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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, March 03, 1869, Image 1

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TUB TROOP*R TO|HI» MARK.
IT r:ILU O'I«nui.
tm.nmh«*borne mefhr »ndfcM,
On pawiiiit hoof. that »s*e never loth,
Our gallop to-day
bt'
»he last
ror tbM or for me—or perchance for both.
As I tiahten your girth do you nothing daunt—
Do you catch the hint of our forming line?
And n*w the artillery move to the front,
Have you never qualm, Day Bess of mine?
"It ia dainty to see you (idle and Mart
As you move to the battle's cloudy marge,
Aud to feel the Dwells of yoi.r wakening heart,
hen our cavalry bugles sound the charge.
At the •cream of tlie shell aud the roll of tlie drum,
You feigu to be frightened with skittish Blanco*,
But tip the green slo(es where the Imllets hum.
Coqaetlishly, darling, I've known you
"Tour skin Is satin,
your nostrils red.
Your eyes are a bird's, or a loving girnt
And from delicate ftll.Kk to dainty head,
A throbbing Yein-cor.li.ge around your
Oh, Joy of my soul If yon they slay,
'or triumph or rout 1 little cure
For there is not in all the wide valley to anf,
Such a dear little bridle-wise,thorough-bred mare."
The Railroad Ts*.
There perhaps has never been a more
smoother and gigantic swindle authorized
tgr Legislative enactment than the law
Miucted at the last session of the Legisla
ture of Iowa, authorizing a majority of
the voters of a township to levy a tax not
exceeding five per cent upon the property
of the citizcns of such a township, in aid
of the building of any Railroad running
tfcrough such township. Let us review
the operation of the law thus: A Ituil
#ay Company is organized to build a road
ffom Sharpsville to Greenhorn City, run
through Flathead township. The
Company demands that the Flatheads shall
^rote a five per cent tax upon their proper
ty to be donated to the Company in aid of
the building of said road through their
tfwnship. This the Flatheads do and pay
Stcr the amount (say $30,000) into the
Treasury of the county of Simple, in
Which the aforesaid township is located.
The law is now fully complied with on
tie part of Flathead township. Now
OOmes the Company to comply with their
part of the law which requires that said
$30,000 shall be expended on the line of
tike road running through Flathead town
drip and no where elso. The Company
4t*ew the money from the treasury and
Honestly expend it as the law requires,
when it is all expended, they say to the
eStizens of Flathead township: Gentle
men we have expended the money you
woted ue, as you will percieve, in strict
compliance with the law, and it has only
enabled os to grade the road from Gud
geon hill to Give-out creek. You, gentle-
Han must vote five per cent again, or we
Will have to abandon the work and you
#ill lose what you have given. Well th«
Flatheads vote again, this time the road
Is peihnps graded, when another call for a
last tax is made to enable the Company to
Tie and Iron the road. Thus the people
of Flathead township have built the entire
Mad through their township, and have
given it to a few fellows living at Sharps
•JJle. This is the law as it stands upon
tie Statute Dook. There is nothing in the
statute making it obligatory on the part
of the Company to built the road project
ed through a township after expending
the tax voted by such township, but ths
*~*»iatute only requires of the Company that
t6ey shall expend such tax in the town
noting it.
This law, that is smooth upo* its face,
Evidently had its origin in some mind long
trained in the mysteries of railroad
ring, particularly that part of the rin£
where the difficult subject of tcay.t and
means is considered, and I would say to
•very person, vote no tax upon your pro
perty in aid of a railroad under the exist
ing law uit it you have security that the
rood will be built. Lut I would say to far
rotrrs, land-owners and citizens of towns
and villages who would be benefited by
the building of a railroad in their vicinity,
give to the Company of such a road, in
SO '1 faith, all the assistance that you can,
bf subscribing your name to an instru
ment partaking of tho following character
when called upon to do so. If a citizen
of tho town of Clayton, let it be particu
larly thus:
CI.AYTON COUNTY, IOWA, 18G9.
The undersigned agrees to pay to the
Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad Company,
the sum of Dollars, when said Rail
road Company shall have built a Kuilro ul
fifom the City of Dubuque, in Dubuque
Hunty, Iowa, along the shore of the Mis
sissippi River, to the town of Clayton, in
the county of Clayton, Iowa, with loco
motives and cars running through on said
road. The building of said road as speci
fied to lie a full and ample consideration
for this obligation.
This instrument when endorsed by the
Company cun be used as a pledge upon a
loan of money or as collateral to increase
S first mortgage lien. Now, when a pro
perty holder (who is to be benefited by
the building of the road) is called upon to
execute an instrument of this kind, he
jftbould file in the instrument the full per
CVtage upon his property that may be
Agreed upon by him and his neighbors,
and if the amount thus promised is liberal
the Company may be induced to go on
with the work, having first satisfied them
selves of their ability to complete it with
this assistauee. If the amount is not
liberal, the Company may refuse to pro
ceed on that rout, and seek some other,
where the offer is more liberal. In this
way a railroad may be successfully absist
ed to its completion, no person wronged,
4tfid the danger of unconstitutional tax
Avoided. ELIPIIALET PRICE.
When by the counting of the electoral
•rotes of the several States it would be
come necessary for the Republican mem
bers of Congress to admit by their count
ing the votes of Georgia that she was a
State in the Union, or in refusing to
•count those votes to say that she was not
a State, these ustute personages attempted
to evade the responsibility of saying
either the one thing or the other, by a
Joint resolution the effect of which wus to
declare that if the vote of Georgia meant
anything it should not be counted but
tbut if it effected nothing then it should
be counted and with a consistency on a
par with the wisdom and statemanship of
the resolution, the House which had ad-
Blitted members from Georgia voted not to
fount her electoral vote, while the Senate,
which had refused to aduiit her Senators,
voted to couut her electoral vote. True it
is that afterward the convention of both
Houses through its presiding officer count
ed the vote and reported it in a way un«
known to aud ::ever contemplated by the
Constitution. The intent was to perpe
trate a cheat. The result was a disgrace
ful quarrel.
Not having the moral courage to say
whether Georgia was a State or not, it is
no wonder that the two Houses should
i .have at last completed their action by a
urse which, if it should survive as a
precedent, would in certain contingencies
aullify the expressed will of the people.
Georgia is a State in the Union, whether
viewed as an original party to the UonstU
tution or as a reconstructed State. Ac
cording to the true theory, she has never
been out of the Union. But, admitting
that by her secessi-jn she went out, she is
in again by the reconstruction acts of this
very Congress, and her Representatives
are now members of the llouse. Ilcr
vote, then, was to be counted as was the
votes of other States, and Mr. Woodward
of Pennsylvania, in tho debate ensuing
the action of the convention, inquired
pertinently, and in a way not to be an
swered with credit to the Republicans:
"If you treat Georgia in this manner this
year, what State may you not treat in the
stime manner next year, or on some future
occasion? What is that but a dissolution
of the Union? Ilcr members are here
sitting on this floor. What right haye
they to be here if Georgia is not in the
Union?'' The truth is, that having thrown
the Constitution to the winds, the Republi­|old
can party is drifting no one, not even
itself, knows whither, by the shifting
winds of a fancied expediency.
But there is something behind all this.
The House has felt for some time the
growing power of the Senate. The tenure
of office act has given the latter a new
power. It virtually controls, under it, the
vast patronage of the Government. It
has not only shorn the President of his
constitutional authority, but it has indi
rectly lowered, and that very materially,
the political prestige of the members of
the llouse. And there is something still
beyend this. The Republican leaders are
divided already into distinct and antago
nistic factions. The ultras both fear and
dislike Grant. Hence the refusal of the
Senate to repeal the tenure of office act.
In the House, headed by Butler, is a
faction whieh seems to see future power
and profit both in curtailing the power of
the Senate and in pleasing Grant. Now
Butler sees clearly enough, that in a quar
rel between the Senate and Grant, he will
Stand a chance to strike in on, or to make
the winning side, with great advantage to
himself. Already he has secured in the
House the repeal of the tenure of office
act, and his purpose undoubtedly in the
coures he pursued in the convention, was,
to widen the breach between the two
Houses—making that which was an open
secret, palpable to Grant and the country.
The Tribune says that the issues which
have welded the Republican party together
are dead. True, but it is kept agglome*
rated, if not fused, by its wide-spread and
so far, all powerful "rings." If the
profits of the whiskey and other frauds
upon the revenue, have been (ntherto
pretty equally divided among the members
of Congress and their special friends, two
dangers loom up in the future. One that
the members of the South will hereafter
have the greatest control over and advan
tage of, the pickings and stealings, and
the other, that Grant may carry out his
promise of enforcing honesty in the col
lection and payment over of the revenue.
Hence, Butler and his coadjutors now
fight the South and will fight Grant if op
posing him is likely to succeed and the
Senate is fighting to hold on to what it
has got, and to compel Grant to succumb
to its olligarchical tyranny. Honest men
are benefited, the proverb says, when
rogues fall out, aud certain it is that the
combination and unison of action of the
Republicans in Congress, has inflicted
upon the country, serious if not fatal
wounds. Grant promises well, but we
doubtif he fully realizes the power and
unscrupulousness of the pretended friends
with whom he has to deal. He cannot
however, we surmise, be so credulous as
to believe that Butler is actuated by any
other than the most malignant motives
and the most morbid purposes.—Provi
dence, 1th. I. llerald.
Not very long ago, a religious polemic
of the Roman Catholic creed made the
prediction in Chicago that in twcnty«five
years America would be a Catholic coun
try. The term '"catholic" was used in the
ser.se of Romanism, and not in the broad
and comprehensive meaning which the
word really imports. It is therefore
thought that a recent occurrence in Au
burn, New York, looks not encouragingly
to the fulfillment of the Chicago prophecy.
In Auburrt, the Roman Catholic Bishop
McQtiuide attempted to turn out a priest
named O' Flaherty, and to instal another
named Kavanau-li. The people of that
re'igion in Auburn said it should not be
done, and, when the bishop himself came
to celebrate mass, the congregation rose
up, took hold of the apostolic robes, and
led the right*reverend wearer thereof out
of the church. A large meeting of llo*
man Catholics was held subsequently,
which condemned the bishop's action, and
declared a determination "not to submit
to one-man power auy longer in the Uuitcd
States."
This was clcarly the outburst of a spirit
of rebellion agaiust ecclesiastical authori
ty. It goes not merely to the uutocratic
authority of missionary bishops, but to
the authority which the church herself
assumes to exercise. It is the natural and
the inevitable outgrowth of free and self
regulating institutions in the Roman Cath
olic mind. Its tendency is to assert tho
right of individual judgment against ec
clesiastical authority, not only in the per
sons of bishops, but in the councils of the
church behind them and not only in
matters of government, but in matters of
faith. Is such a tendency one to encour
rage the opinion that America is likely to
bccome a Roman Catholic country?
A Senator.
Flora the Cincinnati Commercial.
I look across the street *wl *e£itt front
of a Senator's house the carriage of an
other Senator. The pair of blooded hor
ses cost some thousand dollars. The gil
ded harness in keeping. The close, shin
ing coach is one of Brentou's lest, lined
with silk velvet and graced with the choi
cest and thickest plate glass. On the
coachman's seat sit two of God's creatures,
callcd men one a bright mulatto, the
other a white man, and both in livery.
They sit in solemn silence under their gay
robe of furs and white gloves. Directly
the door of the house opens, and two la
dies carrying a poor mau's fortune on their
backs, descend the steps. The footman
swings down and opens the door, with an
easy grace the master cannotimitate. The
door close* with a bang, the footman
mounts, and the coach rolis away. Well,
it seems but yesterday that the owner of
all this came here a poor man.
We remember tho fairy tale where the
old witch touched the pumpkin and turn
ed it into a coach, and touched the rats
and turned them into horses. And so tba
ugly witch of tlie lobby, touched the poor
man, vnd out of fraud came the coach, aud
out of theft came the horses, and swindle,
drives, and stealings oil and burnish.
Like the' whieh, I could touch that man
with this ..elicute little pen of mine, and
carriage and horses, coachman and foot
man, would all disappear. For honor
and honesty would oluuit their own, and
the very clothes would fall from the backs
of wife and daughters.
"Forty Thieves."
DON PIATT.
'Tis not hard for an Iowan to guess the
name of one of these Senators!
Fred. Douglas said at Cincinnati tbst if
he were not a negro he would be "Dutch
man." "Dutchmen" should bp sepsible
of tbe honor,
ThiB term originated with the celebrated
"Ali Babba" of the Arabian Night's En
tertainment. It was modcrnly applied to
a fifteen years-ago "ring" in and about
the legislative capitol of Wisconsin. GOT.
"Bill" Barstow was called the head of it
and every imaginable Lobby-bid was ac
cepted by the ring, school-land stealing,
railway subsidies and the devil only
knows what all else, came within the
reach of gentlemen who then had the
control of Wisconsin matters. To show
where the wicked of those days have land
i ed and how faithfully they exhibit their
dispositions to accomodate their con*
I sciences to the circumstances, the Milwau
kee News sets some of them up, as fol
lows
Few of the renders of Wisconsin news
papers the past ten or fifteen years have
forgotten that the virtuous republicans of
this state owe their original triumph over
democracy to a vigorous assault upon the
friends of Gov. Barstow—designated by
the republican press as
"the forty thieves."
Gov. Barstow, the chief of the numlter,
has passed away—but most of those who
were peculiarly obnoxious to republicans
as the supporters of Gov. Barstow's ad
ministration, followed the republican
party in its victory, and are now leading
lights in that organization. Bashford,
who was the embodiment of piety, em
ployed to support Barstow, fell so low and
so far that he has been found qualified for
a carpet-bag congiessman—of course, a
republican still. Matt. II. Carpenter, who
was Barstow's counsel in the trial against
Bashford, and his "right bower" on all
other occasions, is now elected to the
United States Senate by our radical legis
lature. Judge McArthur, the lieutenant
governor under Barstow's administration
—he who yielded the gubernatorial chair
to "constructive force"—is recognized as
a republican and was influential in secur
ing Mr. Carperter's nomination to the
senate. Gleason, the author and hero of
the "Bridge Creek returns," turns up as a
radical lieutenant governor in Florida.
Alexander T. Gray, ex-secretary of state,
was found honest enough to hold office in
Washington throughout Lincoln's admin
istration, while A. C. Barry, superintend
ent of public instruction under Barstow,
is an eloquent expounder of negro wrongs
and negro equality, and in full fellowship
with radicalism.
We might follow up the record, but this
is enough- to show, what we designed to
show, that the republicans of this state
either deceived the people as to tha men
who then governed us, or they are en
devoring to deceive the people as to the
character of the men who are conspicuous
in the support of radicalism now. Cer
tain it is, that the party which was thrilled
with horror twelve years ago at the sight
ol a "Barstow man" have now most effec
tually endorsed "the forty thieves"—ex
cepting, of course, a few such as Geo. B.
Smith, whose good reputation all the guns
of virtuous republicanism failed to tarnish,
and who yet remains, faithful among the
faithful few.—Mil. Xeics.
French Almanac.
January.—He who is born in thfellMftth
will be laborious, and a lover of good
wine, but very subject to infidelity he
may too often forget to pay his debts, but
he will be complaisant, and withal a fine
singer. The lady born in this month will
be pretty, a prudent housewife rather
melancholy, but very «,ood tempered.
February.—The man born in this month
will love money much, but the ladies
more he w-U be stingy at homo, but pro
digal abroad. The lady will be a humane
and affectionate wife and tender mother.
March.—The man born in this month
will be rather handsome, he will be honest
and prudent, but will die poor. The lady
will be a passionate chatter-box, some
what given to fighting, and in old age too
fond of the bottle.
April.—The man who has the misfor
tune to be born in this month will be sub
ject to maladies. He will travel to his
advantage, for he will marry a rich and
handsome heiress, who will make what no
doubt, you all understand. The lady will
be tall and stout, with a little mouth, little
feet, little wit, but a great talker, and
withal a g-eat liar.
May.—The man born in this month will
be handsome and amiable. He will make
his wife happy. The ladv will be equally
blessed in every respect.
June.—The man wiU be of small sta
ture, passionately fond of women and
children, but will not bo loved in return
The lady will be a giddy personage, fond
of coffee she will marry at twenty-oue,
and be a fool at forty-five.
July.—The man will be fair he wili
suffer death for the wicked woman he
loves. The female of this month will be
passably handsome, with sharp nose and
sulky temper.
August.—The man will be ambitious,
courageous but too apt to cheat. He will
have several maladies and two wives.
The lady will be amiable and twice mar
ried but her second husband will cause
her to regret her first.
September.—He that is born in this
month will be wise, strong and prudent
but too easy with his wife, who will cause
him much uneasiness. The lady round
faced, fair haired, witty, discreet, affable
and loved by her friends.
October.—The man will have a hand
some face and florid complexion he will
be wicked in his youth, and always incon
stant. He will promise one thing and do
another, and remain poor. The lady will
be pretty, a little given to contradiction, a
little coquettish, and sometimes a little too
fond of wine—she will £ivc her preference
to eau de vie. She will have three hus
bands who will die for grief and she will
best know why.
November.—The man born now will
have a fine face, and be a gay deeievec.
The lady of this month will be large,
liberal and of novelty.
December.—The man born in this month
will be a good sort of person, though
passionate. He will devote himself to the
army, and be betrayed by his wife. The
lady will be handsome, with a good voice
and well proportioned body i she will be
married twice, remain poor, and continue
honest.
PCT A HOLS THROUGH IT.—One night
General —was out on tho line, lie
observed a light on the mountain opposite.
Thinking it was a signal light of the ene
my, he told his artillery officer that a hole
could easily be put through it. Where
upon the officer, turning to the corpui'ill
in charge of the gun, *nid
"Corporal, do you see that light?"
"Yes, sir."
"Put a hole through it"
The corporal sighted the gan, and, when
all was ready, he looked up and said
"General that's the Moon.'1
"Don't care a damn put a hole through
it anyway."
The newspapers of Paris report that
Mr. Burlipgame speaks French with puri
ty, and converses with sdn)ir»b|« wit sod
clearness,
ORIGIN
or
THE BOURBON DYNASTY IN FRANCE.
And what a history Extending from
When Henry IV. ascended the French
throne, to 1X30, when Charles X. was
driven out of his kingdom by the rev
olution of July, it embraces a period filled
with events of the deepest interest and of
the highest possible importance to the
human family. Erom the accession of
Henry IV. up to the time of the first
French revolution, there was no break in
the succession in the Bjurbon line in
France.
Louis XIII., Lou's XIV., Louis X., and
Louis VI., were all Bourbons but taking
the first and last of these five kings as
rulers, notliin* could present a sharper
contrast than the character of the first
French Bourbon sovereign, Henry "the
great"' and "the good," as his people de
lighted to style him, and that of the un
fortunate son of St. Louis, who fell by the
guillotine. Whatever the original virtues
of the house might have been, by the time
the volcanic outburst of the revolution
first shook France and tumbled a dishor
ored throne into the dust, the race had bc
come woefully degenerated. The guillo
tine did not, however, finish it in France.
From the stormy days of the revolution,
and through these of the consulate and
empire, the two brothers of the unfortu
nate Louis lived in exile but when Na
poleon fell, the elder of them was placed
on the French throne by the allies under
the title of Louis XVIII. a son of Louis
XVI., who died while yet a child in 1795,
had be^n the seventcin'h of that name.
Louis XVIII. had no children, and on his
death which took place in 1S29, he was
succeedcd by his brother, Charles X. But
experience had utterly failed to teach wis
dom to this obstinate and tyrannical rul
r, who sought to restore the absolut
ism of ihe French monarchy, the conse
qucn ccs of which was that a revolutionary
outbreak occurred in July, ISoO, compel
ling the king to flee from France, and fi
nally to abdicate. The latter he did in
favor of his grandson Henry, duke of Bor
deaux but the act came too late to save
his house. Lnuis Phillippc had already
been chosen king of tho French, and the
Bourbons were, to nil appearance, forever
excluded from the French throne. The
«inly surviving descendant of Charles, the
representative of the alleged claims of the
Buurbons to the French throne, is that
same grandson, now known as the count
tie Ch.imborde, who is 48 years of age. He
is, of couvse, an exile, but is regara«d as
the lawful king of France by the legiti
mists, whose bopes of a restoration he
feeds by occasionally holding levees in
king style.
TIIE BOURBONS IK SPAIN.
The establishment of the Spanish Bonr
lion dynasty originated with Louis XIV.,
of Franc, who, in 17(H), succeeded in
placing bis grandson, Philip duke ef Anjou,
on the :hro. e of Spain, as Phil ip I. The
decendants of Philip, ruled without inter
ruption until 1*08. Napoleon compellod
king Charles IV., to reign, and nominated
a successor to him in the person of Joseph
naparte, the emperor's brother. Charles
died at Rome in ISI1, and after the over
throw of Napoleon, tho eldest son of
Charles ascended the Spanish throne, as
Ferdinand VII., dying in 183S. Ferdi
nand left the throne to his daughter Isa
bella, in whose favor he had set aside by
royal decree the Salic law forbidding a
female to sit upon the throne. The claims
of Isabella were contested by Ferdinand's
brother, Don Carlos, which gave rise to
the Carlist war, but Don Carlos having
failed to establish his pretensions, eventu
ally resigned them, and died in 1835. His
son the Montomolin, in 1860 renounced
all claim to the throne of Spain. The
Bourbon princes of Spain have invariably
exhibited all the worst characteristics ol
their race—foremost among which arc a
bad passion for absolute power, and a
proncness to sensual self-indulgence—-and
under their pcrnicious rule every interest,
the prosperity of' which constitutes the
strength and glory of a nation, has
dwindled away.
TUB BOURBONS IN ITALY.
The late Bourbon dynasties of the king'
dom of Naples and the duchies of Parma
•ind Piacerza were founded by Phillip V.
of Spain, in the early part of the eight
eenth century. They were overthrown
by the first Napoleon, but after his down
fall the Bourbons were restored to the
kingdom of the two Sicillies, which they
continued to govern till the revolution of
18t)0 drove Francis I J. to Gaeta as a
refuge. This princo still lives, an exile
and a muidci cr, and it does not seem prob
able that he will ever recover hi* iost
possessions. The Bourbous of Parma and
Piaden/a lost these duchies in 1859, which
were annexed to Sardinia, and now form a
part of the kingdom of Italy.
TIIE YOUNGER BRANCH OF THE J1OUR0ON
FAMILY.
The branch of the royal family of
France known as the house of Orleans, is
a younger branch of the Bourbon family,
and was founded by Phillip, duke of Or
leans, the younger son of Louis XIV.
From him descended that duke of Orleans
who played 6o remarkable a part in the
French revolution as Citizen Kgalite, and
met so tragical a fate, perishing by the
gu Hot nc in 1703. Louis Phiilippe, chos
en king of the French in the revolution of
July, 1830, was a son of Egalite aud the
counjt of Paris, grandson of Louis Pbillip-
E'rleansthe
e, is present representative of the
branch of the Bourbon faiqily.
It will be remembered that this prince and
his younger brother, the duke of Chartres,
were with our army for smqetime during
the late war. The count of Eu, another
of Louis Phillippe's grandsons, is the
husband of the eldest daughter of the
emperor of Brazil, the heiress of the
throne of Brazil and the duke of Mont
peosier, the youngest son of Louis l'lul-,
-nTiiffjrn
NORTH IOWA TIMES.
The fioitrboai.
As it may now be regarded as certain
that queen Isabella and her children will
be excluded from the throne of Spain, we
have in her expulsion another example of
that retributive justice which h»» fimuWCd
that race to which she belongs for the last
eighty years. The question of who is to
be her successor being yet unsettled, it
would be permature to say at present that
she will be the last reigning Bourbon sov
erign but in the meantime we give a brief
sketch of that celebrated royal house, the
history of which the events taking place
in Spain invest just now with peculiar
interest.
WE MARCH WITII TOE FLAO AND KEEP STEP TO THE MUSIC OF THE UNION.
VOLUME XIII—No. 24 McGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, MAR. 3, 1869. WHOLE No. 646.
TNE BOURBONS.
The house of Bourbon, which has given
so many sovereigns to France, Spain and
Italy, is of French origin, deriving its
name from the old Lords of Bourbon, a
noble family, which centuries ago held
very large land possessions in the former
province of Bourbonais, situated in the
center of France. Through the marriage
of a member of the Cape family with a
Bourbon heiress, the noble house became
allied to royalty in the thirteenth century,
and about the middle of the sixteenth we
find the first of the race on the throne, in
the person of Antoine de Bourbon, king
of Navarre, Antoine was the Father of the
gallant and renowned Henry of Navarre,
who afterward became king of France,
under tho title of Henry IV. With this
celebrated prince begins the history of
ippe, is married to Marie Isabella. The
party in Spain, known as the Liberal
Union, is supposed to be in favor of his
election to the Spanish throne, in room of
Isabella.— Exchange.
Km Advtatan wills a Shark.
Twenty years ago the West India
squadron consisted of sailing frigates and
brigs, not of screw-vessels, as at present.
In those days officers had to depend entire
ly upon their seamanship. There was no
furling sails and getting steam up if a
head wind or calm turr.ed up, or to go in
and out of difficult harbors and it the
passage from one port to another did occu
py a little more time than it does at pres
ent, yet there was the pleasure of "eating
your way to windward," and of seeing
what your vessel really eould do against a
foul wind.
At the time I allude to I was serving as
a midshipman on board the II a fine
sixteen-gun brig. I know no sensation
more pleasant than being officer of the
watch on board a brig of war, with every
stitch of canvass set, the bowlings hauled,
and as much wind as she can stagger un
der, while the little beauty knocks off her
nine or ten knots, close hauled, gliding
over the seas like a swan, sometimes
throwing the spray as high as her maintop,
or at others dipping her sharp nose under
an opposing wave, and sending the spray
right aft to her quarter-:leck, while she
gives a shake to her stern for all the world
as if she were n living creature, and en
joyed the ducking she gave the men for
ward.
Jolly were the times we had in the
II visiting every hole and corner of
he station sometimes down the Gulf of
Meiico, at others cruising among thesand
cays of the Cahaina Channel, or knocking
about the beautiful Windward Islands.
We were commanded by a very smart offi
cer, who, by dint of constant exercise,
made us the smartest vessel on the station
but as is usually the case, wo were very
unfortunate in losing men overboard.
Being a remarkably good swimmer, I was
fortunate enough to rescue on several oc
casions men who, in performing their du
ties aloft, fell overboard, and it was when
so occupied that I met with the following
adventure:
We hud been cruising for seme time for
slavers on the south east of Cuba but yel
low :ever having male its appearance, we
early one morning left Saint la^o de Cuba
for Port Royal, Jamaica. That evening,
at sunset, after the usual hour's exercise
in reefing and furling, all possible sail was
made, with studding sails alow and aloft,
to a fine fresh breeze, the brig going a fair
twelve knots. One of the maintop men
had remained a!oft, finishing some joband
was on his way down over the ot-harping
shrouds, when, by some means or other,
he lost his ho!d, and falling, struck the
spare topsail y ird, stowed in the main
chains, and went overboard. I was stand
ing on the stern gratings, and. seeing him
fall, instantly sang out, "Manoverboard!"
a.nd, throwing off my jacket, jumped over
the quarter after him. The impetus of my
leap took me some distance under water,
but on regaining the surface I saw bin not
far from ine, just as he was going down.
Exerting all my power, a few strokes took
me to the place where he had disappeared,
and I saw him slowly sinking beneath me.
In an instant I was down r\fter him, and,
clutching him by the hair, I brought him
to the surface. By this time the brig was
nearly two miles distant from us, for, al
though sail had been shortened, and the
vessel brought to the wind as quickly as
mortal hands could do it, the rate at which
she was going at the time of the accident
of course bore her rapidly away from us.
I found the poor fellow was quietinsensi
ble, arid In the fact of his right arm
hanging limp, conjectured that he had
broken it in bis fall, which piovcd to be
the case. Supporting him with one
arm, I kept afloat with the other,and look
ing round, saw the life buoy floating not
far from us so, taking a good grip of his
hair, I swam towards it, and having suc
ceeded in reaching it, made my unfortu
nate thipiuate last to it by one of the
buckets, with his head well above water.
By this time he was coming to himself,
and I knew that if they could see us fiotn
the brig, her boats would soon be along
side us but this did not appear to be the
case, for the boats seemed pulling in all
directions but the right one. Suddenly 1
saw, but a few yards from us, an object
that in a moment filled me with unutter
able dread—the back fin of a monster
shark. S'owly the irute approached, until
I could clearly distinguish that he was
one of the largest of hi kind. He evi
dently intended to reconnoitre, aud when
only about five yards from us, began to
swim slowly in a circle, but gradually
nearing, until I could clearly distinguish
the horrid eyes that make the shark's coun
tenance what it is—the very embodiment
of Satanic malignity. Half-concealed
between the bony brown, the little green
eyes gleam with so peculiur an expression
of hatred, such a concentration ol fiend
ish malice, of quiet, calm, settled yillany,
that no other countenance that I have ev
er seen at ail resembles. Knowing that
the brute is as cowardly a^ he is ferocious,
I commenced to splash as much as I could
with my feet. This hud the desired effect,
and with a lateral wave of his powerful
tail, he shot off, and for a moment disap
peared. Again I looked round for the
boats, but btill observed no sign that we
were seen.
Night was fast falling—there is no twi
light in those latitudes—and I could see
little or no hope of escaping a horrid
death from the jaws of the brute who, I
full well knew, was not far off. Suddenly
a cry of horror from uiy companion, who
had now quietly regained his senses, drew
my attention to the rapid approach of our
dread enemy. This time he seemed de
termined not to be baulked, but came
straight on for us. Again I threw my
self on my bauk, and kicked and splashed
with all my strength, which had again the
effect of alarming him, for he went right
under us, and again disappeared. Utter
ing a short but fervent ejaculation to the
boats, and beheld, with leelings no pen
cun express, that at last we had been
made out, and that one of the cutters was
fast pulling towui ds us. But even as she
came our peril increased, for the shark
was joined by another, and both kept
cruising, but a few yards off, in a cirole
around us, My strength was rapidly leav
ing me, and I knew that did 1 once cease
splashing all would be over with us. My
companion was perfectly powerless. Still
continued to kick aqd spl^slj, still the
voracious monsters continued their circu*
lar track, sometimes diving and going un
der us, to reappear on the other side but
the cutter was fast coming up, and they,
suspecting what was the matter, gave way
witn all their hearts and souls.
As she neared us, the bowmen laid
their oars in and began to beat the watef
with their boat hooks. This was the last
I tpw. Nature must have given out, for
when I opened my eyes again, I was safe
in my hammock on board the brig. A
good night's rest restored me to myself
but though I have seen many a shark
since, I can pever look on one without
feeling my flesh creep, ss it were, on my
tones*
(The ®iiuc5.
MoJRBGMR, CLAYTON COUNTY, IOWA.
P. RICHHRDSOH JOHN H. AND
RICH.
One Copy, for one year, $2.50 In advance.
A E S O A V K I I O
l4
4w 3m
S3 50 $5 60
6m Ijr'r,
$S SO $12 00
_Spi»ce. lw 2w
1 square $1 SO $2 60
2 sqtiarM 3 60 3 60 4 M) 7 60 10 00 15 00
3 «quare» 3 00 4 00 6 00 JJO 00 15 00 20 00
C"1 4 00 I 6 00 I 8 00 j~15 00 I 2o 00 |~35 00
col. |~r50 I 10 00 IITOO 25 00 |~40~00y~70 00
1 column 14 00 18 00 ^T00 40 00~| 70 00 l-25~00
9 line*of \'npreil nnlcs a*iqinr«. Bu*lnsiicfirla
of 5 lines, $8 per annum osich udlltional lint-50 eta.
H. BRUNNER M. D.
Oflce, Bank Corner, Smith'* lllirk. up atnlra.
641 McORKOOR, IOWA.
DAVIS BOUSE,
KIkadcr, Iowa. (637) P. F. CKANK, Proprietor.
A.
I. JORDAN,
Attorney at Law,(oBlce in Bank Block)
McUKKUOR, IOWA.
039
R. NobU. L. 0. Hatch. O. Ilenry Fresc.
NOB LB, HATCH & PRE8E,
Attornvya at Law, McUUKGOR, IOWA.
C. E. BERRT,
39
Attorney at Law, (_ri»c, Iowa.
636
DR. ANDROS.
Physician and Surgeon. Ke^iili nce orer Peterson A
Larson's Store. Office No. 3 Masonic Block. S7R-9W
CITY HOTEL,
(Late Allun House,)
McGREGOR, IOWA.
T. ATW0OD, Proprietor.
This house will be kept us a first class house in ev
ery reapt'Ct. Faruiers »rs particularly inrited to
rail. Charges as reasonable as any other house.
Good Stabling and good carc. lS^aniing Ly the day
or week. C41
UNION HOUSE,
MAIN STREET McOllKdOR, IOWA.
BM. It. Puts!, Proprietor.
WINNESHEIK HOUSE.
Decorah, Iowa. Oouerul Stage OSes
JOHN SnAW,Proprietor. 666
JOBS I.CLABK. CUARLII ALLX.1. 0.1. CLASS.
JOHN T. CLARK A CO.,
Attorneysand Counsellors at Law and ltealRotate
Agents,1st doorcastof Winu'shnk House,Decorah,
Iowa. 4^*Will practice in the several courts of the
State also attend to collections,aud tkapaymentof
taxes in Winuesbeik county. 666
MURDOCE & STONEMAN,
SAMUEL MUBDOCK. T. STONIMAW.
Attorneys anu Counsellors at Law, will practice in the
Supreme and District Courts of this State.
Office opposite l»t National Bank. McGREGOR.
THOMAS UFDEGRAFF,
Attorney at Law, (424) McGKKUOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, McGitnGOR.IOWA.
J. C. HOXSIB,
Justice of the Peace. Office with T. Updegraff.
DOUGLAS LEFFINOWELL,
Attorney at Law, McGregor, »otva. Office over Peter
son k Larson's Store 311
LOUIS M. ANDEUCK.
Attorney at Law, Key uold'f Block r.ntraooe between
146and 148 Dearborn Strvct.alsu on Madison Street
and Custom House (P. 0.) place, Chicago.
COOK & BRO.,
G. W.
Coos. MABTIR COOK.
Attorneys at Law, Elkader, Clayton Co., Iowa, will
attend to collections,
examine titles, pay taxes,obtain
bounties, pensions, Ac. Office opposite mill. 636
XL HUBBARD A CO.,
Jewelers and dealers in Musical Instruments, Main
Street, 494 McGREGOR, IOWA.
HATT & BURDICX,
DealenIn Luniber, Shingles and Lath, Main Street.
McGREGOR. IOWA.
NATIONAL HOTEL?
PestTille, Iowa. General Stage Office. C. YanHooMT,
Proprietor. 603
GEO. L. ,BASS
COMMISSION, STORAGE I FORWAROING BUSINESS,
Publie Square, McGREGOR, IOWA.
MAT. McKINNIB,
Wholesale and Retail dealer In Stores, and Manufac
turer of Tin, Copper and
Sheet IronWare, Main Street,
McGREGOR, IOWA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Main Street, McGregor, Inwa. A desirable home for
thetraTeling public, with Rood barns aud Sheds at
tached for the
safe protection vf horses and wagons.
442 M. MURRAY, Proprietor.
J. McHOSE & CO.,
STORAGE, FORWAROING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No. 1, on the Levee, McGREGOR.
Consignments sulicitod.
JOS. H'HOSI. 47 6 0. M'OBIOOS.
McGREGOR FANNING MILL.
MCKEY A WELLIYER,
Manufacturers of thu McGregor Fannii MillandGraln
Separator, on West Market Square, corner Main and
Attn Streets, 415y McGKEGOR, IOWA.
EVANSHOUSE.
[LATE AMIRlCAK.j
Oppoaite Ferry Landing, McGregor. Rr-furnhllied and
fttted up in good style for guests. Patronage respect
fully solicited. U. II. FLANDERS, Proprietor. 474
680
BEZER LODGE No. 135.
Holds its Regular Communications on
Mouday evening preceding the full moon
iu each month.
R. IICBBARD, W.
O. CROOKK, Sec'y. 448
R. S. RATHBUN,
DENTIST,
McGregor. Iowa.
Ofllce on Main St.. over Post Office.
WEST UNION HOUSE,
Corner Tine and Kim Sts., WEST UNION, IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL, PROPRIETOR.
Oood stabling and charges moderate. Stages going
east, west.north and south, call and leave with pas
sengers, moruing and evening. y&32
BOARDMAN HOUSE,
(LATE WASUISOtOM)
ELKADER, IOWA.
LAFAYETTE BIGELOW, Proprietor.
Renovated inside aud out. Not excelled by any
Hotel in the West. Good Stabling. 679
THOMAS ARNOLD,
REAL ESTATE BROKER AND GENERAL AGENT, CON
VEYANCER. NOTARY PUBLIC.
Anduommissionerof Deeds, Ac., for theNorthwea
teruS*%tcn. Will attend to the uurchageaudsaleot
Farm Lauds,City Property .Stecks, Ac., Ac.
Office iu Auction More, Main Street, McGregor,
Iowa. 559 LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
RRAIN BB.OZBZBB.,
SHOT
O
t'S S, Rifles, Revolved.
Pistols Game Bag*, Flasks,
Cartridges, Powder, Shot, Lead,
Crtj'ii. i) ii-wads, Cutlery, Ac., Ac,
near National llupk.
McGregor, lows.
Repairing of til) kinds belonging to t|ie GKB and
lock smith line itoiu. promptly.
Charges moderate upd all work warranted.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREGOR.
Successor to the
McGnxceB BBANCII or THE STAT* BANK or IOWA.
fhltBauk is «p»a for the transactionot a general
'jankingbusiness. Draftbou Europriusuinstosuil.
II. MERRILL .President.
W.I.OlLCBBUT, VicePresident.
O. HULVEBSOH.Cashier.
W.R.KIHITAIBD, Assistant Cashier. 39'i
T. II. QBLSTON. J. M, DONALD. O. T. TREGO
OBLSTOXf. T&SOO & CO.,
(xe&eral Commission Merchants,
No. 13 S. Commercial S«»a«t,
•sohange Building, ST. LOUIS, MO.
7. M. BOZUNOfOV,
O O K I N S
AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER,
0V1K TBI TIMBf OFFIOR, MoQRBOOR, IOWA.
SPECIAL
attention paid to the manufacture ol
Blank Books for Counties, Banks, Mwrohauta-etc.
Music,Magazines,PerioJicals,Ac.,Ac.,Bound with
J. II. Merrill, Prost.
Wm. Larrnhee, Vice Prest.
O. Hulverson. Cashier.
\\. R. Kinnlard, Aast.
CasLier.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OT BECORBCMB.
Capital SIOO.OOO.
At current rates for sale on all the Pilncipal Citit of
England, Ireland,
Germany, Norway,
France, Sweeden,
And Other Parts of Europe.
AtSO
Passenger Tickets
FOR SALE
Te nd From all the Large Cities in EUROPE, l.y
Steamer and Past Sailing Vessels.
All kinds of GOVEItXMKNT SECURITIES bought
and sold. 645tf
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GREEN, DRIED AND CANNED
FRUITS, LEMONS, C..
I!!! GROCERIES 111!
Sugars,
Teas, OoflTet*
Spices, Ac.
I!!! PROVISIONS!!!!
Flour,
Cheese*
And all kinds of Fish.
Cash Paid For
Country Produce!
HXXAFFLESS!!!
A Large Sapply afWinter Apples.
HAVING
MADE
ARRANGEMENTS FOR MY FALL
AND WINTER VUKIT, I AM PREPARED
TO FILL ALL ORDERS AT TUK
LOWEST MARKET PRICE.
e e e e a e S o u w e s o n e a k e
Sqtfttre ,oppoeitellabbard's Jewelry Store,
••7 McGre&or, IOWA.
JACOBIA & KIMBALL
WHOLESALE MID RETAIL
GROCERS,
Wooden Ware.
GLASS, PAINTS, OILS, &C.
•feats for the
Oriental Fowder Co.
Two Boors Above the Broad Axe.
lOWfMMtl. I
KIMBALL.
HAVBunquestionably
Deors^iud UUIKIS ever kept iu the west—ever)
•tyle and form tosuit any builJing that can heerert
ad. s^Onrsis the QMLtLUMBER YM3 onthenortlt
McGREGOR.IOW A.
aide of EainStreet .5 484
JAMBS GXiENNON,
GENERAL DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Family Groceries
PROVISIONS, FLOUR A FEEO.
Always a full supply of
CtXXBXr and B&ZSB AVXTS
AND CONFECTIONERY,
Which will be sold at tha lowest market price*.—
Ia lli'llwig's Uri«k Ulouk, oa cor. Main and 2d
Streets, McGregor, Iowa.
W. H. BLACKER,
Millwright & Draughtsman.
Plans, Specifications aad Estimates made on short
notice.
Steam aad Water Mill* huilt on contract or other
wise to suit.
Will furnish from the best Manufaatnrers allclaasos
of
BU11 Machinery—Bff111 Stones*
Spindlas, Curbs, Iloppors, Stand*. 8bo«w.Damsels
Ac. SmutandBrau cleaners, Separators,Mill Feck*,
Caps and Belling.
Dufour A Oo.'sOld Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloth*,
Ixtri and Extra Ueary and Double Bstra Heavy.
Patentee of the North Western Turbine, also agent
fer the LEFFBL WHEEL- All letter* addressed to
McGregor or Lansing, Iowa. 012
EYE and EAR!
DoetorsMason A Whitney, Oculists andAurlsts
Prairiedu Chien, Wisconato. We treat successfully
grooular lids and all than* worst form of chronic
diseases of the eye. Wa operate for cataract and
oross-eye. Chronic disthssges of the ear and deaf
noas from any cause will reeeire carefulattentlon.—
Patientsfroniabroad' wtltSnd good hoardcnnTsaieut
tothsodJce. oncebourafrow a.m.toll at.
Ill
N E W A I Y K
HOUSS
SAinziift
or
FAR1P0RTH & BROTHER,
MCGREGOK, IOWA.
HIVE MONEY TO LOAN, RECEIVE DEPOSlff,
WILL TRANSACT A
6ENERAL BANKING, EXCHANGE AND COLLECTION
BUSINESS. TNE SAME AS AN INCORPORATES
BANK, AND ON MORE FAVORABLE TERMS,
Notes and Mortgages bought. Government Bond*
Gold aud Kxrlmnge bought aud sold at liest rates.
FOREIGN DRAFTS BOUGHT AND BOLD.
Hit ring had ten year* experience i n. tn !i
k I tig, WQ
will be pleased to have a share of tlie banking bust,
liess of McGregor and llif Kurrouniling country.—
Will guarantee satisfaction «itl nil IIIIIIHH tn
trusted to lis. (640) KARN fcV Ol 1 11 i 1'liO.
II II i iui'n#i"~*"
BXBamr co,
TEIS, TOBACCOS AND CIGARS,
S35 Randolph Stroet,
Geo. flibben,Chicago. 1
Lewis Miitidux, New York.
w. 11. Mikddax.Cinuinmiti. tlOy
CHICAGO.
II. A. H0MEYEK. W. Y0L50. U. R. WBIT,
HSSNUR A. A CO.,
Commission Merchants
NO 10 CITY BUILDINGS,
SAINT LOUIS,
Special attention git
FLOUR and GRAIN.
X. SEXTON & SON,
WhoNale Dealers in
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
F0REI6N AND AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters'
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners' Stock,
Agricultural Implements and Blnnk*mitlis'
338 Bast Water Streets
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN,
MISS H. BUCKLEY
HAS A
IBAVfim ASSORT
ME
STS
or
FALL AND WINTER GOODS
SUITABLE TO ALL AGES.
Her Goods have been selected with much care, both
as to elegance and economy in price. Miss B. would
inform her customers that she has secured the servi
ces of an
Bastern Dress Maker,
Who is familiar with all the styles known ia tha Boat
fashionable circles of the Atlantic Stutea.
W PLEASE CALL.-S*
five Troughs, Tin
FULLYiettledinour
SINCE
McGregor, Iowa.
German Lumber Yard.
Stauei & Daubenberger,
Dealers in
Lumber, Timber, Lath, Shingles,
Boors* Sash and Blinds.
WE SUPPLY Cin AND COUNTRY TRADE ON THE
MOST REASONABLE TERMS
DRUGS'
the largest stockof 8a*h
684
DUMND BROS, POWERS,
Wholesale Grocers,
131 Senth Water street,
646
CHICAGO, ILL.
•W"H-A.T IS IT 1
FRANK KGRZMAN
OPPOSITE
PEARSALL A CHURCH'S LIYERT
Stable,
BCain Street, McGregor,
Is ready to furnish
ALL KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Pipes,
And in fact EVERYTHING in hislineoi burim-ss wil
be well made and promptly put up.
STOVES "d STOVE PIPES furnished and set mp tf»
order.
MEAT MARKET!
CAWELTI & BERGMAN,
FAINTS,
A
CAWELTI'S BLOCK.
New and Ueautyof u Market,
withlce room, and everything whicliconveni
enctaiul neatness could suggest, and detetermlned
alwayt-to
Secure the Very Finest Animal* for the
use ef onr Patrons,
we feel assured that we are offering tl people of this
city greaterindncements thau ever betorc to patron
ire theQueeu of Markets. Fat Cattle bought at the
highest price.
The Wagon has Come!
AND THE CARRIAGES TOO!
Ss
PEABSALL & CHURCH
October 1859, have been saying in the Tims
"Waitfor the Wagon." They now announct to
the public that their stock of Horses and Caniages,
either for business or pleasure, is not excelledin the
West.
The mostrcosonablepricescharacterirethcii" PIO
NEER LIVERY STABLE," located about half-way
•p Main Street, near the Flanders House. Call on
them if you would be suited with team or saddle
horses. PEARSALL A CHURCH.
McOregor.Iowe.
T.W.WOOD
Baa Removed te the nest door Weat ef
E. R. Barrons, and is ready to 6)1,
ders, WHOLESALE er RETAIL. I*
OILS,
\*V
a.
t'
I
GLASS,
Medicinal Wiw ami Liquors,
900SS,
STATIONS*.*
and
WAXiZa PAfUL.
Cash Orders from the Country
Filled at the lowest Rates.
PARTICULAR ATTENTION
Sivea te Compounding PrescriptiejMI
T. W. WQOPf
McQREOQR.IOWA, 0M
O H. & A. O. HUNT
KBSIABirT BBXTTiaCa
OBce on Maiu Street, MoQRKQOR, IOWA.
flfPEOPLE'S MARKET
WTT.T.T it UTS 4t 9&0.*
IN
WILLIAM8'NEW BRICK BLOCK, MAISSf..
McGregor,Iowa,believe in fair dealing, aud will
al way be found on hand ready to deal out the ch«.lce*t
cuts of all kinds of Meat that the country affords.

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