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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, December 09, 1868, Image 1

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Jhc imcs,
MoOtlKUOK, CLAYTON COUNTY, IOWA.
A. P. RICHARDSOW .Z.JOHN' H. ANDRICK.
On* Copy, for one year,
$3.50
AGENTFOR
Sugars,
iu
RATES OF
advance.
A V E ft I S I N
Apace. It 2w
square |"|1 50 $2 60
jj squares 3 60 3 6ifj
3 squares 3 00 4 (K)
gf col." TOO 5 00
£col.
4w ton 6ni
3 50 I $5 50 I $8 60 $12 00
4 f0 7 60 10 Ot I 16 00
6 00
11000 15 00 I «0 00
SOOjls 00 25 00 35 00
50 iooo 115 00 oo 40oo| TOOO
c~olu liliT 14
00
18 00 'J5 00
40 00
7000 12500
linos of Nonpreil make a'square. Itiisin«*ss cnrl*
lines,$8 per annum each additional line 60 eta.
MAT. McKINNIE,
Dealtr in
STOVES AND TINWARE.
P.P.STEWARTSTOVE.
Cash for Rags and Oopptr*
60S
JACOBIA & KIMBALL,
WHOLESALE AND RETAH
O E S
Wooden Ware.
GLASS, PAINTS, OILS, AC.
Areata for the
Oriental Powder Co.
^99 Doors Above\he Broad Aze.
jortN .t ACdnu.
LKIMBALL.
McGregor, Iowa.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GREEN, DRIED AND CANNED
fSUITS, LEMONS, «C.,
GROCERIES!!!!
Teas* Coffee,
Spices, Ac.
I !!!PROVISIONS!!!!
Flour,
Cheese,
And all kinds of Fish.
Cash Faid For
Country Produce!
1!! APPLES X!!!
A fnih Supply of Green Apples and
Peaches received Daily.
BATING MADE ARRANGEMENTS FOR MY FALL
AND WINTKR FUIIIT, I AM PREPARED^
TO FILL ALL OK!. KUS AT THE
LOWEST MARKET l'KICE.
49~ Remember the place,Southwestoorner Market
Square
.opposite Hubbard's Jewelry Store,
567 McGresor. Iow».
Tfie Western
News Comyany.
J^uceessors to J.
R.WALSH Ol OO.
CHICAGO, ILL.,
Supply Now* Agents and Booknellers
with everything in their line at the
earliest moment and at the Lowest
Prices.
Lists giving1 full information imt
all who ask.
O&BBN and DB.XBD FRUITS
AND OONPECTIONERT,
Whieh will be "old at the lowest market prices.—
la llellwU's Brick Block, on cor. Main and 2d
streets, McGregor, Iowa.
A W U S
W
ANTED] All kinds ofSHIPPINS FURS for
lxeEuropean Market.
The Only Bxporter in the West.
Parties^ollectlngRawFurs willflnd ittothelilp.
teresttosend their Purs to me, where they willget
the HIUHB8T CASH PRICK for all klndsof IT
ars
Deer 3kins, Hides, Wool aud Ginseng.
•r. s. VLLnsAZfir.
Ml
Chicago, III.
9*0
LAKE STREET,
German Lumber Yard.
Stauei & Daubenberger,
Peelers in
•amber, Timber, Lath, Shingles,
Doors, Sash and Blinds.
SUPPLY CITY AND COUNTRY TRADE ON THE
tt03T
«»S0NA8LE TERMS.
unqnestlouably the largest stock of SMh,
I A JP%orsiu»d Blinds erer kopt in the west—every
•tflea®dfora» to suit any building that can beerert
V.- *?-0?rS}u
theiWH
H. GEI-STON. J. M. DONALD. C. T. TREGO
OSLSTOST, TREGO CO.,
General Commissioii
Geo. ffibben, Chic&^O. 1
LowVs Maddux, New York,
Merchants,
No. 13 S. Commercial Street,
"Exchange Hrtildin
ST. LOT.'IS, 5(0.
HZBBSN tfl CO.,
TEAS,
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS,
235 Randolph Street,
CHICAGOl
W. 11. Maddux, Cincinnati. ilfy
II. A. HOMEYER. W. YO€Nt. H. E. WHIT.
BEN&7 A. BOMYB& tft CO.,
CommissionJMerchants
NO 10 CITT BUILDINGS,
SAINT LOUIS.
Special attention glvon to th Sale and Purchase ef
FLOtJR and GRAIW.
DEARBORN, TUTTLE & LOW
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
ROOM at.
84 & 86 LA SALLB STXIBBT,
J. L. DEARBORN,
I N. M. TUTTLE
A. LOW, JR.
Chicago, II
Liberal Advancement* mnrts on Consignments 624
K. SEXTON & SON,
Wholsala Dealers in
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters'
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners' Stock,
Agticnltuml Implement* and Blacksmiths' Tools
338 Bast Water Street,
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.
MISS H. BUCKLEY
Has returned from Chicago with a
BEAUTIFUL ASSORTMENT
or
FALL AND WINTER GOOD
SUITABLE TO ALL AGES.
Iler Goods hare been selected with mtich care, botli
as to elegance and economy in price. Miss B. wonld
inform lier customers Ibut she lias secured the servi
ces of an
Bastern Bress XMZaker,
Who is familiar with all the styles known is the most
fashionable circles of the Atlantic States.
*S- PLEASE CALL.-C«
624
DURANO BROS. & POWERS,
Wholesale Grocers,
131 South Water street,
64a CHICAGO, ILL.
FRANK BB.OXHXB&,
SHOT
i
Stable,
FL'LLYIce
588
JAMES GLENN
ON,
GENERAL DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Family Groceries
PROVISIONS, FLOUR & FEEO.
Always a full supply of
L"N?, Kill' s, Revolvers,
I'ittols, Game llii^s, Flasks,
Cartridges, I'uwdor, Shot, Lead,
Caps, Gun-wad«, Cutlery, Ac., Ac,
nearly opposite Flanders House.
McGrcg-or, Iowa.
Repairing of all kind* belonging to the git® andlock
smith lino done promptly.
Chorees moderate aud all work warranted.
"WHAT IS IT I
FRANK XERZMAN,
OPPOSITE
P1AB8ALL CHURCH'S LIYBRY
Main Street, BZcOrcgor,
Is ready to furnish
M.L KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Bave Troughs, Tin Pipes,
And in fact EVERYTHING in Iii« line of busiucss will
be well made and promptly put up.
STOVES "nJ STOVE PIPES furnished and set up to
order.
MEATMAR EE
tfgpt CAWELTI & BERGMAN,
CAWELTI'S BLOCK
Storage, Forwarding and
•A
settled iu our Newaud Ileautyof a Market,
with room, and everything which couvetii
encvand neatuess could suggest, aud deteterwined
al wajto
Secure tho Very Finest Animals for the
use of our Patrons,
wefeelassured that woare otleriuj ti e peopleof tliis
city sreateri uduceiuents than over before to patron
ize tho Queen of Markets. Fat Cattle boughtatthe
highest prico.
664
The Wag-on has Come I
AND THE CARRIAGES TOO! I
PEARSALL & CHURCH I
STNCE
October 1R50, have been saying iu theTlMSS
"Wait for the Wagou." They now announce to
the public that their stock of Horse* and Cairia^es,
either for biisim'ss or pleasure, is not excelled in the
West.
The most reasonable prices'.'haracterize their" PIO
NKER LIVEllY STABLE," located about half-way
up Main Street, near the Flanders House. Cull on
thorn if you would be suited with team or saddle
horses. PEARSALL A CHURCH.
MeGrogor.Iowa.
ANGUS SMITH A CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS-!
Proprietortof the
largest Blevator Warehouse.
Atthe term!
BUI and connected with th
Milwaukee A Mississippi and the Mil
waukee, Watcrtown & Baraboo
Valley Railroads.
AU.iropurty transferred from cars to boats without
ratage. tjf Liberal advances made on consignments
Mil« aukee, or shipments to Eastern .MerVrts.
BRICK
IN
*^0 «»tbenorth
•lie frfwiiuStreet.SjcaRBOOR.IOWA. 4S4
Livery
Stable,
THE ALLEN (LATE FLANDERS) HflUSS,
MoUREGOR.
We would respectfully announce to the public that
we are now occupying our new and commodioui
stable. Our establishment will he constantly sup
plied with as if nod a stock of Horses aud Carriages
asany stable in this city.
103
McLonaham A Henderson.
££PE0PLE'S MARKET.
WILLIAMS dt BBOe,
WILLIAMS'NEW BRICK BLOCK, MAIN ST.,
McGregor, Iowa, believe In fair dealing, and will
always bo found on hand ready to deal out the choicest
cuts of all kinds of Malt that the country affords.
Highest market price paid for all kinds of Stock-
NORTH
DR. AtfDROSi
Physician and Surgeon. Residence over Daniels' Root
aiid Shoe Store. Office No. I! Masohic Block. 578-99
I METROPOLITAN HOUSE,
Late Flanders House, Main Street, McGregor, low*.
Free Bns to and from Cars and Boats.
619 JOHN C. MOHRMANN, Proprietor.
NORTH McGREGOR HOTEL,
latte Mendoii IIous', near McGregor Western Rail
way Depot, Nnrili McGregor, Iowa. Free Bin to and
from cars and boat!. JOHN McIIUGII,
023 Proprietor.
UNION HOUSE,
MAIN STREET McGREGOR,IOWA.
BEN.
II.
FRISK, Prorieter.
WINNESHEIK HOUSE.
Deconh,Iowa. General Stage Office
JOHN SIIAW, Proprietor. 66«
JOHN T. CLARK. CHARLEY ALLEN. 0. J. CT.TSS.
JOHN T. CLARE & CO.,
Attorney sand Counsellors at Law and Real Estate
Agents,1st dooreast of Winneslieik House,Decorah,
Iowa. 4®*Will practice in the several conrts of the
State also attend to collections,and thepaymeutof
taxes in Winnesheik county. 666
MURDOCH & STONEMAN,
BAMUEL MURDOCK. J. T. STOjrUtAlT.
Attorneys ond Counsellors at Law, will practice in tlta
Supreme and District Courts of this State.
Officeopposito 1st National Bank, McQREGOR.
REUBEN NOBLE,
Attorney at Law, (424) McGREGOR, IOWA.
THOMASUPDEGRAFF,
Attorney at Law, (424) McGREGOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney and Counscllorat Law, McORHGOR.IOWA.
J. C. HOXSIE,
Justice of the Peace. Office with T. Updegraff.
A. J. JORDAN,
Attorney at Law, McOrogor, Iowa.
DOUGLAS LEFFINGWELL,
Attorney at Law, McGregor, .oivii. Office over Peter
soil A Larson's Store.
EVANS HOUSE.
[LATE AMERICAN,J
Opposite Ferry Landing, McGregor. Refurnished and
fitted np in good stvlo tor guests. Patronage respect
fully solicited. G. H. FLANDERS, Proprietor. 474
VOLUME XIII-No, 12. MCGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9, 1868.
311
LOUIS M. ANDRICK.
Attorney at I.aw, Reynold's Block biitranoebetween
146 and 148 Dearborn Strvet alsu on Madison Street
and Custom Ilouse (1*. O.) l'luce, Chicago.
COOE&BRO..
0. W.
COOK. MARTIN Coo*.
Attorneys at Law, Elkader, Clayton Co., Iowa, will
attend to collections, examine titles, pay taxes, obtain
bounties, pensions, Ac. Office opposite mill. 636
P. C. YOUNG,
(60
Attorney at Law and Heal Estate Agent,
ELKADER. IOWA.
R. HUBBARD & CO.,
Jewelers and dnil.rs iu Musical Instruments. Main
StrWt, 404 McGRKUOR. IOWA.
HAYT & BURDICK,
Dealers in Lumber. Shingles and Lath, Main Street,
McGREGOR, IOWA.
NATIONAL HOTEL,
Postvillo, Iowa. General Stage Office. C. YanTIooaw,
Proprietor. 603
BASS & ELMENDORF,
COMMISSION, STORAGE I FORWARDING BUSINESS,
Public Square, Mt'GKKGOK, IOWA.
MAT. McEINNIE,
Wholesale and Retail dcal 'i in Stoves, and Manufac
turer of Tin, Copper and Sheet 1 ronWare, Main Street,
McGREGOR, IOWA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Main Street, McGregor, Iowa. A desirable home for
the traveling public, with Rood barns and Sheds at
tached for the
sale protection horses and wagons.
44*2
M. MURRAY, Proprietor.
J. McHOSE St CO.,
STORAGE, FORWARDING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No. 1, ou the Levee, McGREGOl
Cousignmeiite solicited.
J08. M'HOSB.
476
O. M*GBEQ0R.
McGREGOR FANNING MILL.
D1C14EY & WELI.1VER,
Manufacturers of thu McGregor Fannii n MillandOraln
Separator, ou West Market Square, corner Main and
Ann Streets, 415y McGREGOR,
10W A.
BEZER LODGE No. 135.
Holds its Regular Communications on
Monday evening preceding the full moon
in oach month.
R. HUBBARD, W.
O. CROOKE, ?ec'y. 448
R. S. RATHBUN,
DENTIST,
McGregor. Iowa.
ontoa OB Main St..
4 doors
above Evans House
WEST UNION HOUSE,
Corner Vine and Elm Sts., WKST UNION, IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL. PROPRIETOR.
Good stabling and charges moderate. Stages going
east, west,north luid south, call aud leave with pas
sengers, morning and evening. ywa
BOARDMAN HOUSE,
WASUIXGTON)
KLKADER, IOWA.
LAFAYETTE BIUELOW, Proprieter.
Renovated inside and out. Not extellcd by any
Ilotelin the West. Good Stabling. 67#
THOMAS ARNOLD,
REAL ESTATE BROKER AND GENERAL AGENT, CON
VEYANCER, NOTARY PUBLIC,
AndOommis.iioner of Deeds, »tc., for theNortliwes
terii9"»tes. Will attend to the nurchaseaud sale of
Farm Lauds,City Property,Stocks, Ac.. Ac.
Office in Auction St. re. Mum Street. McGregor,
Iowa. 659
LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
HONORIUS COMMANDERY,
No. 8, Enights Tempi*.
The regular conclaves will be W4 on the
second Friday of each month.
LOUIS BENTON, JR., Eminent Commander.
SAMUEL J. PETEKSON, Recorder. 6«5
MISSISSIPPI HOUSE,
NEAR BOAT LANDING, McGREGOR, IOWA.
This well-known House—one of the first in the
City—has all the conveniences belonging to a well
fitted
bouse for
the traveler or boardur is desirably
located has comfortably arranged apa' tments.and
al way s furnish good tables and clean beds, Ac., Ac.
Goodstabliligehconvenient to the house.
679 II. D. WHLLMAN, Proprietor.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF M'GREGOR.
Successor to the
^ICGREOOR B*ASCII
or THE STATE
BANK
or
W.I.GllCHBIBT, VicePresident.
0.
IOWA.
IttiFHank is now open for the transactionof a general
tiankingbusiness. DraftsdfcKurupeinsums to suit.
J.IT MKItRILL,Presideut.
IIULVERSON,Cashier.
W. R. KLNNAIRD, Assistant Cashier. 392
j.
M.BoiszsraToxr,
O O K I N E
AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER,
OVER THE TIMES OFFICE, McGREGOR, IOWA.
SPECIAL
attention paid to the manufacture of
Blank Books for Counties, Banks, Merchants, etc.
Music,Magazines, Periodicals, Ac., Ac., Bound With
neatnessaud dispatch.
0. H.& A. O. HUNT
mBSXA.BSTT BBSTTXSTI
Officeon Main Street, McGREGOR, IOWA.
ALL BOUSBSBBVBmS
Please take notire that I have just received asplsn
did lot of the best quality of
CROCKERY, 6LASSWARE AND WALL PAPER,
which I offer at bargains. A good assortment of
FAMILY GROCERIES and Pnre Native GRAPB
WINE always on band at the I owrst prise*.
J.
F.
L1BBHARDT,
3m622 Above Pearsatl A Church's Livery Stable.
E O O I A N S
CURMAN
I E S
iraOfLftWTPS GERMAN BTTTEM,
AND
HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIC.
Prepared
HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIG
Is a combination of all tlm ingredients of the Bitters,
with the purest quality of Knihi 'rux /.'.im, Uraii(je,
r-tc.. makina one of the most pleasant and agreeable
tenieilies ever (,'ITered to the public.
Those prefer! ing a Medicine free from Alcoholic
fadmixtuie, will use
Hoofland's German Bitters.
Ir. cases of ni-rvons depression, when some alcoholic
stimulus is necessary,
HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIO
should bo used.
Tbo Bitters or the Tonic are both equally good, and
Contain tho same aiedicinal virtues.
The stomach, from a variety of causes, sueli as Indi
gestion, Dyspepsia, N^rvuus Debility,
etc., is very apt to have its functions
deranged. There- suit of which is, that
the patient suffers from several or uioro
of tho following diseases.
Constipation, Flatulence, Iaward Files,
Fulness of Blood to the Head, Acidi
ty of the Stomach, Nausea, Heart
burn, Disgust for the Food,
Fulness or Weight in the
Utomach. Sour Eructa
tions, Sinking or FluttHf®
ing.at the Pit of the Stomach,
Bwimming of the Head. Hurried
or Difficult Breathing, Fluttering at
tho Heart, Choking or Suflbcnting Beo-
Mtions when in a Lying Posture,
Dimness of Vision, Dots or Webs
before the Sight, Dull Pain in
tho Head, Deficiency ot
l'erspirution, Yellow
ness of the Skin
and Byes, Pain in the
Side, liack. Chest,
Limbs, etc., S u n
Flushes of Heat, Burning in the Flesh,
Constant Imaginings of Evil, and
Great Depression of Spirits.
These remedies will effectually euro Liver
Complaint. Jaundice, Dyspepsia, Chronic or Nervous
Pebility, Chronic Di-uih.ea, Dise.me of tint Kidneys,
and all l)i«c vses arising frum a Disoideiud Liver,
fctumach, or Intestines.
I«OTICJBJ.
•t wt*l! osfiMi-'ied f» thit fully on?-hill A
J» f.-n «1" ji-.i ti»»u of sw iHipulatiot
lOllli-ni iu the fl,joy ilS Il'. nt ofgtu-sl hea'.'Js
or. to u-e their own expie.sion, '-never
fe.l weil." They are languid, devoid of all
cii'i'^v extieinely ti« rvoiis. and li ne no appetite.
To this CHts ,,f t!ie IIITTEKS, or tbo
TONIC, are twpeciully teoinne M'led.
WEAK AND DELICATE CHILDREN
Are ma.ie «tre by the use of either "f tln~e i eniO"
dies TIley will cure vvety tf 1 AllA.SMliS,
without fail.
Thousands of cerliflcotes have accumulated in the
hands of the proprietor, but S|iave will allow of tho
publication of but a lew. Those, it will be uinei vH,
are men of nolo aud of such slauding that tbey must
he believed.
TESTIMONIALS.
ifox. o. w. woomvABi.
Ch if Just ice tf the Sti)»emr. Court of IU., writes:
I'Uitutl'.phia, .March 1 «, 1
WE MARGII WITH TIIE FLAG AND KEEP STEP TO THE MUSIC OF TIIE UKI6&
by Dr. C. M. JACKS
OH^
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
Tte Great Remies for all Diseases
OF TIIJ
LIVER, STOMACH, or
DIGESTIVE ORGANS.
BtfoflamTs German Bitters
are composed of the pure ju
cinally termed, t.x
Htrlis and Barks,
tion. Iii|(blr concen
frt' /nun Alcoholic
kind.
DEBIIjITY,
from any Cause whatever
lKOS'l'H.i ri«N OF Til K SVSTKJI,
ly Severe l.»ltor. Il.iril
HIII|M,
1*.
VPOSIII-O,
L'»-\»T
Township Officers.
(r, as they nre modi
tract*) of Hoots,
tanking a prepur*.
trated, and entirely
admixture uny
NOT*.—Those
S,etc.
There nomidicin^extant eipnl totlnve remedies
1
In such CJise*. A t-m. jmd vi^-.r is imp.-irlcl to the
4h"le System, the MMM Appetite is Stronuth
Sued, fowl is en i.ved. the st.uiiach
digests promptly, the l.lrtml is puiitied,
the complexion lie o to e s S'MiwI aud
healthy, tho yell nv tinr e is eradicated from tt.".*
eyus. a bl.ioiii is givioi to tho cheeks, and the weak
and nervous invalid becomes a strong aiul IioaltUy
being.
jPeraona Atlnancrd in Llfet
And feeling the band of timo weighing heatlly upon
them, with all its attendant iiis. will find in (he MSJ
of these ltlTTEHS. or the TOXIC, an elixir that »ill
instill new lite into their vei.s. restore in a mea-iira
the energy and ardor of more youthful days. h:ii!i|
«p their shrunken forms, and giv«hSalttl and
Mss te their ranuiiuuu years.
Sii7.
I find 'Iloofland's German Bitters'is
good tonic, uselxl in diseases of tho
digestive organs, aud of great benefit in
eases of debility, aud want of nervous
action in the system. Yours truly,
GEO. W. WOODWARD."
HON. AMIES THOJirSOX,
Judgt Jf the Xapremt Oun1 of
Philadelphia, April 18IW,
"T consider 'Iloofland's German Bitters' a i-rt/uaMs
medicine in ease of attacks of Imligestion or Dyspe
sia. 1 can certify thi» from my experience of it.
Yours, with respect,
JAMES THOMPSON."
Front Iter. JOS. II. UF.XXAIU, I». !».,
l\tttor of the Tenth Baptist Church, J'hthtilrlphiit.
fir. Jacktnn—Pear Sir I bave been fre pientl v re
quested to connect my name with recommendations
4f different kinds of medicines, but regarding tho
rractice
so out of ray apl'iopriate sphere,
have in all cases I declined but with
a clear proof in vnri wus instances aud
particularly in my own family, -yf tho
usefulness of l)r. Iloofland'h German Hitters, I depart
for once from my usual rouise, to express my full
Conviction that./'/r general debility of the f/slem, ntui
ts}rciiilly fur Liver Complain!, it is a ta/'t mil i tiluahU
preparation. In some cases it may fail I usually,
1 doubt not, it will be very beneficial to lii«M whe
suffer from tho above causes.
Yours, very respectfully,
J. II KENNARO,
Eighth, below Coates St.
From Rev. F.. I. 1KMIAI I,,
Jnistant alitor Chritliun Chnmule, l'ltiUnleljihitx,
I hare derived decided benetit from the use ol
lloi'tland's Herman Bitters, and feel it my privilege
to recommend tliem as a most valnahlo tunic, lo all
Who are sutfei ing from Kennal duhility or from dis
•aoes arhiiug fiuui ilwiu^ement of the 'liver.
Yours truly
E. 1). FEN&AU*
CAUTION.
Iloofland's German ltcmedies are rounterf''itf'!.
Pee that the signat "l'! "f M. JACK
^ON is on the ni| [H J]B per of each bottU
AH others arc Colin lerfeit.
Principal Oftiee aud Mannfcti»ry
at the tierman Medicinc Stole, No. GUI AltCli .Str*»'t
fhiladelLdiiu.
CIIAKI.FN M. I'.VVXR,
(M I man 1'VUGUIST, Proprietor,
Fo'inerly C. M. JACK*IN A Co.
PEIGE3.
DooflandTsQermau
u
For
liitiors II (Xi
p**r K'rftle
b.ilf i-.'/.iii f. iv
Iloofland's German Tonic, pot up in «i»u»rt luitthw.
1 5c
per txilth-. or a ill i|../i ii f. 7 S
*9- Lo not .rget to e\'iiitine well the artlcl"yui.
buy, in order to gut the guiiiiine.
NTIL« BY
all
NRNG£MS
ers nf itl'ilielM-"!.
AH4 I*4MI
for s*lcinMoOrsgor by
L.BENTON,JR.,
E N E W E A O
T.W.WOOD,
Mf HENKEDY A BUCK.
O O A N S
GERMAN
O N I O
IOWA TIMES.
The Elkad*?r Journal furnishes tho fol
lowing list of Townnhip Officers for Clay
Ion Co., as determined by the recent elec
tions. To our County readers it will
Jrovc very interesting for reference. "Jo"
Is entitled to credit for getting it up and
Wo hereby extend that Credit.
HOARD OF SUPERVISORS.
Boardmin—R Place.
Buensivista—None elected.
Cass—11 Taylor.
Clayton—S Peck,
Co* Creek—J CarpenlHh
Klk—Elijah dates.
Farmersburg—C Hall,
Giard—L K Gilbert.
Garnavillo—G W Beach,
Grand Jleadows—II S ffufiiplireys.
Highland—Michael Callaghan.
Jefferson—James Schfeeder.
Lodoniillo—Richard Kdmonds.
Mendon—Amos Pearsnll.
Mallory—J II Bowman,
Millvillc—Wm Blake.
Marion—J 0 Rounds,
Monona—Luther Xichols.
Read—M Uriell.
Sperry—A Lawrence.
Volga—John Garber.
Wagner—R Knight.
marked hold orst tfcoM marked
were re-elected the others uro new members.
TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.
Buenavista—Trustees, Benj Kuyken
dall, Andrew Voggenthalcr, Jacob llcnck
er Justices, Wm Stoddard, Thos
.Smith Constables, John Luughrey, Adam
Henderson Clerk, John Hcrdman As
sessor, Wm Stoddard: Collector, Ernest
Merkcl.
Boardman—Trustees, AD Cook, Charles
Leihrook, E Branch Justices, S Powell,
W Libby Constables, A V Sargent,
II Place Clerk, W Libby: Assessor,
Chas Leibrook.
Cass—Trustees, Bemis, II Wheeler,
A Blank Justices. E Baird, E Gard
encr Constables, Gaylor, Geo Cad
well Clerk, Lyman Sherwood Assessor,
A Blake Collector, Gaylord.
Clayton—Trustees. Richard Only, Cyrus
Hodges, Wm Krueger Justices," Arthur
Armstrong, Fritz Mader Constables,
Christian Henning, John Hawkins
Clerk, Jerome Assessor, S Peck
Collector, Thomas Dripps.
Cox Creek—Trustees, Carpenter,
Gerhardt Schmitz, Joseph Whittle Jus
tices, Geo S Peck, John Xading Constat
bles, Quigley, Hitchcock Clerk, II
Luers Assessor, S Peck Collector,
Reuther.
Elk—Trustees, Hunt, McEvers,
A Rizer Justices, A Lewis, S
Masters Constables, I Brookshier, A
Bailey Clerk, Wm II Appleton Asses
sor, White Collector, Wm Beatty.
Farmersbury—Trustees, Meyer, W
Reed, Renshaw Justices, E Hall,
Schallcr, Hatter Constables, S
Benjamin, Arnold, A Clark Clerk,
E Chase Assessor, A A Bruneon Col
lector, Morgan.
Giard—Trustees, Fnr'cy, Saw vol,
1" Bickel Justices, Tapper, Wm II
Harding, licker.son Constables, W
Wilder, Henry, Scott Clerk, II
W Jones Assessor, II W Jones Collec
tor. I Bickel.
(iarnaviHo—Trustees, Wm II Stevens.
Maurer, II Schumacher Justices,
Shroeder, II Smart, Ilagensick
Constables. Sigg, E antes, A Brad
ley Clerk, Stratemeyer Assessor,
Fox Collector, Wm Thonia.
Grand Mcadotc—Trustees, Xichols,
Bettys, Thonia Justices, W S Hen
derson, McLelland Constables,
W Skelton, Chase Clerk, W II S Mc
Lelland Assessor, W Smith Collector,
McLelland.
Highland Trustees, Asa Stevens,
Larkin, Hurley Justices, Wm West,
Feeney Constables, Feeney, Moran
Clerk, Callaghan Assessor, John Hur
ley Collector, Levi Doty.
Jrfftrson—Trustees. W Bttchholz, Geo
Daum, Kretzmeier Justices. Weh
mer, lvriebs Constables, II Muller,
Trocster C'lerk, II Ihm Assessor,
Goodrich Collector, Andregg.
Lodomillo Trustees, Coolridge,
Randall, Stalnaker Justices, llich»
aids, W Rankin Constables, Wia Boyn
ton, S Richards Clerk, Scott As
sessor, Richards Collector, Buck
ley.
Mendon Trustees, II Hamlin,
Keen, Shoemaker Justices, IIoxi
ie, Baugh Constables. Hopkins,
Conant, Moody Clerk, Daniel La
cy Assessor, Ilcncke Collector,
Ilagensick.
Mallory—Trustees,Wrm IIunt,W Brown,
Hansel Justices, AV Croglow,
Bolsingcr Constables, Hammond,
Hancel Clerk, II IlatHeld Assessor, II
Jones Collector, A Walters.
Millvillc—Trustees, Barnett, S
Ward, W. II Scott Justices, Marshall,
E Blakcslce: Constables, Givens, A
Springer Clerk, E Blake Assessor,
E Blake Collector, W Parke.
Marion—Trustees, S Johnson, IIul
verson, Even Evenson Justioes,
Rounds, Follett Constables, E Dubs,
E Gilbert Assessor, llolstenson Col
lector, Halverson.
Monona— Trustees, Milo W Barnes,
Thompson Justicas, I Winters, Pol
ley, A Bronson Constables, Charles
Monty, Thayer, It Randall Clerk,
John Leach Assessor, A Sackrider
Collector, Richard Slitor.
Head—Trustees, W Ilagensick, W
Kurdeineier, Uriell Justices, 11
Schulte, Schultz Constables. II Buck)
man, Kuse Clerk, Schultz Asses
sor, Ilagensick Collector, Chailes
Schultz.
Sperry—Trustees, O Sanford, Gottlieb
Steinhilber, II Welch Justices, A II
Blake, Freeman Constables, Jewell,
Doolittle Clerk. Bevin.s.
Volga—Trustees, llartgc, Bowman,
Blanchein s Justices, Costinan,
Taylor Constables. Thayer, Mc
Morrow Clerk, S Soyster Assessor, A
Eberhart Collector, Putz.
H"agner—Trustees, Haskins, A
Gooding, W Russell Justices, S Littlo,
Fzra Monlux (elected years ago for life)
Constables, Zebornick. Geo Monlux
Clerk, E Martin Assessor, Geo Monlux
Collector, George Monlux.
One C. N. Payn has just concluded the
Usk of walking one hundred miles in
twcnty-thre« hours, twenty-nino minutes
and fifty-seven seconds.
The Cincinnati Gazette, good and strong
Republican authority, has at last discov
ered that the Freedmen's Bureau is not
so much a means of protection to the
blacks as it haa been made a source of
enormous plunder for the profit of indi
viduals.
The British Government has submitted
olaims to onr Government, amounting to
$45
.1)00,000, as an offset to our Alabama
claims. These claims are made up of
alleged damages sustained by British sub'
jects at the South during the rebellion.
Good authorities state that the prospects
look favorable to a large business in the
Wisconsin lumber woods this winter, hut
not equal to that of last year. Prices paid
to choppers are about the eaB»e.
"Without actually
held by the legs
lifted up and down in the water three
times—this makes picking easy. The
feathers should be at once removed, pin
feathers and all very cleanly, and without
breaking the skin. It should next be
'plumped,' by being dipped about two
seconds into water nearly or quite boiling
hot, and then at once into cold water,
about the same length of time. Most of
the dressed poultry sold here is wet picked,
and 6uch is generally preferred. But very
fat, handsome turkeys, dry-picked, sell
well at Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Great care should be taken to avoid cut«
ting or bruising the flesh or breaking the
bones. It should be entirely cold, but not
frozen, before being packed. This is a
matter of importance for, if packed with
the animal heat in it, it will be most sure
to spoil. If it reaches the market sound
without freezing, it will sell all the better.
In packing, when practicable, use hand
threshed dry straw be sure thnt it is
clean, tree from dust of any kind and
entirely dry. Place a layer of straw at
the bottom, then alternate layers of poul
try and straw, taking care to stow snugly,
backs upward, legs under the body, filling
vacancies with straw, and filling the pack
ages 80 that the cover will draw down
very snugly upon the contents, to prevent
shifting or shucking on the way. The ob
jection to barrels is that the fowls are apt
to be much bent and twisted out of shape
they answer better for chickens and ducks
than for turkeys and geese. Straw should
be between the poultry and the sides of
the packages to keep them from freezing,
though in very cold weather this cannot
always be avoided. In packing large lots,
it is best to put the different kinds in
separate packages, and Kark the kind on
the cover.
Wild turkeys, wild ducks, and the smal
ler birds should be packed in the natural
state. Grouse or prairie chickens, wood
cock and quail, when the weather is cool,
reach us in better order and sell more
rapidly when wrapped in paper, their
feathers first being laid smoothly in their
placcs. Grouse, when shot, should be
hung up by their feet, so that the blood
may run out at their mouth. If the
weather is very cold, so as to freeze at
once, it is better to 6troke the feathers
down smoothly and hang the birds up by
the nock. All animal heat should be out
of them before packing press tiicm firm
ly into the package: two hundred pounds
may thus be packed into a common Hour
barrel. The freight on trapped birds is
no more than others, and those shot or
otherwise mutilated, not only bring a low
price, but arc apt to spoil, and by their
more rapid decomposition cause the others
to smell badly, thus injuring those they
are packed with more than the value of
the mutilated birds. If they are sent they
should be put in separate packages. In
warm weather ice must be used in tho
package to insure the contents arriving
sound."
Spurgeon on Total Abstinence*
At a recent meeting of Baptist ministers
in England t» consider thesubjcct of total
abstinence. Mr. Spurgeon expressed him
self as follows on the subject: ''I may
be allowed for a moment to be slightly
egotistical, and say what is my position
here. It may be the position of oae or
two others. I may illustrate it from my
brother's case. Some two j'ears ago he
was avowed teetotaller some nine months
he was consistent to his pledge, but again
and again he found from time to time
that he was literally failing, aud one
day, so close was he to the verge of the
grave, that I said: 'Young man, there
was one who went to heaven in a chariot
of fire, but there is no reason that you
should go in one of water,' and I went
myself and fetched a glass of wine whic
enabled him to finish his day's work. He
said, 'What more is to be done?' I said,
'I will tell you my own experience. I
tried conscientiously to be a teetotaller for
nine months myself, but I found I was
obliged to give it up, at least I thought so,
and determined to take what I did take in
secret. 1 bought some wine and souie
medicine glasses, and I think for a year I
drank no wino but out of a medicine glass
and with a locked door. But, of course,
it leaked out, and I found that I was doing
more harm than by open drinking. I
found some had £Ot a habit of secret
drinking. I found some had got a habit
of secrect drinking who wero confirming
themselves in what I was doing, so I put
the medicine glass on one side, that no
one should say I was ashamed of doing
publicly what 1 did in private.'"
IMMIGRATION.— The commissioners of
immigration in New York city report
104,057 as tho number of immigrants who
have arrived in that city from January 1st
to November 11th, 1S68. Tho number
during the same period in 1S67 was 220,
474—a decrease in 180S of 20,417. The
receipts of money in commutation of
charges for support amounted to $586,589.
IT VANISHETH AWAY.—Do our readers
all understand that the genuine Chemical
Saleratus, made by D. B. De Land & Co.,
is never eaten. In the process of baking
it all evaporates, leaving the bread light
and pure. It has been imitated but the
counterfeit is not easily disposed of. Use
it instead of Soda. It weighs 16, ettwes
to the paper others weigh 14 oz.
E. B. Whitcomb, a prominent insurance
man and Democrat, in payment of a wager
in Des Moines, on Saturday, sawed two
cords of wood in front ef the Register
office. The affair caused much amuse
ment, and a large crowd was present dur
ing the day. John Kenuedy, a Seymour
cadet, also squared a wager by wheeling a
negro from Dea Moines ltaqsa to the
Savery Ilouse.
Frederick William IKcfcetts, brother of
Charles Diokcus, died a few week* since
•t Darlington, England.
Senator Morton's Letter.
NEW YOUK, Dec.
Packing Ponltrjr and Game
The following instructions for preparing
poultry and game for market are season
able and of incalculable benefit to those Morton, of Indiana':
engaged in the business, as well as to I WASHINGTON, NOV. 20.-— To the Editor
families: of the World— DEAR SHI: In the New
'•One of the meanest of all mean tricks World, of the 2Gth inst., I iind an
of trade is tho common habit of bringing article from which I quote the following:
to market poultry which is not properly telegram to an evening paper, states
dressed, especially in the matter of remov-' fIiat Senator Morton, soon after the open
ing the entrails. Food in the crop injures of the session, will introduce a bill di
tlie appearance, is liable to Bour, and pur-1 meeting the immediate payment, in green
ehasers object to paying for this worse!
backs, 0f
•ban useless weight therefore, keep from issued five years ago. If this report be
food twenty-tour hours before killing the correct the course that senator on this sub
fowls. Opening the veins of the neck, or 'ject
Ihe skill will recede from the neck bone,:
the neck bone removed, tho skin drawn1 troduce a bill directing the immediate
•ver the end and tied and trimed neatly, payment in greenbacks of that portion of
The intestines of the crop should not be ^ie 5~20 bonds issued five years ago, and
'drawn.' For scalding poultry the water have never said that I did to Secretary
•hould be as near boiling as possible, I McCulloch, or any body else. In the next
y boiling the bird, being place, I did not, during the canvai
should be immersed, and i what I said in the senate in rega
payment of the 5 20's in
The draft of the basis of a treaty for
the settlement of the Alabama claims,
agreed upon between Lord Stanley and
Minister Johnson, has been received at
the State Department. The first article
provides for the settlement of all claims
which have arisen Letween the two govt
ernments since tho convention of 1853.
The second article provides expressly for
the settlement of what are known as the
Alabama claims, and proposes the forma
tion of a joint commission, cach govern'
ment to appoint two members, who shall
sit in Washington and determine the
character, legality and amount of claims.
Any question which is not decided unanU
mously by the commissioners, is to be
submitted to an arbitrator agreed upon by
the two governments. This is a brifef
outline of the proposition as submitted.
It lis undoubted that it is not entirely
satisfatory to Mr. Seward.
A well-known wealthy Parisian has had
himself paiuted, by an eminent artist,
"as he was," "as ho is," and "as he wiil
be." "As ho was," represents him at the
age of twenty-five, a poor devil in ragged
garments, with his toes peeping through
holes in his shoes, slinking, half famished,
by the side of a wall. "As he in,1' figures
him lat and jolly as an alderman, well
dressed, with gold chains decking his waist
coat, and diamond rings blazing on his
fingers. And, in "As he will be," ho is
made a rotting, hideous corpse. Not tho
least singular feature of such a singular
freak, is the fact that he has the paintings
hung in his drawing rocrn.
OMAHA, Dec. 3.—The temporary bridge
across the Missouri river at this place,
constructed by the Union Pacific Railroad
Company, was completed ou Tuesday eve
ning, and 100 cars crossed over yesterday.
The company will commenco shipping
freight to the terminus of the road, and
raise the blockade which for the past ten
days has clogged Western commerce.
Six companies of the 20.h Uuited States
Infantry arrived at Omaha from the West
last evening, and will go into winter quar
ters at Sharuian Barracks.
The Electors of Nebraska voted yester
day for Grant and Coli'ax.
A BONUS FOR PROLIFIC
iiiattili^
WHOLE No. 634.
2.—The
that portion of the 5-20 bonds
is
Weeding in the mouth, is the best mode of months ago he was an open advocate of
killing. If the head be taken off first,
t'.10
conspicious for vaccilation. Eight
so-called greenback theory, and du-
1'nS
presenting a repulsive feature. Most of recanted. If he is now about to propose
he poultry sold here has the head on, and and advocate such a measure as that de
Ibis is best when the process of the killing scribed in the telegram, bis renunciation
has not injured the arrcarance of the head.
When it is preferred to remove the head,
it
should be taken off at the throat, the
•kin pealed back a little, and a portion of
the Presidential canvass he publicly
must have been a mere political dodge, a
feigned surrender of his principles,—to
promote the success of his party."
In the first place, I do not intend to in-
ireenbacks. No
speech by me to that effect has been made.
What 1 urged during the canvass was,
that the first duty of the government was
to return to specie payments, which, when
accomplished, would" settle a'l questions
as to this mode of pacing the bonds. I
further urged that the government had no
right to issue new legal-tender notes,
and make them applicable to the pay
ment of bonds, arguing that such notes
could not be made to sustain the same re
lations to the bonds in law or equity that
was suitained by the existing notes, and
that the further issue of such notes would
irdefinitely postpone the return to specie
payments. These propositions were fully
stated in my speech, in the senate, last
summer, in which I argued the legal right
of the government to use the existing legal
tender notes in the payment of the bonds.
I also argued, at various times during the
canvass that whatever might bo the law on
the subject, the government could not pay
the bonds, or any considerable portion of
the coin, while the currency remained de
preciated, aud that the improvement oftho
currency, by bringing it up to par, was a
necessary condition precedent to the pay
ment of tho bonds in gold that if the goV
ernment could not procure gold enough to
redeem $305,000,000 of legal-tender notes,
it was folly to talk about paying the bonds
in gold, that the question of the mode of
paying the bonds will become important
«nly by the continuance of a depraved
currency, without taking steps to improve
it that to take the surplus gold in the
treasury and apply it to the purchase of
bonds in the market, which will not fall
due for fourteen years, would not be pay
ing the bondsj but shaving them,
and would be an improper use of means
by which the paper of the government,
over-duo and dishonored, should be re
deemed. These positions are inconsistent
with anything said in the senate.
I am| T«ry respectfully,
Yours.
O. P.
MoTHEfts.*«»7ery
srave matters aro engaging the attention
of the Tennessee Legislature, as may bo
judged from the character of some bills
introduced November 24th, and which
passed their first reading. One bill for
the benefit of Mrs. Granvillo Lindslay and
others, provides first, that said Mrs.
Lindslay shall receive seventy-five dol
lars annually in consideration of recently
giving birth to three children at one time,
and, secondly, providing for like annuity
to all Tennessee women who ohail iu
future to equally prolific.
.— .I SSI
Scene in a Frenoh hospital. The snr*
geon comes in grave and disturbed
"How many dead this morning?" he a»ked
of the nurse. "Nine." "Bother! I gave
ten prescriptions last night didn't I?"
"Yes, but one didn't wiek to take bis."
Tho Alabama Treaty.
World con­
tains the following letter from Senator
rass rocant
:ard to the
Moarox.
CHITRCII SCANDAL.—It is ieported that a
lady member of one of the New York
churches, a littlo too gay to be satisfactory
to her associates, was tried before the
church and cut off for breach of covenant.
The husband, feeling grieved, has com
menced a suit in the court for libel and
slander, and lays the damages at §5,000.
This suggests to a New \rork correspond
ent sundry questions:
''Can a church deciplinc its members
without having the fear of the courts be
fore its eyes? Can a church be sued for
cutting members off for a breach of dis
cipline? Is it sladder to turn a man or
woman out of church Can parties who
conduct a trial according to the customs of
a denomination be compelled to disclose
what was said or done in a church meet
ing Are not such communications all
privileged
The terms of the protocol for the
settlement of our claims against Great
llntain, whieh was recently received by
the i-tate Department at Washington, have
at last transpired with sufficient definite—
ness to enable us to understood the cbar*
actor of the proposed treaty. It eonaivts
of three articles, which are in substance
a* follows
Article first provides for the general
settlement of nil claims between the two
governments which have arisen since tho
Conventiuu of 1*153.
Artii-le teeond provides especially for
the settlement of the claim against Great
Britain by this Government, known in tho
diplomatic correspondence of the last
three years as the "Alabama olaims."
Article third provides for the appoint
ment of a Joint Commission of four
persons, two to be selected by each Gov*
ernment, tvho shall sit in Washington to
decide upon the validity of these claims,
a,nc^
^H0 rr°videa that in case tho
Commission does not unanimously agree
on any of the questions submitted to it,
such questions shall be referred to the af—
biration of some potentate not specifically
designated, except that he shall be friend
ly, cr in other words, at peace with both
England and the United States.
Those who have watched the progress
of the negotiations on this subject will bo
surprised to observe that this protocol
waives the question of England's respon
sibility in recognizirg the Southern Con
federacy as a lawful belligerent. It was
precisely on this point thut Mr. Seward
most insisted during bis entire correspon
dence with Lord Stanly, and it was
because the English Foreign Secretary
refused to submit this question to adjudi
cation thst no settlement was arrived at.
That Mr. Reverdy Johnson should now
subscribe to a treaty in which this rii&tiet
is entirely ignored, is rather remarkable—
though that venerablo and gastronomio
gentleman has taken the edge off our sur»
prise by many other actions quits as
unaccountable.
But quite as objectionable a feature in
this protocol is the first article, which
gives the precedence to any claims which
tho British Government may produce
against this country. The effect of this
would simply be that if an English sub
ject. lesiding in the South, and engaged,
perhaps, in manufacturing munitions of
war fur the rebels, id his establishment
seized or destroyed by our scldiers, he
could prove his damages, and collect tlia
same of the Government—and this before
the Alabama claims wero reached at all.
It is stated that tho British Legation has
been engaged for some time past in secur
ing evidence of such chums, and has suc
ceeded in making up a bill of about fifty
millions of dollars, an amount which
probably exceeds the aggregate of our
demands for 1 ssos inflicted by English
privateers. And to show nutre clearly
how utterly absurd this would be, while
we were thus reimbursing rebel sympa
thizers—o*ir laws forbid the payment of
the claims of loyal American citizens nt
the South for their looses during the war.
In short, this protocol is a legitimate
sequence of Mr. Johnson's whole course
in England, and shows that he should bo
called home at once, before no has an
opportunity to do further mischief. It is
not to be supposed that the treaty will
oven be accepted bv the State Department,
and it certainly will not be ratified by tho
Senate.
IMPORTANT DECISIONS IN BANKRUPTCY.—
Judge Swayne, in the United States Cir»
cuit Court, northern district of Ohio, has
dccided in the ease of John C. Neal, ia
bankruptcy, as follows
1. l'rnpcrty fraudulently disposed of by
a bankrupt in proceedings by or against
him may be recovered by the assignee
upon petition in the bankrupt court, pro
ceedings upon whieb may be of a summary
character.
2. The district judge may order issues
of fact arising in such caecs to be tried by
jury.
3. Suits mny be brought at common lotr
or by bill iu equity for toe securing of
property in such cases, but as they must
be governed by the technical rules, and bo
subject to the delays incident thereto, it jfl
preferable to proceed by summary peti
tion, auxiliary to the original proceedings
in the court of bankruptcy, that being a
cheaper, speedier and more simple mode.
Another ease of considerable interest to
bankrupts has just been decided in United
States District Court of Indiana. Tho
points are as follows:
1. A failure of fourteen uays to pay
commercial paper is not an act of bank*
ruptcy unless it is shown that the failure
was with fraudulent intent.
2 When a debtor, knowing his estate
to le insolvent, permits himself to be
insolvent, permits himself to be sued, and
knowing that a judgment in such suit will
give that condition an advantage over
others, he commits an act of bankruptcy,
and is bound to seek relief of thr bank
rupt act. Neglecting this, he may be ad
judged a bankrupt on petition of credit
ors.
Up to the first day of January next,
discharges by the bankrupt law will be,
issued without regard to the amount of
assets or property surrendered that is,
a debtor having no property beyond what
the law exempted and allowed him to
retain, mi«iht still be relieved of his debts.
Upon petitions filed after that date the
debts will not be discharged unless at least
50 per cent, of the amount proved shall
be paid, or a majority of the creditors
giving their consent in writing.
OMAHA, lec.
2.—The temporary bridge
across the Missouri, built by the Union
Pacific, was finished last night. Since
then 400 cars have crossed. Freights
going west, her:after, will again go regu-*
larly to tho terminus of the Union Pacific.
Senator Stewart arrived from Nevada
this evening, and left for Chicago, tn Toutc
to Washington.
Six companies of the 27th infantry ar
rived from the west this evening, and will
go into winter quarters at Shctuan bar*
racks.
A snow storm commented here at tf
o'clock this evening, and still continues*
SALT LAKE, Dec. 2.—Yesterday a whit*
man, named Calkins, was sot, and dan
gerously wounded, by a Chinaman, who
afterward shot and killed himself, near
Redding spring, Nevada. The cause of
the affray is unknown.
ST. LOUIS, Dec. 2.—Parties from tb«
plains say that buffalo, in ureat numbers^
aro moving north, an nnusual thing at
this season, and accounted for only by the
fact that Indians and military are now in
possession of their accustomed feedi&g
^rounds.
THE CATTLE CONVENTION.—In
the eoft#
yention of cattle commissioners, at Spriifcr-*
field, HI., a draft of a law, to bepreseuted
to the various state legislatures for enact*
ment, was adopted. It provides that com
missioners shall bo appointed to watoh
over the health of the cattle in the 6tate
who shall have power to place diseased
cattle in quarantine, or to cause them to
be killed to irtspoot all cattle sought to be
brought into the state, and to prevent the
entrance of such as may
4
v'e
deemed capa­
ble of diffusing dangerous diseases. Pro
visions are made for the protection of cafe*
tie in transit: the importation of TeSM
stock, between April 1 and Nov. 1, is pro
hibited and a law is recommended mak
ing owners of diseased cattle responsible
for duuiages resulting therefrom.
The National Convention of Commis
sioners from the several States and from
Canada, to consider the cattle disease and
the best means to prevent it, and to rego»
late the cattle trade of the country, is in
session at Springfield to-day. Cattle
raiser*, cattle dealers, butchers, and th#
public generally, have a deep interest SB
the results of its deliberations.

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