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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, October 08, 1865, Image 1

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COLUMBIA, S. p., THURSDAY MORNING, IEPTEMBE% 21, ?8G5.
.YOL. I-NO. *?*. y
Thc United States Capitel Extension
UTMMorjr mt COH|M<M-DOBC, <&*.
Tile wutk o? removing t?io old
waUs, &c., adjacent to the room of
the Library of- Congress, preparatory
to entering upon toe work of exten?
sion, has been commenced, and al?
ready the portion of the North -wing
has been cleared oat, preparatory to
the reception of the materials. An
appropriation of $169,000 -was made
at the last < session of Congress for
thia work, and the contract was award?
ed to tile Architectural Iron Works of
New Tori;, at $149,854, Each wing
will ba nearly one hundred feet in
length, and twenty-nine in width,
with' four tiers of alcoves instead of
three, as in the present library, and
with the old library will form an E.
It is expected that the North wing
will be ready fox use" in December,
and .the South wing in Kay next.
The work in the -wings will be in
keeping with the old library, except,
as stated, there will be one more tier
of alcoves. The ceiling will finish
with a cove springing from-the upper
cornice df the-, alco ves, instead of the
consoles. The capacity of the present
Hbrary is for 3d, OOO rolumes: The
proposed wings vrill accommodate
70,000 and the attic story 20,000
making the total capacity of the en?
larged room 134,000. It is also pro?
posed to flt np two rooms on the lower
floor for reading rooms, while the
office of the library will be in the,
second Story./ .? . ,
The porticoes t?p. &x? JEast front of
the Capitol are now completed, and
at present the monolithic columns
are being set on the North front, the
traverse crane used to set the East
portico of the Senate wing having
been moved around and lengthened
for this work, it being about seventy
five feet high, and probably the longest
crane of the kind in the world.
By May, it is expected that the re?
maining portico on the North wing
will be completed.
The iron work upon the dome is
very nearly completed, and by the
meeting of Congress there will be no
reason why visitors cannot get as high
up in the world as possible. The
iron stairway, which is of easy ascent,
has been ?; mpleted to the tholus,
and the gas pipes have been put in
their places around the cornices in?
side the dome. It is proposed that
the seven hundred burners in the
dome, which otherwise would require
much labor, shall be lighted and ex?
tinguished by means of electricity. A
fresco on a grand scale, representing
the apotheosis of Washington, cover?
ing an area of over 6,000 square feet,
(some of the figures being over
eighteen feet in length,) is being laid
on the interior of the dome, 180 feet
above the floor of the rotunda.
Washington is in the centre, support?
ed by Justice on one side, and Peace
on the other, encircled by a halo of
female figures, representing the thir?
teen original States. This is sur?
rounded by six groups, in the follow?
ing order: War, with the Goddess of
liberty prominent, sword in hand,
beneath whom is seen the ermine rep?
resenting royalty, with figures repre?
senting Fire, Famine, Pestilence, Dis?
cord, &c. Science is represented by
the Goddess Minerva, with whom are
seen Franklin, Fulton and others.
Marine is represented by Neptune,
Commerce by Mercury, Mechanics
by Vulcan, surrounded by locomo?
tives, Parrot guns, mortars, &c. Ag?
riculture by the Goddess Ceres, who
appeal's seated on a reaping machine.
This is being done by C. Brumidt.
[ Washington Star.
DEATH OP AX AGED MERCHANT,
Wm. Birne, Esq., died on the28tli of
September, at Greenville, S. C. The
deceased was by birth a native of
Scotland, and possessed the industry,
energy, and business sagacity which
generally characterizes the natives of
\ North Briton. Ho carno to this coun
I try in early life, and done business for
' many years, in Broad street, under
thc firm of Wm. '&. Geo. Birnie, and
afterwards of Birnie & Ogilvie. Fox
some years he has been President of
the Bank of South Carolina, and held
it up to a late period, when he retired
entirely from all business pursuits, in
% consequence of his advancing years.
, The deceased must have been near
eighty years of age.-Charleston News.
For the Legislature.
JOHN H. BOATWBIGHT,
WM. WALLACE,'
A. G. BASKIN. Oct 4
T?r?r th* T. ? on' ?! nih-n TO
DB. J. H. BOATWBIGHT,
DB. WM. P. GEIGER,
J. H. KINSLER. _Oct ?
A Card.
BEING now about to return home to my
own city and District, after an absence of
some years, at the solicitation of mr friends,
I hare consented to become again a candi?
date for the Legislature in Bichland, and
hope to got home at least in tune to see my
friends before the election. W. SHIYEB.
Spartanburg, S. C., Sept. 31,1865.
Oct 3_
For the Legislature.
J. H. BOATWBIGHT,
WM. WALLACE,
JOHN H. KINSLER,
W. H. TALLEY. Oct 1
_i_:_i_
For the Legislature.
The following gentlemen are suggested
as fit persona to represent Richland Dis?
trict in the next General Assembly:
WM. WALLACE, 1 WM. K. BACHMAN,
WM. H. TALLEY, | JAS. G. GIBBES.
Sept 28_ . _*>_
"The friends of Dr. E. 8. J. HAYES "te
spectfully announce him as a candidate to
represent Lexington District in the next
Legislature. Bern g a thoroughly self-made
man, a graduate of the South Carolina Col?
lege, and having an extensive acquaintance
throughout the entire State, Dr. Hayes
would carry with him int? the Legislature
an amount of influence enjoyed by but few
in the District. He w?fl receive tho support
of MANY FRIENDS.
Oct 1 t5*
FOE STATE SENATOR.
The many friends of E. J. ARTHUR, in
consideration of his past valuable services,
beg leave respectfully to nominate him for
re-election to the office of SENATOR from
Richland District, at the ensuing election.
Sept 27_
For Congre*?.
?We are authorized to announce JAMES
FABBOW, Esq., ?f Spartanburg, as a can?
didate to represent, in tho Congress of the
United States, the Fourth Congressional
District, comprising the Districts ol An?
derson, Pickens, Greenville, Laurens, Spar?
tanburg, Union, York and Chester.
Sept 30_*_
FOR CONGRESS.
The friends of GEO. D. TILLMAN, Esq.,
respectfully announce him a candidate for
CONGRESS, at the ensuing election, in the
Third District, embracing Orangeburg,
Edgefield, Lexington, Abbeville, Newberry,
Richland and Fairfield. Sept 28 *
To tile Voters of Orangeburg, Edge
field, Abbeville, Newberry, Lexing?
ton, Richland and Fairfield.
FELLOW-CITIZENS: After much hesitation,
I have consented to be put in nomination
for your Representative in the Congress of
tho United States. I publish this card, be?
cause the District is so large and the time
before the election so short that I could
not, if I desired, canvass the District. If a
canvas? were possible, however, I do not
think it becoming or desirable. In my
judgment, this is no time for a scramble for
office. It seems to me that no one proper?
ly impressed with thc solemnity of tho
crisis, and the delicacy and importance of
the duties to be discharged, could seek the
position merely for tho gratification of per?
sonal ambition. For myself, I declare that
I have no-wish but to serve the State.
In 1788, South Carolina, through a con?
vention of lier people, became one of the
United States. She remained a member of
the Union until December, 18G0. when,
through another convention of her people,
she repealed the .Ordinance of 1788, seced?
ed from the United States, and with cer?
tain other sister States entered into andther
government known as the Confederate
Government. We believed that we liad the
right to secede and that, our security re?
quired its exercise in co-operation with our
Southern sisters. South Carolina, in 18."i2,
proclaimed by solemn ordinance thc right
of secession. It had long been tho settled
opinion of tho State, that she was sovereign
and entitled to all the rights of sovereignty.
She asserted self-government in order to
secure her institutions and principles from
groat evils, believed to he imminent. Se?
cession was in the nature of a proceeding
qttia lw>?t. It was conceived in the spirit of
self-preserration-not to injnro others but
to save ourselves. It cannot be uecessary
to say tbkt I am: one of thora who beber?
that it was an honest offort for honorable
pnrposes. ' The United States Government
denied the righi of secession'and waged
war upon the< Confederate States, which
stood upon the defensive. A terrible war
of invasion and desolation followed, and
finally the Confederate States were over?
whelmed by force of numbers and dissolved.
At the ena of the war the State of South
Carolina found tho Confederacy broken up,
her citizens vrho survived the terrible
ordeal exhausted and impoverished, her
institutions destroyed, and the whole coun?
try ocenjbied by tho military forces of tho
United States. Under these painful cir?
cumstances, the President of the United
States invited the States lately composing
tho Confederacy to re-organizo then* gov?
ernments and i is tore their connection with
tho Constitution and GoveVnmont of th' i
United States, upo;< certain conditions, th?
principal of which was an acquiesence it
the abolition of slavoiy. whiH< ??sd boer
accomplished by the ru?itary authorities.
The State, wisely in my judgment, respond?
ed favorably to the invitation. It ia true
that the mere issue of battle does not prove .
right any more than did the old "wager of
battle;" bat it does prove power which can?
not be disregarded. A Provisional Gover?
nor was appointed, who called another con?
vention or the people, which has latoly
repealcd tho Ordinance of Secession, and
by an .article in tho State Constitution,
recognized the abolition of Slavery and pro?
hibited its re-establishment. By repeal?
ing that of Secession, the Ordinance of
1788, through which bouth Carolina be?
came a member of the Union, was ipso
facto revived, and wo are' this day in the
Union precisely as we became in 1788 and
I remained up to 1860.
Wo are now m a very anomalous position.
Belying upon' the good faith and patriotic.
i intentions of the President of tho United
Statesj we have done all that was required
of us to restore our old relations to the
Constitution ind the Union; but still we
have hot been received into fellowship at
Washington. That important part or the
plan of reconstruction remains yet to be
accomplished. It is understood that a
party w?l oppose the President's plan of
reorganizing the States and giving to them
equality of rights, and will insist upon still
farther despoiling and crushing tho States
of the South as conquered provinces. This
radical fanatical party opposed our leaving
the Union, and now they oppose our return?
ing to it. When we were in the Union, they
abused us on account of slaTory. They
waged war upon us because we "tried tb
separate from them, and now that we pro?
pose to return without slavery, they still
object. In this emergency, the State needs
the assistance of all her true mon. Much
remains to bc done, and not the least ia to
secure a prudent, faithful and patriotic
representation in Congress, to assist and
forward the work of restoration which the
State has commenced. I arrogate not to
myself fitness to form part of such a rep?
resentation, but friends have urged me for?
ward, and if you arc willing to try me, I
will give my best efforts.
In some respects, we arc at the beginning
of our poUcy, as if we wore a new State
about to assume new relations with our
sister States; but we must never allow our?
selves to forget that in other respects wo
are an old State-a State having antece?
dents-a name to maintain and u History to
preserve. Whatever may betide us in the
uncertain future, the past, at least, is se?
cure. South Carolina has never swerved
from the path of honor, as she conceived it.
We have a record of which none need be
ashamed; and when any apostate son ef
hers disclaims er disparages it, may she
cast him out as unworthy of her. The
devotion of every true son of the State
adheres in adversity as well as in pros?
perity-is loval through evil as well as
through good report; and in the midst of
the greatest misfortunes, "sticketh closer
than a brother.''
After the delegations from tho Southern
States shall have been received iuto Con?
gress, many delicate.and im poi taut duties
will devolve irpon them, especially in refer?
ence to the freedmen of the South, and the
control which Congress, or a party in Con?
gress, may desire still to exercise over
them. It" may not be improper, in this
connection, to say that, whilst I have ap?
proved the course of the State in seeking
lo restore her old relations with the Govern?
ment of the United States, it has been upon
the faith and expectation that the State, as
soon as reconstructed, is to have entire
control of tho whole subject bf her domes?
tic affairs. The State, and the State alone,
must be left to decido to whom she will
give the right*of suffrage or other political
rights. A new code noir must be enacted
to protect and govern the population lately
made free-to prevent idleness, vagrancy,
pauperism and crime. I am not prophet
enough to foresee whether we can succeed;
but I solemnly believe it will bo impossible
to live in tho country at all unless the State
bas exclusive control of the whole subject.
I have hope that this will be permitted, a:ul
1 th?ik it is in accordance with our inte?
rests and true policy to sustain the Presi?
dent and the Democratic party in theil
efforts to restore tie States to their posi?
tion of equality and to give them cqna
rights in the Government.
With these views, if the voters of tin
District think that I can serve them or thi
State in this critical emergency, I will di
my beat for them; but I have'too high i
sense of my own incompetency and of thi
difficulties and responsibilities of tho posi
tion, to solicit it bv a personal canvass.
SAMUEL MCGOWAN.
I ABBSTILLKC. H., Sept. 27, 1865.
THE undersigned, having inst completed 1
- COMUIES?CN SALES-???M?, situated
adjoining tho Court House, is prepared. t<
ESTATE, FURNITURE, HORSES, VEHICL]
VATE SALE.
Having secured the services of Mr. C. F. I
for his qualifications in this line of business,
faction m all transactions entrusted to his cs
As soon as the^ necessary arrangetrirmtB ea:
tem of REGULAR WEEKLY SALES, which J
sons desirous of disposing of MERCHANT)!
JAME*
Dry Goods,
BLUE, Brown and White BLANKETS.
Brown HOMESPUN,
lirown Boa Island HOMESPUN. "
Bleached LONGCLOTH.
English "
AU-Wool and Shaker FLANNEL.
SilkandWool "
Opera, Kgured and Red FLANNELS.
SCOTCH TWEEDS.
FRENCH CASSIMERES.
AMERICAN SATTLNETS.
C NION PLAIDS and STRIPES.
Brown tod Bleached DAMASK.
" . " - ? " CLOTHS.
BLUE HOMESPUN.
CHECKS and STRIPES.
PLAID LINSEYS.
BROWN and WHITE LINENS.
SILESIAS. Brown and Drab.
Brown and Colored DRILLS.
Chocked and Jaconet Muslin.
White Brilliants.
" India Twills.
Damask Towelling and Napkins.
Bird-Eyo Diaper.
Scotch Linen Diaper.
" Wool Shawls.
Plaid and Fancy Cashmere Shawls.
French Broadcloths,, Black.
" Cassimcres, "
Alpacas and Bombazines, Black.
English and French Merinoes.
Silk Lustres, Paris Pophu?.
All-Wool and Figured DeLaincs.
Black and Colored Silks. *
EngUsh and French Prints.
Paranoia and Umbrellas.
Ladies' and Misses' Hose.
Men's and Boys' Hah* Hose.
Ladies' Lisle Thrcud Gloves.
" Silk and Kid Gio vea.
Men's Kid and SUk Gloves.
Men's Wool, Cloth, Leather and Buck do
Ladies' Under vesta.
Men's Undsrvests and Drawers.
Lint* Cambric Handkerchiefs.
Hem-stitched and Emb'd Handkerchiefs.
Embroidered Bands and Setts.
Lace Setts, Linen Cambric.
Jaconet and Swiss Edging.
Buttons, Thread, Needles.
Coate's Cotton, Velvet Ribbon.
Reit Ribbon, Hooks and Eyes.
Shoo Laces, Silk Thread, Coat Binding.
Pins, Han- Nets, Worsted Braid Cravats.
Suspenders, Gent's Collars.
Toilet Soap. Lubin's Extracts.
Boots and Shoes.
Boys' SHOES and BOOTS.
Misses' SHOES and BALMORAL BOOTS.
Ladies' " " "
CONGRESS GAITERS.
Gents ?H?ES, GMTERS and BOOTS.
HATS hm ?AP3 !
Men's and Boys', from $1.50 to $7.
NEXT DOOR TO SHIVER HOUSE.
Oct 5_6*_
New Goods.
GROCERIES
AND
CALICOES. Crush. andPulv. SUGARS,
DELAINS. COFFEE SUGARS,
M?ren?es, Fancy and Soda-Crackers,
Love Veils, I Icrrmg3, Mackerel,
Ribbons, .'.'Eng. Dairy Cheese,
Hair Nets, Lard. Pickles,
Bolt Buckles, Spices and Pepper.
Buttons, all v. Vs, Table Salt. .
Handkerchiefs, English Mustard,
Gent's Felt Hats, French "
Syrups, Brown and Paney So'aps,
white Wine Vinegar,
Imperial Arrack Punch,
Brandies, Wine^, Segars, *?C.
For s:\le low for cash by
Oct 4 SPECK & POLLOCK.
! CALT?AN & KREUDER,
CO mil SS JON M Eli CHA NTS,
TT" H OLE H ALE dealers in GROCERIES,
VV WINES, LIQUORS and SEGARS.
Especial at tention paid to the purchase and
sale of COTTON, MERCHANDIZE and
PRODUCE. Gervais street, between Mad?
j and Assemblr. opposite State Hon??.
! Sept Qt Ln*>.
Ump gilli
mmwn
lis large and commodious AJJCT?OH- ?StJ
I above hie NEW STORK, on Main street.
> seU all kinda of MERCHANDIZE, BEAL
ES, etc., etc., either at AUCTION or PBI
LARRISON, ap loag and favorably know?
, he thinks ha can guarantee perfect satos
>re. ;
rc be made, hu designs inaugurating a sys
viU present BABE FACILITIES to all p?
ZE, etc., ai auction. Oct 1 '
S Gr. GIBBES.
At Home Again!
IMPORTANT TO MILL O WNERS.
IWILL PATCH. ALTER and REPAIR
STEAM BOILERS, within fifty miles of
this place; also, do any heavy or particular
MILL FORGING. I may be" found brr ap?
plying at this office. S. J. PEERY.
Sept 24 _
New Store
SOOBS.
r^lHE subscribers have just received, di
X rect rr flin New York. ;a full supply of
Ladies' and Gent's FALL and W?mSK
GOODS, of aU kinds, such as CALICOES,
DELAINES, MERLNOES.v FLANNEL, Bal?
moral Skirts. Ladies' Cloaks, Long cloth,
Linen, Handkerchiefs and Fancy Dress
Good?* Ae i
GENTS WEAH-Clotj ?ing, Hats, Caps,
Boots, Shoes, Under-shirts, ko.
ALSO.
A good assortment of CROCKERY and
GLASS-WARE.
Citizens and persons generally wonld do
well to give us a call before purchasing
elsewhere. -
Sept 13 Imo P. LYONS A CO.,
Coraer Assembly and Washiagtom ate.
NEW GOODS ! NEW GOODS !
JUST RECEIVED AND FOR SALE BY
At td* 3>u> Store, Washington Street, jyttt
Opposite the Old Jail.
DRESS GOODS, Colored and Mourai?-,
consisting of :
Plain, Plaid and Striped ALPACA*.
LUSTRES and DELAINES.
Also, CALICOES. TWEEDS, ?te.
BROADCLOTHS andJCASSIMEEBK.
UMBRELLAS; BALMOBAL SKIRTS.
CRASH, for Towelling, LOVE VEILS
LLNEN SETTS, with and withont La??,
and with Mourning Edges.
Black Silk and Colored Silk Cravate.
Elastic Garters, Men's Buck Gloves.
Ladies' Gauntlets and Gloves.
Embroidered Handkerchiefs.
Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs, for La?iei*
and Gentlemen.
Fancy Hair Nets, for Waterfalls, and
plain Silk Nets.
Hair Brushes and Combs.
Gent's Linen Collars. Scent Papers.
Irish Linen, of aU ?.pialities.
Longcloths, Ladies' Undervests.
Rubber, Coat and Vest Buttons.
Gent's Half Hose, of excellent quality.
Men's fine Felt Hats, black and colored.
Colored Woolen Shirts and Drawer*.
Corsets, China Dolls of all sizes.
Hoop Skirtb, Perfumery.
Castile Soap, Suspenders.
Head Handkerchiefs.
Fancy Dress Buttons.
Belts of every varietv, Belting bil.bon.
Scissors, Tooth and Nail Brushes, kc.
GROCERIES.
White'and Brown SUGAR.
Green and Black TEA, COFFEE.
Starch, Soap, Candles.
Molasses, Brooms, Herrings.
Sardines, Matches, Blacking.
Ruta Baga Turnip Seed, Ac. Sept 2fl
COLUMBIA, S. C.
THE undersigned, having
i"".S leased the large and com?
modious building known an
_Itho ''Columbia Methodist*
Female College," bas openodit as aFIRST
CLASS HOTEL. T. Si. NICKERSON,
sept ll Proprieter.
Mounce & Calhoun,
CfOBNER Gervais and Gates streets,
' (near S. C. and G. & C. R. R. Depots.)
Columbia, S. C,, receive and forward ali
kinds of "tt?r?handize, Tobacco, Cotton and
all Produce, aa .store the same. Partie*
I consigning to us will find their freight
I shipped with despatch from Orangeburg,
1 Alston. Winnsboro or other points, by wa?
gon duriug tbe breakage ou said road.?.
We 'keep two two-horse wagons for city
hauling. _ _
R. H. MOUNCE. 4. w, ?.;.vuiiOb?\.
KKiKKB.senB.-J. G. Gibbes, Edwin ?.
i Scott Columbia; Johnston, Crews <x v.o.,
! Charleston; Linton & Dowty, Augusta, Ga.;
Wm. Tavlor k Co., Montgomery, Ala.; Cox,
Braynard k Co., Mobile, Ala.: W. A. J%
' Finnev, Danville, Va.; Robert Lumpkinx
I Richmond, V*. Sept 14 Imo*

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