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Buchanan County bulletin. (Independence, Iowa) 1869-1891, July 05, 1878, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027186/1878-07-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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AT TUB
CITYlF PARIS STORE
FOR MONEY ONLY,
.... c|n fiqd tbc most attractive stock of
DRY GOODS, LADIES' FANCY GOODS,
HATS -A.3ST3D
Ready-Made Clothing,
In the City of Independence.
All these goods are newly arrived, and we are willing to sell them at
LOWER PRICE THAN ANT OTHER HOUSE
West of the Mississippi.
Every lady in this county should examine our fine stock of
GOOD CASHMERES AT 65 CENTS PER YARD.
EVERYTHING IN THE DRY GOODS LINK,
FROM i PAIR OF OVERALLS TO A BROADCLOTH SUIT1
A large stock of Oilcloths.
You can convince yourself that we speak the truth by calling at
NO. 26 MAIN STREET, INDEPENDENCE, IOWA.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS:
First-Class Implements.
1
1 am agent for the sale of
The COOPER WAGON
FURST & BRADLEY M'F'G CO S
STUBBLE PLOWS!
Walking & Riding Cultivators
Also a large Assortment of
HAND AND SELF DUMP HAY RAKES, &o.
The STAR HORSE CORN PLANTER,
BEST IN USE.
Hassillon and Battle Creek Vibrator
THRESHING MACHINES!
—.A. S O—
MoOOHMIOK'S
HUH I UJH'UJ
Ana Self-Binaers.
The McCORMICK is the only successful self-binder and the only one that
has come into general use. With it one man dors the work of five and the saving
of grain over hand binding will PAY ALL EXPENSES.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
CHATHAM ST., Near Main,—Rear of Chicago Clothing
Store, Independence.
Seheetv Blank ami Miscellaneous Books
Sta.ti0n.er3r, .Al'b'u.xxis,
Pocket Boooks, Photographs, Toys and Notions,
WALL PAPER AND WINDOW SHADES,
Waggoner's Block, No. 38 Main Street, Independence, Iowa.
J^Special attention paid to Orders for Books, Periodicals or Sheet Music,
School Books furnished to Dealers at List Prices.
H. C. Happerfleld,
JEWELER
AND DEALER IN
WATCHES, CLOCKS,
JEWELRY SIL YER and
A. MYERS.
S. Newman.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY,
S. WAGGONER,
DEALER IN
JEWELERS. SEWING MACHINES.
PLATED WARE,
SPECTACLES and
CUTLERY, Ac.
•xo. Stt MAIN" STREET,
Allf I fB now lilting business a|me, andrtqtwi
(Jjvidi-.l attention will In- paid to my busii|t*ls.
lid :ilI work left with me will tiecijrof uDyand
promptly «onc and
WARRANTED!
P. S. -Do not lio misled as to where I tun now
se-)ecat«4.
O. F. Herrick,
fcLG
IH
KfCHe
Watch-Maker and Jeweler I
{.Established in Independence In 1856.]
AVING the experience ot Twenty-Swr^n
ft Years in the business, (twenty years in this
tlty.l I foel confident in giving entiresatisfao
®on.
All work entrusted to my carc will rooeive
y personal attention. Thanking the public
their liberal patronage in the past, 1
.shall
jdeavor to merit a continuance of the same.
JWHf F. HEKRICK. I Independence, May 24.1878.
v?
1
BUY THE
Matchless.
n-,
V
IT IS TUB ONLY MACHINE IN THE
"WORLD THAT COMBINES ALL. OF
THOSE GOOD QUALITIES SO
ESSENTIAL Foil (iENEKAL
USES.
fts Light Hiiimliiff, Quietness, unci Slai
tj* of Construction, and Durnliilily,
(as A(,r, Its working parts lire made
of Steel,)-It
IUIH—
Dlt-iiiit if ill cabinet work, and the best stand.
Hcst Shuttle the bobbin holding lflO yards of
thread.
Ilest liobbin .Winder, nseil without running
li Machine.
Ikst Tensions alfcl the easiest regulated.
Ilest llingt s, giving solid support and pcrfect
insulation.
Ilest I.oek Stitcli, each complete before anoth
er is made.
Ilest patent (Mine for balance wheel mid treadle.
The Largest family machine, havtjiig room
under the MIIM.
Correspondence solicited for terms*.
Address, Dauntless Manii
ri-"4»«n NOUWALIC, OH JO.
M. G. COGaLA!*, Special Ac nt &:• Lwa.
MI LLINKRY.
MILLINERY AND DBESS-MAKING.
Hiss I», V, Raymond
Would tic pleased to see her Old Custoawn,
arid the Ladles generally, at her
MILLINW PARLORS,
In Kanz' Block,
Up Stairs.
She is confident that in the Variety. Quality
and Prices of her goods, as well as the excel
lence and taste of her work, she can give
ENTIRE SATISFACTION.
8he lias the Latest Styles and Patters, and
guarantees to give good bargain* to all who
may favor her with a visit.
J8-44tf
FOREIGN.
,".A
YEGETINE
FOR DROPSY.
I never shall
Forget the First Dose.
PltOVIDBSOI.
Mf(. H. U. STEVENS -Dear Sir:- I have been a
great sufferer l'rom Dropsy. 1 was confined to
my house more than a year. Six monthsof the
time 1 was entirely helpless. I was obliged to
have two men help me in and out of bed. I
was swollen H» inches larger than my natural
size around my waist. I suffered all a inan
could and live. I tried all remedies for Dropsy.
1 had three (liferent doctors. My friends ail
expected 1 would die: many nights I was ex
pected to die before morning. At last Vego
tine was sent me by a friend. I never shall
forget the first dose. 1 could realize its good
effects from day to day: 1 was getting better.
After I had taken 5 or ti bottles 1 could sleep
quite well nights. I began to gain now unite
fast. Alter taking 10 bottles, I could walk
from one part of my room to the other. My
appetite was good: the dropsy had at this
time disappeared. I kept taking Vegetine till
I regained my usual health. 1 heard of a great
many cures by using Vegetine niter 1 got out
and was able to attend to my work. I am a
carpenter and builder. I will also say It has
cured an aunt of my wife's of Neuralgia, who
had suffered for more than 20 years. She says
she has not had any neuralgia forN months. I
have given it to one of my children lor Canker
Humor. I have no doubt in my mind it will
cure any humor: it is a great cleanser of the
blood it Is safe to give a child. I will recom
mend it to the world. My father is HO years old
and he says there is nothing like it to give
strength and life to an aged person. I cannot
be too thankful for the use of it. 1 ain
Very yourti, ,10 HN S.
ALLgreatfuljy
DISKASKS OK THE 111,0)11).—NOTTAGK.
If Vegetjnc
will relieve pain: cleanse, purify and cure such
diseases, and restoring the patient to perfect
health after trying different physicians, many
remedies and suffering for years, is it not con
elusive proof if you are a sufferer you car be
cured? why is this medicine performing such
great cures':' It works in the blood, in the cir
culating tiujd. Jt (:aj| truly be called the Great
Blood l'urifyer. The great source of disease
originates in the blood and no medicine that
does not act directly upon it to purify and ren
ovate. has any just claim upon public atten
tion,
VEGETINE
ov/e my Health
To Your Valuable
VEGETINE.
XKB
MR, H.
Ky„ Apr. 'Jit, 1877.
K. SKKVKNSI'IIIIT,
Iitr
Sir:
Having suf­
fered from breaking out of Cankerous Sores
for more than 5 years, caiissed liyau accident of
a fractured bone, which fracture ran into a
running sore, and having used everything I
could think of and nothing helped me, until 1
had taken 0 bottles of your valuable medicine
which Mr. Miller, the apothecary, recommend
ed very highly. The tith bottle cured me, and
all I can sav is, that I owe my health to your
valuable Vegetine. Your most ob'dt servant,
AL11EKT VON ROEDKIl.
It is unnecessary for me to enumerate the
diseases for which the Vegetine should be used,
I know of no disease which will not admit of
its use, with good results. Almost innumera
ble complaints are caused by poisonous secre
tion in the bood, which can lieentirely expelled
from the system bv thcuseof Vegetine. When
the blood is perfectly cleansed, the disease rap
idly yields all pains cease healthy action is
promptly restored, and the patient is cured."
VEGETINE.
Cured me when the
DOCTORS FAILED.
CINCINNATI, O.. Apr. 10.1877.
MB. H.
11. STEVENS DturSir: 1 was serious­
ly troubled with Kidney Complaint l'or a long
time. I have consulted the best doctors in this
citv. I liavo used your Vegetine for this dis
ease, and it has cured me when the doctors
failed to do so. Yours truly,
aMHtOT DURIC. AN, Residence «31 Race St,
Place of business, .173 Cent. Ave.
VEGETINE,
Prepared by
H. R. STEVENS, Boston, Mass.
Vegetine is Sold by all Druggists.
The Old Reliable.
Coiitiunous RI-II/I
A" (.'h'Lit'Jt "J Cum!
Our Road, Our Management!
From CHICAGO to
Pittsburgh, Harrisbiirgh,
Baltimore, Washington,
Philadelphia and New York.
GREAT SHOUT I,INK
TO BOSTON!
yi.v NKW voi(H rrv.
Reaches all Points in Pennsyl
vania and New Jersey.
Pullman Palace Cars
ON ALL EXPRESS TRAINS
maunificentTaks equipped
WITH THE CKI.K11H ATE1)
WESTING-HOUSE AIR BRAKES!
AMI
Janny's New Patent Safety
Platform and Coupler.
Elegant Eati'g Houses
WITH AMPLE TIME FOK MEALS.
EXPRESS TRAINS
3
Leave Chicago as follows:
8:00 A. M. Special Fast Express
Except Sunday.
With tho Popular Vestibule Sleep
ing Car.
Keacliing Pittsburgh 2:lt0 a. m. ltarrisburg
11:45 p. in. Philadelphia, 4:00 p. in.: New York,
6:45 p. m. Boston. »:1' a. in. Haltimore. 0:1(0
p. in. Washington, !i:00 ill. next day.
5:15 F- M. Atlantic Exp. Daily.
With Drawing-room and Hotel Car.
Reaches Pittsburgh, 1:2:11 p. in. Harrisburg,
10:.V p. m.: Philadelphia, :{:it5 a. in. New York
ti:4" a ill. Special Philadelphia Sleeping Car
on this train, which remains in depot until 7:110
a. m., affording Philadelphia passengers a full
0:10 P. M. Night Ex. Except Sunday,
Witli Dnnvliig-Hnom Sleeping Car.
Reaches Pittsburg, 7:M p. m.: Harrisburg,
:i:50a. ill. Haltimore, 7:45 a. ill. Washington,
11:05a. in. Philadelphia, K:00 a. in. New York,
10:115 a. in. Iloston, K:40 p. in. Through Balti
more and Washington Sleeping Car on this
Train.
t^"Fare always as low as any other line.
Through Tickets for sale at all principal points
in tho west. Ask for them by way of the Fort
Wayne and Pennsylvania Line.
F. R. MYERS,
Gen Pass. & Ticket Agt., CHICAGO.
Ayer's
Sarsaparilla
i
For Scrofula, aud all
scrofulous diseases, Erysi
pelas, Rose, or St. Antho
ny's Fire, Eruptions and
Eruptive diseases of the
skin, Ulcerations of the
Liver, Stomach, Kidneys,
Lungs, Pimples, Pustules,
Boils, Blotches, Tumors,
Tetter, Salt Rheum, Scald
Head, Ringworm, Ulcers,
Sores, Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Pain in
the Bones, Side and Head, Female
Weakness, Sterility, Leucorrhoea, arising
from internal ulceration, and Uterine
disease, Syphilitic and Mercurial dis?
eases, Dropsy, Dyspepsia, Emaciation,
General Deoility, and for Purifying the
Blood.
This Sarsaparilla is a combination of
vegetable alteratives—Stiljingia, Man
drake, Yellow Dock with the Iodides
of Potassium and Iron, and is the most
efficacious medicine yet known for
the diseases it is intended to cure.
Its ingredients are so
skilfully com*
bined, that the full alterative effect of
each is assured, and while it is so mild
as to be harmless even to children, it is
still so effectual as to purge out from the
system those impurities and corruptions
which develop into loathsome disease.
The reputation it enjoys is derived
from its cures, and the confidence which
prominent physicians all over the coun
try repose in it, prove their experience
of its usefulness.
Certificates attesting its virtues have
accumulated, and are constantly being
deceived, and as many of these cases are
publicly known, they furnish convincing
evidence of the superiority of this Sar
saparilla over every other alterative
hiedicine. So general^ is its superi
ority to any other medicine known, that
We
need do no more than to assure the
public that the best qualities it has ever
possessed are strictly maintained.
PREPARED BV
Dr. J. C. AYER & CO., Lowell. MassT,
Prmetical amI Anmlytlcal Chemists.
BOLD 8T Att DBU0GIST8 EVERYWHERE.
'^gritnttiiral t|age.
The reading columns on this page will be
de
voted, mainly, to topicB pertaining to FARMand
HOUSEHOLD. The fanner readers of the BUL
LETIN are requested to write for it.
Grange Directory.
PRAIRIE GROVE GRANGE, No. 443.-Meets
at the Sheridan School House, Monday even
ing, on or before the full moon, each month.
A. WHOTKN,Scc'y.
WINTHR0P GRANGE, No. 16fl. -Meets at
Winthrop on Friday, on or before the full
moon of each month.
S. O. PIBRCK, Master.
S. W. RICH,See'y.
WEST BUFFALO GRANGE, No. 1316. -Meets
Tuesday, on or before full moon.
J. I). RUSSELL, Master.
GREELEY GROVE GRANGE, No. Hll. -Meets
on Friday evening, on or liefore full moon, at
Warehouse Hall.
W. BUNCH, Master.
P. 11. SctlKMEHHOKN. Sec'v.
MIDDLEFIELI) GRANGE, No. 52H. Meets on
Wednesday, on or before full moon.
n. DUBOIS, Master.
E. Wiiic, Sec'v.
SUPERIOR GRANGE, No. 152.~Meets Satur
day, on or before full moon, at No. 8 School
House, llazleton Township.
T. MESSENOKH, Master.
G. M. NII.LKK. Scc'y.
BYON GRANGE, No. 287. -Meets at Justus
Durkee's, on Tuesday evening, on or after
full moon.
E. GLKASON, Master.
FRANK FOX Sec'v.
TRIUMPH GRANGE No. 1063.—Meets at the
Sill School House, on the first Thursday, on
or before the full moon of each month, also
in two weeks thereafter
O. S. PAINE.Master.
E. L. HOPKINS,See'y.
Berkshire Blood in tlic Poland-China.
Western Stock Journal and Fanner.
In answer to Mr, (iilmore'.s letter in
the last Journal, as to whether there is
any Berkshire blood in the Poland-Chi
na or not, I would say 1 think there is,
and would like to present a few state
ments from some of the first breeders
of the Poland-China ho# in Butler and
adjoining counties (Ohio), where the
I'olands first originated. I will give the
report of the Hon. John Millikin, of
Union Village, ()., to the Swine Breed
ers' Convention ("National"), at Indian
apolis, Nov. 20, 1872, which is. in my
opinion, as concise and reliable u state
ment of tho origin of the Poland-China
breed of swine as has been written. In
every material particular it is not only
in thorough accord with my belief, but
with the written and unwritten history
of this breed of hogs. His intelligence,
his recollection of past events, with his
connection with stock-breeding and his
residence among those who had most to
do with the formation of this breed of
swine, entitle his statement to the con
fidence of every man who seeks to know
the truth upon the subject. Besides, he
is not seeking to establish any claim of
his own or for his society, as the origin
ator of this broed ho simply states
what he knows as to the breeds used,
the course pursued in the formation of
the breed, and the times when certain
crosses were made, and by whom and
when importations of the several kinds
of stock used were made.
The report made tri the Indianapolis
Convention, and which was concurred
in by Mr. Kankiu Baldridge, of Indiana,
was discussed in the Convention, and
sustained by documentary evidence as
well as by the testimony of Cephas Hol
loway and others. The report was
adopted without opposition when the
facts were presented. Extensive and
experienced breeders of Illinois, Ohio
1 ndiana were present and highly approv
ed the action of the Convention.
For the information of your numerous
readers, and the public generally,
1 hope
you will give below the report then and
there adopted. The report is reognized
in every essential particular as being
correct by the breeders of the Miami
Valley and the great pork producing
States. You will see by the report that
these two breeds—the Berkshire and
Irish (irazier—were extensively used in
making proMsos by tho best breeders in
Butler and adjoining counties*. JJaving
been carefully bred find intermixed with
the descendants and crosses of the Big
China with other breed*, thu stock thus
produced constituted the truo and orig
inal basis of what is known as the Magie
or Poland-China hog.
The following is the report to which
reference is made:
In the early history of swine-breed
ing in the Miami Valley, in Ohio, it is
clear, from the best written authorities
available, and from oral testimony, that
there are two breeds which, to a great
extent, had been profitably crossed with
the common bristled breeil of the coun
try. These were the Bussia and By field
breeds. The Bedford breed is also nam
ed in connection with tho other two to
what extent it was used cannot now be
readily determined.
In 1810, we have positive proof from
an unquestioned source, that the Shak
ers of Union Village, situated in War
ren Co., Ohio, and being four miles from
Monroe, in Butler County, purchased at
Philadelphia one boar and three sows,
of what was, at the time believed to be
pure China, They were represented to
be either imported or immediate de
scendants of imported stock, They were
called 'Big China hogs. These animals
were the first China hogs ever brought
into Southwestern Ohio, Subsequently
other China hogs were introduced and
extensively used.
The Shakers, and other judicious
breeders in Warren and Butler counties,
continued to use the breeds at command
and produced, by repeated crosses, a hog
of exceedingly tine qualities for that
period, which was generally known as
the 'Warren County' hog. These hogs,
continually increasing in good qualities,
were bred in both counties, and the very
best specimens were carefully and in
terchangeably used, so as to make the
best crosses,
Such was the progress that had been
made iu forming the ground-work of a
good specimen of a hog. This condition
of the breed continued until about the
year 1835 or 183(i, when Mr. Beach, of
Warren Co., first introduced the Berk
shires, which were obtained from C. M.
Beinent, of the State of New York.
Other lots of Berkshire's continued to
flow into the Miama Vallev until about
1SH.
The Berkshire blood was liberally
infused into the stock existing, iiot only
in Southwestern Ohio, but in Kentucky
also. Crossing with the Berkshires was
almost exclusively dope until about
18M8 and 183!, when Mr. Win. Neff, of
Cincinnati, imported some choice speci
mens of the Irish (irazier.' This breed
soon grew into high favor, and, as a eon
sequence, was liberally used in making
crosses with the best specimens of the
crosses previously made. This inter
mingling of blood—this crossing of
breeds—continued for some time. In a
few years, however, the use of the pure
blooded was entirely discontinued, and
there were no further iiniiortations
made of the Irish (irazier. The breed
ers of swine in the Miami Valley settled
down to the conviction that the basis of
a good breed of hogs had been establish
ed, and that in the future judicious and
discriminating breeders could use, and,
if necessary, modify the material fur
nished, so as to meet the demands of
the public. For more than thirty years
no iirw blood has been introduced into
our breed, and no effort made to obtain
a new supply of (lie "blood of cither
breed previously used.
"While this is true, our breeders linvti
not been indifferent to tho further im
provement of our breed. Stimulated by
their success, they have persevei'ingly
aimed to improve what they had been
so successful in forming. The best
points or qualities have been preserved,
and, when practicable, have been made
even more excellent. All defective
points or undesirable dualities have
been corrected or improved by the care,
skill and judgment of our experienced
breeders.
"Thus we have a breed thoroughly
established—of fixed characteristics, of
fine style and of unquestioned good
qualities, which can be relied upon for
the production of a progeny of like
qualities and character.
"The following is presented as the
characteristics of the foregoing breed:
The best specimens have jsood length,
short legs, broad, straight backs, deep
sides, flanking well down on the leg,
very broad, full square liauis and shoul
ders, drooping ears, short heads, wide
between the eyes, of spotted or dark
color are hardy, vigorous and prolific,
and when fat are perfect models all
over, pre-eminently combining the ex
cellencies of both large and small
breeds." E. VANHOOSSK
Rock Creek, Mitchell Co., Ia.
Apples up North.
Western Stock Journal.
The country is settling back to the
belief again that Northern Iowa will
soon be a successful fruit growing re
gion. The difficulties experienced by
the early pioneers in this northern sec
tion of the State were of the most dis
couraging kind. In the first place we
were the victims of the unscrupulous
trce-pedlar. He had a conscience that
was as near dead as his trees and none
of the inconveniences that are experi
enced by an honest man, ever confront
ed him. He could fill any kind of a
bill out of the same row of trees. If
Fanieuse were wanted, the row was of
that variety if Duchess were named in
the bill, the same row was the variety
called for and the only thing that re
quired any attention or care was to see
that the bill was filled out by tin: label
exactly right. The labels would answer
the descriptions in the order with won
derful fidelity and that was as far as we
could investigate matters when the trees
were delivered. In the spring the trees
would be properly set, and as the sea
son would advance the farmer would
begin to count the dead trees, The
mortality for the first year would be
fearful to contemplate. After that it
would be more gradual. The kinds of
fruit that would do well in Mass. or N.
would not do to rely on for this sec
tion. Many old friends that had been
favorites in the east had to go down'one
after another, until the process of snrt
inl up bid fair to take the complete
stock. But after twentv years or pa
tient labor with all tho old hardier kinds
and the survival of the fittest, we have
discovered, so to speak, a good many
kinds of standard trees that are hardy,
good growers, adapted, to all appear
ances, to our climate, and bear great
quantities of rich fruit. The very best
summer kind is the Duchess of Olden
burg, They are extra hardy. I do not
know of one ever dying from the sever
ity of the winter. They bear when
young and never let up when they once
begin the work. They come iu a season
when w'e need fruit more than at any
other time, that is, through harvest and
stacking. They are a little tart to taste
but at that time of year the stomach
needs just the acid the Duchess apple
affords and they are much more health
ful than a flat negative apple. The
other tree that seems to bo a full match
for this one, in vigor, health, and last
ing qualities, and covering the period
from November to February is the Fa
nieuse. V» HVowii iri thiw lutitMije tho
Fanieuse apple has no superior in the
wide world for external beauty or in
ternal richness. The flavor is just
right, flesh sound, juicy, white, as snow,
and sound to the very core.
Put out plenty of Duchess and Fani
euse. and the farmer can raise all the
good apples his family needs unil W\ich
better than Uiov uuu Lu.y,
There are other kinds that are also
being tested that are holding up to the
promise and grow on as though they
had come to stay. The Tetofsky has
lots of friends. Its season is in July
and August. It bears young. Some
speak against it but I predict for it in
the near future a niche in the scroll of
fame, right near to the Duchess. The
Haas has also come to stay. Those
that know most about it like it best.
The Plumb's Cider is not gtmuially
found in tlieso juclimde, hut wherever
it has had a trial, has proved itself a
great bearer, and hardy as an oak. The
Tallman Sweet has stood it for fifteen
years, are to-day great trees, sound as
elms and full of fruit, The Wealthy
and Walbridge are with us untried by a
long test, but are very promising. They
claim great things for them in Miun^o.
ta, and I underhand tl^t the Horticul
ture Hociuty of the Htatc have set the
Wealthy at the head of the list on ac
count of its vigor, endurance, and the
quality of its fruit. There are a great
many other good kinds, and probably no
other man would make this list just as
I have, but in tho main 1 think all in
this section will subscribe to what I
have here stated.
This is a great country for small
fruit, such as currants, raspberries, !fce.,
&c. We must except, however, black,
berries. I have jiot. hcur-d of any one
raising th^.n »uct'esiifu|ly, but as tooth
er kinds of small fruit we take our hat
off to nobody. As to raspberries, we
grow the finest fruit in tho world. As
to peaches, all have to say is "Shoo
fly'1 and they "shoo."
Then was an old practice in vogue
here five and ten years ago of ridging
up the ground where the trees stood by
plowing once or twice a year toward
the trees, until the ground was all
ridges and ditches. The trees by this
plan were not sufficiently watered and
winter-killed. That is, they choked to
death in winter. Those that followed
that plan have no orchards now and say
you can't raise fruit. But those who
keep their orchards level as nature gave
them, are having good luck with their
trees. If you are going to work among
your trees, koop tho ground level.
N. L. ROOD.
Orchard, loira.
Be Not Discouragvu.
Western Stock Journal.
Since the price of hogs has gone down
to a figure that is almost, if not quite,
below the cost of production, it is natu
ral for a farmer to partially lose his in
terest in hog raising hence we frequent
ly hear the question asked this spring:
"What shall 1 do with my pigs jt will
not pav to foed thom and I cannot sell
them.'' To such we would say, figure
on it awhile before you get discouraged.
The decline in pork was nothing more
than could be expected. For the last
ten years everybody that possibly could,
rushed pell-mell into hog-raising, until
now thai product has had to conic down
with everything else but we are not of
the opinion that it is going to remain so
loiif^ The present low price will have
the effect to cause many tq tqrq their
attention to soiqe otllor liiuiioh of farm
ing which is evidenced by the great
acreage of wheat sown this spring over
last. Then, again, there is but a small
portion of our country that can be de
pended upon for raising cheap corn, and
it is not supposable that our eastern,
southern and northern fanners are go
ing to continue feeding fifty or seventy
five cent com to hogs at present prices.
By taking this view of the question we
are led to believe that before another
year we will be receiving 5NL"0 or $4.00
per hundred for our hogs, and the far
mer who continues right along is sure
to win. "Can hogs lie raised for per
hundred?" Suppose 1 owed and
had my choice to pay off the debt with
wheat at 80 cents per bushel w ho#* at
$15 per uwt., 1 coi'taiuly would take the
hitter. We have tried paying debts
with wheat in Iowa, but never made
much headway. It would take fifty
seven acres of wheat at twelve bushels
to the acre to pay this debt. What
would it cost? Our experience has
been, that it would cost fifty cents per
bushel to raise and market it. On the
other hand, let us take the drove of Po
land-China ho'rs. I)r. !MS OII, of Llli
noitt. sold, a short lime ago. one hun
dred and eight head, that averaged four
hundred and fifty-six pounds. Let us
take fifty of them at !?.'{ per cwt. -that
would just pay the debt, It is unnec
essary for uiii to ask which cost the
most the fifty hogs raised on twenty
cent corn and grass, or the wheat.
Yes. as long as we can get $3 per cwt.
for hogs, and we are sure of that, we
will stick to the business, and continue
to raise our Poland-Chinas with as much
energy as though they were worth $.")
per cwt. A.JIOOOWKX.
Smnivridc, la.
Iu Cheshire. England, which is a great
grazing country, the land that has been
underdrained and to i-dressed with
ground bones will carry one cow to each
acre through the summer, but (lie laud
not thus treated will only curry one cow
to two acres. The dressing of bones
upon pasture land there is 1,200 to 1,.
l}00 pounds ner acre, once iu seven
years. Would it not be economy to im
prove our pastures up to a higher stand
ard than now prevails?
Practical Hints.
Uoimekl® a harness before filtoning
ana oiling it.
Never, under any circumstances,
leave your milk-strainer at the barn
over night.
If you will plant seed of the castor
bean where moles are most troublesome
it will drive them off.
Insects on vines can be driven off by
sprinkling the vines with plaster, soot
or air-slacked lime.
This is the time of year to plant Man
gel Wertzel seed. It is a great mistake
plant two or
:n is enough.
ot trim up vi__.
feet. Let the limbs of the tree come
near the ground. In other words, short
en in your tree.
to plant two or three inches deep. One
cn is enough.
Do not trim up your trees five or six
The great English agricultural writer,
and practical farmer, Jethro Tull, living
and writing 100 years ajjo, held that fre
quent nlowing and stirring the soil was
equivalent to a liberal cost of manure.
Worms in horses are causcd by hard
work, poor food and general neglect.
1" or ordinary cases of worms, common
salt, nutritious food and pure water
will prove satisfactory. Salt should
always be kept in the stalls of horses.
Cauliflower should be transplanted in
rows some two feet apart, leaving about
two feet between the plants. Cultivate
as cabbage. Aid the growth by liberal
manuring, and protect from the sun by
breaking its leaves over the head when
in flower.
A simple remedy to prevent the pres
ence of moles in and around hot-beds
was told_ to us a few days since, viz:
Stick pieces^ of green elder bushes in
the ground in the premises infested,
and these troublesome creatures will
give it a wide berth.
The Chinese, with whom agriculture
is held in higher estimation than with
us, were the first to use night-soil.
They forbid its waste and furnish re
ceptacles to receive it. They mix it
with clay and then make dried cakes of
it it, which can be transported any dis
tance, or preserved any length of time.
Those who buy currant or gooseberry
bushes as late as this, will do well to
cut them severely back. No fruit would
be borne this year if this were not done,
and the expanded leaves not receiving a
sufficiency of sap from the roots, will
exhaust Uie stems and cause weakness
from which it may require a year or so
to recover.
To wash the wool on the sheep's back
js not a profitable practice. The wool
is not half washed, and the difference in
price will not pay for the loss in weight,
to say nothing of the trouble and risk
for both men and Hock. If the sheep
are kept reasonably clean, and the wool
free from rubbish, it will be found bet
ter than having to wash them to get rid
of unnecessary filth.
An Eastern farmer says "After ex
pcrimentiua with all the varieties of
oorn sowing In broadcast, in drills, and
cultivated by hoeing it, I have come to
the conclusion that the best and most
profitable way to raise corn fodder is to
plant sweet corn put your rows three
feet apart, plant thick, not more than
three feet apart, put iu six to eight
stalks in a hill, manure heavily, keep it
clear of weeds, hoe two or three times,
and you will have an abundant crop
of the best kirv.l of fodder for milch
cows."
A HIHH in Bethlehem, Conn., has had
patented a new instrument for milking
cows. It consists of four small silver
tubes, about the size of a knitting nee
dle, with holes in the sides, the ends
rounded and very smooth. The tubes
are inserted into small india-rubber
tubes about six inches lung, fastened
•together at the lower end. When the
tuhesi I'tV-fi iuxjc.t teit into the teats about
uu inch the milk will immediately flow
in a continuous stream mitil the last
drop is drained.
The^large crop of fruit throughout
the West this year will be a blessing to
all classes, and growers, it is to be hojied
will carefully sort their fruit and pack
fine choice fruit together, and if the
green worthless stuff must be sold, pack
it by itself—it will pay the producer, as
better prices will bo p*id for all choice
fruit, and of ft will bo bought with
that grower's brand when it proves to
fie a choice article. Too much care can
not be used in sorting fruit for market
to get the best prices.—Western Agri
culturist
To wash strawberries make a box ten
or twelve inches square—only sides and
ends put a piece of wire cloth,one-inch
meshes, on for a bottom sink it in a tub
of clean water, level to the top pour
the berries into the sieve raise and low
er it twice or three times. Your berries
will be clean. Set them in the shadow
to dry and drip, the sun will fade and
wilt them. I have fourteen sieves to
wash in, By pouring so that they fall
Into the water, there is no bruising them
at all. They need not remain in the wa
ter over one-fourth of^i minute.
The internal vital organs of the hog
are very much like those of man. Hogs
are subject to many diseases that men
are subject to. A severe cold frequent
ly produces pneumonia in man, and in
hogs it produces the same disease. Tens
of thousands of hogs die yearly by this
disease. The preventive is good feed,
good shelter, warm and dry bedding. If
hogs lay out on the cold, wet ground, if
they and their bedding are exposed to
the rain aud sleet and snow, is jt any
wonder that they take oold, get the
pneumonia and die? Men subject to
the simie treatment would die. The hog
has not fur or wool, or hair, or if called
hair, a very coarse article it is to shield
it from cold and storms. Hence good
shelter, dry beds and kind treatment is
very essential to keep hogs healthy and
thriving.
A correspondent of the Land and
Water describes a process of skimming
from the bottom instead of the top of
the vessel. Tn one of the large dairies
Yorkshire the milk is »et in a nan three
feet long, two and a half feet broad and
inchc.ideop. The bottom of the pan is
one or two inches narrower than the
top. In the bottom of each pan, near
the corner, a hole is made, to which is
soldered a small pipe reaching lelow the
pan some two inches. This is stopped
with a cork. When she wants to get the
cream, the dairymaid places a vessel un
der the pipe, removes the cork, and al
lows the milk to flow in a rapid stream
till it is nearly all drawn, when the cork
is withdrawn, and the cream is found in
the bottom of the pan. Some of the
processes iu use in this country for sep
arating the cream are, in principle, the
I same. This plan is very simple, liow«v
er, anil may work well in practice.
mm
Pane vs Beet Sugar.
The total annual consumption of-sug
ar by the people of the world is 3,079,
000, tons, which is a fraction over 17
pounds per capita. The United States
I alone consumes annually 750.000 tons,
1
an average of 42.' pounds per capita, for
which it pays in gold nearly $100,000,
000. To show in what rolation the inan
I ufactii^i (if beet sugar stands in the
I |.i-oiiuction of that made from sugar
cane, iu 1874 there was made from cane
in all the sugar manufacturing coun
I tries. 1.840.080 tons, and from beets,
i 1,110.100 tons. The principal beet sug
ar producing districts are in Europe,
viz France, Belgium, Prussia, Aus
tria and Russia.
A plan for improving the aroma of
butter, iu use in many parts of Switzer
land. noted for good milk and fine but
ter, is as follows: The milk, as soon as
I it is drawn, and while yet warm, is fil
tered through a sprig of washed fir tips,
the stem of which is inserted loosely
and upright in the hole of the funnel.
The milk deposits hair, skins, clots or
I gelatinous slimincss on the leaves. It
has imparted to it a most agreeable
odor, and does not readily turn sour. A
fresh sprig should be used each time.—
i Scientific American,
She asked the clerk if he were sure
—•ouite positive tho eggs were fresh.
"On, yes," said the young philosopher,
"I know they are wny, the fanuer said
none of his hens were more than a year
old."
(TELEGRAM.)
(EXTRACT.)
(EXTRACT.)
AGRlCUXTUltAIi.
HOOBA1 HOOEA11
Good, Better and Best! The Proof of the Pudding it in
the Eating."
GAMMON & DEERINCS
MARSH HARVESTER!
-AND
Is fowid to be the
Only Reliable and Successful One
-IX THE
Harvest Fields of 1878.
©VLX -A-g-ervts ESZTTX-.T-A-rNT.
A Few Specinen Reports from Hundreds already Received.
We again offer to the
FARMERS
-THE-
W
NEW BUCKEYE
TABLE RAKE,
AND THE-
Buckeye Harvester!
HAVING SOLD THE
BUCKEYES,
For the past 13 Years,
*9 HOSE NEED BE SAID.
Winegar & Manning.
[2m44
POULTRY.
DARK BRAHMA EGGS
For Hatching—75 Cts. per 13.
13-:t3mt A. LITTLKJOHN.
FURNITURE.
O. Marquette,
WICHITA, Kansas, June 5,1878.
The eighty Binders that you shipped to Wichita are every one running and
Have put a number in place of Wood's and Elward's
giving perfect satisfaction,
returned.
All the Harvesters and Binders we have started are working finely. We
have been in snrme twenty trials, and can say what competitors cannot, that we
have never had a break down. We had a trial at Elkton vestcrdav, and beat the
McCorwick badly. DICKEY & BRO.
Dickey & Brother have had sold between one and two hundred this year.
G. & D.
We are happy over the grand success of the Crand-Binder. It works like a
charm. I could have sold many more if could have gotten them. The Marsh,
with the Crane-Binder, takes the front seat. The Wood and McCormick take a
back seat. The Elward and Massillon Binder are a complete failure. The Ad
ams & French almost as bad. The Wood and McCormick have been doing badly,
and working badly in many places. The Marsh is going far beyond the expecta
7ELI
tions of all who are working them. W. B. COLDWELL.
Jt NK 7,1878.—In field trial to-day at Shabonier. Til., the Marsh was the only
machine that cut its piece without a stop or break. The Marsh cut one-third
acre in 17 minutes McCormick. 40 minutes the Wood broke down. The Marsh
cut smooth and with ease to the team. Account of this record from
We started a Marsh Harvester with Self-Binder on Saturday, the 1st day of
June, 1878, in a piece of wheat a half mile long cut three times around the
piece. The Binder worked to perfection it never missed tying a single bundle
in all the three times round the piece. The distance cut in going round was
three miles.
CHICAGO, June 8th, 1878.
M. J. LYNCH.
SPARTA, 111, June 6.1878.
OXFORD.
Kaasas, June 2,1878.
W. B. EAGAN,
DIECKMAN K ERNST.
LINCOLN CENTER, Kan., June 3,1878,
H. HOLCOMB.
R. BARTLE, Agent,
MAIN STREET, INDEPENDENCE, IOWA,
AGRICULTURAL. V. & X.-AV. R. R.
BUCK-EYES!°
THK CHlCAOO & NOKTH-WKSTEKN RAILWAY
Embraces under one management the Great
Trunk Railway Lines of the West and North
I west, and with its numerous branches and con
nections forms the shortest and quickest RI.ute
1
-0F-
BUCHANAN COUNTY,
lietween Chicago and all points in Illinois, Wis
I cousin, Northern Michijran, Minnesota, Iowa,
Nebraska, California, and the Western Terri
1 tories.
Its
OMAHA & CALIFORNIA LINE.
Is the shortest and best route between Chicago
and all points in Northern Illinois, Iowa, Ihiko-
Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Neva-
da, California, Oregon, China, JULIAN and Aus
tralia. Its
CHICAGO, ST. P. & MINNEAPOLIS LINE
Is the shortest line between Chicago and all
points in Northern Wisconsin and Minnesota,
ami for Madison, St.Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth
and all points in the great Northwest. Its
LACUOSSE. WINONA & ST. PETER LINK
Is the best route between Chicago and La
Crosse, Winona, Rochester, Owatonna, Manka
to, St. Peter, New I'lm and and all points in
SoutherAud Central Minnesota. Its
GREEN BAY & MARQUETTE LINE
Is the only I.ine between Chicago and Janes-
ville, Wutertown, Komi du Lac, Oshkosh, Ap
pleton, Green Hay, Hscanaba, Negaunee, Mar
quette, Houghton, Hancock and the Lake Su
perior country. Its
FREEPORT & DUHCQUE LINE
Is the only route lietween Chicago and Elgin,
Rockford, Freeport aud all points via. Free
port. Its
CHICAGO& MILWAUKEE LINE
U the old
Lake Shore route, and is
the only one-
passing IM'tween Chicago ami Kvanston, LATAN
Kor*t, Highland L'ark, Waukegan, HAVFCJCI,
Kenosha and Milwaukee.
PULLMAN PALACE DRAWING U UNT OAKS
arc running on ALL througn trains OT tins VOAT).
This is the ONLY LINE running these WIW be
tween Chicago and St. Paul aiu\ Minneapolis,
Chicago and Milwaukee, Chicago
and Winona,
or Chicago and Green Hay.
Close connections ure made at Chicago with
the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, Michigan
Central. Haltimore & Ohio,Pittsburg. Ft.Wayne
& Chicago, Kankakee Line and Pan Handle
Kouti-s for all points Kast and South-Kast, and
with the Chicago & Alton and Illinois Central
for all points South.
Close connections arc also MMTC with the
Union Pacific R. R. at Omaha for all far West
points.
Close connections made at junction points
with trains of all cross points.
Tickets over this route are sold by all Coupon
Ticket Agents in the United States and Caua
tlas. Remember, yoi. ask for your Tickets via.
the Chicago & North-Western Railway aud take
none other.
New York ollice, 415 liroadway Iloston office.
No. 5 State street: Omaha office, 2+."I Farnham
street San Francisco office, L'-S! Montgomery
street Chicago Ticket offices, »B Clark street,
under Sherman House 7." Canal, corner Madi
son street Kenzie Strret Depot, corner West
Kin/.ie and Canal streets: Wells Street Depot,
corner Wells and Kin/.ie streets.
For rates or information not attainable (KM
your home ticket agents, apply to
W. II. STKSNKTT, MAHVIN IIeonITT,
Oen. funs. Au't, 'h i i/. Orn. Man.
Chtcago
FOUNDRY.
STAR FOUNDRf
A N
Machine Shop!
All kinds of CASTINGS, including
COLUMNS,
I WINDOW CAPS,
SILLS,
LINTELS,
SUOAH KETTLES,
I
DEALER IN
No. O Kast Main Street, HOOK H1NDKRY.
INDEPENDENCE, IOWA I JULIUS J. BOETTCHER,
The largest and ttnest stock of Plain and Fan
cy Furniture In the city, at prices lower than at
any other establishment.
Also Agent (or Henry M. Sherwood's School
Furniture.
CAST IHtlN FENCING,
SLEIGH SHOES and
FANCY WORK of all KINDS,
Together with General Jobbing and machine
work, repairing, &E., executed with the utmost
promptness, and in a satisfactory manner.
Prices, material and workmanship guaran
teed to be as satisfactory as at any establish
ment in Iowa. Foundry East Side, near river.
FRANK NIECOW. Prop'r.
IB00K BINDER.
All stylos of lllndlng
executed in the best and
promptest maimer. Orders solicited.
Rooms next the river, over Ungerer'g
Restaurant, Independence, Iowa. lS-7yl
Ii^li

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