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Buchanan County bulletin. (Independence, Iowa) 1869-1891, December 21, 1877, Image 1

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VOL. XIII, NO. 22.
O. M. GILLKTT,
A
1TORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY PUB
-£X lie. Office in Osgood's building, up stairs,
next to the river.
PHYSICIANS
W
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY.
Wm.TOMAN, Editor and Proprietor
OgUc in Blood's Building, on the South- Side of
Main St., Four Doors from Bridge.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
SS.OO per Annum, In Advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING:
1 w. 2 w. 3 in. 1 6 m. 1 yr.
One Square,
Two Squares,
ft Column,
4 Column,
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10 00
1 50 I 3 50 I 6 50 I 10 00
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0 00 111 00 118 00 30 00
10 00 I 20 00 I ai 00 I 55 00
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Legal and Official Advertisements, One Dollar
per square for the first, find Fifty Cents per
square for each subsequent insertion, up to
four Insertions. A square is equal to ten lines
of Brevier type, or eight lines of Nonpareil,
the type of this paper.
Business Cards of six lines, or less, J6.00 a
year.
Marriage, Death and Religious Notices insert
ed without charge. Obituary Notices ten
per line.
cents
ATTORNEYS.
DIANE MO WRY.
ATTORNEY
4
AT LAW AND COLLECTION
Agent, Independence, Iowa. Office with
H. W. Holman.
J. K. COOK,
ATTORNEY
AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
Iowa. Office over
A. H.
Frank's Itestau-
rant, Main St.
H. W. HOLMAN,
(SUCCESSOR TO J. S. WOODWARD),
ATTORNEYOfficeLAW
AT AND COLLECTION
Agent. over Tabor & Son's Drug
Store, Independence, Iowa.
FRANK I). JACKSON,
ATTORNEY
AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Speeia 1 attention given to Collections. Of
fice over Chicago Clothing House.
AS. E. JEWEL,
AWYER OFFICE IN MDNSON'S BLOCK
-Li with Lake & Harmon. Independence, Iowa.
Collections a specialty. Will practice in all the
Courts of this State and Federal Courts. Col
lections and conveyances made, taxes paid,
houses and land rented or sold. All business
in city or country, and before Board of Super
visors will receive prompt attention. Also
agent for Equitable Life Insurance Company,
of Des Moines, Iowa.
D. D. HOLUlilDGE,
A
TTORNEY AT LAW, NOTARY
PUBLIC
and Land Agent. Office over Taylor's
Hardware Store, Independence, Iowa.
LAKE & IIAKMON,
ATTORNEYS
AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
Iowa. Office in Munson's Block, Main St.
JED LAKE. M. W. HARMON.
ItKl CKAItT & NEV,
ATTORNEYS
AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
Iowa. Oflice over Morse's Store. Consul
tations in English and German.
D. W. BRUCKART. JOHN J. NEY.
W. G. & J. B. DONN'AN,
LAW,
CONVEYANCING, WAR CLAIM AND
Land Agency )llice. Ollice in First Nation
al Bank building, Independence, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
DR. H. O, DOCKHAM,
"PHYSICIAN AND SITBGEON,
A ton, Iowa.
QUASQUE-
DR. II. II. HUNT,
OFFICE
AND RESIDENCE, CORNER OF
Court and Blank Streets, north of Catholic
Church.
W. A. MKI.T.KN, 1. I).
HOMCEOPATHIST,
INDEPENDENCE, IA.
Ollice and rooms in Ilurr's Block, Chat
ham Street, over Harnhart's Grocery. Office
hours from
8
to
9
A. M. and from
5 p. M.
1
to
3 and 4
AN1) SURGEONS, OFFICE
over People's National Bank, corner Chat
ham and Main Streets, Independence, Iowa.
Will attend to calls in the city or
country. Con
sultations in English and German.
J. O. HOUSE. S. G. WILSON.
M1JS. DR. BETSEY EGGLESTOK,
C1EDAR
RAPIDS. Bever's Bank Block, Com
mereial-st. This lady has acquired a A ery
wide reputation. She doctors all diseases she
examine- lier patients and explains their dis
ease solely from the circulation of the blood.
All are cordially invited to call and see her.
Consultation free. She will remain in this place
several months.
msriiAisrerc, &c.
FRANK I-. JACOBS,
INSURANCE
AGENT ANI) AUCTIONEER.
Represents old and reliable companies.
Will cry sales on property of any description.
Terms moderate. Ollice "at W. U. Telegraph
office. Main St., Independence.
liAHIiKR (SIIOP.
.JOHN BURKE,
fTIHE FASHIONABLE BARBER AND HAIR
-I Dresser. All tlie modern conveniences
known to the profession. Shop over Barnett &
Co'g Store, Main street. Independence, Iowa.
LAUNDRY & liAllBEIt SHOP.
I. W. EVANS & CO.,
PROPRIETORS
OF'NEW (*ITY LAUNDRY
and Barbershop. North side Main street,
four doors east of Walnut. We are perma
nently Unrated and desire a share of your pat
ronage. All work warranted.
DENTISTS.
E. E. SHATTUCK,
DE1TTISTI
Over the Bazaar, Main St.,
Iudejxiiilciicr. Iowa.
Prices Reduced toSuittheTimes
Best Rubber Plates $ 8.00 per set
Best •'elluloid Plates, 8.00
Best Silver Plates, 15.00
Gold Plates, 40.00
Vf All other work at reasonable
prices.
W. H. THRIFT,
DENTIST,
(Over II. R. Plane's Store),
Independence, ... Iowa.
Extracting, Filling, (Gold or Silver) Regulat
ing irregular teeth, &c., &e., at reasonable
E. M. BISSELL,
Dental Rooms!
Over City of Paris Store,
INDEPENfJKX 'ft, IOWA.
JLTMBER AND 111 ILDING.
Money Saved in Building.
To save money in building, and to put up sty
lish, woll-proportioned buildings for less money
than usual, can be done by calling on
E. ZI2ST2ST,
Independence, Iowa.
Having in connection with mrhwMm'SSa first
class Lumber Yard, and always keeping on
hand a full assortment of Sash, Doors, Blinds,
&c., &c„ and have also in my employ a gang of
first-class mechanics, I will be able to take eon
tracts and execute work for less money than
any one else. I also keep in my Lumber Yaixj
near the Depot, a complete assortment of all
grades and descriptions of
^235"
CITY DRUG STORE
DRV GOODS AND CliOTHING.
Important £Totioe.
NEW YORK STORE!
Ill order to reduce our very large stock of
A fresh arrivalhOf
Winter
i i WE WILL OFFER FOR THE
NEXT THIRTY DAYS,
ALL THAT CLASS OK GOODS CONSISTING OF
DRESS GOODS, CARPETS,NOTIONS,
CLOTHEXTC3-,
HATS, CAPS, FURS, ETC., ETC.,
At New York Cost. We cannot afford to carry over
until another year this large stock of goods.
THEY MUST BE SOLD,
-AJNT33
WE SftSLL MAKE OUR FRIGES
Low Enough to Sell Them.
All Goods will be sold at this sale,
STRICTLY FOR CASH 2
DRUGS AND MEDICINES. GROCERIES.
Sign of theG-OLDEN MORTAR.
Largest and BEST StocLin the Oity!
—AT—
Smale Brothers,
Independence, Iowa.
PURE
•rugs and Medicines,
At Lowest Rates.
to
HOUSE & WILSON,
A. B. CLARKE.
Drugs,
y-Ajasnrs, OILS,
WINDOW GLASS and LAMPS,
GLASS AND
ION-EXPLOSIVE CHANDELIERS, &c.
Chicken Powder,
A positive cure for Cholera in all kinds of poul
try—never known to fail. Also
HORSE POWDER,
The best remedy for Epizoot and Influenza.
The last two articles are my own manufacture,
and I can recommend them with confidence.
Swedish Leeches Constantly on Hand!
Prescriptions Carefully & Acnrately nlMl.
Everything for sale at
Astonishingly Low Prices.
|®"Take a look.
C. II. WALLACE.
GROCERIES AND DRUGS.
GROCERIES
U S
NEW CASH MtnfflGElENT.
I will from
E E 3 I
Which I will sell at the
Lowest Price for the Market.
Estimates and Specifications made. out at
short notice. Also constantly on hand a large
supply of Coal and Lime.
E. ZZ2T2T,
Contractor and Builder.
TO RENT.
Houses Rented by
O. D. JONES,
The Insurance Man.
v
this date sell both
Groceries and Drugs,
At my stores at west end of the
For Cash or Country Produce!
At Pftaes that cannot be beat.
FARMERS' TRADE SOLI
tsrCood Goods, Small Profit» ttnd no
Combinations to keep
vp Prices.
D«ttY*rfd fttrant Town.
A. B. CLARKE.
BUSINESS COLLEGE.
ATTKNI) CLINTON
Commercial College,
To learn Book-keeping, Penmnnship, Tele
graphing, See. Address
,ly7 EILEY & PEARCE,
Clinton, Iowa.
jynn—rmwim cn««, iw».
ooDda,
Lawton & Post.
Buy Your Groceries of
JOSLIN,
The Grocery Man.
G-BOCEBZES
Cor. Main and Walnut tits.,
Independence, Iowa.
The subscribers have on hand a choice and well
selected Stock of
FAMILY GROCERIES!
Which they will sell at the very lowest bottom
prices. Their stock consists of
Sugars, Teas,
Coffees, Spices,
Syrups, Confectionery,
CANNED AND DRIED FRUITS,
Kerosene Oil.
Wood and Willow-Ware,
Earthen Ware, &c., &c,
|T» B.—All they ask is to call and see their
goods before purchasing elsewhere. Highest
price paid for Produce. Kemeinber the place,
corner Main and Chatham streets.
THOS. EDWARDS & CO.
Buy Your Groceries of
JOSH-JUST,
The Grocery Man.
A. vv U unno LUII
Has
jost removed and is now located in
LEYTZE'S BLOCK, MAIN-St.
Where he keeps on
band a large Stock of
Groceries, Crockery!
G-3LASS
Wooden
"Weir©
Please give him a call and he will pay
yoti Cash for
ABUTTER AND EGGS.
Buy Your Groceries of
JOSL.IN,
The Grocery Man.
GROCERIES!
I have purchased the
OITY TEA HOUSE,
And will sell you
GOOD GOODS AT LOW PRICES!
Highest price always paid for
BUTTER & EGGS
and other produce.
PLEASE GIVE ME A CALL.
NO. 25
MAIN STREET,
Independence, ... Iowa.
WM. 8PADEK.
MITJTJ INK IIV
New Millinery Parlors!
Hiss L. V. RAYMOND
Would inform the ladies of this city and vicin
ity that she h:is secured rooms in
Leytzn'N IMock, over Tucker's Itcxtaurant,
And is
again ready to
receive orders is
the line of
Millinery and Dress Haling!
Her goods are all new and of the latest and
most fashionable styles, and she is conlldent
from her long experience in this city that she
can give PEKFEOT SATISFACTION to
may favor her with their patrohage
are invited to give her a call.
HASTE* JOHNNY'S NEjCt'
3KKMJHBOK.
all who
Ladies
lOmlt
MONEY TO LOAN.
Money Loan,
ON IMPROVED FARMS IN SUMB OF $500 OR
OVER,
AT 8 PER CENT INTEREST.
Loans speedily effected. Any one desiring a
loan will ao well by applying, either in person
or by letter, to
BHUCKAKT
k
NET,
12-7-1 y Independence, Iowa.
BOOR
1»RET HARTE.
It was Spring the first time I saw her, for her
n[or,
a and mama nipved in
just as skating was over, and mar
bles alsmt to begin,
For the fence in our back yard was brokcn,and
I saw and peeped through the slat.
There were 'Johnny Jump-ups' all around her
and I knew it was Spring just by that.
I never knew whether she saw me—for she
didn't say nothing tq me,
But 'Mai hero's a slat in the fence broke, and
the boy that is next door can see."
But the next day 1 climbed on our woodshed,
as you know, mamma says I've a right.
And she calls out, 'Well, peekin' is manners!'
and I answered licr, 'Suss is perlite!'
But I wasn't a bit mad, no, papa, and to prove
it, the very next day.
When she ran past our fence in the morning, I
happened to get in her way.
For you know I am 'chunked and clumsy,'as
she says are all boys of my size,
Anl she nearly upset me, she did, pa, and
laughed till tears came in her eyes.
"And then we were friends from that moment
for 1
knew that she told Kitty Sage,
And she wasn't a girl that would flatter, 'that
she thought 1 was tall for my age
And I gave her four apples that evening, and
took her to ride on my sled.
And—'What am I telling'you this for?' Why,
papa, my neighbor is dead.
"You don't hearone-half I am saying—I Really
do think it's too bad
Why, you might have seen crapes on her door
knob, anil noticed twlay I've been sad.
And they've got her a coflin of rosewood, and
they say they liuve dressed her in white,
And I've never once looked through the fence.
Pa, siuee she died-at eleven last night.
"And ma says it was decent and proper, as I
was her neighbor and friend,
That I should go there to the funeral, and she
thinks that you ought to attend
But Ium so clumsy and awkward, I know I
shall be in the way.
And suppose they should speak to me, papa, I
wouldn't know just what to say.
"So I think I'll get up quite early,I know I
sleep late, but I know
I'll be sure to wake up if our Bridget pulls the
string that I'll tie to my toe.
And I'll crawl through the fence and l'llgather
the Johnny-Jiimp-Ups' as they grew
Round her feet the tirst day that 1 saw lier,and
papa, I'll give them to you.
"For you're a big man. and you know, pa, can
come and go just where you choose.
And you'll take the flowers in to her, and sure
ly they'll never refuse
But, papa, don't «i they're from Johnny, thej/
won't understand, don't you see.
But just lav them down on her bosom,
and
OFF CAPE HORN.
I do believe, Mr, Pier.son, that we
are fated, and the ship laboring under a
spell as bad as that which is said to en
velop the Flying Dutchman. Fourteen
days we have been off Cape llorn, and
the last thirteen there has been no op
portunity to catch a glimpse of sun,
moon or stars. I would give half of all
I am worth for just an hour of clear
weather."
And Capt. Hardy—Jack Hardy, as he
was best known—descended to the cab
in to pore over a large chart spread out
on the center table. He was not over 80
years of age, brave, capable, and hand
some despite the bronzing his complex
ion had received beneath tropical suns.
His frank, open countenance wore an
anxious expression, which was reflected
back from the rough, weather-beaten
visage of the mate, a man past the me
ridian of life.
As for the ship—the Sunbeam—she
was a clipper, and as fine a craft as ever
sailed from the port of New York for
San Francisco.
The ship was lying to-under a close
reefed maintopsail, main spencer and
forestaysail, and as the short day came
to a close the gale seemed to increase
from the southwest. Furious squalls of
hail and sleet passed through the tall
spires and taut rigging of the ship, which
at times keeled over to the icy blasts,
until the lee-scuppers were submerged
in the dark foam-streaked waters.
The whole expanse yf the heavens
was covered by a black cloud, which, as
.T "W «Tnil Tl Qf!mi the darkness increased, appeared to sink
lower until the Bildti(1 of the poleg
were obscured by whirling masses of
scud driving before the furious tem
pest.
The shivering watch, wrapped in mon
key jackets and oil-skins, gathered aft,
crouching for shelter under the lee of
the bulwarks, while the mate, bundled
in his long watch-coat, walked the quar
ter-deck in sombre silence.
Aft by the binnacle, peering at times
at the compass, dimly revealed by the
flickering lamp, stood Capt. Hardy. A
terrible anxiety, coupled with thoughts
of wife and children, filled his stout
heart as he peered incessantly to wind
ward, or strove to pierce the gloom
which had settled down like a pall to
leeward.
And so through the long dreary night
the watch was kept up, and with the
morning's dawn a slight change was
noted.
The ship was lying on the starboard
tack, making fair weather of it for so
sharp a vessel, when the murky obscur
ity began to clear and a glimmer of clear
sky was seen.
The important news was immediately
reported to Capt. Hardy, who was doz
ing in a chair by the companion-way.
With a bound he sprang up the steps, at
the same instant the cry of Land ho!
echoed through the ship.
Four points off the weather-bow the
loom of land was seen, which every mo
ment was becoming more distinct, while
off the lee-beam stretched the ice-bound
coast of Cape Horn.
The dark face of Jack Hardy grew a
shade paler as his eyes ranged from
point to point, taking in certain land
marks, which but too accurately con
firmed the dangerous predicament of
the Sunbeam, a presentiment of which
had haunted the young commander's
breast.
The ship was nearly land-locked on a
lee shore, attended with horrors well
calculated to demoralize the ablest sea
man. The land on the weather-bow pro
ved to be the island of Diego Rimirez,
that on the weather-quarter St. lldefon
so rocks, and that on the lee-beam was
the coast of Cape Horn.
But two alternatives remained by
which the lives of all on board could be
saved, together with the ship and cargo.
One was to run between Diego Rimirez
and the coast, the other to make sail
and endeavor to beat off shore in the
teeth of the gale, which had abated
somewhat in violence.
It was impossible to remain hove to,
as a few hours would have found the
vessel on the rocks.
Jack Hardy was not long in making
up his mind as to the best course to
pursue. A glance at the chart revealed
countless sunken rocks and ledges in the
channel, with which he was totally un
acquainted. He would only attempt that
as a last alternative.
Send all hands aft, Mr. Pierson,
Rouse out the watch below. Splice the
main-brace, set the close-reefed foretop
sail and reefed foresail.-'
Tho steward hastily served out the
grog, which was eagerly swallowed by
the sailors, who fully realized the strug
gle they were about to engage ip.
A tromendouN sea was running, which
set the ship still nearer to the lee shore
with every heave. Under the press of
canvas which it was imperative to carry
the Sunbeam was all but buried in the
foaming surges.
Sea after sen broke over the ship as
she lay in the trough, deluging her with
water from the forecastle aft to tho bin
nacle. where two of the best seamen had
been lushed to the wheel. Occasionally
the sharp bows of the clipper would de
scend with terrible force, plunging mad
ly into the seas, threatening to tear her
self asunder as she struggled on.
The entire ship's company was on
deck, clinging to life-lines which had
been rove fore and aft. The Captain
had taken his position aft by the wheel,
while the two mates, with their respec
tive watches, stood ready to execute any
orders that might emanate from the
quarter-deck.
Gradually the ship closed in with the
land, and the sight was truly a terrible
one. When the vessel was in the trough
of the sea, nothing could be distinguish
ed but a waste of waters but when
borne aloft on the summit of some enor
mous wave, then the high, beetling
rocks, with mountains of ice, over which
the seas were breaking masthead high,
were fully revealed to the shuddering
sailors.
Suddenly the sails shivered and flap
ped like thunder.
Up with your helm! Keep her full!"
shouted the Captain, as he turned tow
ard the binnacle.
The wind has headed us off a p'int,
sir,'' responded the seaman, as he glanc
ed from the compass to the weather
leech of the maintopsail.
Then God have mercy on us," mut
tered the Captain, as he glanced quickly
to leeward. 'Tis a narrow chance, and
anything is preferable to being dashed
to pieces on von rocks. Mr. 1'ierson,',
and he raised his voice:
Loose the mainsail and reef it!"
The mate stared at his commander in
unalloyed amazement, and probably for
the first time in his life, hesitated to
obey the order of his superior.
She will never bear it, sir."
She must, or carry the masts over
the side. Set the sail, or I will do it for
you."
I will do it, sir, if it is the last act of
my life," and soon after the hardy crew
wore heaving the tack down, while the
sheet was manned and hauled flat aft.
The effect of the broad surface of
canvas upon the ship was tremendous.
Her lee channels were buried in the
foaming surges, and she reminded her
bold commander of a fiery steed under
the lash.
The ship no longer rode over the seas,
but forced herself bodily through them,
dividing the masses of water which
poured in one continuous torrent aft to
the break of the house.
A favorable start had enabled the Sun
beam to head well up, and the breath of
the seamen came freer but in the midst
of their hopes and fears the short wintry
day closed in, and the sombre shades of
night enveloped land and sea. All day
long not a mouthful of food had passed
the lips of the crew, from whom came no
complaint.
pa­
pa, she'll know they're from me,"
It was impossible to start a fire in the
galley stove and. in fact, no one on
board thought of hunger.
Sound the pumps there, carpcnter,
and pass the word for the Steward to
light the binnacle!"
The carpenter's orders were at once
obeyed the carpenter in a faltering
voice reporting three feet of water in
the hold.
What's the matter with you. Chips?
Your voice trembles like an old wo
man's. Is it anything to be wondered at
that a vessel makes water when she is
forced in this manner? Rig the pump,
sir, and be careful what you are about,
or you'll rue the day you ever signed ar
ticles with Jack Hardy," and the Cap
tain's voice assumed a hard, stern tone,
which had its effect upon the subordi
nate.
The howling of the wind and the nev
er-ceasing roar of the huge waves as
they toppled on high, now mingled with
the dismal clank of the pump and the
rush of the hail as they pattered on the
deck. The running-gear had been swept
in confusion to leeward, and jammed by
the water washing to and fro beneath
the span spars lashed along the water
ways.
The glass had begun to rise, and alrea
dy the gale betrayed symptoms of dying
out. Still not an officer or man left his
post. At 10 o'clock the vessel was judg
ed to be abreast of the island, and as the
gale lulled, the roar of breakers dashing
against the rocks boomed through the
air.
At midnight the wind sank suddenly
away, and the sound of the breakers be
came clearer. Perilous as had been the
situation of the ship throughout the day,
it was rendered infinitely more so by the
dead calm.
There was not a breath of air. The
ship had become unmanageable, driving
abrondside to the rocks, where the hea
vy southwest swell was breaking with a
force only equalled by the appalling
noise of the reverberating surges as they
culminated in clouds of foam and vapor
about tiie iron-ltound shore.
"very moment the ship was forced
nearer and nearer her doom. The cables
and anchors were entirely useless, for
there was no bottom to be had at 160
fathoms the boats were of no service
for towing on account of the furious
swell, and all hands realized that in less
than 20 minutes the good ship Sunbeam
would be ground into pieces as minute
as toothpicks. The seamen gazed at one
another aghast, as death, clothed with
countless terrors, stared them in the
face. Suddenly the carpcnter started
forward.
There is one chance left, lads. Fol
low me, and lend a hand to launch the
long boat."
The long boat! the long boat! was
repeated from the pallid lips the poor
fellows, who were ready to gasp at a
straw to save their lives. Fear had
deprived them of their cooler judg
ment.
But in a voice of thunder Jack Hardy
arrested their movements.
Stand fast, lads, and do as I bid you.
Carpenter, come out of that boat."
Not 1. Tis each man for himself
and (Jod for us all, now," was the reply
of the man. as he coolly cut the lashing
which secured the boat.
"Once more, I say, obey my orders.
You would be dashed to picces in a mo
ment."
"As well in this boat as on board here.
Come on, lads."
And he waved his hand to the crew,
who were already wavering.
For the last time, I order you out of
that boat. So long as two planks of this
boat stick together and I have life, will
be obeyed."
"'And repeat, life is sweet."
With the words came the sharp crack
of the revolver the man threw up his
arms, grasped convulsively in the air,
and fell headlong into the heaving swell,
disappearing among the bubbles and ed
dies astern.
To your stations, lads, and stand by
for my orders!" was the stern order
which fell from the lips of their com
mander.
The seamen were silent and solemn.
Quiet and subdued they thought of eter
nity, which mystery they were firmly
convinced they would soon solve.
Every sail that, was available had been
set, but the ship was little less than five
hundred vards from the rocks, and the
wind from the rebounding breakers fall
ing heavily on the limp canvas, forced
the sharp vessel ahead nearly twice her
length.
The sun rose clear from hor watery
depths, not a cloud was to be seen in
th(i heavens, as a flood of glorious
sunlight tinged the crests of the huge
swells.
A light cat's-paw camo dancing over
the light surface of the water from the
eastward. Another and another follow
ed the ship forged forward, the light
sails filled, and in fifteen minutes the
Sunbeam was running with studding
sails set alow and aloft.
With a fervent "Thank God! Jack
Hardy stenped below to commune in
private witn his Creator.
Cape Horn for him had lost all its
terrors.
Origin of Lynch Law.
J. N. Sandidge in New Orleans Picayune.
In Campbell county, Virginia, on the
Roanoake river, (then called Staunton
river), during the old revolutionary war,
when there were some Tories of obnox
ious character still remaining in the
oounty not reachable by any statutory
INDEPENDENCE, IOWA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1877. WHOLE NO. m.
law, Colonel Charles Lynch, supported
by Captain Robert Adams, his brother
in-law, both farming on adjoining plan
tations, and Calloway, determining
to rid the country of such dangerous en
emies, seized on different occasions three
of the worst of them, tied them to a
tree and flogged them so severely as to
prompt an unceremonious departure
from the State, as they were ordered.
This sort of proceedure on the part of
Lynch and his friends, proving so effec
tual in Campbell, was quickly followed
in other counties, where loyalty to King
(jleorgc sometimes provoked summary
punishment, and it was called "Lynch
law," and has been to our day.
The snatch of an old song of the time
is still repeated in the neighborhood:
"Huzza for
Capt. Bob, Col. Lynch and Galloway,
Never let a Tory rest till lie cries ont Liberty
John Lynch, the brother of Charles
Lynch, was the founder of Lynchburg
only a few of their descendants are now
living—none in Virginia—bearing the
name, so far as is now known, the last
of the males, Charles Henry Lynch, and
his brother, John Pleasant, having died
in Campbell county since the war of se
cession their sister, Mrs. Dearing, and
her daughter, Mrs. Faunt Le Roy, now
occupy the old homestead where still
remains the stump of the walnut tree
to which the three Tories were tied and
whipped—life was never taken.
ebster, in his unabridged dictiona
ry, says of "Lynch law," that it is the
"practice of punishing men for crimes
or offenses by private, unauthorized
persons, without a legal trial. The
term is said to be derived from a Vir
ginia farmer named Lynch, who thus
took the law into his own hands."
A Clear Havana.
Burliiiffton Hawkeye.
It. was on a Rurlington and Cedar
Rapids train. The tall passenger, when
he got on, was in that happy frame of
mind that doesn't care whether Congress
is in session or not. He held on to the
railing very carefully as he climbed into
the smoking car, and appeared to be a
little annoyed at being the object of
general attention. He ceased to smile
and assumed an expression of profound
thought and dignity, and backing into a
seat with great deliberation, sat down in
a man's lap. He got up in some confu
sion, and when lie shot into the adjoin
ing seat lie straightened himself up and
assured himself that it was unoccupied
by carefully feeling all over the cushion
with his hands. He then made an elab
orate apology to the wrong man for sit
ting down in his lap, and cast a stern,
but withal an unsteady glance up and
down the car, to reproach or repress the
smiles that were going round.
For he was not the kind of a man to
be laughed at. He was well dressed and
had a certain air of dignity about him
that, under ordinary circumstances,
would command respect. He sat still
for a few moments and then took off his
hat and hung it up outside of the rack,
and was apparently amazed to sec it
reach the seat before he did. Presently
the entrance of the train boy bearing a
box of the soothing Indian weed, re
minded him of something, and he dived
into his vest pocket and brought forth
half a dozen matches, and then he dived
into an inside vest pocket for the other
materials necessary to a comfortable
smoke.
He had great difficulty, at the very
His smoking did not progress very
rapidly. He couldn.t make the old
I thing work. It wouldn't light well. It
didn't seem to draw, and his agonized
grimaces as he pulled and sucked at it,
i
were enough to make a snake laugh.
But nobody in the car dared laugh very
loud, for every time the tall passenger
hear a
titter hc would pause, and.hold
ing his smoking material in one hand
and the burning match in the other,
glare around the car in the most forbid
ding manner until the tittering ceased,
or the match burned his fingers.
He soon burned up all the matches
he had, and then, casting his eyes about
for some one of whom to borrow a light,
he spied the train boy. smoking like a
volcano, and beckoned him up.
"(limine a light, young man, if you
please." he said.
"Light?" demanded, the astonished
monopolist, "light? What ye want a
light for?"
"For my c-c-cigar," replied the tall
passenger, with great gravity.
Smothered laughter went up all
around the car and the train boy, drop
ping into a seat in his hysterical excite
ment, threw up his hands and fairly
shouted:
"Cigar! Oh, bloody Nero, that is a
banana you're tryin' to smoke!"
The tall passenger bent a glance of
calm contempt upon the shouting boy
and the writhing passengers that filled
the car with an oppressive silence, and
then, in tones of conscious and superior
wisdom, he said:
"An' don't I know that, young man?
Of c-coursc it is. I never s-smoke any
other kind. It's a genuine ban made
imported banana, and don't you forgit
it."
Then the passengers threw their hats
fiercely on the floor, and climbed up on
on the backs of the seats, and in one
wild, maddening howl of laughter, lifted
tho roof clear off the car.
Cost of a Trip to Paris.
K. V. Smalley's Letter to N. V.Tribune.
Many exhibitors will want to go to
Paris, whether their presence is neces
sary or not to the proper display of
their contributions to the fair, and all
who have had no experience in foreign
travel will be glad to see an estimate of
the cost of a trip. First-class passage
to Paris and back by way of either
Liverpool, Southampton or Ilarve, will
cost from $200 $250 according to the
line_ of steamers selected. Living in
Paris costs about the same as living in
New York. Hotels are dearer if the
picst orders all he has been in the hab
it of ordering at an American hotel, but
cheaper if he lives as foreigners do.
Board at respectable pensions can be
had at all prices, from $." a week and up
wards. $10 will nrobably get a good
room and a fair table, but not in favor
ite localities, such as near boulevards or
the Champ Elysees. Incidental expen
ses, such as omnibus fare, newspapers,
bootblacks, cigars (I will not add drinks,)
etc., cost about as much as in American
cities. Nothing is cheap except cab
hire. I should say an American accus
tomed to economical habits, might leave
home with $500 in his pockets and spend
three months very comfortable at the
exhibition. Of course he could not fre
quent the Cafe Anglais, or go often to
the grand opera, or dine every day in
the Bois, or indulge incautiously of the
numerous facinations of Parisian life.
But he could see the exhibition, the
jiicture galleries and the pople thorough-
Anecdote of Lincoln.
Editor's Drawer, Harper's Magazine.
"One day," said Mr. Lincoln, "when I
first came here, I got into a fit of mus
ing in my room, and stood resting my el
bows on the bureau. Looking into the
glass, it struck me what an awful ugly
man I was. The fact grew on me, ana
I made up my mind that I must be the
ugliest man in the world. It so mad
dened me that I resolved, should I ever
see an uglier, 1 would shoot him at
sight. Not long after this, Andy
(naming a lawyer present) "came to
town, and the first time I saw him I said
to myself, 'There's the man.' I went
home, took down my gun, and prowled
round the streets waiting for hinr. He
soon came along. 'Halt, Andy,' said I,
pointing my gun at him. 'Say your
prayers, for I'm going to shoot you.'
'"Why, Mr. Lincoln, what's the mat
ter? what have I done?'
'Well. I made an oath that if I ever
saw a man uglier than I am, I'd shoot
him on the spot. You arc uglier, sure
so make ready to die.'
'Mr. Lincoln, do you really- think
I'm uglier than you are?'
"'Yes.'
'Well, Mr. Lincoln,' replied Andy,
deliberately, and looking me squarely in
the face, 'if I am any uglier than yoo,
fire away
Jury Juice.
State Register.
The decision of the Supreme Court,
Tuesday, with reference to jurors drink
ing liquors during the trial of a case has
started all the lawyers to thinking about
their experience in the matter. Yester
day morning before Court, a party of
them collected in the court room and
told so many big ones that all the press
reporters present thought of commit
ting suicide for chagrin at finding out how
bad these legal chaps could leave them
behind in a lying match.
This is supposed to have happened in
Polk county six years ago. One of the
parties to a suit thought he had been
beaten, when the jury retired to deter
mine upon a verdict, and consequently
put his wits at work to study up a plan
for securing a new trial. Finally he de
cided that the most feasible thing to do
would be to introduce some whisky in
to the jury room. Accordingly he
freighted a market basket with savory
chicken and toothsome sandwiches. The
seductive mince pie had a place there
and stomach destroying sweet cake, and
underneath them all were sundry bot
tles of Kentucky Bourbon. He carried
the basket to a point just below a win
dow in the jury room, tied one end of a
long rope to the handle of the basket,
fastened the other to a pebble of suffi
cient weight, transformed himself into
a catapult and threw the rock through
the window. The jury, which had been
in consultation past one time, were in
good condition to swap testimony for
grub, and when the string and pebble
came through the glass they wen not
very long in ascertaining what was at
in
dri
outset, biting off the end of his cigar. held his peace.
He was a little undecided, to begin with, Not very long since an old chap with
which end to bite off. He turned it a red ribbon nose was placed on a jury
over and over in his fingers and looked
at this end and that, but finally came to
in a knotty case. Thinking that when
they should once be locked in their
a decision and acted upon it promptly, room they would be occupied several
It was a little tough, but he chewed
1
days in guessing, he prudently provided
away at it manfully and persistently, himself for contingencies. Among his
and got it off at last. Then he spit the inheritances was an old sword cane, de
end fiercely against the window, and I scended from the times when that kind
when it just struck against the clear
glass instead ofiroing through, he looked
foolish, and rubbed it off with his hand
kerchief.
of a weapon was common. The blade
was gone but the orifice it once filled re
mained and the owner gauged it for
half a pint of tanglefoot. Then he
screwed the top on the cane and return
ed to Court prepared for any emergen
cies. The jury remained "out" forty
eight hours but the red ribbon chap was
as blooming and fresh at the end of the
long vigil as when he first commenced to
do duty.
While General Given was prosecuting
attorney, he prosecuted ardruggist in the
Warren County District Court for sell
ing liquors contrary to law. The speci
fic charges were that he sold "Ilostet
ter's Bitters," "Wine of Life," and oth
er liquids purporting to be medicines,
but which contained spirituous liquors.
The General proved, by reliable witness
es, that the articles had been sold, and
that they were alcoholic. Then he
made his speech, and the opposing coun
sel, who had introduced half a dozen
bottles of the "medicine'' in evidence,
commenced. In the course of his argu
ment he uncorked a fat bottle and hand
ed it to the jury to taste, assuring them
that he was willing to risk their own
judgment in the matter. They tasted,
and probably ascertained that it was
something good. "Exhibit A." the said
exhibit being the remaining five bottles,
were taken to their room by the jury as
a proof of the evidence in the case.
When they returned into court the jury
box was redolent of corn juice, and sev
eral familiar noses shown like the bea
con at Eddystone lighthouse. Every
bottle had been emptied. They convict
ed the druggist, and then the attorney
for the defense moved to set aside the
verdict on the ground that the jury had
misbehaved by drinking intoxicating liq
uor in the jury room. In proof he ques
tioned each juror separately. Each ad
mitted that he had concealed under his
waist coat several horns of Exhibit A.
The fact was well established, but the
General was able to save his verdict by
eliciting testimony showing that the
drinking had been done after the verdict
had btstJii agreed upon.
A
T:':
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT.
WM. KLDEX, Editor.
In compliance with the earnest solici
tations of County Superintendent Par
ker, I have consented to edit for a time
an educational column in the
BULLETIN.
I have heretofore refused to undertake
this work on account of the small
amount of time which I have to devote
to it, and I consent now only in the ex
pectation that my fellow-teachers will
render me practical assistance.
Being constantly employed in school
work, I shall not find time to write
much, but I hope that such original
matter as I may be able to prepare or
procure, with liberal selections from the
journals of the day, will make a column
that shall prove not wholly an inefficient
factor in the educational work of the
county.
Teachers laboring anywhere in the
county are requested to send in such
items of interest as may come under
their observation, also any practical
questions which may come up in their
school work or private studies. When
suitable questions are sent in, we shall
give them to our readers with the re
quest that any who feel competent to
do so will send us answers, or, if the
questions be mathematical, solutions of
the same.
A National Educational Fond.
There are before Congress several
bills proposing national aid to educa
tion. One of these, introduced by Sen
ator Hoar, of Massachusetts, provides
that "the net proceeds of the public
lands, the net proceeds arising from the
issue of patents, and all sums hereafter
repaid to the United States by railroad
corporations, either as principal or inter
est. upon any loan of money or credit,
or bond loaned to them, or paid for their
use, or guaranteed for them by the Uni
ted States, shall be hereafter forever set
apart for the education of the people."
The bill further provides that some
thing more than one-half the aggregate
of these sums shall be invested in Uni
ted States bonds, bearing interest at
four per cent per annum, and be known
the other end of the rope. They hoist- as the National Educational Fund, and
ed up the basket, hoisted in the edibles that to the principal of this fund may
be added any sums donated to ike Uni
ted States for that purpose.
and drinkables and soon returned into
the court room. Meanwhile the plot
ting caterer had retired from view as
soon as he threw the stone and rope in
the window, so that none of the jury
knew where the good things came from.
But for all that th?y filed into court
with the comfortable feeling of men
that had dined amply and with a suspi
cious flavor of spiritus frumenti perva
ding the atmosphere about them and
then, to the surprise of all. they return
ed a verdict in his favor. He had de
signed to overthrow the verdict on the
ground that the jury had been drinking,
but when they guessed on his side he
The bill also makes suitable provis-
ions for the apportionment of the re
mainder of these sums, together with
the entire income of the educational
fund. One of these provisions is that
after the first year they shall be appor
tioned wholly to the payment of teach
ers' wages.
We have given a very brief outline
of the more important provisions of
Senator Hoar's bill. It seems to us to be
one of the most important acts that
Congress will be called upon to consid
er. We hope that it may become a law.
Little children need personal attention
and instruction. A well-ordered prima
ry school should never have over forty
pupils, and thirty is better. The home
is the true pattern of education, where
the mother has a small number to teach,
say from one to six or seven children.
The kindergarten follows, with its class
es of eight or twelve children. But
when we come to the primary schools,
the common custom is to herd children
together as a flock of sheep, and then to
ask teachers to instruct, develop, and
discipline them wisely and well.—The
Primary Teacher.
The apostles of the "spelling reform"
may expect persecution even from those
who ought to be their warmest support
ers. We were led to this remark by
seeing four Independence teachers, the
other day, making merry over a gaily
painted sign on which the word "buggy"
was spelt with one g, and "jobbing"
with one b.
The next session of the State Teach
ers' Association will be held at Cedar
Rapids during holiday week. Address
of welcome at 10 A. M., Dec. 26th.
Among the important subjects appear
ing on the programme, are: "The emi
nence that should be given to the En
glish language in the public schools,"
"Moral training in schools," "Normal In
stitutes," &c. Quite a number of Bu
chanan county teachers expect to be in
attendance.
Our ever active County Superinten
dent. W. E. Parker, conducts an educa
tional column in the Conservative. He
will neither rest himself nor let
else rest.
Boy's Death from Alcohol.
Louisville CouricisTournal.
The Sunday following the big fire on
Sliced ami Second streets a number of
children found a barrel of whisky under
the ruins. Accustomed to seeing their
parents—all of whom live on and around Through the kindness of the publish
the liver front drinking liquor with er, S. R. Winehell. the Practical Teach
great relish, they imitated the example
given them and did likewise. The bung
was removed, and while one sucked the
others held the barrel in proper position
for liini or for her, as the ease might be.
And so they drank themselves drunk,
becoming ultimately so helpless that
they rolled and wallowed on the bricks
and other debris, unconscious of every
thing and everybody. Among their
number was Tommic Creed, a lad of
eight years. The alcohol he consumed
so soaked itself into the boy's body as
to affect his brain and poison his entire
system. He suffered horribly in conse
quence. Monday night he had convul
sions, suffering more than half a hun
dred ere the coming of death relieved
his agony. The boy's brother remained
with him and a physician attended him
in his dying nour. When Coroner
Moore called yesterday to hold the in
quest he found the body in an old, dirty
basement on the riyer front, near Sec
ond street. The surroundings indicated
unmistakably thcesigns of poverty of the
worst kind. The face of the dead,
shrunken and shrivelled bv the failure
to receive proner nourishment while
sickness existed, appeared doubly ghast
ly in the absence of life, the eyes frou
the depths of their shallow like sockets
showing the impress of agony in the ex
treme. The mother objected with much
demonstration to the holding of the in
quest, and after she had been induced to
become quiet, her husband came in full
of drink and desire to clear out the
room.
The Eastern war largely stimulated
the growth of wheat in Russia.
anyone
The temple of knowledge ia oa hill.
It can not be brought down to the val
ley, nor can the valley be filled up. He
who would worship at its shrine must
climb.
Never let your pupils seo that they
vex you.
The mind, impressible and soft, with ease
Imbibes and copics what she hears and sees
And through lile's labyrinth holds fastthooaw
That education gave her, false or true.
—Cowper.
er is sent free of cost to the Indepen
dence Reading Room. Those of our
teachers who do not take that paper
should look for it there. They will find
that it is what it claims to be—practi
cal.
The Independence public schools close
to-day for the holiday vacation of two
weeks. May teachers and. pupils have
a "Merry Christinas" aad a "Happy
New Year."
Another "Old Saw" Exploded.
Detroit Tree i'ress.
While a prisoner was yesterday being
searched at the central police station, he
suddenly blurted out:
"I'll never believe an old saying
again!"
"What's wrong with old sayings?"
asked the captain.
"Why, there's one that says: 'Heav
en helps them that helps themselves."
I helped mysolf to a pair of pants, and
now where am I? Where is heaven?
Where is the help to get out of this?"
They gave it up.
The largest plow ever manufactQMdl
has just Deen made at a factory in
Stockton, California. It is designed for
work in the tules, and cuts a furrow
thirty-five inches wide. The mold board
is eight feet long from the point to the
end. The plow will be attached to a sul
ky and will require a team of twelv*
itont animals to pull it.

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