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Buchanan County bulletin. (Independence, Iowa) 1869-1891, July 05, 1878, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY.
Wm. TOMAN, Editor and Proprietor
Office in Blood'x Building, on the South Side of
Main St., Four Doors from Bridge.
TERMS
or
SUBSCRIPTION:
MM Annum, In Advance.
KATES OF ADVERTISING:
1 w.~| 2 w. m.
SPACE.
,ic Square,
,vd Squares,
Vc Column,
a Column,
Chic Column,
tfLeKal and Oflicial Advertisements,
One Dollar
fir square for the first, and Fifty Cents per
•uare for each subsequent insertion, up to
fOur insertions. A square is equal to ten lines
of llrevier type, or eitfht lines of Nonpareil,
the tvpe of this paper.
•Business Cards of six lines, or less, ffi.OO a
year.
Marriage, Death and Religious Notices insert
ed without charge. Obituary Notices ten cents
Jf line.
ATTORNEYS.
FRANK JENNINGS.
ATTORNEYStore,
AT LAW. OFFICE OVER
O'Brien's Independence, Iowa.
J. E. COOK,
ATTORNEY
AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
Iowa. Office over A. H. Frank's Restau
rant, Main St.
a*
H. W. HOLMAN,
(SUCCESSOR TO J. S. WOODWAMrt,
ATTORNEYOfficeLAW
AT AND COLLECTION
Ajrent. over Tabor & Son's Drug
Store, Independence, Iowa.
FRANK 1). JACKSON,
TTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
'L. Special attention ifiven to Collections. Of
over Chicago Clothing House.
O. M. GILLETT,
ATTORNEY
AT LAW AND NOTARY PUB-
lic. Office in Osgood's building, up stair9,
next to the river.
JAS. E. JEWEL,
LAWYER
OFFICE IN MTTNSOITS BLOCK
with Lake & Harmon, Independence, Iowa.
C*"'H'tlons a specialty. Will practiceinrl' *^e
Courts ot this .Mate and Federal Courts. Col
lections and conveyances made, taxes paid,
houses and land rented or sold. All business
in city or country, and before Board of Super
visors will receive prompt attention. Also
agent for Equitable Life Insurance Company,
of Des Moines, Iowa.
D. D. HOLDIUDGE,
ATTORNEY
AT LAW, NOTARY PUBLIC
and Land Agent. Office over Taylor's
Hardware Store, Independence, Iowa.
LAKE & HARMON,
TTORNEYS AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
CX Iowa. Office in Munson's Block, Main St.
JKI LAKE. M. W. HAltMON.
HRUCKART & XKV,
ATTORNEYS
AT LAW, INDEPENDENCE,
Iowa. Office over Morse's Store. Consul
tations in English ami German.
I). W. MU'CK AHT. JOHN J. SKIT.
AV. G. & J. B. BOXSAN,
LAW,
CONVEYANCING. WAR CLAIM AND
Land Agency Office. Office in First Nation
al Bank building, Independence, Iowa.
J. S. SNIFFIN,
Counsellor At Law,
Walker, Linn County, Iowa.
Conducts a General
Banking and Exchange Business,
And gives special attention to Collections, &c.
i:t- i7yl
PHY SICI AN S.
A. L. CLARKE, M. D.
PHYSICIANClarke's
& SURGEON. OFFICE OVER
over A. 1$. Drug Store, west end
of bridge. References, Dr. H. Bryant, Inde
pendence: Drs. Staples, MeClnre, Waples and
other physicians, of Dubuque, and the faculty
of the Bellevue Hospital Medical College.
L. M. JOHNSTON, M. 1.
PHYSICIAN
AND SURGEON, WINTHROP,
Iowa. Office in Post Office I$uilding.[38m3
H. C. MARKHAM, M. D.
PHYSICIANnorthwest
AND SURGEON. OFFICE AT
residence, corner Chatham and
Gennessee Sts., Independence.
DR. H. O. DOCKHAJI,
IAN
JpHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, QUASQUB-
ton, Iowa.
I»R. H. II. HUNT,
OFFICE
AND RESIDENCE. CORNER OF
Court and Blank Streets, north of Catholic
Church.
W. A. ,M EI.l.EN, M. D.
HOMOEOPATHroomsINDEPENDENCE.
1ST, IA.
Office and in Burr's Block, Chat
luun Street, over lianihart's Grocery. Office
hours from 8 to 9 A. M. and from 1 to 2 and 4 to
-5 p. M.
HOUSE WILSON,
PHYSICIANS
AND SURGEONS, OFFICE
over People's National Hank, corner Chat
ham and Main Streets, Independence, Iowa.
Will attend to calls in tin- city or country. Con
sultations in English and German.
J. G. HOUSE. S. G. WILSON.
INSURANCE, &C.
FRANK L. JACOBS,
INSURANCE
AGENT AND AUCTIONEER.
Represents old and reliable companies.
Will cry sales on property of any description.
Terms moderate. Office at W. U. Telegraph
office, Main St., Independence.
BARBER SHOP.
JOHN lil'KKE,
THE
FASHIONABLE BARBER AND HAIR
Dresser. All tin* modern conveniences
known to the profession. Shop over Harnett &
Co's Store, Main street. Independence, Iowa.
LAUNDRY & BARBER SnOP.
I. W. EVANS & CO.,
"PROPRIETORS OF NEW CITY LAUNDRY
tIT and Barber Shop. North side
Main street,
fbur doors east of Walnut. We are perma
nently located and desire a share of yourpat
TO'inge. All work warranted.
DENTISTS.
E. E. SHATTUCK,
DE1TTIST I
Over the Buur. Main St.,
I n e e n e n e I o w a
mr
All work at reasonable prices.
W. H. THRIFT,
E N I S
(Over It. It. Piano's Store),
Independence, Iowa.
Extracting. Filling, (Ooldor 8Uver) Regulat
ing irregular teeth, &c., &<•., at reasonable
prices.
£. M. BISSELL,
Dental Rooms!
Over City ofParis I
INDEPKXTiEXCE, IOWA.
PUOKPECTUE.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
"Iowa Investigator!"
THE
Oldest Temperance Paper in the State,
And endorsed by the
PROMINENT STATE TEMPERANCE
ORGANIZATIONS.
.71* famstigator will he sent jffahrthis
time fa January 1, '79, for Mc.
REGULAR RATE, $1 .PER YEAR.
Address,
BRANT A KATZENMEYER,
*5m2 IOWA CITY.
09 CENTS.
CO TO THE
99
OE2STT
The Cheapest Place in the Known World
If) IN]
»o oo i a=» oo
TO GET
fVS 00
Hats & Caps,
:ir. no
55 00
Table Cutlery,
Gents' Furnishing Goods,
Overalls & Jackets,
Plated Goods,
PICTURES AND PICTURE FRAMED
BRACKETS, MIRRORS,
AND
NOTIONS of Every Description
Don't Fail to Visit the
99
CENT STORE
Where you will get
MORE GOODSforLESS HOE!
Than any other place In the West.
NT)
Outside of 9» Cent Department
JJ.~Goods at all Prices.
(37tf) MRS. E. DAWSON.
FUP-XITURE.
Thos. Coghlan & Sons,
Cabinet Makers & Undertakers.
Having opened
out a
shop for the Manufacture
and Sale of
HOUSEHOLD, CHURCH, HALL AND SCHOOL
FURNITURE.
AFRSO COFFINS AND CASKETS.
Fimemti promptly irttcaliitJLo.jL•
A Full Stock in Every Department*
Ware-rooms in Judge Barton's store, one door
east of the Commercial Hotel. Main St.,
21
DEPENDENCE, IOWA.
ABSTRACTS OF TITIiE.
HAVE YOU
Good Titles?
BREWER BRO'S
Have now complete, after several years of
hard labor, a Complete Abstract of all Titles
of all Heal Kst:ite in Buchanan Comity, la.,
and are prepared to fflve reliable information
relating to tlie same. There are many clouded
titles. Are you sure yours
is all right? By get
ting an abstract from us you can ascertain.
fay-Remember that our office is in the Stone
Building, three doors west of the Merchant's
Hotel, Independence, Iown.
Look to Your Titles!
W. C. A J. B. DONNAN,
OWNEKS OF A
COMPLETE ABSTRACT
Of all Titles of Lands and Village I.ots in
Buchanan County, Iowa,
Are prepared to give prompt attention and re
liable information relating to the title of any
real property in the county. Several thousand
acres of Wild Land and several
VALUABLE IMPROVED FARMS FOR
SALE
In different parts of the county. Also, a num
ber of Lots and Dwellings in the city of Inde
pendence. {^"Pensions and all kinds of War
Claims attended to promptly.
LUMBER AND BUILDING.
Honey Saved in Building.
To save money in building, and to put up sty
lish, well-proportioned buildings for less money
than usual, can be done by calling on
E. ZINN,
Independence, Iowa.
Having in connection with my business a first
class Lumber Yard, and always keeping on
hand a full assortment of Sash, Doors, lllinds.
Sec., &e„ and have also in my employ a gang of
tirst-class mechanics, I will be able to take con
tracts and execute work for less money than
any one else. I also keep in my Lumber Yard
near the Depot, a complete assortment of all
grades and descriptions of
J.,ITL£BBE I
Which I will sell at the
Lowest Price for the Market.
Estimates and Specifications made out at
short notice. Also constantly on hand a large
supply of Coal and Lime.
33. ZI2T1T,
Contractor ami Builder.
BANKS.
first National
INDEPENDENCE, IOWA,
Qorner Main and Walnut Streets.
CAPITAL, 100,000.
Domestic and Foreign Exchange bought and
sold. Passage Tickets to and from Europe by
theCunard Line of Steamers.
OFFICERS:
U. CAxropsix, Pres. E. LEACH, Vioe-Pres.
H. P. BKOWNE, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
R. Campbell, J. Campbell, E. Leach, P.
Munson
Jas. Jamison Jed Lake. H. A. King.
FLOURING MILiIi.
FARMERS
OF
Buchanan County!
THE
Independence Mills,
Having made extensivc.'improvemeiitsin their
mills this summer, are preparedito do
I S I N
by the exchange method, giving Flour, Mid
dlings, and Bran in exchange for wheat Our
rates of exchange are from 30 to 36 pounds of
Flour to the bushel, with offall. We shall aim
to do what is Just by all, und will give as gobd
returns as can lie made by any mills doing
ilrst-class work. The excellent reputation of
our ilour warrants us in saying that we are do
ing better work than ever before. The high
est market price paid for milling wheat.
TO THE TRADE.
Orders promptly filled for the following
brands of Hour: Patent Process, Fancy, Fami
ly and Qraham. Orders and correspondence
solicited.
INDEPENDENCE MILLS CO.
Independence, Iowa, Sept. SO, 1877.
GROCERIES.
J. W. Johnston
Has just removed and is now located in
LEYTZE'S BLOCK, MAIN-St.
Whew hekeepe on hand a large Stock or
firoceries, Crockery I
O-r^.39
—AHB—
ITSToocien
Ware
Please .give Kim a call and he trill pay
you Cash for
2.(1
0
ABUTTER AND EGOS.
Buy Your Groceries ot
JOSLIN,
The Grocery Man.
aEOCEEIES
Cor. Main and Waluut Sts.
Independence, Iowa.
The subscribers hare on hand n choice an!1 well
selected Stock of
FAMILY GROCERIES!
Which they will sell at the very lowest bottom
prices. Their stock consists of
Sugars, Teas,
Coffees, Spices,
Syrups, Confectionery,
CANNED ANI) DRIED FRUITS,
Kerosene Oil,
Wood and Willow-Ware,
Earthen Ware, &c., &c,
N. B.—All they ask is to call and see their
goods before purchasing elsewhere. Highest
price paid for Produce. Remember the place,
corner Main and Walnut streets.
EDWARDS & CO.
Buy Your Groceries ot
JOSLIN,
The Grocery Man.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
CITY DRUG STORE
A fresh arrival of
Fixre IDruLgs,
OILS.
WINDOW GLASS and LAMPS,
GLASS AND
XOH-EXPLOSIVE CHANDELIERS,
he.
Chicken Powder,
A
positive cure for Cholera in all kinds of poul
try -never known to fail. Also
HORSE POWDER,
The best remedy for Eplzoot and Influenza.
The last two articles are my own manufacture,
and I can recommend them with confidence.
Swedish Leeches Constantly on Hand!
Prescriptions Carefully ft Acuratejy Filled.
Everything for sale at
Astonishingly Low Prices.
t&~Take a look.
C. R. WALLACE.
PURE
Drugs and Medicines,
At Lowest Rates.
A. B. CLARKE.
Sign of the
GOLDEN MORTAR.
—THK
Largest and BEST Stock in the City!
-AT
Smale Brothers,
Independence, Iowa.
MANUFACTURING.
INDEPENDENCE
Manufacturing Company
Wood Work.
Sherman Patent Window lllinds, Screens for
Doors and Windows, Sash and Doors, Frames
Mouldings, Wood Turning, &c.
Machine Shop.
Machinery Repaired, Lathe work of every de
scription, Drilling and Fitting. Corn Plow
a specialty.
Blaohsmithlnc.
Ploivs Repaired, Horse Shoeing by an Expe
rienced Workman, Oencral Job Work.
Feed Mill. &
Feed Grinding done Feed kept n haad for
sale.
deduced Prioes.
All the above work at prioes reduced to suit
tfeetli£«l. Coaw aodaee tor yourselves.
Inaependtnct, IK.. May 15. *77.
YOL. XIII, NO. 50. INDEPENDENCE, IOWA, FRIDAY, JULY 5, 1878. WHOLE NO. 674.
OTHELLO'S APOLOGY.
[Oil City Derrick.]
Most potent, grave and reverend seignors.
That I have ta'en away this old man'sdaughtcr
Is most true true, I have married her,
As I can prove by the officiating clergyman
Who is a Justice of the Pence down in Herki
mer.
Bv your patience
I will a plain, unvarnished tale doliver
Of my whole course of love what drugs, what
charms,
What conjuration, and what mighty magic
For such proceedings I am charged withal—
I won his daughter with.
Her father loved me: not a continental
Did 1 care for the old man's love.
But 1 pretended to reciprocate his affection.
And in this way did I make myself
A very Muldoou with him in solidity.
He oft invited me to tell the story of my life.
From yearto year, the battles,
sieges,fortunes,
Eteetera, and so forth, and so on
With which I had been stuiling him..
I ran it through e'en from my lmylsh days.
And you can bet your sweet lives
That I spread it on pretty thick
I spoke of most disastrous chances.
But did not stop to say they were with
A confounded 'oiistallc who wanted me
For the small offense of jumping a board bill
Of moving accidents by tiood ami Held
Of hair-breadth 'scapes in the imminent deadly
breach.
Or some other placc that I had read of
Of being taken by the insolent loo
And sold to slavery of my redemption thence,
And with it all my travel's history.
Omitting that part when 1 was introducing
The North American Corn and Ilunlon Eradi
cator.
Warranted to remove corns und bunions.
Without pain or loss of blood.
All these did the old gent swallow.
And to hear which would Desdeniona seriously
incline
But still the house affairs would draw her
thenee.
Although in this I now suspect my Desdemona
Did dissemble, for since we married are
I tlnd she can no more a llap-jack bake
Than I can eope with Hercules!
Anon she'd come again, and with a greedy ear
Devourupmydiscour.se: and free
Am I to swear that hers was the
Nicest ear in town, anil ofttimesdid I wish
I might in turn devour it.
One day the gentle maid with earnest heart re
quested
That 1 would all my pilgrimage dilate
Whereof parcels she had something heard,
But not distinctly.
This was great leather, and all at once
I did consent.
My story was immense.
And it took me four nights a week
For throe years to tell it.
When at length the tale was done,
She gave me for my pains a world of sighs
She swore in faith twas strange, 'twas passing
strange
Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful,
And laid over anything she had ever heard be
fore
By a large majority.
Sin- wished she had not heard: yet she wished
That Heaven had made her such a man.
She thanked me.
And bade me, if 1 had a friend that loved her
I should but teach him how to tell my story.
And that would woo her.
This was a complete give-away
That is to say, tumbled did I to the racket,
And we were wed forthwith.
So there's the long and short of it.
DO INTENTIONS INJURE THE LA
H0HER'
Scientific American.
One of the arguments made use of by
many against the patent law, is the old
fallacy that improvements in machinery
take the bread out of the mouth of the
laborer, and the great number of unem
ployed people at the present time is cit
ed as an example of the effect of the
use of machinery enabling one man to
do the work of several, who must, it is
stated, be thrown out of employment
because the one man on the machine
does .all the woilc that the others did be
fore. From this it is anrued that a pat
ent law for encouraging invention is a
bad law, and should he abolished.
This is one of the old ideas that are
continually cropping up, and .its fallacy
has been so thoroughly exposed by the
logic of events that it seems to many as
hardly worth considering. We certain
ly thought so until lately, but it has
made its appearance quite often of late
ill places where we would hardly have
thought to have seen it. Petitions have
been sent to Congress for the abolition
of the patent law various newspapers
have been publishing articles condemn
ing the introduction of new machinery,
and seriously proposing a* return to the
old methods of hand labor, so as to give
employment to the thousands who can
not get it. and it appears from various
questions asked by some of the mem
bers of the Congressional Committees
on patents, in the recent discussion on
the amendments to the patent law. that I
they are, or rather were, believers in this
others indirectly supported by the sew
ing machine business.
In our remarks so far we have only
cited such points as appeared to have a
bearing on the question of the effect on
labor of the employment of sewing ma
chines, but have said nothing as to the
gain of the people generally by their
use. We do not nave by us any reliable
statistics on the pricesjof clothing,but if
any one doubts tne fact that sewing ma
chines have reduced the price of wear
ing apparel, let him go to a shirt maker
and ask the difference in the price that
.would be charged for making two shirts
of the same materials, one to be made
entirely by hand and the other by ma
chine.
With regard to the effect of sewing
machines on the shoe manufacture we
Jlave some interesting statistics that we
believe may be relied on. The sewed
shoes which are made in the greatest
numbers are the ordinary gaiter shoes
(women's). These shoes, before ma
chines were introduced for sewing them,
sold at about $2.00 per pair, but now
shoes of the s »me quality can be bought
for $1.50, notwithstanding that the ma
terials in them have gone up from 40 to
70 per cent., and that wages have more
than doubled. The women who former
ly sewed the uppers got 50 cents per
day they now get $1.33 on the machine.
Men got on an average $1.25 per day,
varying according to their skill now
they get about $2.50—some rather less,
many a great deal more.
If we consider the textile industries
of cotton goods, woolens, worsted goods,
carpets, hosiery, etc., we find that not
withstanding the great advance in the
number of labor-saving inventions, the
hands employed have increased faster
than our population, and that the wages
paid have more than doubled, as will be
seen by the following figures, taken
from page 596 of the Industry Volume
of the Census of 1870:
1
doctrine. We say "were," because we
believe that since the discussion before I
these committees the members thereof
have become so well posted on the good
effected by patent laws that some of
them, who were originally inimical to
to the law and seriously desired to re
peal it or suspend its operation, are
now in its favor. The fact, however,
that men having sufficient general intel
ligence to edit a newspaper or to reach
the position of members of Congress be
lieve in the theory that machinery is
hurtful to the laborer seems to call for
some effort on our part, as the spceial
champion of the inventor and the patent
law, to show how erroneous is this idea,
and we therefore propose to cite a few
instances that occur to us where it
would appear that if there were any
chances of machinery throwing people
permanently out of employment, it cer
tainly would be in the examples men
tioned.
As one of the prominent and most fa
miliar examples, let us consider the sew
ing machine. When Walter Hunt in
vented his machine in 1888, his wife ob
jected to his introducing it, as she
thought, like many others, ''that it
would throw all the sewing women out
of employment.'' Hunt appeared to
tliink tne same himself and on his wife's
entreaties abandoned his invention, thus
losing a fortune and leaving the field
open to Howe, who was either wiser
than Hunt on this point or had less
scruples. Now what has been the re
sult of the introduction of sewing ma
chines in lessening the demand for la
bor? Are there fewer people now em
ployed at sewing than there were form
erly? Is it not a fact that the thou
sands of operators earn much more than
they formerly could by hand that
where one stitch was put in a dress
when made by hand there arc now ten
that the miserable "three-stitehes-to-the
inch" style of clothing has disappeared
from the market since sewing machines
have been introduced that tens of!
thousands of women who formerly made
the underclothing of their families, now
buy it ready-made, because it is made I
so cheap by sewing machines and that
sewing machine made goods are export
«1 in large quantities to countries that
would otherwise supply us, because
with their underpaid laborers they
could compete with and undersell our
manufacturers, and thus throw thou
sands of our people out of employment?
These statements may, however, be
said to be mere assertions, not borne
out by facts. Let us sec, therefore,
what the figures of the census say on
this question. In 1850 there were 52,
(KiO tailors employed in the United
States, which then had a population of
23,191,87(5, or one tailor to 445 inhabi
tants. In 1870, notwithstanding the in
troduction and use of thousands of sew
ing machines, there were 10(!,G70 tailors
in a population of 38,558.371, or one to
301 inhabitants. So that although the
population had not doubled by nearly
eight millions, the number of tailors
employed had more than doubled. The
statistics relating to women's clothing
are not so readily obtained, or we have
no doubt but that they would show
equally as well.
There is, however, another point to be
considered. The introduction of the
sewing machine has not been made
Without labor, for according to the ccn
sus there were 17,372 hands employed
ki sewing machine factories in 1870, and
there were 3,152 dealers in machines in
the same year, besides the almost count
less hosts of canvassers or "agents" who
were perambulating the country, all of
whom got their living directly from the
sewing machine industry, to say nothing
of the numbers of people who were em
ployed in mining ana manufacturing
iron and steel for the machines and lum
ber for the tables, ansljtjbe thousands of
ISM 1870.
Hands 1h1,"m0 255.H2S
Wages 37,:«)1,710 79,401.:)67
Product 1!W.41«,4(K) 395,158,565
The last line shows the advantage of
the use of the improved machinery now
employed, as, notwithstanding there was
ouly an advance of less than one half of
the number of hands employed, the val
ue of the product was increased about
150 per cent., although the hours of la
bor in many factories were largely re
duced between I860 and 1870.
As another instance, take the use of
the reaping and mowing machine. In
the twelve states where these are used
most we find that farmers and agricul
tural laborers have increased from
1.301.8(!3 in 1850 to 2.024,3f9 in 1800,
and :i,tJ41,S30 in 1870.
It may be objected, however, that
most of the States where mowers and
reapers are used are the rapidly growing
Western States, and that this is there
fore hardly a fair argument to use. We
will therefore give the following table,
compiled from the census, showing the
hands employed in the various manu
factories of all kinds all over the United
States
Hands. Wages. Population.
1S50 058,079 #236,759,404 34,101,876
1800 1,311,844 379,878,966 31,443.321
1S70 2,*sa9!Hi 775,5H4,.'U3 3K,558,371
From a comparison of these tables it
will be seen that, notwithstanding the
immense number of labor saving ma
chines introduced in the twenty years
embraced in the above figures, the
hands employed have more than doubled,
and the wages nearly quadrupled, al
though the imputation had only in
creased from a little over twenty-three
to thirty-eight and a half millions, or
about 67 per cent.
In considering the effect of inventions
on the laboring interests of the country
we must not forget that many inven
tions actually increase the amount of
labor to bo performed, as, for instance,
the telegraph and photograph. The
census of 1870 gives nearly 17,000 as
the number employed in different ca
pacities in the telegraphic offices of the
country, to say nothing of those indi
rectly connected with it in building the
lines, drawing the wire, making the in
struments, etc. The photographers are
also a large class entirely dependent on
a modern invention, without which their
occupation could never have existed,
and they in their turn keep a large num
ber of people employed in preparing
chemicals, paper, plates, mats, frames,
etc., for their use. The rubber business
also employs tens of thousands of oper
atives directly in the manipulation of
the rubber, leaving out of consideration
those engaged in other countries in the
collection and shipping of the raw gum,
and the thousands employed here in the
sale of the manufactured articles. If
to these we add the immense number of
people employed in connection with the
railroad and steamboat interests of the
country, which are wholly dependent
upon the inventions of the steam engine,
locomotive and steamboat, it will appear
plain to the meanest capacity that in
ventions, so far from throwing people
out of employment, have rattier increas
ed the demand for their services.
WESTERN HORSE THIEVES.
Tlie Inside Workings of a Great llorder
Conspiracy Farts and Statements Glean
ed from a Confession.
Kansas City Times.
During the past ten or twelve years
horse-stealing upon the western border
or along the State line of Iowa, Nebras
ka, Kansas. Missouri and Arkansas has
been a profitable and lucrative business.
Thousands of tine horses have been stol
en and run out of reach, and compara
tively few of the thieves have been ar
rested. The efforts made by the officials
of the various border counties to arrest
the thieves have proved futile, and to
day the nefarious business is being
prosecuted with little or no check or re
straint upon tlie part of the law. The
records of the Kansas City l'olice Court
for the past ei»ht months reveal a start
ling record of crime of this character.
The extent and the immensity of this
contraband trade in horseflesh can only
be estimated from the official records on
file at headquarters. They show a
startling increase in horse-stealing and
wonderful immunity from capture upon
the part of the thieves.
Within the last eight months the
number of horses reported stolen at po
lice headquarters, in Kansas Citv, was
3!8. The thefts reported were divided
between the four border states in tlie
3Iississipi valley as follows Horses
reported stolen in Kansas, 157 horses
reported stolen iu Missouri, 140 horses
reported stolen in Iowa, 50 horses re
ported stolen in Nebraska, 21 total, 368.
This number only includes those re
ported stolen and advertised by their
owners, and whose cards and descrip
tions reached the Kansas City police
station.
It is presumable that this estimate
does not cover more thai* one-half of
tlie number stolen during the last eight
months iu the Missouri valley and the
adjacent country. Not more than half
of those persons losing horses by theft
go to the trouble of having cards or
handbills printed describing the stolen
property and offering a reward. Hence
it is not unreasonable to estimate the
losses of the owners of horses on the
border at double the number reported.
Or say $80,000 lost by theft in the four
states bordering on the Missouri river.
A few days ago a released convict
named Harry Lawrence, who has just
served out a two-years term in the peni
tentiary for horse-stealing, returned to
Kansas City. Harry is a native of
Clinton county, and although not more
than 22 or 23 years ot age, boasts of
stealing not less than seven horses be
fore he went to the pen. He speaks of
his exploits with the gusto and relish
of ai\ old soldier telling the incidents of
an old batjtle. He describes the modus
operandi of taking a fine pair of black
horses from a stable on Walnut street
about four years ago, and recites the de
tails of two other horse-stealing opera
tions in this city with a cool, careless
nonchalance quite surprising. From
him some interesting facts were learned
relative to the mode of disposing of
stolen property. He said "Our or
ganization was not very large when I
went into it, but it continued to grow
year after year. At first we had no
agents north of St. Joseph nor south of
Fort Scott, but now we extend from
Sioux City to Galveston, and from the
Black Hills to the Rio (Jrande. I was
only in the pen about a year and a half,
but in that time the business has grown
to great proportions."'
Lawrence in conversation gave some
interesting details of various horsesteal
ing affairs he had been engaged in, and
while he jealously refrained from giv
ing the names of his companions, he
did not hesitate to tell his own misdeeds.
The favorite mode of running out
horses is thus described: Two of the
gang enter a settlement where there are
good horses, and hire themselves out as
farm hands, and go to work. After
working a while they leave the neighbor
hood, and go to work for parties owning
good horses. By this means they learn
the habits of the owners, and the loca
tion of the coveted horses. Within a
few days after they leave a placc or a
neighborhood a raid is made upon the
stable and the coveted horse disap
pears. The thieves seldom run
their stock to towns or stations
where railroad or telegraph lines can
reach them. Thcv run their stock over
lines seldom traveled, and as the gang is
very large, the same men seldom go
more than one or two stages before
changing horses, and return to the
neighborhood of the theft to take notes
and spread false reports to mislead pur
suit. Lawrence relates one instance of
one horse stolen in Fremont county,
Iowa, passing through nineteen hands,
all of them members of the gantr, before
it was sold in Sherman, Tex. In some
places in Western Missouri, Arkansas
and Iowa, and in Eastern Kansas, there
are farms kept open for the especial
benefit of the gang. These are general
ly in quiet, remote districts, far from
the main road, and where horses can be
fed, doctored and disguised for a safe
sale.
Notwithstanding the zeal with which
western farmers endeavor to suppress
this vice, the number of horse-thieves
is constantly on the increase. Of the
157 horses stolen in-Kansas, more than
"100 were stolen by boys under 23 years
of age. Of tlie 140 horses stolen within
the last eight months in western Mis
souri, more than two-thirds of the num
ber were stolen by young men. But
while young men do the stealing, older
men do'the concealing and trading. The
records of the past year show that more
than half of the horse thieves caught in
this region were men of mature age.
Fanners and others who have lost valu
able horses in this region of country are,
many of them, blamable with criminal
neglect. They seldom give a proper de
scription of the stolen horses to the
officials. Not one farmer out of a doz
en knows how to describe a lost horse,
and few offer a reward large enough to
justify pursuit or capture. A liberal
estimate of the number of stolen horses
recovered in this region is one out of
two. With a good detective force and
a thorough organization among the
farmers, horse stealing would become
dangerous, unprofitable, and so cease.
NASBY.
Mr, Xashy ill Disgust Returns to the Cor
ners, anil Briefly Describes the Kfl'ert of
the Itiircliard Itcsolutinii upon that III-
Fateil Community,
CoN'KEimiT
ROADS,
(Wich is in the State uv Kentucky,
Joon 17,1878.
I am back in Kentucky, and I sliel
stay here. I don't want nothin more to
do with Democratic politishns, or Dem
ocratic polytix. Ef Basconi will give
me a place ez bar-tender, I will forever
dismis the hope so long and fatally nus
sed uv bein post-master, and settle down
for the remainder uv my life, content.
I don't want salary—a permanent posi
tion is all I need. Board and likkcr, and
sich clothes ez comfort demands, is all
that is necessary for me. I hev no more
anibishun— I almost wish I wuz dead.
We lied the radikels in a vice from
wich they cood not escape. We lied
charged fraud onto Hayes, and we hed
bought up our witnesses. Ef Anderson
wuzn't suttishent we cood hev hed jest
ez many more, quite ez credible, ez we
wantid. Witnesses is cheap, and ez our
witnesses wuz willin to sware to anv
thin we wantid, thar wuzn't the slitest
diffikilty in provin everything that wuz
necesary. Then all that wuz want
id wuz to move onto Hayes with an im
peachment and seat Tilden and Reform
in his place. Then the Post-Offices, the
Custom-Houses, and the entire patron
age uv the Fedrel Government wood
hev come to us, and there wood hev bin
that peace without wich thare can't be
no prosperity.
But what come uv it? Jest ez this
wuz all fixed, Burchard interdoosta res
olooshen deelarin that the objict uv the
investigashen wuzn't to disturb the title
uv the President!
Dimocratic members votid for it and
it wuz past! In the name uv Hcvin wat
wuz in for then? For wat did I go to
Washinton and spend my time and Til
den's money, ef it wuzn't to
oust Hayes?
For wat wuz the eyes uv every Dimo
crat wich hez looked longingly on post
offis and custom house tlies many years
turned anxuslv to Washinton? Not to
disturb his title? Why, that wuz what
we wantid, and all that we wantid. We
wantid them places, wich we cood only
git through Tilden, and wich so long ez
Hayes sits thar wuz not for us. Wat do
I keer ef Paul plants and Apollos wa
ters ef I don't git none uv the inerees?
The inerees is wat I wuz after. I want
id days uv ease and nites uv delite. I
wanted conciliation and a offis. I want
id prosperity restored to the Corners by
heviu the government disburse more
money, and to hev that money cirkelate
among the proper people. I wantid Bas
coni to prosper, and the Deekin's few
last days to be contented.
All this is lost by the pusilanimity uv
the Dimocratic members. All this is
gone. They don't want to disturb the
President's title! The investigashen is
now a farce. It is a circus without any
ring-master, clown or riders. It is a
menagerie without any animals. The
soul is gone out uv it. Wat good does
it do to investigate ef nothin substan
sliel comes uv the investigashen?
Wo is me! I hev nothin left now but
sooicide and an untimely grave. I hev
bin livin on hopes ever since Johnson
went out and Grant come in, and hopes
hez but little nourishment in em. ou
kin stand it awhile on hope, ez you kin
on stimulants, but you hev to hev suth
in more substanshel, or the system will
break. That substanshel wuz wat the
Potter investigashen promised, but that
gone all is gone. The reackshen is ter
rible. I look at that Post-Offis and ex
claim in the words uv the poet,
"Thou art so noer and
yit
so far!"
I am done. I don't want nothin more.
Basconi does nothin but look at his
slate, the accounts on wich will never
be paid, and weep, and Deekin Pogram
hezn't spoke an intelligible word since
the fatle news struck him. There is a
gloom settled onto the Corners the like
uv wich I heven't seen since Lee sur
rendered. It don't matter to me wheth
er Tilden or some one else is the Dimo
cratic nominee in 1880. The disappoint
ment hez so weighed onto my mind that
long before 1880 I shel be in the silent
tomb, und it won't watter to me who
succeeds Hayes. I can't live ez I hev
bin, and the sooner I die tbe better.
Dimocrisy ain't got no muscle nor much
intelleck. It's flabby. It won't survive
me long. PETROI-KITM V. NASBY,
Despairitt.
TWILIGHT AT NAPLES.
Scene from the Baleony of a Neopolltan
Hotel—a Delightful Picture.
T.
B. Aldrlch In Atlantic.
The great squares of shadow cast up
on the street by the hotel and adjoining
buildings were deepening by degrees.
Fitful puffs of air came up from the
bay —the early precursors of that re
freshing breeze which the Mediterran
ean sends to make the summer twilight
of Naples delicious. Now and then a
perfume was wafted to the balcony, as
if the wind had stolen a handful of
scents from some high walled inclosure
of orange trees and acacias, and flung at
me. The white villas, set in their mo
saic of vines on the distant hillside, had
a cooler look than they wore earlier in
the day. The heat was now no longer
oppressive, but it made one drowsy,
that and the sea air. An hour slipped
away from me unawares. Meanwhile
the tide of existence had risen so imper
ceptibly at my feet that I was surpris
ed, on looking down, suddenly to find
the strada flooded with streams of car
riages, and horemen, and pedestrians.
The gay life of Naples that had lain
dormant through the heavy noon, had
awakened, like the princess in the en
chanted palace, to take up the laugh
where it left off, and order fresh ices at
the cafes.
I had a feeling that Masaniello—he
was yet there—was somehow at the bot
tom of this that by some diablerie, of
his, maybe with the narcotic fumes of
that ciirar, he had thrown the city into
the lethargy from which it was now re
covering.
The crowd, which flowed in two op
posing currents past the hotel, was a
gayer and more smartly dressed throng
than that of the morning. Certain shab
by aspects, however, were not wanting,
for donkey carts mingled themselves
jauntily with the more haughty equip
ages on their way to the Riviera di
Chiaia, the popular drive. There were
beautiful brown women, with heavy
fringed eyes, in these carriages, and
now and then a Neopolitan dandy—a
creature mi generis—rode alongside on
horseback. Every human thing that
can scrape a vehicle together goes to
the Riviera di Chiaia of a fine after
noon. It is a magnificent, wide avenue,
open on one side to the bay, and lined
on the other with palaces and villas and
hotels. The road leads to the (Jrotto
of Posilippo, and to endless marvels be
yond—the tomb of Virgil. Lake Aver
us, Bairc, Cuniie, a Hellenic region
among whose ruins wander the sorrow
ful shades of the gods. But the after
noon idler is not apt to get so far after
a turn or two on the promenade, he is
content to sit under the trees in the
garden of the Villa Nazionale, sippin
met in a week at Rome, their natural llie Planet Saturn.
headquarters but in Naples, as in the
pictorial effect, and gave me an incon
gruous twelfth-century sort of sensa
tion. Once a file of monks—I do not
remember ever seeing so many together
outside a monastery—passed swiftly un
der the balcony. I was near tumbling
into the middle ages, when their ton
sured heads reminded me of that
row of elderly gentleman one always
sees in the front orchestra chairs at
the ballet, and I was thus happily drag
ged back into my own cycle.
The twilights in southern Italy fall
suddenly, and are of brief duration.—
While I was watching the darkening
shadow of the hotel on the opposite
seawall, the dusk closed in, and the street
began rapidly to empty itself. A cur
tain of mist was stretched from head
land to headland, shutting out the dis-
thousand, fringing the crescented
Rocky Mountain Netcs: There is now
on trial in our courts a man possessed
of a good trade, and capable of earning
a decent living in any city or town in
the country. Under the influence of
liquor, a few weeks since, he attempted
to knife a man to him unknown, and he
will now pay for a few glasses of vile
whisky by spending more or less time in
the penitentiary. Thursday's evening
train brought to Denver another less
fortunate victim. He, too, had been
imbibing vile whisky, and, while under
its influence, drove the lock of a gun
through the brain of an antagonist, from
the effects of which he died. Here are
two men —a would-be murderer and a
murderer—whose proper pleas in court
would be, Drunk, Your Honor."
A school boy was asked by his teacher
to give an example of earnestness. He
looked bothered for a minute, but his
face brightened like the dew drops
glistening on the rose in early morning
as he delivered himself of the following
happy thought: "When you see a boy
engaged on a mince-pie till his nose
touches the middle plumb and his ears
drop on the outer crusts, you may know
he has got it.
"You need not be afraid ob giving too
much," the old darky said. "If any ob
you know ob any church w'at died ob
liberality,(just tell me where it is, an' I
will make a pilgrimage to it, an' by de
soft light ob de pale moon I will crawl
upon its moss-covered roof an' write up
on the topmost shingle, 'Blessed am de
dead who die in de Lord.'"
A Florida negro mistook a mule for
a ghost and poked it with a stick. The
•erdict recited that he came to his death
by using too short a stick in probing
the unknowable for evidence of a future
existence Worcester Press.
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT.
WM. ELDEK Editor.
"Amend it Altogether."
•or the New England Journal of Education.
There are teachers and teachers.
There are, for example, those who ap
ply themselves to their work as an art,
and improve from year to year. There
are, also, those who pursue the daily
school-room round as a mere labor, ana
who, by the second or third year, are
less able to stand an examination, and
are less efficient in their teaching, than
they are the first. They not only do
not improve, but they actually deterior
ate. And among at least the lower
grades of teachers, these largely out
number the former class.
Now what is the occasion of this fall
ing-off in knowledge and efficiency?
Simply this,—that when the first en
thusiasm or necessity has passed, its
place is not made good by the continued
study of the branches taught, and by
careful perusal and use of the proper
guide-books of the art. There goes on
from day to day a certain formal round
of so-called teaching, but there is no
accompanying teaching of the teacher,
than which nothing could be more fatu
itous.
Now the query forces itself upon us,
Ought not this gross neglect of the
teacher's professional duty to be official
ly looked after and corrected? Why
should not teachers of lower grades,
and yet unestablished knowledge and
skill, be kept somewhat under inspection
and control? Why not, to this end,
require a renewal of license to teach, on
actual examination each year, increas
ing each year the breadth and severity
of the examination? Especially, why
not, in each examination, make a point
of testing the teacher's attention to the
reading and study of works on the art
of teaching? Would this be any more
than an honest attempt to make our
system of supervision and examination
decently honest and effective? Would
it be anything more than the wholesome
restraint and stimulus absolutely needed
by a large class of teachers? Would it
be any more than justice to our schools,
and indeed to the better class of teach
ers themselves?
IOWA CITY, June 28,1878.
DEAR BULLETIN 'The Science In
stitute and State Association of Princi
pals and City Superintendents have now
been in session four days. The two are
so arranged that those present may at
tend the exercises of both. A goodly
number of the leading educators of the
State have been in attendance, and the
exercises have been both pleasant and
profitable.
Besides the papers and discussions
before the Association, we had the
f'residenton
leasure, Tuesday, of listening to
Pickard on Wednesday of
seeing an illustration of the Natural
Method of teaching the Modern Lan-
his sherbet dashed with snow, and'lis" g^ges," and of listening to an excellent
tenin" to the bind I lecture by President elch. ot Ames
I saw more monks this day than I u^,
t0p,ay
of hearing Prof. Leonard, on
Th.e
Eternal City, they are not generally evening to be followed by the State
in busy thoroughfares. I think some Normal Institute which will continue
religious festival must have bee-.^. V- M1™11-1!
Association will adjourn Una
next,
wee k
on in a church near the Chiatamr^ V^10'^ adopted w the following, presented
solemn, dark-robed figure gliding iifai.LFi-
r'
-the resolu-
*,e''ows
out among the merry crowd had aqueer r^'°
int,'rests o1'the
our
,""ntr5-of
recotrnltion of claims
educational news and discussions in the col
umns of the dally and weekly press and that
we shall hail the"day when all our leading pa
pers shall follow, in this respect, the example
set liy the Chicago Journal.
Of the Science Institute we will give
some account after its close on Friday
of next week. Suffice it to say now
that Professors Calvin, Heinrichs and
Philbrick have full classes and keep us
hard at work. But we must close, for
our head is full of Brachipods and Tril
obites and besides it is not."
TEACHING, A GROWTH.—So many
teach only for a time—men until they
can prepare themselves for something
else, women until they can marry—that
instances of life-long devotion to school
keepinsr, though by no means rare, are
i ,T' not as common as they should be. For,
taut objects. Here and there on a jut-
a
ting point light blossomed, its dupli-
theie were a hundred lights, and then
fter teaching is a business to grow
nor can
cate glassed in the water, as if the fiery jovet[ the doer. Adopted merely for
flower had dropped a peta Presently
text
effects of the night air in Naples just
as our Nepolitan host, at a later date,
let fall some disagreeable hints about
the Roman malaria. They both were
right. Tn this delicious land death
shrouds himself in the dew and lurks
in all gentle things. The breeze from
the bay had a sudden chill in it now
the dampness of the atmosphere was as
heavy as a fine rain. I pushed back my
chair on the balcony, and then I linger
ed a moment to see the moon rising ov
er Capri. Then I saw how that bay,
with its dreadful mountain, was lovelier
than anything on this earth. I turned
from it reluctantly, and as I glanced
into the silent street beneath, there
was Masaniello, a silhouette against the
silvery moonlight.
be well done unless it is
the sake ()f st
ipend, degraded to a me-
c}la)1jeal
routine, made only an affair of
.books
and
shore.
On our leaving Rome, the landlord term-time all too long, and the vacation
ad pathetically warned us«ot the fatal
a
formai rotations, nev-
er getting beyond a drill of classes, the
jj t(0
s
hort the monotony varied only
by quarre
is
with
committee-men and
controversies with fault-finding parents,
—teaching under such pitiful conditions
and limitations may well wear out the
nerves and dwarf the character and turn
the school-keeper not only into a ma
chine, but into a machine constantly
disordered. The distemper of discon
tent is contagious, and reaches from the
desk of the principal to the desk of the
pupils, until what should really be a de
lightful occupation both for the teacher
and the taught, becomes a weariness to
all the soul which either has left.—New
York Tribune.
Waste no Time.
After allowing yourself proper time
for rest, don't live a single hour of your
life without doing exactly what is to be
done in it, and going straight through it
from beginning to end. Work, play,
study, whatever it is—take hold at once
and finish it up squarely and clearly
then to the next thing, without letting
any moments drop out between. It is
wonderful to see how many hours these
prompt people contrive to make of a day
it is as if they picked up the moments
that the dawdlers lost. And if you ever
find yourself where you have so many
things pressing upon you that you hard
ly know how to begin, let me tell you a
secret. Take hold of the very first one
that conies to hand, and you will find
the rest all fall into file, and follow af
ter like a company of well-drilled sol
diers and, though work may be hard to
I meet when it charges in a squad, it is
A parrot created a sensation in a bag- easily vanquished if you can bring it in
gage car on the Chicago, Burlington & to line.- The Standard.
Quincy Railroad the other day. The
cage was inclosed in paper and set on a
coffin, and was soon forgotten. As the
conductor and other trainmen were
passing through the car they heard a
sepulchral voice issuing apparently
from the coffin, crying, "Lemme out!'
They were startled ana frightened, and
thought they had a sure case of a
ghost, till Polly was discovered whining
for liberty.
In the higher moral education the
management of the passion of fear is of
the greatest consequence. The evils of
operating by means of it are so great
that it should be reserved for the last
resort. The waste of energy and the
scattering of the thoughts are ruinous
to the interests of mental progress.
The one certain result is to paralyse
and arrest action, or at least to concen
trate force in some single point, at the
cost of general debility. The tyrant,
working by terror, disarms rebellious
ness, but fails to procure energetic ser
vice, while engendering hatred and pre
paring for this overthrow.—Prof. Alex
ander Bain in Popular Science Monthly.
The earnest desire, the pure example
and the timely word will flow from the
pure heart. It is impossible to over-esti
mate the influence for good of the truly
worthy teacher.—[Baldwin.
Nature develops all the human facul
ties by practice, and their growth de-
[oggi.
lends upon their exercise. [Pesta-
THE Educational Weekly has a new
editor, Mr. E. O. Vaile, late Professor
of English Literature and Mental Phil
osophy in Woodward High School, Cin
cinnati, Ohio.
PROF. T. H. MCBRIDE,of Hopkindhm,
has been elected assistant to Prof. Cal
vin, of the University.

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