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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, April 21, 1869, Image 1

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I
A tn A Storm. ...
"B was ft private parlor of a hotel in the
provinces. Two men sat at a well-spreacf
breakfast table. Th« younger had jus#
pushed back from the table with an im
patient movement.
"No," he said abruptly, "I cannot eat,
I etnnot drink. If I believed in present*
ments, I should say I felt a warning of
something disagreeable, if not horrible."
"Well, then, my dear nephew," said!
the elder, as you do not believe in such
things, why not make yourself eomforta*
ble, and enjoy your breakfast? You are
not to start until to-morrow, any way, you
know."
The young man arose from his seat and
walked to the window, throwing it open,
and looking out into tho frosty, brilliant
sunshine. The air was intensely cold, and
reddened his cheeks instantly. Ha drew
in his head, saying
"I shall start this morning. There's
going to be a storm, and I must go. 'Will
you accompany me to the station
kwere
I
The
train starts in an hour."
The uncle shivered, and drew his dress
ing-gown closer.
"No," he said, "I'll not leave the house
unless I'm obliged to. I did not leave
England to get frozen by a Canadian win
ter. I did not know you were so senti
mentally foolish. Alice will not thank
you for coming a day sooner. Women
l^don't like a bridegroom around when the
wedding preparations are going on, no
matter how much in love they arc. Take
my advice, and stay here until the time
appointed for you to start."
Robert Russell, the young man address
ed, listened with bare civility to his com
panion's words. What was such advice
in comparison with the urgent cries of his
whole nature? lie had left England, three
weeks before, to claim the womun of his
choice, who had been three weeks in Mon
treal, whither she had emigrated with her
parents, carrying with her the love and
promise of one in whom she believed with
utter devotion.
Russel's uncle, and adopted father, had
accompanied him, and now sat smiling at
the impatience, and whims of youth..
"There's a storm in the air in spite of
this sunlight." Russell said, still standing
by the window. "I etiould not enjoy
being blockaded in by 8now on my jour
ney."
"Probably not: but yon might aa wall
expect it in this climate."
"Well, I shall take Alice back to Eng
land as soon as possible," Russell said,
with his hand on the door. "Good bye,
uncle, then, good bye."
Russell was soon speeding from ths
town, his eyes looking eagerly forward
over the vast stretches of snow, as if lie
would outstrip even the steam which bore
him.
lie was not half through his journey by
rail, when from the west, where it had
lingered throughout the sunny morning,
rose the flimsy, white veil that is the her
ald of snow. Weather-wise people looked
out of the car windows, and shook their
headt, s,tying
"This will be a hard one. It's just a
year ago since the horrible storm that
blockaded in this train."
Russell, looking, felt his faoe grow pal
lid in spite of bw hopes, his youthful
energy.
He did not tear the storm while in the
cars he knew they would get to their des
tination before the storm would be suffi
ciently advanced to retard them much,
but he remembered the twenty miles he
must go in a cutter after the last station
for Alice waited fur him at the residence
of a relative beyond Montreal. .Her aur.t
had persuaded her to have the marriage
there, where wealth could give its glow
to the ceremony, and what girl could re»
eist such an invitation
"If she
only in Montreal," mur*
mured Russell and the first few flakes
began to drift slowly downward.
Soon the air was filled with fine, sharp
particles. It grew colder instead of warm
er,—or apparently PO, for the wind rose
and whirled the snow fiercely.
It had snowed two hours when Russell
Righted at the station in Montreal. It
was already dark, save that the gloom
.Was mitigated by a full moon.
lie was half benumbed by cold and sit
ting so long, but he could not wait. Rea
son told him he was a day eii^ly, and
might easily stay in the city until to*mor
£how but some feverish, morbid haste ur
ged him on it was impossible for him to
rest quiet a moment.
He stood a lew moments by the bright
fin* iu the waiting room. Then he deei
4Ki to go to the house occupied by Alice's
parents.
Arriving at the house, he learned with
taaypreviously.
that Alico had left two or three
rs Oppressed with fcar
fiirt forebodings, he hurried on, taking the
road which his servant supposed her dri
ver hud selected. As he emerged into the
open country, the runners of the cutter
juyik deep in the snow. The horses strug
gled desperately through the drifts, while
the blinding storm and benumbing cold
nlmoftt overpowered him. To arouse
himsfilf from the lethe-gy which he felt
was the precursor of death, he stepped
out of the sleigh and plodded on beside it.
POf hours, it seemed to him, he traveled,
alternately walking and riding, the ani
Saals he drove being almost exhausted.
Suddenly with a snort of alarm or eqr*
prue, his horses stopped and threw up
th£ir heads, their eyes starting in their
sockets, at something indistinct is the
ahead.
There is something infecting in the
Alarm of an animal, and Russell felt his
cheeks pale as he moved slowly forward,
leaving the horses standing there.
A shudder like the first chill of an iin
jending doom shook the young man, as
he came upon a cutter overturned in the
snow. He was close to it before he could
A., make out what it was. Theie were no
horses attached—that he saw at a glance,
—but the tugs, cut short off, were fasten
ed there. The snow had blown away
from one side oi the sleigh, while the
other side was deeply imbedded. He
leaped upon the runner, and hurriedly
pulled the buffalo robes away, a fear
coming upon him such as he bad never
!nown before.
At last,—it seemed to him so long,
though it was hardly a moment,—in that
snowy moonshine he saw the pallid face
ot a woman lying motionless among her
furs.
With a suppressed cry he lifted that
beautiful form to his shouTder, and sat
down on the cutter, bending his lips to the
cold ones that could not respond to his
caress. And yet she was not dead—a
faint breath just sighed across his eheek.
Was it thus he had thought to greet his
promised wife? lie could not think,—
he knew nothing but that he had found
Alice,—and his whole being rose to ti e
resolve that be would save her,—that
neither snow, nor ice, nor cold should
take her from him. She was his, and he
claimed her, despite everything.
But he could not linger there he must
be moving on. though ever so slowly. He
bore his burden to his own cutter, taking
with him the furs that could not save her
after that fearful sleep had begun. His
horses walked on again—they needed no
guiding—they could find their way better
than man could direct.
Anything but intense love would have
despaired in that tempest of snow, with
that pitiless wind freezing across the
earth, raising no glow on the blue-white
face against his own.
He roughly chafed with snow her hands
and face, but he suon saw that severe
measures must be tried that the lethargy
was too deep. She dimly felt tVe fierce
friction, for she moaned and seemed to
shrink from it a wordless request to be
left alone.
Russell had forgotten the cold for him
self the snow swepthim unheeded.
Again he lifted her in his arms and step
ped out into the snow, letting her stand
beside him, then tryiug to make her tight
her way on, knowing that if she could be
aroused she was saved.
At first she fell down hopelessly, sank
inanimately, with no wish to stir. But
in a moment his ceaseless efforts hud some
effect, and he could compel her to use her
muscles slightly, though her head dropped
in an unknowing stupor.
Russell felt that he had never suffered
before. He thought the pain and sorrows
of all his life were crowded into that one
night. By slow degrees, almost hopeless
ly slow, conciousness and horrible suffer
ing returned.
His face was pale and sick, as he knew
the agonies she endured. Bu* pain was
the signal of life, and not now would he
despair.
At last she looked at him with recognis
ing eyes, and when everything else had
failed, love reached the fonntain of crim
son, and sent a wave of its red to her
facs.
Weak, suffering, she reclined upon his
arm, unable to move or to speak. Could
he keep the life be had saved through a
much longer journey?
When he left the city tbcra were a few
houses scattered by the roadside for two
or three miles. The dim gliaimer of their
lights he had seen but since then he hud
noticcd nothing—it was a waste through
which he was riding, with no lamp of
hope held out to him. And the delicate
girl, but half resuscitated, he thought—
oh, how many miles before safety
Au half hour passed, and though Rus
sell's brave soul had already darted the
first doubt, human endurance could not
la*t forever, and it was more than he
could do to preserve the feeble life he had
recalled. In another half hour ice and
cold might conquer him. lie would die
with her he could not live when that
dear face was beneath tho sod.
A quarter of a mile further on, and be
saw through the storm a dark object by
the roadside. It was a building of some
kind, and it could shelter them, lie
turned his horses' heads that way, and
plunged through the snow to the door.
There was no door. It was a dismantled
log hut, with it* door gone, and its one
little window broken out. But it was bet
ter than the fury without, and in another
five minutes Alice was sheltered Iroiu the
wind. With painful and patient fumbling
he succeeded in fastening the buQ'alo skin
in front of the doorway, thus forming an
insullicient barrier. Then he drew fiom
his pocket his cigar case and his matches,
and lighting one of the latter, looked
eagerly round the room in the flickering
light. That glance told him that there
was an imuienso fire place at one side of
the hut, and a divine light streamed into
his soul at the sight.
As his horses had dragged his cutter to
the house, the runner had grated over the
top rail of a fence, and the unseen post
had nearly upset the light cutter.
The white-fingered, fair-faced English
man worked with a power that wus uiore
like fury, and when at last a ruddy blaze
blew up the broad chimney, tears of joy
actually floated from his eyes.
Exhausted, happy be knelt at the feet
of Alice, and with his face in her hands.
With that reviving warmth came a little
of strength to her weary soul. She leaned
forward, smile upon her lips, and ia bar
eyes, and murmured
"It was heaven itself who sent you here,
Robert."
Two hours later a gray dawn was strug
gling through the clouds a broad strip of
blue encircled the west the wind moaned
in lower tones. The old hut was golden
with the wood fire,—it threw its radiance
over the two horses that had been led in
and stood mild and grateful in a corner
staring at the lire.
Renovated, though weak with a happi
ncss beyond words, warm in heart, Alice
Malcolm greeted her wedding-day. She
had told her story to Robert—the story of
her desertion in the snow. As the storm
had come on more furiously, her driver,
whom she believed trustworthy, announced
his intention of returning.
She had discovered that he was in
semi-intoxicated state, but she refused to
return, and he would not go a step further,
and had cut the traces, and, mounting one
of the horses, left her to her fate.
She did not know, when sho spoke, that
9 wile back, witl^ig $ few miles yl' ibe city,
NORTH
he lay frozen to death, the eddying snow
drifting over his body. Ho had found a
face which his mistress had escaped.
Backward, through a vista of happy
ye.irs, looked Russell and his wife to that
night of horror in Canada, when peril re
vealed to them the full depth of their de
votion—the infinitude of their love.
Character of the Carpet Baggera—Ra
dical Authority aa to the Rascal*—
Graphic Description.
Joseph Medill, one of the Editors of the
Chicago Tribune, is in New Orleans, and
is writing some very readable letters to
that paper. In one of them, recently, he
pronounces judgment on the carpet-bng
gers and it corroborates all that tho Dem
ocrats have said of this infamous class of
pest. Such talk as this, last year, about
the wretches, when it appeared in Demo
cratic papers, was disloyal now it is the
staple talk of the most radical newspapers
in the country:
In regard to negro office~holding, the
ex-rebels are more sensitive than about
negro voting still, they declare that they
prefer negro Creoles to hold office rather
than carpet-baggers. They entertain an
irrevocable animosity towards carpet-bag
office seekers, and I really cannot blame
them, for it is a deplorable fact that a very
large majority of these gentry are scamps
and thieves rotten driftwood, who have
floated down the Mississippi, and squatted
on the offices. They bring disgrace on the
paity to which they profess to belong.
They possess as keen a scent and as raven
ous an appetite for plunder as the vultures
ti-ho Jill the air have for putrid carcases.
The difference between these birds of prey
is that the foimer feast on the substance of
living men, while the latter content them
selves with the carcasses of dead animals.
It would be safe to enter the Louisiana
carpet-bagger for pilfering, peculating
and scoundrelism, in competition with any
of the tribe in any other part of the South.
These rascals were, many, or most of them,
appoiuted before the breach between
Johnson and Congress. They gave in
their adhesion to "my policy," while the
power of removal remained with the Presi
dent. After the enactment of the Tenure
of-Office law most of them proclaimed
themselves radicals. But Johnson man*
aged to get rid of a good many, and filled
their pluccs with men of the stripe of
Stcedman and Perry Fuller. But no mat
ter whether they professed to be radicals
or conservatives, they were^all alike vul
tures, who fed and fattened on the people
and the treasury. Millions upon millions
of State and city tuxes have been stolen,and
other millions of Federal taxes have taken
the same direction.
Mr. Medill says that one-third of the
cotton-tax was stolen that one-half of the
custom house dutips are divided between
the officials and the importers, instead of
being paid into the Treasury, and that 05
per cent, of the whisky tax due were never
collected that the tobacco tax was a fraud
and cheat, but that this scoundrelism is
"excelled in downright unblushing dis
honesty by the State Legislature and State
Government." He adds, "To sum the
whole matter in a sentence, official life in
Louisiana is synonymous with fraud and
rascality." These are a few of the hard
words that this ready writer uses, and he
is more severe still on the mixed Legisla
ture of blacks and whites, that, thank the
Lord, contains no Democrats. That fea
ture is so graphic of radical rascality, as
viewed by one of themselves, that wo tran
scribe it:
I daro not trust aay pen to relate whit
is told me of the doings of the Legislature:
of how money is appropriated, raised and
.squandered how bills for swindling the
public were passed, or the means employ
ed to induce tho governor to sign some
bills and veto others how gambling shops
and lotteries were chartered and how
ch it cost to pass the bills, and secure
their approval. On every business street
of New Orleans gambling hells, licensed
by the Legislature to ply tl.eir avocation,
are nightly in full blast. The gamblers
hire stores on the chief business streets,
hang out their banners on the outer wall,
and from first floor to attic all games of
chance, fraud and deception are carried on
from nightfall to morning, and these places
are visited by throngs of people—hundreds
gambling and thousands looking on and
learning the games, preparatory to trving
their luck in combats with the tiger.
Blacklegs are swarming hither from all
parts of North America, and from Europe
to prey on those less skilled in the art of
cheating with dice aud cards. A bill for
the licensing of houses of prostitution was
gravely discussed and nearly passed the
Legislature and, it is believed, only failed
from bccor.:ing a law in cousequence of
the inadequacy of the bribery fund raided
to secure its enactment—otherwise forni
cation would be carried on as openly uuder
protection of the law as gambling now.
This is a picture of radical reconstruct
tion. It is almost as bad as the Brownlow
government of Tennessee.
THE IIANBS OF LADIES.— Arsene IIous
saye says in his last essay on female beau
ty :—"Irish girls have the most beautiful
hands. English girls have too fleshy and
plump hands. The bands of American
girls are too long and narrow. The fingers
of German girls are too short, and their
palms too broad. Next to the Irish girls,
the daughters of Poland deserve the palm,
so far as the beauty of the hand is con
cerned. The hands of the French, Italian
and Spanish girls may be called indiffer
ent, though there are more beautiful hands
to he seen in France and Italy than in
Spain. The Parisians bestow a great deal
of carc on their hands, aud the consequence
is that superficial and inexperienced ob
servers will believe that they havo finer
hands than the women of any part oi
Francq or any other country."
An only daughter and the onlj heir of
one of Portland's Protestant citizens has
bevwe a tomat to Ruwtta Cuthyliviuu.
VOLUME XIII-No. 81. McGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1869.
Joah Bllllnga Papers.
Spring came this year as mutch as usu
al, hail butuous virgin, 5,000 years old
and upwards, hale and hearty old gal,
welcum tew York State and parts adja
cent
Now the birds jaw, now the cattle hol
ler, now the pigs skreach, now the geese
warble, now the kats sigh, and nature is
frisky the earnest pismire, the virtuous
bedbug and tho nobby cockkroach are
"singing Yankee doodle and "coming thru
the rhi." Now may be seen the musketeer
that gray outlined critter ov destiny, soli
tary and nlone, examining his last year's
bill, and now may be heard, with the
naked ear, the hoarse shanghigh, bawling
in the barnyard.
Kittens in the doorway, and puppies on
the green, neighbor chats with neighbor,
and the languid urchin creeps listless
toward the school. These things are all
fust rate in their places, but spring brings
pesky liles, and plants them carelessly,
sometimes among the maiden's charms,
and sometimes among the young men's.
I kan tork like a pressure poet about biles
just now, for I have one in full bloom
growing on me, almost reddy to pick, az
big az an eggplant, and az full ax a broken
heart.
Biles are the sorest things ov their size
on rekord, and az kross tew the touch az
a sitting hen, or dog with a fresh bone.
Biles alwas pick out the handyest place
on youre body tew build their nest, and if
you undertake to brake them up, it only
makes them mad, and takes them longer
to hatch out. There aint no such thing
az coaxing, nor driving them away. They
are like an impudent bed bug, they won't
move till they have got their fill.
Biles are az old az religion. Job, the
proffit, waz the first champion ov biles,
and he is currently reported tew hav more
biles and more pashunce to the square
inch than enny one—two very rare things
to he found in enny man.
Biles and pashunce I should aa soon
think ov mixing courting and muskectcrs
together, for luxury.
I hav got a grate deal mor| faith than I
hav pashunce, but i haint got enough
faith in biles. I wouldn't trust a bile,
even on one ov mi boots.
I think faith iz a better artikle than pa
shurce. Faith eumtimes iz an evidence
ov brains, and pashunce quite often iz
only nHnibneis, but i don't think in those
smoothe shod times it is best to hav too
mutch capital invested in either ov them.
But i am. out of tha road, i must git
back onto biles again.
If a fellow begins tew wander, and git
out ov the straight and narrow path, it is
curious how quick ho will begin to go to
There is one more smart thing about
biles they are like twins they hardly
ever come singly, and i have known them
to throw double sixes.
What 1 twelve biles on one man at a
time This is wus than fighten bumble
bees with your summer clothes.
Biles are sed, by the educated and oor
rect spellers of the land, tew be an opera
shun ov nature to get rid ov sumthing
which she wants to spare. This is so
without doubt, but it don't strike me az
being a very polite thing in nature tew
sliuv oph ber biles onto other folks. I1
say, let everybody take care ov her own
biles.
But say «H yer kan about bilea, call
them all the mean names current among
fishmungers, revile, and persecute, and
spit on them, groan, grin and swear they
visit yer, hit them over tho head, and sei
on th:m if ye pleazc, there is a time in
their career when they conccntrate all the
pathos ov joy that a man has on hand to
spare, and that is—when they bust!
This is bliss, glory and revenge on thq
half shell. A man leans back in rectified
comfort, az innocent and az limber nz a
mermaid. This pays for the fretful nights
and nervous days while the bile haz been
hatching this shows us what it is to grin
and bear it—this shows us what it is to be
hiled, and wrung out, and hung up to dry.
This is the calm after the storm, the wed
ding day ov pashunce and joy this iz the
christening ov hope, the mystick hen that
lays 2 eggs a day this is butter in yurc
sassagis. Exit Biles.
We clip the articles following from the
Charles City Intelligencer. Both suic us
first-rate, in fact and in style of writing
POLITICAL LEECUES.—Attached to every
political party are thousands of men who
never dream of engaging in regular busi
ness pursuits, or of working as producers
for a livelihood but live, Heaven knows
how, year after year, upon the hope, aud
with tho intent, of procuring office. They
will spend ten years of idleness to get one
or two years of partisan and official bread
and butter or often the bread without
tho butter. Only one of these in, say live
or ten thousand ever gets a position worth
daily salt. Yet nothing will induce them
to seek subsistence in any other form.
They have usually suffering families,
many of whom are as anxious, eager and
visionary upon the subject of ollico hold
ing as their heads. It is a great pity that
this curse of habitual office-seeking cannot
be modified, reduced, or nearly altogether
abrogated.
OUR friends in all the lice towns round
about here are requested to furnish items
of news for our columns. Don't write
essays, but give us news. Let us know
what is going on or what has happened in
your locality. Tell us in your own way
what is going on, and we can "do" the
^rauwar yart and spelling, if iwctsjary.
imp
WE MARCH WITH THE FLAG AND KEEP STEP TO THE MUSIC OP THE UNION.
Biles are very sassy sum times
when yer go to set down they will git be
tween yer and the chair this is one evi
dence of their ill breading, and i had one
once plant herself on the frunt end of my
uoze, which waz a most remarkabel piece
of bad manners, for there iz no room on
my noze ennyvvhare for a bile for when
it is even ebb tide with mi nozc it covers
half ov my face. Biles are sed tew be
heltliy, and i guess they am, for i hev seen
sum helthy old biles, az big az a hornet's
nest and az full ov stings. I always want
tew be helthy—i am willing to pay the
highest market price for a good deal ov
helthy—but if i had to hev 2 biles on me
awl the time, in order to be helthy, i should
think that i was bulling the market.
Bntlcr'a Voice.
Don Piatt writes from Washington
"Butler's voice, is a fair indication of the
character of Butler. It is harsh, broken,
and exceedingly unpleasant. This matter
of the vocal organs is not sufficiently con
sidered by students of human nature. In
the animal kingdom the cry of a wild
beast is the carefully-prepared utterance
of the nature of the beast. From the
hiss of the snake to the roar of the lion,
we have in clear, unmistakable language,
the sort of an animal we encounter. As
we ascend in the scale, and approach in*
nocent, harmonious natures, the utterances
become sweet. The poet tells us
"All things young and innocent
Are taught, they say, to sing,
As the maiden sitting at Uor whMt,
The bird upon the wing."
"Tho voice of woman, 'Hgenoral
thing, is soft and pleasant, and, as one
loses the feminine charactcr, her voice
becomes coarse and discordant. Physi
cians tell us that the first indications of
insanity are to be found in the changes of
the voice that are "like sweet bells jangled
out of tune, and harsh." And one can
well s-ippose that the moral insanity, now
so much discussed, is accompanicd with a
like loss of harmonious utterance.
"Be that as it may, Butler's voice is a
combination of the growl of a tiger and
the hiss of the snake. A timid, sensitive
nature would ^shrink and shudder to hear
the roll of malignant, angry utterances of
this man. And his appearance, when
speaking, carries out the impression. Ilis
retreating forehead disappears in the ani
mal developments, that are large, and ap
pear more prominent from being bald,
while bis shaggy, gray eyebrows, throw
in deeper shadow the cavernous recesses
from which his distorted eyes gleam in
wruth. His cheeks arc flabby, and fall
over a chin that lacks the square promi
nence that indicates firmness and censis
tency. In a^word, his head is the head of
a cat, and, when aroused to anger, he
seems to growl and spit until one can al
most see the gleam of the white teeth,
sharp as needles. As Schenck sat in grim
silence, listening to the roll of vituperation
with his square hrave face, the scene re
minded one of a wildcat baiting a baar."
The Decay of Lecturing.
The lecturing system is an example of
the rapidity with which we invent, develop
an wear out new habits in this country.
It was peculiarly American, and, at one
time had an unbounded popularity. Twelve
or fourteen years ago, nearly every man
eminent in science, literature, philosophy
and politics, was a lecturer and nearly
every considerable town in the country
had its lyceum or literary association, be
fore which lectures were delivered every
winter. But there grew up an army of
persons, eminent in nothing, who "took''
to lecturing as a business. A hundred
dollars a night and expenses paid, was al
together -attractive to needy adventurers,
who could find little employment for their
valuable talents in ordinary vocations—
particularly as the quid pro quo was the
same well thumbed manuscript which had
cost them nothing but a few days reading
of cyclopaedias,. and a few hours writing.
The business was new, the entertainment
novel and fashionable, and the public
easily pleased with the cheap conceit of
intellectual improvement. But after a
while, the public began to grow critical
three-fourths of the lectures were disco
vered to be mere jingles of words and
the more exciting attractions of the theater
and opera re-asserted their old authority.
The business, from being overdone, broke
down, and all the efforts in lecturers, ly
ceums and library associations, have not
been able to revive it.
Teachers' ExamlnatlMuu
Notice is hereby given, that I will be at
the following named places for the purpose
of examining persons wishing certificates
to teach in the Public Schools of Clayton
«HW»ty
At Garnavillo, April 22, 1869.
Monona *27
Mc Gregor 29
Strawberry Point, May 3
Elkport, 6
A fee of one dollar will bs charged each
applicant in advance of examination (see
School Laws, page 45, sec. 78). The
School Boards at the several points are re
quested to secure places for holding Baid
examinations.
W. A. PRESTON,
County Superintendent of Schtebk
Cariosities In Names.
There are over 25,000 Post Officca in the
Uuitcd States, and the Post Office Direo
tory is dry reading nevertheless there
are curious things to be found in it. We
have just been looking over the new Di
rectory, and find that there are 350 Post
Offices with the prefix South, 400 with
East, 500 North, and something over 500
West, evidencing the growth of the coun
try to the West and North".
Our propensity to exalt public men is
shown by the names of many of these
Post Offices Fifty»foar are named from
Franklin, 53 Jackson, 45 Jefferson, 31
Lincoln, and 28 Grant. Neaily 600 Post
Offices have the prefix of New, as New Al
bany, Ac., 250 have Mt., Mount, or Moun
tain. 120 are named for the various Saints.
The trees come in for their share—150
have the prefix Oak, 76 Walnut or Ilicko
ry, 40 Maple, &o. Forty are named for
the Beaver, the great representative of the
ingenuity and industry of our people. 150
are White, 90 are Big, 47 are Blue, and
114 have the prefix of Pleasant, showing
the estimate in which they are held by
their inhabitants. 11 have dared to apply
the name of Boston to other places than
the hub, while bqt one has dared to rival
the great metropolis, and call itself New
York.
A ery curious names soma of those 23,
000 offices have. Strange, unpronounce
able, Indian names, and many ridiculous,
coumuu place uaatee, Pennsylvania baa
an Applebachsville, South Carolina a
Bachelor's Retreat, West Virginia a Post
Office with the euphonious name of Big
Skin Creek, Virginia a Burnt ordinary,
Missouri a Cote Sans'Dessien, whatever
that means, Indiana a Delectable Hill,
named evidently by some enthusiastic rea
der of Bunyan's allegory. Among the
many other curious names we notice, in
glancing over the pages, are Dry Town,
Grizzly Bear House, Brood Axe, Gadfly,
Habolochitto, Kinnickkninnick, Mud Lick,
Nine Eagles, Ninety-six, Paddy's Run, Pa
Pa Me, Scalp Level, Tarr Farm, Travellers'
Repose, Veal Station, and Wolf Trap. The
seven Xenias are the only representatives
of the initial X. In most cases there are
two or more Post Offices of the same name,
and it is therefore very desirablo that in
writing addresses tho County and State
should be written very plainly, aa well as
the name.
Insects.
All insects have six legs, liflless they
have met with an ancident. They do not
breathe through the'r mouths, but by a
great number of little pipes which run
through them lengthwise, having openings
here and there on th« side ^of the body
where the fresh air is drawn in. These
little openings are very curiously con
trived, in some ca*cs protected by tiny
trap doors,"opening on hinges in others
having a strong grating over them of every
coarse hair. Hence an insect when cut in
two, as he does not use his mouth for
breathing, and as his brain is not confined
to his head, but runs all through his body,
will live for many hours in this mutilated
state. In fact, some insects never eat a
mouthful after they are full grown.
Insects have from two to five eyc3. Two
large eyes, called compound eyes, because
they are made up of many littlo eyes,
united like a bundle of eix-sided spy
glasses tied together, large at one end and
very small at the other, and looking under
the microscope like the meshes of a very
fine net. Ihen there are sometimes three
little eyes in addition to the largo ones,
placed generally on the top of the head,
although they occasionally vary in their
position.
All insects are provided with antenna:,
which are those little, many jointed pro
jections extending from the head, near the
eyes, somewhat like a reindeer's horns.
These ase probably used for feeling,
smelling and hearing with, although their
uses have not been definitely settled.—
They vary much in appearance, sometime
resembling Indian clubs, sometimes fringe
ed like a firtree, notched like a saw,
plumed like a feather, or armed with teeth
like a comb. A few insccts have no wings,
others have two, others four, but none
have more than that number.
Insects pass through several stages of
existence before they become fully devel
oped. Most of them are hatched from
eggs then they jrass into the larva state,
in which they aro caterpiller, maggot and
grub, according as they are to become
butterfly or beetle, in course of time they
go into pupa or mummy state, from
which they emerge ready for action as
perfect insects. In some classes these
distinctions are not so strongly marked.
—It tiers ide Magaz
inc.
'I
Population of the Globe.
There are on the globe about
1,288,000,-
000 of souls, of which
360,000,000 are of the Caucasian race.
552,000,000 are of the Mongol raee.
100,000,000 are of the Ethiopian raee.
170,000,000 are of the Malay race.
1,000,000 are of the Indo-American race.
There are 3642 languages spoken, and
1000 different religions.
The yearly mortality of the globe is
333,,'33,.333 persons. This is at the rate
of 91,554 per day, 3,730 per hour, 60 per
minute. So each pulsation of our heart
makes tho
decease of some human creature.
The average of human life is 33 years,
One-fourth of the population dies at or
before the age of 7 years.
One-half at or before 17 years.
Among 10,000 persons one arrives at
the age of 100 years, one in 500 attains
the age of 90, and one in 100 lives to the
age of sixty.
Married men live longer than single
ones. In 1000 persons 65 marry, and
more marriages occur in June and Decem
ber than ia any other months of the year.
One-eighth of the whole population is
military. Professions exercise a great in
fluence on longevity. In 1000 individuals
who arrive at the age of seventy years, 42
are priests, orators, or public speakers 40
are agriculturists, 33 are workmen, 32 sol
diers or military employees, 29 advocates
or engineers, 27 professors, and 24 doc
tors. Those who devote their lives to the
prolongation of that of others, die the
soonest.
There are 335,000,000 Christians.
There are 5,000,000 Israelites.
There are 60,000,000 Asiatic religions.
There are 160,000,000 Mahoinmednns.
There are 200,000,000 Pagans.
In the Chribtian Churches
170,000,000 profess the lloinan Catholic
75,000,000 profess the Greek faith
80,000,000 profess the Protestant.
TUE following are tv&out the prices paid
for fast horses at the pres nt day. A
horse that can trot in 2:35 will bring from
£1,500 to §2,000 a dashing, good young
animal, of squaro action, will command
$2,500 or $3,000, while, a well bred one,
say a Messenger or a Bashaw for instance,
that can trot in 2:25, with a prospect of
improvement, will be sought after at
$5,000, and one of either of the above
stock that can beat 2:30 is considered
cheap at $10,0i)0, wbilo for every second
in twenties $1,000 will be reudily given.
Office-seeker to Grant—1uIf party serri
ces
don't bring offioe, then what's the use
of being a parly man?" Grjjot— I don't
koow," s.
WHOLE No. 653.
McQRfiaOR, CLAYTON COD NTT, IOWA.
«. P.
BISHMDSO* JOHN H. UNDRICK.
One Copy, for one year,
$2.50
c"l-
in Advance.
RATES OF A 1) V K K TIS I N O
^8puce. lw 2\v 4w 3in ly'r.
1 Bijimre $1 50 1 $2 50 f3 50 *5 50 $S 60 $12 00
2 gqunr»s 3 60 3 50 |~4 50 |~7 GlT|To 00 15 00
3 si
r.n
res 3 00 |4 00 |600
jlO 00 15 00 20 00
J4
4 00 5 00 8 00 15 00 25 00 35 00
col. 7 50 10 00 15 00 25 00 40 00 70 00
1 column 14 00 IS 00 25 00 4lTob 70 00 125 00
9 Hnpsnf Xonpri'il mike Ilnsini ssc:ird»
of 5 liri'js, $S per annum each luMitional line 50 cts.
R. C. AMBLER,
Attornoy at Law, Culiiiur, li.wa. Will
the Courts of the Stuto. C18
prettll*)n
OUR HOUSE,"
(Late Bfftaon House.) Menouu, luw«. Refitted and
Furnishad. Uouil Livery.
648 WILLIAMS & WISE, Proprfetor«.
II. BKUItfHER M7D.
Office, Bank Cornvr, Smith's iiloek, up stairs.
041 McGRECIOR, IOWA.
DAVIS HOUSE,
Elkader, Towa. ((1:7) 1'. K. CK Proprietor.
A. J.JORDAN,
Attorney at Law,(efflco in Uautc Rlnck)
630 MeliltKUOK, IOWA.
B.V. L. 0. Hutch. OMIenry Frese.
NO LE, HATCH & FRESE,
Attorney* at Law, .Mc(i RE'JOR, IOWA. 630
C. E. BERRY,
Attorney at Law, Crca^o, Iowa. 686
DR. ANDROS.
Physician anil Surgeon. over Peterson A
Larson's Store. Ollice No. -M.IS.JIUO Block. 678-99
CITT HOTEL,
(Late Allen House.)
McGREGOR, IOWA.
T. ATWOOI, Proprietor.
This house will be ki'pt us u hint class house in ev
ery rospcct. Farmers are particularly invited to
rail. Charges as rt'imoiuiMe As any other house.
Good Stabling aud good ciic. l'omdicg by tluiday
or week. &H
UNION HOUSE]
MAIN STREET, McGREGOR,IOWA.
BUM. II. FBESE,1'iopriater.
WINNESHEIK HOUSE.
Oecorah, lotfu. (ji-in i.tl 8tage Office
JOHN SIIAW, Pr.prit ti r. 666
JOHS T. CLARK. CUAILLKY AI.I.K.V. 0. J. CLASS.
JOHN T. CLARK & CO.,
Attorneytand
Counsellors at Law and KealKstite
Agents,1st doorcast ot' Winnesheik House, Uecorab,
Iowa. Will practice in the several courts
of the
State also attend to collections,and thepayment of
taxes in Wimiebheii county. 656
raURDOCS & STONEMAN,
SAMUEL Ml'RDCCK. J. T. STOXKJfA!*.
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, will practice iu the
Supremo and District Courts of this State.
Ollice opposite 1st National Batik, SIcC.REGOR.
THOMAS UPDEGRAFF,
Attorney at Law, (V24) McURKiiOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, McGUKGOR.TOWA.
J. C. HOXSIE,
Joatice of ths Peace. Ollice with T. CpdagralT.
DOUGLAS LEFFINGWELL,
Attorney at Law, .McGregor, xovva. Office ov«r Pete#
son A Larson's Store 311
LOUIS M. ANDRICK.
Attorney at Law, Reynold's Bluck| tntrauce between
140 and 118 Dearborn !3tr»et, alsu on Muditon Street
and Custom House (P. O.) Place, Chicago.
COOS & BRO.,
Q.W.COOK. MABTIXCOOK,
Attorneys at Law, Klkaderi Clayton Co., Iowa, wilt
attend to collertiynn, examine titles, pay taxes,obtain
bounties, pensions, Jtc. Ollice opposite mill. 636
R. HUBBARD & CO.,
Jewelers and dealers in Musical Instruments, Main
Street, 494 McGKKGOR. IOWA.
HAYT & BURDICE,
Dealers in Lumber, Sliiir-lc.-i ami i,ath, Main StrMt.
McGREGOR, IOWA.
NATIONAL HOT^^
Pestville, Iowa. General Stage Oifice. C. VanTIoosef,
Proprietor. 503
GEO. L. .BASS
COMMISSION, STORAGE & FOTWAROING BUSINESS,
Public Square, !. CKKGOR. IOWA.
MAT. DIcKINNIE,
Wholesale and Retail dealer In Stoves, and Manufac
turer of XintCojiperand Sheet Inm Ware, Main
Street
McGREGOR, IOWA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Main Street, McGregor, lowu. A desirable home for
the traveling public, with Rood barns and .Sheilaat
tached tor the sale protection of horses and wagons.
442 M. MURRAY, Proprietor.
J. McHOSE & CO.,
STORAGE, FORWARDING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No. 1, on the Levee, McGREGOR.
Consignments solicited.
J08.
M'HOSE.
470 a.M'utlEGOB.
McGREGOR FANNING MILL.
DICKEY k WELL1VER.
Manufacturers of the MiOrc^ Fannii MillandGralu
Separator, on West Market t$juare. corner Main and
Aun Streets, 415y McGREGOR, IOWA.
EVANS HOUSE.
[LATE AMERICAN,J
Opposite Ferry Landing, McGregor. Re-furnished and
Ittted up in good style for guests. Patronage respect
fully solicited. G. 11. FLANDERS, Proprietor. 474
BEZER LODGE No. 135.
Ilalds its Regular Communications on
Monday evening preceding the full uioon
in each mouth.
R. nUUOARD, W.
G. CROOKE.Sec'y. 448
RATHBCN & GILL,
DENTIST,
McGregor. Iowa.
OQceOn'Main St.. over IVet Ollice.
WEST UNION HOUSE,
Corner Vine and El in Sts tl'EST UNION, IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL, PROPRIETOR.
Good stabling and charges moderate, stages going
east,west.north and south, call ami leave with pa*,
sengels. morning au! evening.
BOARDMAN HOUSE,
ILAI£ W AaUl.NCTON)
ELKADER, -t IOWA.
LAFAYETTE BIGELOW, Proprietor.
Renovated inside aud out. Not exielled by any
Hotel iu the West. Good Stabling. 079
THOMAS ARNOLD,
REAL ESTATE BROKER AND GENERAL AGENT, CON
VEYANCER, NOTARY PUBLIC,
AndCyomuissionerol' Derdti, for tlieNowtllwcs
ternS'itcH. Will.itUtul to the Durchane.mdsaleol
Farm Lauds,City Property ,StocU».&c., Jcc.
Office iu Auction $tic. Main Street. McGregor,
Iowa. 5&!>
LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
FB.AXTK BROXBZS&,
SHOT
(J 1,'N s», Revolvers,
l'itols.Gam- U.«':-=, Flasks,
4)artridpes, Powder, Shot, Lead,
Caps, 11 iiu-w»ils. Cutlery, Ac., Ac,
iiear National liank.
regor, Iowa.
Repairing of all kinds U nking to the gaa Md
lock smith line done promptly.
Charges moderate tuul .ill work warranted.
T. II. GELSTON. J. M. DONALD. C. T. TREG®
OBLSTON, TRBCtO dt CO.,
General Coiiission Merchants,
N». 13 S. Commorcial Street,
Kxchungo Buildiu^, ST. LOUIB, MO.
J.M. HOISIN*TO V,
O O K I N E
AND BLANK BOOK
MANUFACTURER.
OVMB TIMES OFFIC*, McGRJ£GO*,IOWA.
SPECl
VL ittfution paid to tho manufacture of
Blank BooksforCouulieB,Bankf, Merchant*,etc.
Muiiic.M i^-t/.itXV.PifriodKAls, 4c., Ac., Qouud with
J}eft#C8,aii(idiaj*Ul», $SBl
13 W 15 .V K
BAxrsxsro
FIRST
HOUSS
or
FABNSWORTH & BROTHER
MCGREGOR, IOWA.
HIVE MONEY TO LOAN, RECEIVE DEPOSITS,
WILL TRANSACT A
GENERAL BANKING. EXCHANGE AND C0LLECTl||
BUSINESS, THE SAKE AS AN INCORPORATED
BANK, AND ON MORE FAVORABLE TERMS.
K 'I' :sn-1 MortKHtreM Lom ht. Omi riimctit U. ndi
GoM HIHI Kxiliuhge bought uutl soul at beet rxti H.
FORKKIN DRAFTS BOUGHT AND BOLD.
Hiving hail ten yours experience in bnukIng, we
will be pleated IO IIHYO A slmrc ot th« tanking bini*
ncsNot McUregor and the Hurrmn-.ding ouiiti^iJs»"
Will guarantee MliXm tii n witli all l.i.iiiin Ml*
tn IIS. (tUO) FAT.NSV ItTIl
i.
/. 11. Merrill. Prrit.
Wni. Lurraliep, Vice Prcft.
O. llulvorvon,
I K'J,,
ca«i«ar*
W. 11. Kitn.iard,, It. CntLiif.
NATIONAL
BAHI
Or McGREGOR.
Capital $10 0,000.
At enmat
rates for Ml* oa all tlta Piiacipal dtto of
England, Ireland,
Germany, Norway,
France, Sweeden,
And Other Parts of Europe.
^LX*SO
Passenger Tickets
FOB SALE
To and From nil tho Large Citlea In EUROPZ, by
Steamer and Fa»t Sailing Vessels.
All kinds jI GOVEP.NMrNT SECTTRTTTK8 bought
and sold. if
azBBssr & co.,
TEAS, TOBACCOS AND CIGARS,
236 Randolph Street,
Geo. Ilibben, Chicago.
W. 15. Maddux, Cincinnati. 519y
CHICAGO.
II. A. I10MEYER. W.YOUNG. H.R.WHIT.
BSZ7&7 A. BOmXYSR CO.,
Commission Merchants
NO 10 CITT BUILDINGS,
SAINT LOUIS.
Speciat attention given to th* Sale and Purchase mt
FLOUR aud OKA IN.
K. SEXTON & SON,
Wh.Uale
Dealers in
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
FOREIGN AMD AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters'
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners7 Stock,
Agricultural Tn U tm'iits and B!-a Jv.-n,itl Ttate.
338 East Water Street*
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIIf.
~DURAND BROS. & POWERS,
Wholesale Crocers,
131 South Water itreot,
646 CHICAGO, ILL.
"WH A.T XS IT 1
FRANK KERZMAN
OPPOSITE
PEAR8ALL A CHURCH'S LIVERY
Stable,
Main Street, cGrcgor,
Is ready to furnish
AU
KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Eve Troughs, Tin
Pipes,
Andiufact EVKRVl'lllSG ia hiiliucui Lucmuaswil
bo well mads aud promptly put uj).
STOVES STOVE PIPES furnished and «et opto
order.
MEAT MARKET!
MK CAWELTI & BERGIM.^l
E3Li
CAWELTI'S ELCCK.
FULLYiettlediuour
NCWAIKI Beautyot aMarW«t
withlcu room, aud everjthyj^ wliiel.conveni
encvaud neatness could suggest, and detetcrxuiucd
always to
Secure the Very Finest Animals for til*
ase of oar Patrons,
we feel usuredthat we aro offering ttepeoplt oftl»I«
citjr ^reatrri uducpiiionta than ever before to patro®«
i/e th"Q.ieeu of UarketH. Fat Cattle bought at til*
kighest price. 554
The Wag-on bas Comtl
AND THE CARRIAGES TOO!!
PEARSALL & CHURCH
SINCE
Octohei 1859, have been saying i u theTltfM
Wait for tU« Wagou." 'i'Uuy now announce*#
the public that their stock of Horses aud Caniagta,
either for business or plououre, ia uot excelled in tka
West.
The mos
treasonable price? chanictrrirc tlieii"PI©»
NKKK LIVKltY STABLE,' locultd about half-w*y
up Main Street. near the Klandt is House. Cull on
them if yon would be suited with team or saddl*
horses. MtARSAIiL k CHURCH.
McGregor, Iowa.
German Lumber Yard.
Stauei & Daubenberger,
Dealers iu
Lumber, Timber, Lath, Shingles*
Doors, Sash and Slinds.
VKE SUPPLY CITY AND COUNTRY TRACE ON TP'
MOST REASONABLE TERMS
HAVE
unquestionably ho 1 ir^et Htocliof SaftJll
U-oroand Uliu.U ever kept iu the west—
style and form L*sitit auv huildiII^ ha can be ereft»
ed. M,OurM« the ONLY HI WBER YARO on he north
side of liailiStreet .Mel! RUUOR IOWA 4!4
JAMES CLENNOIf,
GENERAL DEALER IN ALL KINDS UF
Family Groceries
PROVISIONS,FLOUR & FEEO.
Always a full -supply of
OXLBBZr
and
DRIED rRVZVI
AND CONFECTIONERY,
Which will be sold at th«lowwt marVetpricei
In ilellwic's Urick Block, on cor. Main aud 24
Streets, McGregor, Iowa.
W. H. BLACMER,
Millwright SL Draughtsman,
Plana, Spcciflcationit aud Estimates luudc ou shaft
uoti'e.
Steam and Water Mills built on contract orothw*
wise to suit.
Willt'ijmish front the best Manufacturer* alftla«Mf
of
Mill Machinery-Mill Stones*
Spindle*, Curbs, lloppers, Stuxds, &horK.Daw*«l£
Ac. Smut and Brau cleaners, 8eiaiatoi »,Mil If ecfcij
Ctipe aud Beliinp.
Dufour & Go.'s Old Dutch Anchor Boltlni: CIot|»,
Extra and Extra U''a\ an.I Double E^tra llea*y.
PaW'uleeof the North Weutoro Tuibict-,
torthe LEH Kf WHEEL AU k tler» *-!,ii •,.-.-dt»
Mc0r*for9irl«MiPf,low» Ml
*M81MfcSif

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