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The north Iowa times. [volume] (M'Gregor [i.e. McGregor], Iowa) 1856-1857, October 17, 1856, Image 1

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VOL. 1.
A. P. RICHARDSON,
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OWA.
JMtERMCAJY HOUSE,
BY W. H. HAflOINa
9
Iowa.
*WcGRECtOR HOfSE,
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JM R*W E RS JfOaVJS,
By JULIUS BOETTCHER,
IW «TRBaTf
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VM*P ER mo VSBt
By J. McMULLEN,
a i n S e i
e o
o w
Mj A. WANSEY,
i n 8 e
McGregorj
SELECT STORIES.
KAJIL* HOVBHTr.
The good people of Drontheim say that
in
A
certain village north of their city,
which is known to be the nearest town to
the pole, there once lived two honest
lads, named Christian and Karl, who, be
ing coopers by trade, were accustomed
to go from house to house selling their
wooden vessels, and mending all that
ut,... were broken. They had lived thus for
three yeartf tAw%JB going
together.
though they were no relations but their
trade had been learned with the same
master-cooper, their mothers had died in
the same year, their lathers married in
the next,and their step-mothers found out
that they were the worst boys in crea
tion. All these chances made them agree
to inhabit an old forsaken hut, and travel
the country in company. Whether it was
the setting in of hard tims, the change
of fashions, or the coming of a new coo
per, the story docs not say but trade
grew dull with Christian and Karl.—
Housekeepers appeared willing to put up
with half the pails and dishes which us
ed to serve them. Things did not even
get broken at the former rate and, as
they could not live on chips and shavings,
the young coopers resolved to set forth
and try their fortune in the rich towns to
the southward. The days were at their
longest, and the rye in the ear, when one
morning at sunrise they began their trav
els, proceeding for the first lew days in a
fishing-vessel on its return southward,
and afterwards betaking themselves to
their feet, each with a stout .ashen staff in
his hand, and all his worldly goods pack
ed in a pannier on his back. They took
the road to Drontheim, though Karl said
he had heard that people there were to
grand to use wooden dishes. It led
'through a pine-forest and scarcely
I had they got in among the tall trees, when
a sound of lamentation reached them, and
a little way further they saw a man seat
ed on the mossy root of an old pine.—
Whether he was a native of Old Norway,
or of some foreign land, they could not
say. His face was brown, so were his
hands and beard. Ho wore a scarlet cloak,
with a tine hat and feather but the tears
were in his eyes, and he wrung his hands,
exclaiming^ *'Oh, my fortune, my hard
fortune
Good sir,** said Christian, "what is
the matter Have you lost anything, or
made a bad bargain?"
No," said the stranger "but which
of you will take my fortune, and give me
his in exchange?"
44
I'll take it," said Karl
44
whatever
it be, since you re so well dressed."
"Mind whaiyuu are about,comrade,"
said Christian
44
this man is not in such
haste to part with his fortune for noth*
ing."
No matter," said Karl it can be
nothing bad with such fine clothes."
Give me your staff and pannier,"
said the stranjrer "take'my cloak and
hat, make the best of your way to yonder
frith and he pointed to an opening in
the trees, where a long arm of the North
Sea pierced deep into the forest.
44
Half
a mile along the shore, you will find two
fishermen in a boat, who will take you
safe to Christiana there inquire for oil
called Holderbond, and tell him you are
come for the fortune of Hans Peterson."
Christian would not have believed that
his friend would leave him on so short a
warning for any man's fortune but so it
was. Karl was out of sight in a minute,
scarlet cloak and all and the stranger,
taking up his staff and pannier, with a
joyful look said
44
in tho direction of tne frith, by way of
gathering resolution to ask him what sort
of fortuue he was so glad to get quit of
but the singing seemed suddenly passing
away, and when he turned his eyes on the
stranger, there was nothing there but the
trunk of a blasted pine. Christian had
heard of fairies and sorcerers but he
thought their day was done even in Nor
way. However, there was no trace of tho
stranger to be seen and, having no incli
nation to linger iu that spot, he hastened
on to Drontheim. The only man whom
Christian knew in all that city was the
inaster-cooper from his native village, with
whom he nad learned his trade, and to
hiu? he ropaired for counsel. Glad was
honest Gimil to see his former appren
tice, and hear news of his old neighbors
but having a managing wife, who did not
hiv "ountry-people, he could do nothing
for Christian but let him work in his shop
all day ut very low wages, and sleep at
night in a loft of the wood-house. The
terms were not over-gtod, but no lotter
were to be found so Christiau set him
self to work honestly for his master, to
scdl his own dishes on holidays, and to
please Dame Gimil. How he succeeded
in the lastendeavor is not said but years
passed away Christian's dishes were all
sold, and ho laved the money. His mas
ter found hitn so useful, that he promoted
him to be foreman, and gave him the
wood-house to live in, when he built a
new one. Moreover, Dame Gimil had a
servant-maid named Hilda, a good pretty
girl, whom Christian did please, ana their
wedding was attended by all the coopers
in Drontheim. The rich brought them
bits of furniture-—-the poor gave them good
wishes and they set up iu the old w ,d-
Erick street, and the house of a merchant question, Hans Peterson was out of sight,
fiallrt/i I I klil.tfhiMiil unrl #-^ll AM.. .i.v.l l.w. 1. A. i
Come on, friend it
is a long way to Drontheim." Christian
knew their was truth in that remark and
on he wont, wondering to himself at his
new companion, whose sorrow seemed all
over
WE MAR OH WITH THE FLAG, AND KEEP STEP TO THE MUSIC OP THE UNION.
M'GREGOR, FRID AY, OCT. 17, 1856.
in the town—who should walk up but. the
stranger Hans Peterson, with the very
same staff and pannier for which he had
exchanced his fortune Good-even
ing, honest Christian," he said.
derbond1"0 merchant Hoi-
44
Christian was grieved and astonished
at this account of his early comrade.—
Neither did he care for an intimate ac
quaintance with the stranger who had
a"d
1^'*
wVre
tian
Christmas-eve, as he
wondering what gust
send them—for Hilda, like himself, was 'comrade Karl. I have always heard,"
from a far-off village, and had
110
relatives he said,
Is it nossihlA wiirl Pliri«tian "that
minute to call his own and at last hand
ed him over as a mere bondman to luilf a
score of masters worse than Holderbond
himself."
have business for you at Christiana and]
beech-wood, for the cooper himself was
•, £et!ino
110,1
anf
fnr h« hr. ,L-n f.-kcrk in n i n?i i.\ i u l° cAiioricu
Dfy
makings, wi^h a voice so loud and clear body in Drontheim, except the president,! fn(-
that the old forest rant?. Christuin looked i traveller). The
rang.
r, lor he broke forth in a jovial song Hilda to keep her heart up, and went on in-el wirh «hnr »T.,rl
""d tiahing-bout by which every
rum'v rr'i-nniti
reached Christian la salely, that he bought! «rlens,
the beech-wood a quarter of a dollar chea-!
®nH
than his master reckoned on, and
per
then set himself diligently to search (or
old Erick street. It is gone now, place
and name, for towns change even in Nor
way but when Karl found it, the street
was inhabited by merchants of the sub
stantial sort, and was made respectably
dark and narrow by the second floors of
their houses projecting far over the first,
so as to form comfortable porches, iaved
with roany-colered tiles, iu which the
well-to-do masters were wont to sit, with
pipes and corn-brandy, on summer-even-
ings. Christian walked the whole length zk.
and still more why his unlucky friend
Karl was to be found amidst such wealth
but, no doubt, all his masters live here"
thought Christian, when the face of a1
merchant in liner clothes than common,
aud with a table covered with glasses juid
e
n lie o »e porches, he lace was yerv
red and ill-humored, but there was in it
a likeness to his early comrade which
emboldened Christiau to look in and ask
mi*cl* re*civnct'',
in that u ruT
4*
44
(south
4,I
have
come to spend Christmas with yon, and
tell you news of your old comrade Karl."
You are welcome, Honest Hans,"
said Christum, "though truly your leave
taking was rather short when last we ir
ted. But come in we will do our best
to entertain you in our poor-house, an
glad am I to hear how fares my good friend
Karl.
"He is poor ae poverty" said the stran
ger he has not a half dollor to lend his
grandmother. But I
IU
given Karl such bad fortune for besides had stepped behind him. The staff and
the fashion of his departure in the pine-: pannier s ill lav in the porch, but then
forest, he did not look a day older, and was no man u.'be seen in all that stately
did not seem to have sold a single dish street, except the merchants who sat at
out of the pannier. However, he hstd their doors with pipe and glass, and said
come to spend Christmas and when his t.liov saw nobody. Christian went
home
f.
Wld
"P
in the
cornor'
himself seated close by tne blazing fire, !dieti jn ^ro
eral, as made Christian thvuk ii«ni the
blithest guest that ever came his way and I
travels, and news uf Old Norway in gen-1 „)me „l,| (Jk, still remember the storj I
is-morning, which Hilda said no
44
old comrade a dollar in your hand
There are two yet in the money-box."
No, no," said Hans
1
to Hilda and his master. Karl lived and
lt
0f
Hilda lis iAinedand laughed while she pee-1
pared the supper. 8o they spent the:
Christmas-time. Hans Peterson helped
them to Work and make merry. More- .1 have often seen accounts of "hair
o\*er, he went with them to church on breadth scrapes," in such cases, which
Christouis*vi/A"iik'v ivKi/iii Uihtn »A( i
sorcerer
A MISSISSIPPI AD VENTURE.
BT A UACKWOODSMAN.
very wise people —who kn^v nothing
tell him how blithe we have been able, and in some instances by sad experi- jtlloU9ands
together. But stay could not I send my ence. In illustration of which, I will en-1^
441
never carry
dollars Besides he would be too proud fronl
to tako it from me. But your master will
e i s s i s s i i W a s I
mv
inf u,Cy. I was then,
vears
ttely
aad the honest cooper's heart onco more
took misgivings of him, for never did
man disappear more quickly. Hard
working days, and the concerns of the
wood-house, gradually wiped these sus
picious out of his memory but he often
thought of poor Karl, and had sa\ed up
the two dollars for his behoof, when at
mid-summer-time his master told him he
must go to Christiana to look after some WOO(ltf
Karl,
when you see Karl, take my advice, and adventures. The month of October had fortunate institutions, and in our vast
pretend to be poorer than he for other- arrive.l-the givat
season
wi^e you will not hear the truth." deer-shooting' and in accordance wilhmv1 i *L I
Betore Christian could offer remark or .«lnvst daily ett-tom, I.- aiiicd out withm'y i
fowling-piece—an*
[house, willing to work, and well content. Ashe spoke, Christian knew the face 'to my back for my hunterVknife, resolv- If wo repuls- hint from our shore*, b#
All this time Christian had heard noth-! through all its redness and ill-humor, in ed, if such can be called resolution, to save cause there was not work enough for hin
kjg of his early comrade Karl but on
ade Karl but on apite of the fine elothes, the well-covered my life if possible, i had got it drawn
stood at his door,! table, and the porch of the grand house from the sheath, and was watching a fa
Providence would for the merchant was none other than his vorable opportunity to plunge it into the
"'brute's throat when, with a frightful roar,
it fell across my body, apparently in the
very agonies of death. A fearful sfrug
been sound d(X-.trine, for you are Karl gl* ensued, which JKxnj put a stop to my
and that Hans I'eterson, whose fortune feeble exertions.
you took, made me believe you were as When 1 ne\t came to my wnsos. I was
poor as poverty, and
that there was no truth told
of Drontheim, and that must have
I
happen him when he took up my fortune, lay beside him. as Hans Peterson walked me. He aceidently came to where I had :n tu.,
with his ol
1
c?
^?U.»
never gave him a penny to spare, nor ajdid not so much as a9k me to sit. What, rels of the gun were found nearly ei 'ht
one and the pannier. shot and hung up the ^CC
sto"es
Is it possible, said Christian, that cned Chris lan and Karl in a breath. and eaten their cousin He then siruek
I weight of his purse, Christian is rieh, and woods sportsmen, and which, with many i
I Karl is p»r." others ejually romantic, is an
repute for riches but who I
giving tli11 matter much thought, I sue-1 ''"n'
woods, 1 liunflf him t«p.jn a ^plfn^. in-i^P1
ming
,nm
l?
0
temliu"
Christian, accord-:
|a2y- Christian, accord-
to send for him
t|
ie p!4
compjuiion, whose sorrow seemed a 1 tnwly, re-'ulated things at home, exhorted 1 u v 1 1 a- 1 .. uunutc
not
•nn.,..™ i 11 1 u.f _.i _• i. me sc«-ond Djriti with snot also. 1 Iiacl pje
pr0CCeded
j.
mifRbi,.tJ
kneIt llpon
wondering at its grandeur, eye. All this took place iu a very few
,. w Ias lightning both barrels were discharged
I"?8
°r° fp,Ca^® full into his breast, and I received a shock
aH
if jy.,,,,
an hou-

thought Christian had come to st^al.
1
am a poor fellow who was once his
comrade," s.iid Christian and recollect- j-,.oin
ing the stcangor's advice, he added
want some help, if Karl can
4*
uf
one'knee and watched
seconds.
At length the hauuehes and ears were
drawn back, aud with a tremendous snort
he bounded in the air, with the evident
intention of descending upon me. Quick
a
alt
atter
1
j„g
it one
pil,. engine, which deprived
sciLtion About thive hours
n^r
1
^uU'(1 j»d^
,J
ates afterwards. I was brought to a .. ...
partial
anywhere my
1
gcnsiDUitv
face,
1 diJ
n°l
fa,,°
l«xk lip-
a
i
No said tfie merchant
hurry
sides, he is not here, and poor folks are
nover suffer^ this pvk
uri
n
3
(tearing
he can't spare anvthiug. Be­
1
have brought two seated, leaning against a
dolhrs all the way with me to give to you wart Indian youth, who had bwen my coin
for old time's sake but the knave bade panion in many a hard day'.s hunt, was
me to say at first that I was poorer than busily employed in binding up my wounds
yourself,
lest you would be too proud to with leaves, and sfrips torn Irotn his own
take them." scanty garments. Not being able to take
The shameful story-teller cried me home that night, he made a fire, and
Karl, unmindful of his own sayings "he nursed me as a mother would a child, and
were as rich as a Jew.miking grand feasts, parents
and helping all your friends. There he It appeared that ho had called for me,
comes. Won't I reckon with him and but being told that I was only gone a few
knew would Karl grasped the silver-headed staff which minutes, thought he would make up to
But Hans leisurely laid down his staft their trail, and followed them to where he
all these years in which I have been
working to get a decent house over my
head, and a good woman to help me, Karl
has gained nothing, but is poorer ijow
than the day he left me so quiekly With
your fine cloak and hat? Honest Hans,
how did it happen
"Just as I expected," said Hans.—
^he merchant took him in my place,. y,)U inherited after learning to grow rich, had been so close upon me, when I fired, j^iniys
made him work and reckon, buy and sell and marrying Holdcrbond'sdaughter,you that his chest was singed, and tliat the bar-
and pack, and looking at them both like saw the,old one apparently devouring
old acquaintances, said Honest Chris- something, he did not know what. He I 'h
tian, when I came to your wood-house,: tired, and being aware of their tenacity of
before me. ealthy and right-worshipful its dying struggles I have been maimed for
i then, could I say but what seems to me inches deep in the wound formed by their
roek,
a,ul
n:. an
perhaps a mi
,-tf
li i
n
The story records, that he I through a succession of narrow and rocky °f
0
i
e
with
and had sprung
into a rift of not more than three feet wide,
when I perceived the eyes of an immense
buck glaring at me at not ovur ten feet dis
tance. A glance showed me that lie had
no means of escape except over myself
.and aware of the desperation of this other
wise timid creature, under such circum
stances, aud at this particular seasou, I
formed my resolutioir-in an instant. 1
cocked both locks, placed my fingers on
tho triggers, and resolved*to wait his
spring, as I did not think my charges
would injure him except at the very muz-
and a stal-
toll me last-New-year's Day that you next day carried me by easy stages to mv sighed for matrimonial blis?=», but failed to
"pop the question."
"Girls, why don't some of you get mar
ried? Here our paper goes to press week
after week without a siirn of an example
M,
you entertained m- like a brother—nay, life, waited to re-load his rifle, ere he veil-1 wife as not,* and then you know it wouM
like a lord, for the best you had was set tured to advance-* sad job for me, as by
Karl when I came to ths mansion which life. It is worthy of remark that the deer od handsome youn^ bachelor, only 23^
like a nightingale, that wants II
and if some of you will jiun
.iv.irly eight
ithe verity? Christian has the heart to own discharge, while I and the stock had follow Will some of you «'et marriel
jgive and make merry Karl has nothing b«*in driven upward of thirty feet by the
to spare or rejoice in. Therefore, what- force of his spring. ,,
ever In* the size of his dwelling, or the Such are some of the perils of the back-1 m,
min""r
with the first glass out of their Christ-j that Hans Peterson was, or how he fared obtaining their living by their industrv, that TheToustituti^
mas bottle, Hans told such tales of his ,ft,r. not yet known in the north, where should no doubt be supported by the con- ^pteli Z Edition of Z
national prosperity in years gone by and
i den. To send them to u.s that we inny
mlI„itj.s
Karl's poverty. i ™uni"^ "rst utcaine a
who is
P°°r
Wlll,ng hilllds,
fond of wild scenery and sporting i®«k is an opportunity to labor. Under our
for partridge and 0(untry wi immense regions of
wa,tl,,o
w..v
4,owre
We
could do and whenall the feast- about it—in more civilized places, have from the clamor that is kept up so tineeas-' *olrerl, That Ac principle that tha
days were done, he took up his staff and charged to the marvelous, but which we' ingly against the admission of foreign 'PeoP',
pannier, and set out for Christiana. jof the woods—at least many of us—know nmiTw^rs into nnr m. to make such laws as the majority of
ou will see poor Karl," said Chris- t0 be not only possible, but highly prob- i
v
1
deavor to describe an adventure of my would be glad to work, and for whom no
own. In 1837 I resided on the banks of i occupation is to be found in the crowded
ago, stout and athletic, and passion-1
„f
but found
that Some bears had broften the sapling, ijf these marriageable voung gentlemen
true I
As Hans spike, Christian thought he tale," as I and many others know by hard Convention at West Union, as publiskeS
experience. in the Pioneer.
EUROPEAN PAUPERS AND LABOR
ERS.
^"dv, or by any other cause, from
K
i0 which th. first bce'ame •, ly*
1 1
support them is
a
Ir
trick .f the bitsest so«
a wrong which we ought not to endure, its violation or infriegnient but anarch*
But is it to be laid down as a rule that no- land disunion, and the destruction of th«
body shall he allowed to land on our shores ®nd dearest interests vf our cont-
might
fairly infer this j111011
7'
iiuroPe
who
no
i i
about 201!,*" fcoduyj
strcnSth
an 1 all they
tobe
barrel containing a bail'thiti °PP°rtunity is to be found. They
3 ...
and the other with small shot. I had sue- come hither not to be supported by char-
eeeded in bagging some small wares, and ity, but to get work. Thev are brought
-j crime, but itdo-^s not render them the less
he p!4rt of the country in which I wasdid useful as laborers. Two or three vears
^n,Pai" boundless wilderness, ready to burst into
Wl K ., and scratching my clothes but being very products of our soil, as fast as they leave blood relations is the worst. He has mot
be?" said tlie'me
rc han Jodt fng^as i fhe
T1,'11
yl,?"»ous
W11 1
paws
,win"L
1
t|,e
indeed, ldid
1 1
w u n w a was my horror to
bear, coolly licking the blood ',ur P°Pu
.u ed 1 ,U()re ti|UQ self-poiteession kept me still a armies, looks to the western hemisphere
I moment, while two hall grown cubs were jor The man who brings strong
ut in a great
and cni:clnng my leii.s and feet. ....
Tkn 4"s.vralio» arf M* ca.i abused mv imm
to sudden energy, and I slowly stretched i
fertile
i
broken by the plough,
i„pa.sSi„Sacrk,,bscrved»rcoo„b„si.!1,ilherby«L natural operation nf fj h.f under am, or .. the garb of a
ly employed turning over the stones in ... respondent, for the Tribune,
iareh of fm-s,-worms, *. without 1 "hloh'uodorthu
new twlluus
ca°ses
ceedetl in removing "Ursa Minor" to an-1 demand for it. That such persons have
^d}?."T
1
.C
i n a v a a s
pU
forvm,8ra-
Way
,° int)'19
rt of the country in which"I wasdid useful as laborers. Two or three vears bundle of shoe knives and a rvickimi af
ery ot.en aflord large game, I charged since England offered a remarkable exam- sweetmeats t.» th# eohhh.r
e
0f
w0 1111,1
an
ic cession of
high aud precipitous sides, the poor-houses of England swarmed with in the future, should obey
•ling trom a rather high rock inmates. At the close ot 1 b.V2, in con-' maudments," be attentive to
pauperism lie re. the Mississippi north of Dubuqu^
It is, iu fact the interest of our country
at the present moment, to hold out the
greatest encouragements to tho iudustri-'
ous tiller of the soil, fn.m whatever part!
of the world he may come, and however
j.
rsmrcj
m. 2
(TERMS IN ADVANCE
$2,00 PER ANNUM.
to do at horn", arid, we can, then for%
bring him under the designation of a pau
per, wo do what is as impolitic as it is ia«
humHt.
jf-tgT We would call the attention of ot#
lady readers to the following very sensi
ble remarks from the Lynns Advocate
There are some do doubt who would
gladly follow its directions if they coulf*
command the necessary amount of cou#.
age. We hope they will do their dut|p
while they may, for tho benefit of thoall
young men who for many years, hare
S1,.rti,0
and yot you all
wont come to
yrtU
|[aVt.
iVc no ri'frht to
w
fe
COme
(.om,,
ro,i
nf
\^k
for it cv®ry weck
J,
a™ of their own accord.
why pitch into lhem it U leap yoar And
n p(.rVvt
ri"ht to do ir. Thefr
lmI»rr'0ff so. Every on*
of them m*v lisl a/we|i ho starving
add dUch interest lu lho
of n
ft
We know
nice, modest, literary, black whisker*
round we'll show him to you an"
-nun
wv iro sure t],at
«.jove
1
at
and Kivc
are
first sij/ht" wi
us a chance for a paragraph."'
A
ow"!n3
^c^llent Reaolu-
cu'
from the late Democratic
IMM
What man in S»wit
th« iMMft te
hate, or the head to controvert them?
Tho cripples and beggars of Europe,' Re*olred. That we have tho utmost eon
persons disabled by age, by infirmity of i fidenceinthe wisdom, statesmanship, and
e. patriotism of the framers of our fedcrit
i constitution as it exists, and we be lie
We hail v fuJ ,he
onl' 8hi^'ld
|,rV'"'1
to
gaurtfc
"l P"rP"
union, and that nought can issue frop
c0untl7'
{',e
CTC are
Territories have the rigJit
18a^ people prefer, is the goodly principal
become paupers upon which they an be governed und*r
C*ult of their own thousands who a Republican form of government, a:id
1
:u,y
priiu'iple aj)pased
l'ie
tins, cou-
language and the
... .of the Declaration of Independence,
I It is reported that tho principal
Kansas Correspondent of the New Yoift
1 ribune, has been !rrestud as a lur4§
thief! The »St. Charges Int. Hi^.-ncep,
j( Neutral) says, "this will no.abate in tl|§
I least from the truthfulness of his f«tau||
i lotters." We think so too.
ti SaiU.C'
labor to go where tltero is a last case of abseuce of indfl
that
°r °thCr
aC"
,10t
n e u u o o a n o e n
°^y
n0
e e e e s s -P o v e y o i n w o s e n s a i one|k
01
1 1 sweetmeats to tne coooicr.
the truth thatoauperisni in the old mi
mile, and was cross- u 1 u- t» ...
a Tamarack swamp
c:,s-''s
tho
tW
VHDCi'
1,1
nv something i revolting ieaturesot Mormon lnsti utiou*.
of partial sensibility by something touch of the plough. We revolting features of Mormon instiutioui.
and something growling hungry market absorbing all the I that which permits marriage betweem
hands of the tiller, and craving new I
Suppli,8.
on
^bother a horf^
we have lizard of was that of*.
|yo«»g *au. hundred miles
(rom fi
very pleasaut village—once known
buoc anives, anu a patkagc 01
^^ple ctiect Z"T oung men who desire to be happy
overcrowded populiition. In 1851 |ou earth, and dwell with the redeemed
sequence of the emigration to Australia live honestly, render unto every mqlfc
and elsewhere, they were comparatively
1
empty, and in many districts entirely so. Jof the
the ten com
to the ladiea
his juat due. and be a paying subscriber
Xorth Iowa Times.
The paupers left the work-houses and en
tered upon the employments left vacant by JSrT M'Gregor, Iowa, has doubted jt
the sudden and extensive emigration.— population within two months and is nop
The opportunity of work was the cure of one of the most flourishing towns in tl}ft
pauperism there, and, in the case of thou- west. It is the terminus of two importak
sands of emigrants who come penniless Kail-Roads, and r.ecieves more frcigfcl
to this country, it will be the antidote to and passeugers thau any two points
(lu, strot.ti4 with calicu^
much II«J may have suffered by poverty in ...
his native land. The more unfortunate he Morals at Salt Lake. A traveller wl»o
has been there, the happier will his lot be
1
IK*re, by way of contrast. We have a g'ves us a tearful picture of th*
1
w
wi'h
Kun.]X., with immense masse* ^1'•""th"""'! "l^ghtt
Lice rated breast. Weakness labors of husbandry, and employed in her' mentions that Brighaiu Young, lately
built a harem of stone to cage his uinety
beauties in, put they all kicked againat
the arrangement and asserted their figkl
to be treated like free bom dingbat* of
CA
s
been au enormous''all
silks iu Paris, owin«
There has
lmc0f}
!i^li™il,idl,e(l1
P^du^tion. LadkJ
i s o u s o e n e i s i k e s k
has recently visited the Salt Lake settl«*
^^^nuled mond eonditit^nuf that "heave*
«pon earth.. He suvs tliat anioiiL^t tij#
uuiueroua instauees of men marry*
-1 o o n e o e w a s a i e s i w i v e s 0
withdrawn from the sisters, and moreover his own niece.
v
T|1I,DS
brI,,5N
to our
^owutry, if he has
iIK ew ti b» MiM-'Vti. m.
.-it I
...
R.
A M»IK«
H«*
Eve. The Governor he vays wadohU^d

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