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Iowa voter. [volume] (Knoxville, Iowa) 1867-1874, January 01, 1874, Image 7

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?BE NEW YEAR.
k
OT*T
old n»« tolled at the ropa
Emd ran* the Iwrll, aud clear
The hour was midnight, and the tune
Xbe of
nd a« he toi':'d, tnc old man «Mig,
Kud iau«h«d beneath his breath
til laughed and mills? wiih glee IM ytl
Ue lulled a kueli furd'.-atli.
old man,'' naid I. "this rhamelWB mirth
Seem* ?ad)y out of piace
Mlemu chant. a dirge, or prayer
Would bear a better grace.
The Old Year die# weighed down with sin
Weighed down wiih lives mifispeut
Come slice I you down with me,.awLinoiirn
Come, join it) my lament.*
mourn not for the past^ said
A
uew life I begin,
I do aot rinse the Old Year out—
I ring the New Year In.
u vj^hy Uo yon wii"h to mourn and glfaTOf
Thif hour i« not for teare
The »tar of Hope nhine# steadfast, ptNi
Above the comiog years!
I langh and ning for very joy.
And not wiih shame leu* mirth
Go«d air. I toll not for the dead—
I celebrate
u
birth.
Come, turn your back upon the past,
Andjbid yonr grief begone
The night it dark, but then, good air,
JWjrSometh with the dawn."
A RASH ACT.
The lspire of tbe church at Benton had
oosened during a great gale, and it
was
found necestary to strengthen it.
For tliis purpose a lolty staging was built
arouml it, which reached from the gtound
to the topmost point.
This was scarcely finished when one of
the main supports sank down somewhat,
and the whole staging was pronounced
unsafe. None of the workmeu would
trust themselves upon it, and so it be
came necessary to take it all down and
rebuild it in a more substantial manner.
This, of course, involved delay and as
the contractor had other engagemsnts, he
left this for a time, and took his workmen
elsewhere, intending to return in about
a fortniirht to repair the spire. Duriug
hifl absence the defective staging was to be
left standing.
Two or three days after Ins departure a
Crowd of loyn stood looking at th'j spire
«taging, 'la 'nlr'cate network of
beams and boards, and diacus&ing the sit
uation.
"1 don't see why they loft it," said one
-of them. "It seems strong enough."
"It seems that it
aint
strong enough, at
any rate," said another.
"There's a great lot of planks and
iposts there, too," said a third.
"What a row there'd be if it -(Should all
tumble down," said a fourth.
"Tumble down," cried the first, with a
laugh. "A likely story' Why, man
alive, that staging's all right. 1 heard a
man say so."
"Then if It is, why did the contractor
leave it?"
"O, that was only an excuse. He had
to attend to that bridge at once, so he put
up this staging anl then pretended it
wasn't strong enough. He wanted to
make the people here wait. That's what
I heard a man say."
"Anyhow, I wouldn't lil» -to tTOSt
mygeli'on it."
Pooh!" said the speaker.
O, it's all very well to say pooh, Tom
Balch, but I tell you their ain't many
BMn that would go up there."
l'p there?" Why, I'd j»at MOD go
up as not.
*\ou?"
"Us, me."
JL scornful laugh was *hepaly rejoin-
I'd just as soon go up as not," repeat
ed Tom Balch.
I'd like to see you try it," said the
Othtr, "you look like it."
"Well, you may see me try it, for I'm
going up there," taid Torn, walking tow
ard the staging.
The boys stood watching in silence,
thinking that it was only bravado, and
waiting with a half smile for the time
when he would turn back but to their
surprise, he began climbing, aad in a few
minutes he had ascended to a height of
•early forty feet.
Tom Balch was known throughout the
village as a bolu, rasb boy, capable of al
most any act of daring. He was not a
boy of evil propensities he was honest
and warm-he tir tod but his love oi ad
miration was so strong, and his rash dar
ing so great, that he had frequently per
iled his life for no other reason than to
make himself notorious. It was this
feeling that animated him to his present
enterprise, and it needed only the chal
lenge of his playmates to send him up
the perilous height of the church-spire.
The village had but one street, and the
Church was at one end of it. The vil
lagers were all at work in their shops, or
on their farms, or were in their houses
and none were near except Tom's friends,
who soon egan to perceivc that Tom was
in earnest, and that the matter was far
more serious than they had at first antici
pated
The roof of the church was about fifty
feet high, and the spire rote fifty feet
above this, so that it# whole height from
the ground was about a -huhdrcd feet.
The staging was divided into successive
'Stories, each of which (about ten feet in
heiirlit) was formed by loose planks laid
across the rafters, that passed from the
tmaiii beams to the houwe. Lad
ders passed from one story to another, so
.that the whole could
IK-
easily climbed.
Up this staging went rash Tom Iialch.
Be ascended half way without perceiv
ing any weakness in the structure and
the impunity with which he^ad ventured
far made him determined to go on lo
tte very top.
He looked back for a moiaent, waved
Me hat triumphantly at his friends be
low, and then continued hifc foolish un
dertaking. The boys below looked up,
bet gave no ret-ponse.
Tern now went
OH
with#reekless rap-
Mity, surmounting ladder after ladder,
harrying across the successive .floor
ings e\ a rate which made the vibration
of the Paging very perceptible.
He thought this too trifling to call fur
•pecia! caution. It was nothing (he said
tohittsrit') more than would be produced
OB auy -staging by the tramp o a man
talking upon its floorings but as he-as
cended Uglier the vibration increased,
and tl»is was accompanied by a slight
•waying of the whole structure, that in
spired al&rst at last in the breast ot the
thoughtless climber.
A vague tea? came to him. Something
the matter. But by this time he was
at the tip of the staging, and close bv the
Deak of the spire, with its gilt ball ami
iron vane.
But no sooner kad he reached the ball,
than the vibration?, ceased, and suddenly
th® boards on which he stood seemed to
•ink beneath him. H's first thought was
a plank had given way. Mechani
cally he flunjr himself forward, and
grasped the iron rod of the weathercock
With both hands. Tbe n*xt instant there
a noise like thunder beJow him, and
down went the whole bum
ot
»tbe ground!
As it fell, the boys screamed and fled
in different directions, and turning again
and looking up in awful dread, they saw
Tom clinging to the iron vane, llis
hands clutched this firmly, nud he had
seated himself upon the ball, ^.asping it
with his legs.
For some time not a word was said.
Nothing, indeed, could be said. The
boys stood paralyzed, looking and expect
ing to see Tom tall. But he held on firm
ly, and at last his voice came down to
them from his lofty perch and roused
them to action.
"Boys," he called, "are you there?"
His back was turned to them where he
sat, so that he could not see them.
"Yes!" they shouted, in answer.
"Go and get help, quick!" wsts his cry.
At this, tiie boys all started on the full
run for the village, and spread the news
in all directions. Soon a crowd had
gathered, full of excitement and terror.
As they looked up and saw the boy on his
giddy perch, a feeling of horror took
possession of them. But after the first
shock was over, they called to him, and
found that he was not exhausted and that
he was not dizey. These two facts in
spired 9ome hope among the spectators,
and at once every one began to make
proposals as to the best way of rescuing
him.
Some of the wildest talked of re-erecting
the staging, but that was soon decided to
be impossible.
Others suggested a chain of ladders
but a little uiscussion brought out the
fact that there were no ladders in the vil
lage long enough or strong enough for the
purpose.
One man proposed shooting an arrow,
with a string attached, which should fall
over the weathercock but this plan was
dismissed, as no one in town was expert
archer enough to send an arrow cxactly
over the spire.
This brought out a shrewd old man who
had thus far been silently considering the
situation.
"Have any of you boys a kite?" he
asked.
"Yes," said one.
"Then hurry and bring it here as soon
as you can. I'll go home and bring some
things. Quick, now!"
Away went the boy for his kite, while
the old man, who was a retired sea cap
tain, hurried to his house in a wagon
which had just come up. In less than a
quarter of an hour the boy was back with
lm kite, and the captain made his appear
ance with some ropes and a block.
In tne block was a long rope with a
canvas band at the end. Another rope
was attached to tne head of the block.
On questioning Tom, the reply cams
that he was still free from either weak
ness or giddiness and reassured by this,
the captain began to carry cut his plan
of rescue, every incident of which was
watched with intense interest by the
crowd.
A fresh breeze was blowing, and the
captain, going away at some distance
from the church, let fly the kite. Soon it
rose in the air. It was not difficult to
guide the kite so that it ro»e over the
spirt and brought its string within Tom's
The captain now fastened the string to
the rope, and called on Tom to pull up.
Tom's position enabled him to hook his
elbows round the iron rod, aud thus have
the use of both hands. It cowt him some
trouble, but the rope was at length pulled
up, and by it he pulled up the block.
In accordance with the captain's order,
he now bound the block to the iron rod
so strongly that it could -aupport his
weight.
After this he passed the sling over his
shoulders aud under him, so that he was
sittiug on it. The sling was attached to a
rope reeved through the block, and ex
tending down to the hands of a half-dozen
men below.
The hardest task of all remained, and
this was to let himself down so that he
might hang below the block. If he had
been in the slightest degree dizzy, this
couid not have been done.- but his head
was steady yet, and there were ropes to
cling to now, as he lowered himself. At
iast he hung below the block, with the
sling under him, and his hands grasping
the line.
In this way he was lowered to the roof.
There men waited for him, and he went
through into the attic, and so down to the
ground.
As he joined his friends, e wild cheer
arose scores of hands grasped his in
cordial greeting. This was because of the
relief and joy felt at his escape from death
but he really deserved to be reprimanded
and punished for his foolhardy adventure.
Youth's Companion*
woodwork
Making Wood Perk*
There are many families that raise
their orvn pork yet what a miserable
article do we to often find—flabby, greasy,
running to oil when cooked, and fre
quently'rank, sometimes hinting of the
sty, and sometimes of worse things.
Mow am: then you mwit with sweet,
white, solid pork, that wi'.l boar frying,
and is perfect cooked in any way, re
minding you of Ella's inimitable roast
pig crackling. And such l^J4 j8
healthy well as roliahiug. Besides, it
costs no more to make than the Cabby,
wretched, rank stuff.
Why thii difference? Why should we
use a poor article when good may be
had at the tarnecost? It is beeauiKJ peo
ple are cureless and ignorant. Anj
breed (or n* breed) that comes in o tfeeir
possession by trade or otherwise they
use and such feed as they may have,
often refuse, of the poorest, they gwe,
without regasd to cleanliness or f/omlort.
1 nd thus the.one kind of {Kirk is made,
or rather mahis itself. A large use of
nvlk or whey has much the saaie e»«ct^
making soft, «abbv pork. A little
this may be used as a drink, or par:,
dmik. The r*t should be, mainly, grain,
an ft corn at tfcuct. old corn Itest. The
other grains mwy be fed as adjunct*, giv
ing "arietv whioi.. when well timed, will
proitote appetite. But experience has
long, i^o demonstrated that there is noth
ing so good as Ko&ad old corn to make
solid, sweet pork, reirurarly given, never
too mxcb at a feed, it the appetite would
be retained clean pens, cozy, well aired,
warm in cold weatfcer, cool in hot. A.
hog tbouL'h he will wallow in the nnre
(for the want of souring cleaner to coo
him,) has yet a sense o* the neat, and will
seek, fr«m choice, a clean place, lie
thrives u/ider good treatment. Col/1
hurts him—he will »ake it manifest
by unmistakable squeals and acuvi y,
and an excess of heat will make I.im
sufler. Thc*e are to be avoided. llth
in a pen is tranHfrrnvl to table
pork.—Utiea '.
HOME, FAita AND GARDES.
-—Lemon Pies.—Grate one lemon add
one cup ot while sugar, a small piec* of
butter,, yolk of three eggs: dissolve a
tablespoonful of flour in a cup of milk
this will til! two pies bake until done.
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth,
add a half cup of sugar, spread over the
pies and brown lightly in oven.
—To Mend China.—Mix together equal
parts of fine glue, white #f eggs, and
white lead, and with it annoint the edges
of the article to be mended, press them
together, and when hard and dry scrape
oif as much of the cement as sticks about
the joint. The juice of garlic is another
good cement and leaves no mark where it
has been used.
—Buns —One-half cup of lively yeast,
one cup of white sugar, three cups of warm
milk, stir them together, add flour enough
to make a thin baiter, let it rise in i warm
place over night in the morning add
another cup of sugar, one cup of butter,
and more flour if necessary let it rise
again, then knead it out the same as
biscuit. A few raisins will improve it.
This rule will make fifty or sixty biscuit.
—Bleaching Discolored Flannel.— It
was found by Prof. Artus that flannel,
which had become yellow by lying for
some time, when treated with a solution
of Impounds of Marseilles soap in 50
pounds of sofl water, with the addition of
one-third of an ounce of ammonia, and
subsequently rinsed, was much improved
in appearance. The bleaching was more
quickly accomplished by soaking the ar
ticles for an hour in a dilute solution of
acid sulphite of soda, then stirring in
dilute hydrochloric acid (50 parts water
to 1 of acid), covering the vessel, and al
lowing it to remain a quarter of an hour,
and afterward thoroughly rinsing the ar
ticles.
—To Make Soft Soap.—For one barrel
of soap, take thirty pounds of grease free
from salt rinds or bits of lean meat, and
the lye from two barrels of good ashes.
Put one quart of lime in the bottom of
each barrel of ashes. Put boiling water
on to leach with have ready the soap
barrel where it is to stand. When the lye
begins to run, melt the grease in a little
lye and pour it in the barrel. Heat the
lye and fill it full, stirring frequently un
til cold. Always use the stove kettle,
as that is free from rust, which make
white cloth yellow. Soap made in this
way will be very light-colored and thick,
and requires but little labor in making.
If the lye is not strong enough to eat the
grease, boil it awhile.
—Liquid Manure.—If the stable is in a
basement and protected from freezing,
make a plank floor with a trough to carry
off the liquid to the manure or compost
heap—the trough to have a flat bottom,so
as to
IK-
cleaned with a shovel. Suitable
dimensions are—two feet out-side or be
hind this trough for a walk one foot or
more for the gutter—which may be five
or six inches deep the platform on which
the cow stands four and a hall or five feet
and the manger about two or two and a
half feet wide. But for our long and cokl
winters, farmers generally prefer using
plenty of straw litter, which is. abundant
on all grain farms. This will absorball
the liquid, and is thrown out daily to tne
manure heap, which must be allowed
time to rot down thoroughly in the open
air.
Cheap Transportation.
Low rates and quick dispatch increase
all kinds of business that relates to the
carrying of passengers, freight or letters.
If the rates are too high, neither corn nor
grain can be sent from the extreme West
to the seaboard, and only a limited
quantity from places less remote. Not
one passenger would go to Kansas or
California where ten now go, if the stage
coach were substituted for the railroad,
the fare, remaining the same.
The actual cost of trans|Krtatioa de
creases as the quantity of merchandise
and number of passengers incree.se. If
there are iwo railroads of the same length,
lie one carrying double the quantity of
freight of the other, its expenses will not
l.e fifty per cent, greater, for liMiay of
them bear no relation to the amount of
usiness—as the general office exfrtmses,
grading, fencing, ties, and culverts
In the mail service especially, hy the
jrreater dispatch afforded by railroads
and the reduced postage, the nailed
letters have increased with a few years
from forty millions to five hundred mill
ions, while the deficit of revenue is no
greater in proportion to the number of
letters transmitted at three cenb than
at the former average postage of 1C cents.
This principle applies still more fittingly
to the telegraph the rates are so high
that few citn afiord to use it, although the
gain in time over the mails is so great.
ALroad, at low rates, it is generallv used.
In England its use has more than fu-ibled
within three years since the telegraph
hat? been connected with the posioliice,
while here the number of telcgruw. ha«
increased less than one third. The aver
age rate for telegrams in Knglaod is 25
ccnl'4 in all Europe, U4 cent* in Ameri
ca, cents. The Postmaster (Jwneral
recommends the vnion of the U-U'g aph
with the postofliac by the purchaw and
operation of the lines of telegraph. While
all admit the greater cheapness and nior«
free ise of the telegraph abroad, some
oppose: this plan on the ground that un
der a -epublican form of government'the
telegraph cannot be managed as weli as
under a monarchy. If this be true, und
the people are unatole to manage their
own affairs, then giw us a king and aris
tocracy at once. Woi do not participate
in these fea*s, and the sooner this ques
tion is understood and decided the better.
Others oppose this (tan on account of
the great outlay involve 1 in the purchase
and extension.of the liue and a plan has
been proposed by committees of the Sen
ate and Bouse of Representatives in Con
gress to thorn the subjor !, was referred, i
by which lelegrams will foe received as I
letters art tow at all port-ofticcs, and at
all telegraph offices, a.id transmitted In
tween tne eri'icets by partv-s furnishing
and operating the lines at rtfes fixed bv
Contrress, not-exceeding one cent a word
i if
Y.) Herald.
O.NK of the charges for wbirh »n artil
lery officer was recently cashiered, speci
fied that on a cerWin occasion he
n,er\a
a store in Sitka, Alaska, and.seattug him
self on the floor beai/le an Indmn ^uaw,
took her pipe and smoked it. Hucu co
duct was considered lusboouittiflifl AJi
officer and a gentleman.
telegrams-4ransmi'ted miles or less
by lay, and l.tfX) miles or leiwi by night
.a reduction of rJout 50 per oent. of the
pr«'.-cnl rates—£5 cents for a Bight teie
p»m from St. Louis to New Y-ork or New
Orleans. This 4lan relieves the post
oflkx- of the neottfsity of purchasing and
operating lines, while it utilizes all its
existing "facilities, and places tbe tele
graph at once witkin the reach «f all
das***. This systean is in exact analogy
with ibe present postal service all corre
spondence will be r«-e*ived and delivered
through the
poat-ffle*4
Ledg*.
WIINN WKITI-4i TO UIVKKTIHKRS
T* PLERIU- «,• FOM OHW IHN A«L*ERII»E«MEU*
la thin paper.
iWt
HI
RElWrEIJ-S"
THAT IV11.1. 1 HE
CONSUMPTION
Will th-*c who hnvN-fi lnnf( VtHlclod witli
ConnumpUon take Courage I
PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING:
CotrMiu HKNUT CO., Man-h
Me«Fr*.
P«RKY, THVIH & SU
9,1873.
V 11» KRIh A. C.i im inuatl, Oiim
I)BAH SIKS-1 W
«nt
YOU
to
»I
rnl
MI- EII
IH*I K.e
hottlcs
of the l.uugsof
at
AllcnV l.uiii Slnrf l.i-t M«y 1 Imvo bought
Mid taken about twenty bottles of tlie l.ung Bmsiim,
for a
TIIIKI KEX EAKS»' HTAM
ING. Before that time I liavc bought uud lined n«nrly
every Lunjr Remedy reeocuiiieTnieil, anil yc.ir l.uifK
js »he only thing ihut has given me pertnanetl
relief. I bellev e thai It mived my life lad Mprtng,
wheu I eommenoed ItH use. I do not eipeel anything
will cure me entirely, but the Balsam keep* me up K
that 1 can attend to bUHincRa. It g\\
GKNTI*-l.»Ht December I vu t«keo With KTWt
CODKII.
uu.l was cuii(lin il to iiiy loom. Put aa I »at
mediiailnK on the nimra of lUttercnl articles I had In
my st,,re for couch*, thounht I would try a bottle of
Alle.I'-I I.IIIIR Balaam, of which, at that time,
*c'.d a h-,ttle. I took a bottle and opened it, aildci'iil
menced using with the mottt happy renults, aud wsi
•oon e'ltirely cured of mv routrh since then 1 have
rwoniini-n.ied it to a number of friends, and I have
yet to tin 1 a Hin^le Instance In which It lias failed. I
consider it a complete counh-enr.-r
OAUTIOW.
Be not deceived- Cat for ALLKV8LTTNG BAlr
SAM. and take no other.
MfDirocUon* accompany each bottle.
I. V. HAS&IS & CO,. Cicdnuti, 01%
l'UorKJKTOKS.
SOLD BY AUK MKIIICINK DKALERN.
LOW RESERVOIR
Are Suited to all Climates,
AND FAMOUS FOB BEZMO
BEST TO U32l
CEEATZCT TO BUY II
-c
E A S S O S I I I I
iM.
Haincn' TdHnnllip
HIII'H I'racltrf. AE^ORFLLNN
8t-»'U'e" in, I ie, inoli* Ui Utv nt-tte of llllvola. 1 vol.,
8'.,, S./I pp.
IIIHM winimi l.nw Prarticf. Accordln({
to (lie -itui.-x iii.-d lie.
IHUIIH
2- ol*.. wo., I
Junm'
IIIIIIOIK
Koruia
PIhITIV'KJL.V
FOR 1874.
Trrs 1* edited by 1'uk
AIM,,
My
a
rue immediate
relief, lUivl 1 niujrreaUv improve.! in general health.
Ireuiaiu gratefully your*.
1. D. POOL.
Vkat bettor proof of a good remedy Iter
Consumption do yon wantI
K tw
AKKBT,VJU.
March 24.1871.
Famous fe cloli.R r*«-il
BETTER COOKING.
SOlN'i
OAK
EXCELSIOR.
MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
612 and (»l! X. Main .St.,
ST. LOUIS. MO.
Illinois Law Books.
Hill'w Mnrilcliml Olflcrr. A Manunl fur
Coui.i v, ity, I o ii. Vllluk'ti and I'reciuct Dlileer».
•lid iti/.i
IJK
v'ei..-riilly whelhir under I'rlmury "r
T'^wnmilp Or^inu/.ii!.lon, lu hluu* of fillrn.iK. with
all li.e neecHs iry l- ot!MH, under the ruc«i-t lawn. 1
TOi., H44 patjee l:i w blndlntr, t-1.00.
Hill I'rohulc i.iiitle. Acconllngto the Stat
ut*» ..nd l»e iriuiot In
IIIMO.IJ.,
e. ttors. A dud,i If-1 r.ttor«
I. I. TH*
UT
1
had not
O SNYDER. Dra«t«t.
The Lunu Ralsam neYer faila to du good for ttkOM
afflicted with a cough.
It I* hannhuH to the most delicate child.
It contain*
DO
opium in auv funn
It Utotd by Mediclne-le .li re I'cinmljy.
fcly 'l tn will i\
IT
talfker
andChaayar
Tfcaa AO Rbi\'UOf COAt,
FAMOUS PUUCIVI.Na
8oth£acticn Every•wbca,
OAK 2*— ND n*ia
Adapted
TOTHB
Vi!!!S OF
Vim
MEIEm
BOLD X31T
be)u* it jruide for Kx
unr
HHIIUII'
11am and onacrvatorK,
111 Ilie uinuBirriiieiit »ud ftl lenient, of Kutatet, with
fi/rio» ii^il j»r c.edeutH. 1 vol.,
K.o tif) |IJI.
v
£»I|('V«
IJIIWD,$2.90 MI
f.t.00.
to the
mmI
K.rtlieuae ofilerkai.f onrlH, hlierifli.. (.oroiie,-.
County C'omiiil'.iiloner*, JuHtlceaof the F*,we,
y» r», onsUihl.i. Notarii I'lilillc.
i-tr,
.-arKV.l. 1 vol., fev,,., h-C
\Vo«»»l
At
LonK'w \«"»v ll«e»t of tlw Declnloi.
of tle ^f||ireiii.: Court of lllliiolti.
2
!4.v.
E. H. MVBI'.H, I.AW 1'i'fii loilKn, ChiiJ^tO
NO CHUOJHOfl.
THEDANBOKYNEWS
DA VBUBY MAH
Im outrlbut.'d to by A i.i-Mto Towxawwri, the
chief of Newnpaper Correhp'oideiit
t?, for mm-»l«copy Ujltr.L.'I'L'MJtMM*
v',a»lilriK'.mi
Ave M. l#ula. Mo.
IIMIIIII,
lidliiK o* tlieadtlrimaof ten iieraona, with 10
it. will r. eelve.
ANY
frr*.
DR."WHITT!ER,
the mailed letter
transmitted by contract with railroad atad
stage-coach contractors, the telegraph
letter by -contract with the telegraph com
pany. Ttxfc benefits of thit plan are evi
dent it involves no Constitutional ques
tions, and can be easily, quickly and
without cost to the Oerieral Government
carried jq|o ciitftical o^wralivc,—Chicago
f&b« JStm.
NEW YORK, I873"4. WEEKLY, SEMI-WEEkLY, AND DAILY.
THE WEEKLY SUN is too widelv known to require any extended recommeiii^
tion but the reasons which have already given it fifty thousand subscribers,-ttd
which will we hope, give it many thousands more, are briefly aa follows:
It is a firTt rati newspaper. All the news of the day will be found iu it,
densed when unimportant, at full length when of moment, and always presented t»
a clear, intelligible, and interesting manner.
It s a first rate familv paper, full of entertaining and instructive reading of ev».*
kind but containing nothing that aan offend the most delicate and scrupulous tastfc
It is a first-rate story paper. The best tales and romances of current htoratuw
«e carefully selected and legibly printed in its pages.
It is a first rate agricultural paper. The most fresh and instructive utiefcs .1
agricultural topics regularly appear in this department.
It is an independent- politi. nl paper, belonging to no party, and wearing no col.
lar. It fights for principle, and for the election of the best men to office. It es
pecially to the exposure of the great corruptions that
weak
altog'
devotes its energies to the exposure of the great corruptions »»w
ken and disgrace our country, and threaten to undermine republican, institutions
rether. It has no fear of knaves, and asks no favors from their ^npptirtera.
It re(Mrts the fashions for the Indies, and the markets for the men,
es.pt (iail the
cattle markets, to which it pays particular attention.
filT.
rf.™.L»« W' ,*»«
tht'ir r.o»t In ono HOUon, in thf*
A*k fur Uieui at thn Hardware htoroa or
fill HI IIO il»l uwair nun I
W
IVIERCHAWT'S
IARGLING
ll.ft «er» ll».-riu-y 11 erst. !•'.]ward I'-^Kle.C' n
»eri il tory 1« Jn-.t Wctn!iiil.i(f buck eli.ipo i it'ipplleil
MM Mllecrri. r- Mia. Hlo\t,
-n
I.
one
Any
Mil fe i
Wlxh. if It i
Hu fe tmrnihx trUit,
t/irvery
SeiMi
txi
C'IKKI-B* I.KOA-
author of tiie "hhcet Iron f«t," and one of tho
elevtrefct paraxrapliera 11 llit: country, ami other ex
c»'!ei,t writer*.
'I n NKU -t ha* I la own Scientific, Kathlon.Cfai'M and
Puzzle e.iitoro puhlixhea the bent original matter, the
be-' mlM-ellany, and tii" frenlient and best utonea.
t'alrtieripi.'ori. f'J.'W |o-r uniiu.'ii. hample Copu-nfree.
Special rateJi to I'oDliiianters and ciubx.
,fc IXIVOVA.V, Ilnnbnry, t«._
Dr. Turner's Guide to Health,
Glvl'ij all advice necea.ary for every one liable
to i»»Mute of any kind, nir.rried or Klnnle: aid tr
youiiKt I'jr all H^'en, or conditio:!* hi
nt* wuntcd for thin fie Iw-HtfelllnK book pub
»*ml
A. UuxiUxi^
beat lioak the«i
Send for circular*
BOOK^K^
tpodlit ni 1'ltiniia Worth
-j.VIKIO Wituia *ii|i»lie«l. 'I
Klu* of ftrcri I Itooh-. HI color Chro»«o
fre.-. CON I INhN'l A I. I I I!
i
II SI. I.i»ula, vo.
aliehnilful' hroino and
utructlnim how 10 net rich poat paid.
O N E
City
itrllf/ OH Koulh 8ih St., I'lilla., I'a-
I MII.NTII
2 pneknK«- fine
hlte envelop* and 2 quire*
j.-d for TiO (•••ntit. CI'cnlar
iK. Cedar liapld*. Iowa.
B300
IK." .tie Ifl.
lot ell...... .".J! __
8Tft^%i.WEEE1
ao^ mt urn. f-i, j.lciiai «f M»
If 1 a AT
we
have found nomethlnK
th:ii? Tun i-viif bundled. Untnpl
ui acti K'UCX-4«C"
5500 REWARD
rttfti'iu
9f J'hi/itl' iun*
skw
for
A I lAOl a enta. It will »ell better than any.
'ttMpl'*aWIT- KCIJKKA
VFAH-
lark or 114 Moduvn St.,Chicago
Viii.1. At uaa. i ii, «».. i***, a*.
%.' STV
will, ,-tei.ell A Key f.'iieei-,
:*J JIC E (/mill*, catalotruen, Min plea anil full pin
s ii»KvrirK. in ll»toverM .Koatoa-
CTOCK, WMWHV, DRKNH, M.AWTK,
&4U. See Deus* Journal. WKRI^nsn
J»""
OIL
L.1
!i:i :.! ef tl
MOOODUilt
I'm led
f'urnx and Scalds, Hhrumatism,
hilhUiiM, llei)nirrk4da or I'ilm,
ntul Prninen. S r« S'imilrt,
I 'hn/i/ixl ItamU, 1 flrniMt*,
h!,*h H'nnd*, ht*MiMir,
I 'iKxt IHlCJI, in,
rrtermil Srrnl'hm rr
•*awl 'rtu-k*. f-triiiiihiUt.
If ind.,nlt..
call* all l.iwl imtUtvtl I'n t,
-U ItinjO.'w, rat kxt //#«/*.
r,.ll Etit, Hot in h"
JfUeMof Animaln, /:, upiu routtry.
l\«lha7k', an /Uu k, ,,,•.
Large Size 81.00. Medium 50c. Small 25c.
BmiillBlio for Family l'«e, 516 cent*
The I. irk'lint nil luit U-cn in iiw :i
liuiiiKM.l sine** Ktl. All w H-k i« -i wii'
trial, Intl. la: nurctrvl follow iliiecti.uir
A v o u n u i I i K K
i 1 1
lilt MIieinen for cm' efmir AllnHI« -, rvml
reivl wli tt th»* wiv aluml the till
The •inr^ini »il f'"- tiy f|l .«'•
.{MM'iaWic ile-tlor-t IhrtiiiKl'""1
Mflrciiani's (iiirirlin
JOHN HODGI
nil-
I 1
Anl !.
(S.OO.
IVeMr Treafltt- for Junttce of the
1 vol., 8.V) pp.
I mint
,sH't'l 'ilfw- rtmntriM.
Our •!.' i'coTii to th* live*
unl, nil'I iiiv
inn i'nt
\Ve .1
l»o n: ilinfio lure
JTlerch*nt,ii Worm Tablet*.
We 1 iir unil liiw'i'.il v.th nil, i*"'l
.U" fj, e.,!.U ele I loll. M,. o o I 1 -1.1
III
11 KIT
eomiilniitlon
for (Jii'ii'i*-
mri, A'Jtal*
unit SuLfmnru'
-Br.iirv Wini. Hitr'-iirB'H fntnllv newnjiaper jth'"
(((-IVH,',W
I'AIK of the laru. nl and flli'
A ire
II
ta have
»l,r K.HKl call "tM*l Iiuxlne-T ever olfcre I |..r
Cai uiHem." We furnlRh the lightest i,.id Uaiid/" ,
eat .nlIIt, and pny very hljjh ..iiimlfKlona. oli
(ubw.riher r«wiv«a, without hk i r, 1» o bean11ril
plct'ir.'*, hl«h are ready for 1.11 MKlll AT1« If .«
hlVKItV. Tho paper ilat If »l.n.-.t |eei
ailli '.k' laiully journals, being no popmaur tl, tt. of 1»p
0la*N, It liaa tho
loiiif ••*|^H-teil to-
,l
bun Ii KH( atiOiilU
tor
ciieulam and liy
o I I i I A- I
New Vo I.
In the .State of lliiimii.
l.i in II
or
E N S
IO
-I:,II, I
vty I-. I. o-
PfK-rilnrf.
Tfcird cdllli
vu'.a Uo)a
Hvo.
limits l.itw of CortmrHlloni. Tim general
Kt.iiiiti of Hanoi* on the l,.iw of Corpora!lotin, with
l-i.n/w for the oir»iil/.allon and )n (irjioriillon of
,1 -lot Htock CompumeH, etc.. aa well
DANIEL SICKLES
i'tvi
tin
the reor-
(fUMization of tlie name, and for rrllKloO* and other
corporation!!. Hy Hon. .lumen I', jioot. 1 vol.
^,'Auy book ocnt free on receipt of the price.
,,t.-.t ,n Wall I.
to a fortune. No
.i puniphlel fr. I,
Tuintirld/c A-.
'.'iil.'tilin
lid lirolu
thJU
Wail-at, N
Write* the Kor, iri
(.'orre-.|oiidetice puh
illfl. KT ON TIIK IlKAK'l II.
I nre le,ii(f received every
day, to till* Kreat. popular lliuniiati ,1 I-.o ll) *'or\ i»
per. ItipaKcHfulI of frei-1. conlrlbi|i.oi.H, thrilimtf
Jketrhen, Htorlen, ele. eric, only %l
n y
ur,
A Oil liroiiii
v'»ir\y
vr. l»r 4 oul!»$
aid hroino. If yon in .• not antintied we will return
your money and von nmy keen no. Chronio for »ur
trouble. A(»KWTM U l\Tr l» Kvi rywhtrt.
Oil EH IIAhl.KY, l'iilfi»ln-r«,
1JO ilroadway, New Vorlf.
oucc.
for» full fourfe of Telegraphing './h»-n
taken with III SI!V KSS ItMK. For
(dretilara addr.^H .(onea Commercial Col.
lette, ht. l,oulo. Mo. Open Jmy a'
$5 toS20,^rw"'rb'n/pe ,ple
i'
Al«bt,
For Von agent Headers.
Baperbty lllaa
tinted.
ber. Ad!rrn«
b«nd utamo for a aarnplc
.JfiifS
6 I N 0 U I N I N E
/s as j)I rfii'tl 'i ranxhf
FOR FEVER & AGUE
aa tho ^'lipli.'ite I'l 'lie e.irie while It
the till II mh
Iroin all (.iirla of the country.
^~Sajii|de friteka^ea for trial, 2ft cent*.
Pr«f.are bv Cl.Ai'l' & CO.,Cherototii,
IJaMoti, Mawt. New V»i I !!iee, A. 9 Colfego ItiMie.
CANVASSING BOOKS 8ENT F£££ F0K
Prof. FOWLER S Great Work
On Mt• hood. Womanhood, «"l U»'lr Mutual
Inter.llci.ilIn-.:
I^IH
Areriin are
4.1
C'
ButMCriber. It IB not nece»»ry t» g« »P '1»J'» '•"E WELMjT
BtfN at thia rate. Any one who sends a single dollar will get the paper for a yea*
Till! \VKKKLV SFN.—Eight pages, flftv-aix Columns. Only fl.OO a year, no discoirta
TI1K SOI-U KI KLT SUN.- Sameeiue as the Datly Bun, $9.00a
20 -r cent, to CJubM of IO or over. -i
To Clnbn of 10 or over, a discount of 20 per cent.
Add re—
WEEKLY
jut. A
MfHB
NO MORE WET CARPETS! NO MORE COLD FEET I
THE ADJUSTABLE THRESHOLD
••*n nt
ntiii. old.thwt.HiioWj
DwwatrrioN. The slmvt. en,rrnvin» re|.re«.ent. our A .lJu-t.»l'].' TI
acknowledged l'» a 1 lot" lie ., Illy l!l ent I ». I flodmell tll.lt .,'•«•
from rtiiiilitif uiuitT li tionr I Ji* i».t: Iuiu 1
K :i
:i1 11 utii!' 11 w
heavy pure ruhher, murked II In tlin en»rravlii|{. The ruliherl* let Into U:o' WJ""' P'
thei.ei ui,nal lew aliov o, and In «vi urely H*ti nrd there, him forming n rnhht ar.
the threi-Uold
IM III
ltn pl»C
entire widtn, cull
tH place, the ruhher arch nrcfHei) Ketitly on the hot
ictely excluding ruin, en Id, dUHt.Hc. ft»du, .ihllit
ear any ordinarr wooden threoholil. It I*
a a a a n e e I o o u w e a a n y o i n a y w o o e n e i o i n
IH,|MI*I
1
v^nted°V*Ko*tVnly'i»Vi1,*iiitrH i^Uio'ouly eyer tMreutud, aud bM BO
pell tor lu tliokiKiwu world.
X» XI. O 3D
For single Door (width two fe*t nix tuchwi to three
dlscomtot
BI'N," New ¥ork Cl«y.
enl whleh la
I AT.' iiti)!.-«lby afttrip of
1
I
rttl.i, 1(1, dust."now,
im '.v 111 le ."ili»crv«d la
1 III the center When
ntly tm the bottom of the door when cloned, ae.ronN Its
Illy h:ot been tented for yciirx, itnil we will
1 i n i I 1 u I u u i
Uwt),
9t.SO For DouUl« Door (width four fw*
n. In the wn«nmpnon oi ion,
we will aend ro« of ei|euiic, anywhere, on receipt of me price.
IL SO%, PK1IU K O., HOLI* MFTNAAU:LURCRS| VNIFIGO*
(UREK*
.VINEGAR BITTERS
|r.
J. Walker's nliloniia V in
«'irnr am a ]»nrnly Vo^ntable
j.n'iiaratioti, in ulo fliictly from tho na
tivi- licibs toiuul on the, ioww niriRcH of
thf Sierra NevadaiiKiiiiitalnnof (Califor
nia, th« mcdiritial |roporti«B of which
,rc extracted ihoiclroui without tho use
i if Alcohol. Tho quoHtioii is almost
,!.iiiy usk«*d, "What i« tho cause of tho
unparalleled
HUCCOH8
«C
OI.IO M.KAI'IIS two moht tttln.cllVB Hiihj.-cl-,,
that" tise"
on -.(till
-palnled hy Mr*- Ai.dei ,,i iu
o n i u i a n n i a i i o i i n o o
and /-Vwt
of VIN K
A
OOUJI
it Brr-
i i-.iwf" Our answer is, that they removo
iht' cause of disease, and tho palinit re*
covers his health They are tho groat
III.MKI purifier auu a
LU'O-tfivlriK
principle,
a perfect Uenovator and Invigorator
of the system. Never before in th«
bintory of the world
IIIW :I
m.Mlicino bwm
comiM»unrti*fl ptmKCHHing the reniiirkabl®
(JUttllllt'M of VlMKOAK illTTKKH ill lltlttlillK th©
sick »f nvory tliHcanu mini is heir to. Thny
ar« ii gcntlo I'nrjjutivo in woll a« a Toiiic^
relieving
lgention or Inllttummtion of
au VUcural Orgaun, in Bilious
tbo Liver uu(]
Tin1
pro|M'riI(»s of
VmK/Ait
lU'tfil orrntatloii in Ihf morlri'
TK-
WAI.KKH'S
lirn KiiH iirn Apuriniit, Diiiiihorotin,
Oantiniiilivi', Nutritiourt, liUxitLivt Uiuretio,
Sedalivu, (,'oiiuUtr Irritant, BwlofitiC| Alts*
aud Anti liiliu'in.
II. II. MrlMWALD A Cfl..
Drnif^Ul* nml (ien. Apia.. Him I'mii'luco, California,
udiintrtoii and Clnu lUui KIH., N. Y.
ill lruKK'*(" Ih alerit
and
Hold
hy
[WANTED.
And its OurOi
WILLSON'H
a o a e o i y e O i
l,H a f' I'-iit Ir mi1 !, ion ,,f two welI 1-.
i„i Unr
rHl
All clam
H. MI. JROBXC
tdd. 0iaitH m,re money at work for u» in their ep*»r»
mono 11U, or a,I tbe time, than at »uyl hiriK ei»e i'artieu
lars fie.- Addi^M Ii
HTIMHON
tx.so.
A Co 1'ort.Iand, Maine.
lOV-a.
WOMKN.
It* l.an», I'oner, etc.
KCMIIIK
from L" to
!4."»
MI#u
medi­
cines |l» tlieory IB iil-l lo lun nl llie ,1, Hi, tlltill
build tin I he »•, ctem. I'livHieiaii" lind I he doctrlno cor
rect. The really cUrlllng curia performed by Will
».mV Oil are proof.
Cillbnltr A' 'I fiu'lt/rsl// orri-Kti Utrrty.
It lH tl»
moat powerful iinlliteptie In ti e known world. Kn
teriiiK Into the circulation. It lit once rrap|ilc» wiih
corruption, and decay txu»en. It purlll' tho aouixen
Of dlheilKe.
in yaturr'i bunt ai'liimtt
In reaUtinR
Consul.ij! n,n.
|*«lt 11 ill lur^e wril^rKhrpi'il iHlttlen,
Item in IK-
IMVI-IIIIII
IOU
I»y I»e«l
».i)(iuiliaii', umt In
Lru^y,ial».
I'repuretl hy
J. lI.VVllUH)lli, H.{ John Ht., ,\fw York.
W
,„,
IIV
........ III:r I.L!I'T 4
WWTBBN Aore.j
K06AI.L.CH«OAOO.Umiis..Kto.,t&•
tesp^lTHE&-NECTAR
tiiteu 'O »IIit all tinti K, i-or«ale
vc-ry where. Ami lor wile whol
ale onlv by tin I i cal A Hani l(! t,
'acltlc Tea Co., 131 KillUn at.iitiiJ
I
and 1 l^iurch-dt,
N. Y
f"/\ I KNTs for 'he
1 'ii,
copi' a day, and
we mud a cnvawniK booU free to any liook aaent.
Addre-a, atatiuir ei[»erieiice, etc., NATIONAX. PUB
LISHING CO., Chicago or St. LouU.
UfEATIJCB STDIDft A pent* wanted In
well I new o I mrOfl ev,,
y
town the
I'.O. Hu*
VViO.SeudforThea Net farcircular
IVICRKI.V WIJ«I ONHIN,
v'"l*ry«f
Yurk b'lun
the
1a I !,eat l''f»ii:||y I'aper, four in.intha, eoi.talnintf
111 Hi- whole of The liiter.a'inir aerlul i-tery,
Z 'I
I.itrpinutttii llon^e.
'J'hla Krcat atur- doe* not liifrliure upo,.
plBtenraa of other departmciita.
'f lu '.TKHM.V WIH-
I..SKI- i» a -IS column ,|Unrt, la^jrer th-.i, tnu
or ibe
I/Ji-I»
i in i |,., .ile .itnl //no
Send lor lewfij.tive i,, uiar Willi
Tntthwmlula
New
Ann iorH HWt I,/.
Siunple Co
plea
free. Ail letrcra ali'iuhl be curefullv addreaaed,
CKAMKK AIKKNK & CKAMKK. Milwi.uk. e, Wla.
PIOIl OA V Coiimnnmon oi fc::0 a week
Kiihn-y. and expenaea. Wp o'r. It :ind will
pay It. Apply now. O.Wi lilM'rAl n., .1 inon ).
DR. WHITTIER, ^,r
1 rI» and TJoyn wanted f) »e(l out
Fri neli and Airierlcan .Jewelry, lloo^a, Cajnes..
etc. .No capital needed. Cataloaue. Tertiw, etc.. neat
free. P.
O.
ViCKKUY & Co.,
AUBIUIU,Jlv
A. U.K. 4 IStt-K.
Agents
Wanted.
MINlK'i .l'.s' OTMKI
or 1 ui
aiiplifatioll /in, J. \V
S- I.ndleii
(.articulajK ,ti
MciNTYiMJ,
No. 4 Hon th HffSHu,
PA1.Btt
Hi.
Louis, Mo.
,« fYlnUni w.th INK mwuf^turea
Jet» '1

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