- t
ed tor the sake ol the Southern whites, and for i
the sake of the blacks, as well as the glory of c
American freedom." (Herald report.) Elliott t
was followed by Cardozo, "who defended the t
action ot the colored Legislature, and showed c
that the trouble which had existed was entire- v
ry due to the Intolerance of the old slavehold- t
e'rs, who could not bear to see their old eleves o
in the enjoyment ol* any-rights." -After car- c
dozo's address the meeting came to a sudden 1
stop. No allusion was made in the speeches
to the. news from Charleston.
Two new theatres are. being erected, and
heavy subscriptions are being collected tor a
third. The new theatre In Brooklyo,' on the ?
site of the old St. John's*-Episcopal Church, ls ?
late to our great suburb what Wallack's is to ?j
the metropolis. The Conways own a part of 1
it, and will be the lessees. It will be-ready to j
open In October. The new theatre being built (
by ex-Internal Revenue Collector Sheridan 1
Shook, on the corner of Broadway and Union 1
Square, is nearly finished, and will open with '
the beginning ot the fall season. The pro- .
posed German theatre wiil be the largest and 1
most magnificent in the citv. It is to cost ?
$700,000, Including the cost of the land. The 1
subscriptions have already reached $100,000. !
It is designed, if possible, to locate lc on !
Fourteenth street, between Third and Fourth
avenues, and occdpy twelve city lots, which j
will make a total lrontage of 150 feet, and a '
depth ol' 200 feet. The Germans do nothing '
now-a-days except on a colossal scale. Their 1
new temple ol tho drama ls to include under
its roof a grand banquet hall, which will be
suitable also for balls and publlouieetings, a
small coucert galoon, a first-class restaurant,
and a number of fine stores. It is estimated
that the Income irom rents, exclusive of the
theatre, will be $112.000 annually, which will ,
allow a handsome interest on the luvestment.
NTM.
THE BATH PAPER MILLS.
The work of closing the break in the dam,
building a new brick flood-gate, ways, &c,
was commenc?d at the Paper Mills last Tues?
day ?pon, under the supervision of Messrs.
Geo*. Hull and S. Winter Plume. Although
tnjpsak in this dam ls much worse tush the
Langley Mills, the water being irom nine to
twenty feet deep, the current of the stream
was turned, at G.30 A. M. on Thursday, and
now the work is progressing at the utmost
possible speed. While the injury, done
at Langley Mills wasj?aly the washing away
of the earth emban?ent, that at the Baili
Paper Mills was tliewfcplete destruction of the
flood-gates, waste wawr overfall and the canal
entrance, besides washing away th% dam
where it was the greatest height and the
heaviest work. With all this the above gen?
tlemen hope to have the mills going by the
first of October, and the work completed In a
good, substantial manner. The new overfall
for waste water will be one hundred and fifty
feet long, which lt is hoped will prevent any
like accident in the future, though lt ls dlffl
cull to build anything that WI*stand the sud?
den pressure of a flood as great as that which
waa caused by the breaking of the Langley
mill-dam.- Augusta Ckronide.
TSE QROWiNQ COTTON CROP.
Dismal Accounts from Georgia and
Florida.
The Gaines ville (Fla.) Independent of the
4th Instant says: "We are sorry to chronicle
that a great many of our farmer-: complain
that the rust is Injuring their cotton crop very
much, and the 'bottom crop* or bolls is drop?
ping off to a targe extent, which lt is feared
will reduce the coming crop one-half."
The Quincy (Pla.) Journal of the 4th Instant
says: "Since our last notice of the crops, cot?
ton has greatly Improved. If the splendid
growing weather we have had tor the last
three weeks continues, tbe cotton yield of this
county, after all, will be tolerably good. Corn
ls not. turning out as well as expected, but
still wo hope enough will be gathered to do
the county."
The Rome, Georgia, Commercial says: "We
conversed with several farmers yesterday
(rom different parts of the county, who report
the crop prospecls as very discouraging. With
goods rains the yield would not exceed a third
of a crop. Everything is completely burned
up, except cotton, and a much longer contin?
ued drought would almost destroy that."
The Columbus Sun, speaking of the crops in
that section, says: "It ve have the very best
of seasons, we do not believe we can raise
two-thirds of an average cotton crop. Nor
are the reports from other sections any better.
Between here and Opeltka they are wretched.
Corn is so burnt up that little fodder can be
saved. On the majority of the lands it will re?
quire twenty acres of cotton to make a bale
mingled with a light sprinkling ot rocks." ?
A correspondent writes from Morgan Coun?
ty, Ga. : "My estimate will be based partly on
personal observation, and partly.on opinions
ind reports made?to me by prominent plant?
ers. Tbe wheat crop In this section was, as
pou doubtless have already heard, almost a
total failure. The cotton crop, as a general
thing, ls not good. It will compare with that
st last year in the ratio of two to three-that
is, about two-thirds as much will be made,
provided the seasons hereafter are favorable."
The Bainbridge (Ga.) Argus, of the 5th, says
:otton ls growing rapidly and Improving every
lay. The-same paper says the rust has made
ta appearance on the colton in portions ot this
county. A field near this place has shed Its
eaves, and all the forms and young bolls are
lead. AU the maturing bolls are open. The
caterpillar dy ls believed to have made its de?
mi, and apprehensions of much injury to the '
mtton crop from this insect is being Indulged
)v many of the farmers in that section.
The Boston (Thomas County, Ga.) Journal of
he 5th instant says the crop reports in that
'egion are anything but favorable. The want
>f rain during the past month has cut the corn
irop short, and it ls feared a less quantity will
>e made than was last year. Cotton ie also
greatly Injured-first on-account of extreme
vet weather, and'how on account of extreme
?ry weather. Four or Aye open bolls of cot?
on on one stalk are reported, but this does
mt rejoice the farmeri, for, say they, the
veather ls so dry and the sun so not as to
lauBe unmatured bolls to open.
The Griffin (Ga.) Star, of the 5th instant,
ays: "vVe passed through a portion of Pike,
Meriwether, Coweta and this county the first.
>f the week and lound the crops suffering
nuch more than we expected. There seems
o oe a streak running from Line Creek
brough the lower portion of Coweta and
Meriwether, and extending into Pike, where
hey have not had a season in nearly seven
veeks. lu many places fodder is literally
mrned up, and the stalks and ears of corn
ook as it they were dead. The cotton looks
vi ttiered, and we heard that in some Instances
t was dying. To the above there were rare
inceptions, where the corn was as fine as the
pound could produce, and the cotton looked
?ealthy and vigorous. How far this drought
extends we could not learn. The farmers
renerally have 'laid by' their crops, but seem
llscouraged."
QUIETEN PORTO RICO.
POETO Breo, August 7.
The state of siege was raised yesterday
hroughout the Island, and quiet reigns. The
laptaln-general has resigned, ' and lt ls sup
tosed General Saud wlU be reappointed.
ECSOES OF OUR VICTORY.
The Harbinger of Prosperity.
[From the Augusta Constitutionalist.]
Congratulations are pouring In from all quar
ers upon Charleston for the brilUant victory
if the Citizens' ticket over the Radicals. . One
it the most pleasing features ot the result is
hat even the defeated party concede that the
ictory was not only decisive, but that lt was
airly achieved. They admit that they have no
'alla grounds for contesting the election, and
rill submit wit hont a protest. After so stormy
i canvass, this augurs well for the future tran
[iillUty of the city. It ls th? harbinger of
leace and good government. We hope ere
ery long to be able to enroll the City ot
marleston again as one of the well-governed
.nd prosperous dlies ot the cour try. In days
if yore this fine old City of the Sea was dlstln
;ulshed for her sound financial condition and
onservat I ve councils.
A Healthy Sign.
[From the New Tort News.]
The defeat of the Badlcal party In the mu
ilcipal election in Charleston, S. C., ls really a
tealtby sign. Il a city which bas been the strong
lold of the corrupt and worthless creatures
vlio have carpet-bagged from the North can
ie cleansed of such parties, what may not be
toped of the State, and eventually of the
iouthern country ? It is gratifying to observe
hat ?ll the respectable classes of citizens-the
lative Carolinians, the Northern-born resl
lents ot character and respectability, the Ger
nans, the Irish, and the orderly blacks
?anded together to defeat the carpet-baa
xew which, has battened and gorged Itself
vlth -plunder so long at the expeuse-ot the
axpayers of Charleston. The Mayor elect ls
in ?ruinent German citizen; the defeated can
lldate ls a Boston carpet-bagger, a brother of
'old woman" Parker Pillsbury.
. A Deserved Defeat.
[From the Washington Chronicle.]
The Bepifhlican party of that city has acted
in idiotic part. It has long been cursed with a
let of desperate and reckless rascals, the worst
>t whom were native white and colored men.
Che best men in the party insisted that these
traceless seamos should not be nominated for
)ffice, but the' Republican convention nomi
?ated a ticket which the best men of the party
?onld not and would not support. Several of
;hese were afterward set aside and better men
mt on. Still the ticket was one which ought
o have been beaten; and so far as it is con
:erned we are not at all sorry to record its de
eat. The victory of the Conservatives will,
?ve hope, teach the Bepublican party that their
Ulterate vagabonds must be put down and
heir beat men be nominated.. With such
?otninations as the Republicans made in
Charleston (except the Mayor and two or three
jthers) the party will be soundly beaten, and
Might to be.
ROASTING AN ACTOR.
A Scene Not In the Bills.
[From Don Fiat's Capital.]
Lord, how I did laugh at old Dean, father of
Juba Dean, one night. He was playing that
funny old king to Booth's Richard, one infer?
nal cold night In Buffalo. When Booth
stabbed him, the awkward old duffer fell flat
on the reeister of the 6tage. Some devil of an
actor seeing this, ran down and told the wild
Irishman at the furnace that everybody was
freezing on the stage-to rush up the fires.
We who were in the secret watched the re?
sult. First the dead king broke into a pro?
fuse perspiration while Bichard was deliver?
ing his long soliloquy. How the dead king
did sweat ! But, as the fire increased, he be?
gan to wriggle and squirm. The audience
was startled to see the body quiver and the
legs give little Dost mortem kicks not in ac?
cordance with the text. .We could hear him
mutter to Bichard :
"Hurry up, cuss it, hurry up ! I'm roasting
here !"
But Burnard continued rolling out lils heavy
thunder as Blow and deliberately as if his royal
highness were re&Jng on a bed ol' roses. At
last when he groaned out, "Down, down to
hell, and say I sent the thither I" bis depart?
ing, majesty rose up and walked off the stage,
rubbing his back as If he felt ridiculous, to the
utter amazement of the audience. But Booth
vms equal to the occasion. Striking au atti?
tude, he roared out :
Can such things be,
AnU overcome tn like a summer's cluml,
Without our special wonder?
Dean got a black eye and a broken nose
while attempting to kick the Irishman.
IRELAND AND AMNESTY.
DEPARTURE OF THE ROYAL PARTY
FROX DUB LIX.
The Cold Shoulder-Not a. Cheer Given
by the Crowds In the streets-The
Riot-Continued Excite men t-T h e
People Deprecate Lawlessness, but
Furor the Release of the Fenian.
Prisoners-The Communist Trials
The Insurrection in Algeria.
DUBLIN, August 8.
The royal visitors have left Dublin. There
was not a single cheer from the lined streets
through which they passed. The silence was
only broken by a few hisses. The conduct of
the police at Phoenix Park, which is denounced
as inexcusably brutal, embittered the people.
. LONDON, August 8.
A dispatch from Dublin says the city is quiet,
but the excitement of the populace has not
subsided. It is generally thought the sympa?
thizers of the Fenian prisoners have not given
up the idea of holding another meeting in
spite of the prohibition of the authorities. The
sentiment ot the majority of the people ls In
favor ot grantlag amnesty to ali Fenian prison?
ers, but violent opposition ?to th? authorities
is deprecated. The belief was that the royal
visit would be taken as an opportunity by tbe
government lor the release of the imprisoned
Fenians. The populace Is very bitter against
the Prince of Wales because he hos not interced?
ed tor amnesty. The. whole police loree is still on
the alert, and the military are consigned to the
harricks to be .ready, if called upon, to aid the
police. Thus far no deaths are reported, but {
lt is thought that Ave to ten persons will die
of their injuries. Howe, the superintendent
of police, ls in a critical condition, but hopes
are entertained for his recovery. It ls yet un?
certain whether the government can legally
prosecute Mr. Smythe and other leaders for
the demonstration.
In the Commons to-day, ofter a bitter de?
bate, Gladstone implored the House tc pass
the ballot bill, and the bill was passed. .
VERSAILLES, August 8.
The courts-martial for the trial of Com?
munists opened yesterday. The indictments
were read. Some of the prisoners treated the
proceedings with levity.
Advices from Algeria say the Insurrection?
ists are routed, and Monededron subdued.
The revolt, however, continues in the Province
of Constantine, the most eastern of the three
departments of which Algeria is composed.
Numerour murders are still committed by the
rebels la that province, and several forests
have been burned.
A council of war was held to-day, in which
Thiers and McMahon were present. It was re?
solved to adopt energetic measures to suppress
the Algerian rebellion.
A second election was held in Strasbourg
yesterday, and over half the voters abstained.
A similar result took place In Mulhouse and
the other conquered towas.
The Gaulois and Paris Journal state that
Jules Simon ls a member of the International
Society._
REWS FROH WASHINGTON.
Piensanton'? Removal-Its Manner and
Causes-Mis Successor-Chas. Francis
Adams- as Arbitrator, Acc., die.
WASHINGTON, August 8.
Last night Grant sent his private secretary
to Commissioner of Internal Revenue Pleasan
ton, requesting his resignation. Pleasanton
declined to resign, whereupon the President
determined to suspend him and appoint Doug?
las. This was formally done to-day, and Doug?
las is now in possession of tbe office. The im?
mediate causes assigned for Pleasanton's re?
moval In official circles are that the revenue
was not collected with efficiency, the reversal
of the rulings of his predecessors, making de?
cisions the effect of which needlessly les- j
sened the revenue, and acting on Impor?
tant matters without consulting Boutweli,
wherein Boutweli had paramount authority,
Pleasanton's letter concludes:
"In Justice to the public interests placed
under my charge, and the Importance to the
taxpayers of a proper solution of these difficul?
ties, I must respectfully decline to tender you
my resignation, and trusting lt may not be
deemed inappopriate, I will again request that
your present determination may bo reconsid?
ered, and an Investigation cf the matter of dif?
ference between the secretary and myself be
referred to the attorney-general for his legal
opinion."
Charles Francis Adams has signified his ac?
ceptance of the arbltratorshlp under the Wash?
ington treaty.
The President has departed. There was no
Cabinet to-day. '
The postal money order system with Ger?
many goes into effect on October 1, 1872,
the North German Lloyd Company requiring a
j ear's notice._
ENGLAND AND CANADA.
QUEBEC, August 8.
Advices by to-day's mull settle the final
withdrawal of the Imperial troops from the
Dominion. _.
THE WEATHER THIS DAY.
WASHINGTON, August 8.
The barometer will probably rise, with par?
tially cloudy and pleasant weather, on Wed?
nesday, north and west of Ohio. Cloudy and
threatening weather ls probable for the Gulf |
States. Fresh southwesterly winds, with
Sleasant weather, for the .Middle and Eastern
tates.
Yesterday's Weather Reports of the
Signal Service, U. S. A.-4.47 P. M.,
Local Time.
Place of
Observation.
c
6?
: ?
2 : 33
1 l?
Augusta.
Baltimore.
Boston.;.
Buffalo, N. Y....
Charleston.
Cheyenne, W. T.
Chicago.
(lluclnua'l.
Cleveland.
Corinne, Utah...
Detroit.-.
Duluth,Min ....
Indianapolis -
Kev West, Fla...
Knoxville, Tenn.
Lake City, Kia ..
Mempbls, Tenn..
Milwaukee, Wis.
MobUe.
Nashville.
Sew London, Ct.
New orleans....
New York.
Omaha, Neb.
Oswego, N. Y....
Philadelphia.
Pittsburg, Pa....
Portland, Me....
Rochester, N. Y.
.-an Francisco..
Savannah..?
St. Louis.
St. Paul, Minn..
Toledo, a.
Washington, D.O.
wumington.N.O.
Norfolk.
Lynchburg..
Leavenworth....
Cape Ma*.
Mt. Washlnnton.
? 30.01
29.ST
80.70i 82
I 29.76! 79
I 30.11: S6
! 29.041 C8
I 29.361 3'j
29.93' 83
|SW
SW
s
?SW
?SW
B
W
29.81
m
29.89
29 .SS
30.03;
30.01 75
30.06 SS
30.07
29.85
30.03
30.0.1
29.76
30.06
29.77
29.32
29.68
29.82
29.85
29.73
29.62
30.06
30.07
29.93
24.96
29.761 89
29.K4I 81
30.071 87
29.911 91
29.02 79
..9.98 81
29.85 80
30.12 66
Gentle.
Fresh.
Gentle.
Brisk.
Fresh.
Brisk.
Fresh.
Gentle.
?SW [Gentle.
SW|Fre,h.
j XW i Fresh.
iNWloentie.
I SW bight.
|E ?Fresh.
Gentle.
Fresh.
Gentle.
Fresh.
Light.
sw Fresh.
SW Gentle.
S Fresh.
S Geuile.
W Brisk. .
S .,
SW Gentle.
SE Genile.
SW Brisk.
W .
S [Gentle.
W Fresh.
SW Gentle.
SW Fresh.
S Light.
SW Brisk.
S Fresh.
-.W Gentle.
E Light.
SW High,
sw |Gfnr.ie.
2- BB
? S
Fair.
Fair.
Thr'ng.
Fair.
Fair.
Ilazy.
Fair.
Fair.
Fair.
Fair.
Clear.
Clear.
Fair.
Fair.
Cloudv.
?Fair.
L. Rain
Clear.
Cloudy.
Thr'ng.
Thr'ng.
Fair.
Clear.
Clear.
Clear.
Fair.
Cl'g up.
Foggy.
Fair.
Fair,
loudy.
Cloudy.
Clear.
Clear.
Cloudy.
Clear.
Cloudy.
Thr'ng.
Clear,
ll. Kain
Moiviv.
NOTE.-The weather report date<l 7.47 U'CIUCK,
this morning, will be posted in the rooms of the
Cr.atnber of Corameri/e ac IO o'clock A. M., and,
together with the weather chart, may (by the
courtesy'of the Chamber) be examined by ship?
masters at any time during the day.
THE DEMOCRATS SWEEP KENTUCKY.
LOUISVILLE, August 8.
The Democrats carry the State by. about
30,000 majority. All the Democratic candi?
dates for the Legislature are elected.
TROUBLE NEAR SAVANNAH.
SAVANNAH, August 7.
A party of negro excursionists on the Saran
nah Seaboard and SMdaway Railroad took [
possession of the cars. After cutting loose
two of the cars near Sandfly Station they com?
menced "fighting among themselves. One
negro ls reported killed. The remaining cars,
with a large number of ladles on board, came
on to the city. The negroes have possession
of the road. The sheriff will go out tonight to
arrest the rioters. ^
- SAVANNAH, August 8.
The sheriff's posse which went out last night !
to arrest the negro excursionists, returned
this morning. The negro men had ali left the
captured cars and taken to the woods, leaving
their women and children in the cars. These
were brought to the city and: allowed togo to
their homes. No arrests have been made.
NEW YORK ITEMS.
NEW TOBE, August 8.
Within the past few days, one steamer and
six vessels bave been quarantined with yellow
fever on board from the West Indies.
Parepa-Bosa arrived-lo the Scotia.
Specie shipments to-day over r. quarter of a
million.
Thurlow Weed returns from Europe, the
trip falling- to restore his health. ?. . "
At the Court of Special Sessions torday, Na?
than Boyofsky, a Jew, was charged with dis?
turbing the Methodist congregation of Alan?
son Church by working on a sewing machine
during the hours of divine service in a room
opposite the church. Judge Sbandly found him
guilty, but suspended sentence. The judge
said no disturbance to religious worship of
any kind could be permitted. The law, he
said, had the same redress against others if
they disturbed bis religious worship on Sa?
turday.
?Datdies, Jsrosirrj, &t.
JpiD?E JEWELST, WATCHES, Ac.
THE LATEST STYLES.
Particular attention is invited to the NEW,
LABOE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF WATCHES,'
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE AND FANCY GOODS,
suitable for Presents, just received and opened.
a -
AT
JAMES ALLAN'S, No. 307 KINO STREET.
JAMES ALLAN'S, No. 307 KING STREET.
JAMES ALLAN'S. No. 307 KING STREET.
All the newest and most exquisite designs In
Jewelry, comprising,
SETS OF PEARL. GARNET. ALL GOLD,
. CORAL AND STONE.
Leontine, Opera. Neck and Vest CHAINS; Seal
Kings, Dlampnd Rings; Cent's Pins, Pearl and
Diamond; Plain Gold and Wedding Rings always
on hand or made to order; Sleeve Buttons'and
stnds, Bracelets, r.roochea and Earrings; Armlets
ami Necklaces, In Gold and Coral; Brooches for
Hahr or Miniatures, Lockets, Charms and Masonic I
Pins, Glove Bauds, at
JAMES ALLAN'S, No. 307 KING STREET.
A few dcors above Wentworth street.
nov24-mwf_
ALL, BLACK & GO.
B
No. 665 AND 661 BROADWAY, N. T.,
Have jost received a fine assortment of Im?
ported
HORSE T I M E 2 S
for Sporting Purposes-denoting Minutes, Sec?
ondsand Quarter Seconds. Price $25. Orders
for every description of RACING and Presentation
Plate, executed at the- shortest notice. Designs
drawn to order and Estimates given.
Also the largest assortment of BBADT-MADK
SILVXB AND TAB LEW ARB to be found in the city.
Jnlyl8-lyr_.
SRiButiatuouB.
C
HARLES LIEBENROOD,
STEAM TURPENTINE DISTILLERY,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
ter Highest Prices paid tu Cash for Crude Tuc
pen tina.
49" Virgin $1 23, Yellow Dip $3 30.
JalylO-lmo* ,
rp HE UNIVERSITY MEDICINES,
PREPARED BT THE
NEW YOEE MEDICAL UNIVEBSITT.
COMPOUND FLUID EXTRACT OF CANCER
PLANT-Price $2
Cough Llnctns-Price $1
ui:aa th us Extract, for Epilepsy, Sr. Vitus' Dance,
Spinal and Brain Affections-Price $2
Catarrh Specific-Price $2 -
Hydrated Oxymel, ror Consumption, Bronchitis,
Whooping Cough, Ac-Price $2
Pile Extract-a never falling Pile cure-Price $?.
May Apple Pills, for Dyspepsia, Torpidity of the
Liver, Constipation, Ac-Price so cents
Headache Pills-Price 60 cents *
Alkaline Resolvent-an Iodized chemical water
superior to Vichy, Kissingen, Seltzer, Ac
Price $1
Five Minute Pain Curer-Price $1
Chemical Healing, Blood and Bone Ointment,
. Price $1
Ethereal Phosphorus-Price $3
Lltlila-for the Kidneys-Price $3
Katalpa Extract-the woman's friend-Price $3
Victoria Regla-unrivalled for beautifying
complexion-Price $2
Amaranth-for the Hair-stops failing hair-Price
*l
Neuralgia-Rheumatic Elixir-Price $2
Fever and Ague Globules-Price $2 per box.
For sale by DR. H. BAER,
anr2l No. 131 Meeting street. Charleston.
rjlHE GREAT GERMAN REMEDIES.
Professor LOUIS WUND RAM'S BLOOD PURI?
FYING AND PURGATIVE HERBS, (in Pills Ol
Powders,) for the cure of all Acute or Chrome
Diseases, resulting from Impure blood and Imper?
fect digestion.
Also, the following Medicines by the same (PrO'
lessor Louts Wundram, Brunswick, Germany :)
GOUT POWDERS.
Rheumatic Tincture.
Epileptic Remedy.
Toothache Drops.
Herb Tea (for Dyspepsia and Nervousness.)
Rheumatic Herb Tea.
Gout Tincture
. Eye .Water.
Wundwasser (the German "Pal n tiller.)
For sale by Dr. H. I A ER,
mayjO _No. 131 Meering street.
JUST RECEIVED,
CARBOLATE OF LIME, the be3t Disinfectant
and destroyer of Rats. M ce Bugs. Coc?roacnes,
4c A small quantity placied where they frequent
will at once disperse them.
Pendleton's Panacea, or Vegetable Pain Ex
tractor.
A fresh supply of Fleming's Worm Confections
the most reliable in usc
Also, a fresh supply of SEAL OLEUM, the grea'
remedy for Rheumatism.
For sale, wholesale and retail, by
Dr. H. BAER,
myao_No. 131 Meeting street.
rjrmussES, suppcTfeiEES, 4c.
Just received, a large asssortment and for salea:
UH- H. BABR'S
_ Drug Store
g AGE'S CATARRH REMEDY.
PIERCE'S GOLDEN DISCOVERY. DsBIKG'S PILE
REMEDY, and all other new Preparations.
For sale by DR. H. BAER,
mario No. 131 Meeting street.
T
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(tontaina all the News, Editorial and Miscellane?
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THE DAILY NEWS AND THE TRI-WE?KLT
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INCLUDING: -~
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PoUtlcal Intelligence,
Commercial and stock Reports,
Literary Topics "and Reviews
Selected Social Essays,
Personal Gossip, and
Information for Planten.
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LIGHT READING, and
POETRY,
From tbe current Foreign and Domea?o
Periodicals.
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tv Address, (enclosing money in Registered;
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.RIORDAN, DAWSON <i CO.,
CHARLESTON, S, C.
rp HE YORKVILLE ENQUIRER FOE 1871
with tbe flrst of the year, tbe YORKVILLE EN?
QUIRER wm enter npon its seven teen tn volume;
and tbe success with which the proprietor has
met m the past, m his efforts to publish a first
class Literary and Family paper, bas induced him
to present attractions In the future, super:-. - to
any heretofore offered. With trna view, aid for
the parp?se of. securing
ORIGINAL SERIAL STORIES
or a high order, remunerative prizes were.offered
for the three best competitive stories. From a
large number that were submitted, a committee,
composed of disinterested and competent literary
gentlemen, selected as the most entertaining.
"AVLONA," ''TEMPTATION," and "TBE LOST
DIAMOND;" which, on opening the seals contain?
ing the authors' names, were found to te from
the pens of some of the most popular story wri?
ters; and these productions are pronounced equal
to the stories issued from any weekly press In the
country.
THE PRIZEJBTORIES
will mn through at least twenty-six numbers of
the paper, and will be followed by three other
Original Stories or ab so rb tag interest, written ex?
pressly for the ENQU?BEK, entitled, respectively.
''DESTINY-A TALE OF BEFORE THE WAR:"
"BROKEN CISTERNS:"and "UNKNOWN"-mak?
ing not less than three hundred columns of Origi?
nal Stories to be published dn-lng tho year,
which, in addition to the "Miscellaneous Read?
ing," adapted to ali classes, the Agricultural De?
partment, containing practical and useful infor?
mation for the Farmer; "Reading for the Sab?
bath," under the supervision of a clerical gentle?
man of marked ability, whose graceful pen embel?
lishes his department In every number: a column
of -Wit and Humor; together with Editorials on
appropriate topics; a corapend of the News, ac
home and abroad; Commercial and-Market Re
ports, and being one of the l?gest papers poo
fished In the South, printed in the best style on &
steam press; the ENQOXBEE will supply the want
or every fireside, and sustain its reputation as a~
newspaper for the family circle.
PRIZES TO SUBSCRIBERS.
With the determination' to keep np with the.
spirit of the times-the distribution of Prizes bo?
ng a popular idea-the proprietor has deter?
mined to adopt a system ot GIFT DISTRIBUTION
among the subscribers ol the ENQUIRER, but upon
a plan different from that so prevalent, in which,
brass Jewelry, "dumb watches" and shilling pic?
tures are the chief attractions. It is deemed pre?
ferable to award a substantial gift, In aa equita?
ble manner, upon the following plan:
Co mme rit tag with the first week. In January, .
1871, the name of each yearly subscriber on the
hat, who has paid m advance, will be-placcdla
a box provided for the purpose. On each. Wed?
nesday morning throughout the year; after tho?
roughly mixing the names, one name will be
drawn from the box-the person whose name
shall be so drawn to be entitled to a prize of FIVE
DOLLARS In cash, ss*-As hames are added to the
list they, will be placed In rhe box.-*? The name
of the person drawn each'week will be announced
in the Issueof the paper succeeding the drawing,
and the money promptly, forwarded to the ad?
dress.
TERMS, IN ADVANCE.
one copy, one year.S 3 00
Two copies, one year.. o 00
Ten copies, one year, with an extra copy to tue
person making the club.25 oo
Money can be safely remitted-by "registered'?
letter. Specimen copies wm be sent on applica?
tion. Address L. M. GRIST,
decl7 . ~ Yorkvllle, S. C?

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