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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, June 30, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027239/1869-06-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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WHO STOLE TUB BIRD'S NEST.
To WHIT To whit! To who*
1
Will j"u listen to in"
Who »t|A tonr eggs I l«ld,
And the nice ue»t 1 nisilef
Not I, s»1i tho cow, Moo oo I
Such ft thing I'd never do,
I K*ve you a wliji ot h»jr.
But didn't tnk«* your nest away.
Not I.ouid the cow, Moo oo!
Such a thing I'd nover do.
To whit, To whit, To wheel
Will JOII linten to nip?
Who stole tour *KK« I laid,
Aud the nicu neat I madof
Bob-* link
1 Bob-a-llnk I
Now what do you think
Who ntnle a nest »wny
From the plumb-tree to-duy.
Not I, ihM the dog, Row wow,
I w»ulil n't l. tt» ii iran. I vo(,
I «»vc hitira hn nest to mukA
But the iiPHt I iliil not ti»k•. I
Not I, "iiiil the do«. Bow wo#l
I would u't be HO mean, I fo|K
To whit I To whit! TowhAl
Will you llaten to met
Who atolo four emt* I laid,
And the uice neat I liniiUt
Coo coo! Coo coo I Coo coo
1
Let m« speak a word, too.
Who stole that pretty neat,
From little y«llow breutt
Not I, fiald the abeep oh no.L
I would n't treat poor !i
I j[»ve wool the nem to line,
But is nest was none ot mifl&
Baa »a 1 said the sh'-ep, oh nt,
I would n't treat a po..r bird
®n whit! To whit! To wbes!
Will j(»n llnlen to nief
Wtio atolc four efigB I laid.
And the uice neat 1 made i
Caw Caw Tcried the CTOV,
1 ahouM like to know,
What thiol took awav
A bird's neat to-day
Cluck, clack, said ihq|»a,
Do n't ask me again.
hy 1 have n't a illicit
Would do such a trick.
4
Wa all gave liar a feather.
And she ««vc tti.-in together.
I'd scorn to intrude
Ou hir anil lirr brood.
Clurk, clin k, nxid the ben,
Do u't ask me agapi.
Chlr-a-whirr! Cblr-a-WhirrI
We will make a greitt Btlrl
I.et us t)mi out bis nawe.
And all cry ''for gli.iMel"
I would not rob a bird.
Said li'tle M*ry (irfMJ
I think I never heard
Of any thing so nicin.
a*i
"is rery cruel, too,
Salil little Alice Ne(lt
I wonder if he kn- w
How sud the bird w
A little boy hnng down his head.
And went mid hid behind the bed,
Ht stole Hint pretty m»t,
Front little yellow
IHHKI
Aud tlieu he telt so lull ot «lin_
He dH u't like to tell his nainj
VOAR lHFAKl,
AW AOBOfCM.
As I jj'wo on thy loveliuos, I think ah, how soon,
Life's bright happy morn, mint be followed by noon
Vernal buds of sweet chilc'hood, by tlioiu-hidden
bloom,
And youth's blissful visions by sadness and gloom,
Native vi^ur »uU beauty, by ags aud the tomb.
Bweet innscent being! bow swift speed the hour*
That baste to remove thee from iur.iutilu bowers
Enjoyments of childhood and love's anxious i J(,
While care-worn and wearied with earth thou wilt
sigh,
And some that once loved thee will treacherous
pr»ve,
Regardless of friendship, truth, honor and love,
Theu inayest thou, loved one, seek thy treas
are
above-
Reject earth's allurements, inspired in vain,
Interweave not thy heart with ambition or fame,
Cherish virtue and truth, and if bliss thou wouldst
kuow,
v*J»i(l communion with Qod through all nature below,
Murk the pale, aoitened tueoubi'uniB, the niild balmy
breeze.
Omnipotence view, in tho proud swelling seaa,
Now in wonder adore, 'till thy soul uio ints above,
Disembodied to bathe iu the aea of God's love.
Butery mt the Shamrock.
.When King Lerry, surrounded by his
lords, vassals and Druids, was celebrating
his birthday at Tarn, the ancient cap.tul
of Ireland, it happened to be on the eve
of Easter. The time had come when all
the fires were to be extinguished, that after
a while they might be relighted from the
sacred torch consecrated to tlfe heathen
gpds. In the interval of hallowed daik
ness, suddenly there appeared a brilliant
light at the top of the Stupes of Charitns.
The sp'arks and flames rose from the mys
terious camp, in profanation of the ancient
faith of Tara. Who hud dared to profane
the sacred darkness by unho y tires? What
bold blasphemer ventured to ligbt the
torch until the flame had been brought
from the altar of the gods? The warriors
grasped their arms and rushed up the hill
to tear the infidel to pieces. Thiy seized
him and dragged him down to the hull of
judgement, but all the while he kept re
citing prayers to the unknown God and
when brought before the assembly of en
raged idolaters, St. Patrick, who for seven
years had be n Milcbo's herdsman slave,
stood forth, like the heroic Paul, and ans»
wered for himself. In his lonesome cap
tivity he had learned to love the Irish
people, and with the burden of salvation
be had traversed the great plains from the
mouth of the Boyne to the Slope of the
Chariots, lie stood and preached to them
all night—to the birth of the stars till the
jjgrand ascension of the sun. lie spoke as
never had man spoken in Tara. lie told
them the story of the Kazarene, uf the
Blessed Trinity—Father, Son, and Holy
Ghost—of Baptism, of the Eucharist—of
all the Sublime faith of the (Jhurc.h of
Home. Towards day li .lit the people be
gan to believe, and fell into debate, pne
with another. The arch Druid, the King,
and two beautiful maidens were converted
and baptised. The tumult increased the
true fires of heaven were blazing in thu
dark valley of Paganism, and St. Patrick
preached on^intil the day dawn began to
reveal the course of the Black-water, the
Boyne and the hills of Cavan, and the
heights of Slane. But the people could
not understand the strange doctrine of the
Trinity—how three persons should consti
tute one Clod—and, with daylight, their
hearts began to return to their idols. Sud
denly the Apostle caught up a sprig of
Shamrock, which had been holding up its
triple palms in adoration of the one true
God, and, holding it forth, he showed the
people that three leaves growing fro»j a
single stock constituted but one. Instantly
the quick-witted people understood the
mystery they rushed upon the Apoctle,
and would have carried him on their shoul
ders. From that hour Drudical super
stition was overthrown upon tho ^JkuiM of
Prostration.
Blaraell'a Wife.
A story is told of Lady Beaconfield's
devotion to her lord and his'ambition
wbich, if true, is a touching commentary
on the unselfishness of womanly affection.
On one occasion, when Disraeli was chan
cellor of the exchequer, his wife accom
panied him to the Parliament House.
It was "budget" night—the most moment
ous ef all sessions to the chancellor of the
exchequer, for he bad io unfold his finan*
cial plans for the ensuing year to a criti
cal and not easily satisfied bouse. Disrae
li, as be took, bis place iu tbe curria^iw*
Marble.
V
J!
wholly wrapt up in hi» subject and hie
figured it was crisis in his career if
he failed this night, he might take Wol
eey's advice to Cromwell, "Fling away
ambition Ilis wife entered the carriage
also, softly, so as not to disturb the think
er. In getting in, however, her finger
was caurht by the door, which, shutting
upon it, jammed it terribly and held it
80 fast that she could not withdraw it. She
uttered no cry, made ne movement her
tin and agony must have been intense.
There was the finder crushed between the
panels to Rpeak or attempt to withdraw it
would disturb her lord—would drive the
figures and arguments from his head. So
there stayed the finder, every moment
ire painful, until they reached the house,
no.' did Disraeli hear a word of it till long
after the famous debate of that night had
become history. All that evening the
faithful wife sat in the gallery, that her
husband's quick glancing eye might not
mis* her from it she bore the pain like
martyr and like a woman who loves.
No wonder that hy her husband's act
fh« has become Viscountess Beaconfield
still less wonder that, as Lady Beaeonfield,
she is honored in England's proudest cas
tles, and has taken her place in the here
ditary society as naturally and easily as if
she too had been "to the mannor
born."—
Lipjrincott's Magazine for June.
The Marshall Times contains ft descrip
tion of the marble quarries of Tama
coudty, from which we take the following
extract:
"We were deeply interested by a visit
to the quarries of Oolite marble and lime
stone. The deposit is 12 feet thick with a
light stripping of earth. The upper rook
is somen hat fractured but makes splendid
lime. The three lower layers are very
massive and thick, with seams atconven*
ient distances for easy working. Blocks
of any drsired dimensions are easily
procured for sawing purposes and the
manufacture of table tops, mantles, orna
ments, &c. The appearance or the polished
marble is very beautiful, interesting and
unique. Being a perfect mass of minute
fossils connected together with a transpar
ent erystal'ne cale spar, the solidity and
compactness of the mass and exceeding
tirmne.ss of its atomic structure render at
susceptible of the highest polish known to
art, while its beauty is enhanced by rich
veins anil groupings of cream* uff, steel
and brown co'oring. Some of this marble
has uiready found a market at high figures,
and us it not only rivuls in beauty Italian
and Egyptian marble, but as there are no
working dep jsits known to exist between
liis oint and the Atlantic, it is evident
hat an immense demand for this rare and
n*autilul articio will arise, which will nt
0 i!y benefit the proprietors, but make
Oriord a lur^eand tUmiu^ manufacturing
town."
On this subject we have something to
ay. Six years ago a little girl of Mc
Jregor—she is now a young lady—gave
us a piece of polished Iowa, fossil marble.
We wrote about it on several occasions,
commending it to publ notice. The
Liublie did'nt "notice" much, and our
narhle-men seemed indifferent about it.
1 is abundant here scarcely a ravine is
vvithout it. We have seen in the Patent
ffice, ut Washington, all the bmutiful
luarNes'ot the world and there is nune
iike the IOWA fossil rock. Tbe word
O^o lite is not applicable. That means fisb
roe or eggs, petrified our specimens are
wigs sht-lls, injects, little fish, snails—
•spiral and ordinary—leaves and buds,
together with everything the forest of old
the waters of the Mississippi furnifhed.
fhe water lines on our bluQs indicate that
iur Great Iliver was oiCe in flow 200 feet
ibove its present bed, or the blufft wer*
2"0 lower than where they now are we
•loot care which. As we are told, ^the
waters covered the preat deep," it may be
irthodox to believe thar the land has come
up out of the water, but we are not par
ticular about theories. Before us is a
splendid specimen of these fossil beauties
handed us by Marshall Hatfield of this
city. It is a world in itself—a book—a
-tady. There is more company in it^
significance of pictures than in any mur-e
um. Why does not some one look after
aucb a m'ma a£ wealth V
FAYETTK, IOWIU
Dear Times:—Having given you a brief
di'scriptioD of the "poor farm," I will
proceed to tbe nvxt thing of importance:
the U. I. U. This noted Institution seta
on the hill, the sun gets behind it when he
wants to get up. In this school, as in
common schools, students are goy
erued inoBtly by .tbe persuasive
e oquenee of Brush refractory students
are often "suspended." The most curious
thing connected with the building, is Mc
Luin's "curiosity shop the most promi
nent curiosity, is ''wouians eurbsity." It
is comical .that the commencement should
ho the aid of the term it is ot: the same
principle of a "Germans'' house, the (rout
door on tbe back tide. The word Tethe
gaihiati, in English is Tethegampiao.
Bacca'auriate is, "a bachelor I bate" (not
usdd hy the ladies.) We have "literary
exercises" every once in a while, or a
while and a half this is all the exercise
we have. The iuo*t beneficial society is
the "faculty meetingstudents are not
permitted to attend, unless by "special"
invitation tbvn it is a "breach of
etiquette" to decline. We would be happy
to see the men of the scissors and quill
piesent at commencement, (the beginning
of the end.) If you cannot cotM, and
want a slice, I will send it to you.
Youra truly,
llATrLs T. Bavg.
Wo want It in brief. EDS. TIMB*,
A Texas paper says that though court
ing can still go on, getting married is
"played out," there being no one author-
mm
^II,. iii wmii-i
She ®iwfs.
MoUlUIuSOK, OL.WTON COUNTY, IOWA.
N. P. BICHUBDSQW ZLOHH H. ANDR1CK.
One Copy, for one yenr, $2.50 in advance.
A E S O V A V E I S I N
8puce. lw 2w 4w 3m 6m ly'r.
1 s|UHre~ tl 60 $2 50 113 50 So 50 00 12 00
2 squares 2 '0 3 50 4 M)
n ik»• u
O. W. COOK. MARTIS COOK.
Attorneys at l.itw, Kikader, Ohiyton Co., Io^va. will
attend to collections, examine li I leg. pay taxes, obtain
bounties, pensions, ic. ullii e opposite uiiil, US
R. HUBBARD & CO.,
Jewelers aud dealers iu Musical Instruments. ^Taln
Street, -i'.i-l M. KK'.nK. IOWA.
SIAYT & BURDICK,
Dealers In Luii.i..-r. s
11 11
i i and Lath, Main Street,
Mei i K Ki.(!t, linv.v
NATIONAL HOTEL,
PostTille, Iowa. General 8tage Office. C. VanlTooser,
Proprietor. 603
~GEO. L. FAf?
EMISSION. STOBACE & FORWARDING BUSINESS,
Public ss.iimre, (iKI.fioK. IOWA.
MAT. McKINNIE,
Wholesale an.! i .-:ail 'i. al in M.nes, and ManuTac
turer of lin, Cojiper and Sheet lion Ware, Main Street
MctiKKCiiR. lt')WA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Main Street, McOrepor. Iowa. A desiralde home Tor
the travelini pnl-lic. with food lmrns ami Sheds.it
tached i'ir the sale jjrotection i-l horses and wagons
442 M. MURK AY, Proi»i ietor.
J. McIIOSE & CO.,
STORAGE. FORWARDING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No. 1, on the Levee, McUKEUOIt.
Consignments solicited.
JOS. N']JOSC. 478 M'FLREUQB.
McGRESOR FANNING MILL.
.-ir.vi.v ,v w t.i i.n i.i:,
.VIaniitin tuiei ,i| tin, M, (ii-ej-or Kamiii Millfimilralii
depunttor, on Went larkei Square, corner MHIII aud
Ann Streets. 41 \v McORKGOlt, IOWA.
EVANS HOUSE.
[LUIS AMKll K'
Opposite Ferry Lapding, .Mot.re^or. Re-furnished and
tilted up ill sood style tor guest*, patronage reejiei't
full.V *"|i:-ited. tl. II. PLANDEKSt, Proprietor. 474
BEZER LODGE No. 135.
'ommunicatiuue on
eniugpreceding the t'ull utoon
RATHBUN & GILL,
DENTIST,
McGregor. Iowa.
Office Oil Main St.. ivel pi!-. Office.
'Vid -i lm'tifsri-red as sp -v iiility.
WEST UNION HOUSE,
CoruerYinc.iinll.ini si.»., I- I ION, IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL, PROPRIETOR.
(loodutabling and charges moderate. Stages going
east. west, north and ouih, call and leave with pus
tengers. moi uiiiK »n»i eveninR. ybV'l
^OAhUMAN HOUSE?
WXoiilbWi
ELKADKH, IOWA.
LAFAYKitti BxoGLow, Proprietor.
Ronovateu lumde aud out. Not exielled by any
Hotel iu tho West, (ioud Staldin^. 57
THOMAS ARNOLD,
REAL ESTATt UKUKLH A Mt OLNTRFLL AGENT, CON
VEYANCER, NOTARY PUBLIC,
Anti.^mmlshiunei oi Deeds, tc., for the MortUwes
terudkHte». v ill.itteiid (o the nurcliusi and saleol
Farm bauds.City Properly .Sti-cko.ic.,Ac.
Oilicti in Auction pii'ie. Mam Slice:, McGregor,
Iowa. &59 LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
FRANK BB.OZHISB..
("Ns.:: it, n-jvoUere,
Plnlol»,l'..ine li.in*. If'lasks.
Oartridces, "oivder, Shot, Lead,
Caps, tlun-waii», t'uilery, 4'C., Sc,
near N111 io li ii
1 Hank.
McGregor, Iowa.
Repairi uk of all kunb lie ion--nig to tke fas f«4
lock smith line done 1 loiaptlj
Charge moderate and all work Warranted.
T. II.
tiKLSlOX.
J. M.
DONALD.
VOLUME XIII—No, 41. McGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 1869.
7~f0
|lo 00 "if00
3 (Miuaroe 3 00 4 00 6 00
V 10 00 15 00 00
cul. 4 00 6 00 8 00 15 00 2.r) 00 35 00
V% col. TS0~T'i0 00Tl5 00 26 00 40 00 P?0 00
io wf 170 ooTm oo
1 column 114 00 I 18 00 I 25 00
9 Hni". V
of i i !!•'*, S
1'iiri'. nmin
I'Hiti'iii.tl line
or i n ii ii
in M"h
KiOil, IOWA. 039
O. E. BERRY,
Attorni-\ ui i- cu, Iowa. 635
DR. ANDROSj
PhysicianuntlSurgeon. KI'-M'-III II uver Peterson
Larson »Store. Otliue No. Al.is .uic illuck. 578-9U
CITY HOTEI.,
(liiiti? All-.*n ll 'U-ie,)
McOREOOR, IOWA.
T. ATWOOD, Proprietor.
This house will be kept un a lust clam liimne in ev- I
ery rospect. Kuriners are particularly invited to I
nail. Charges a* reasonable us uny other house.
JJood Stat/LMG UN«! K!'OU I .-.L e. I'.I.HI I.MG by tbeilay
or week. H41
UNION IIOUSB,
MAIN STRIiKl', MM.KKCOR.IOWA.
IJEN. II. KHESK, Prepriutur.
WINNESHE1K HOUSE.
Uecorab, Iowa. Ueuerai Stage Office
JOHN SHAW, Propri. tor. 506
JOBN T. CI.\RE. CHAKI.F.Y AM EN 0. J.CLABX.
JOHN T. CLARK Sc CO.,
Attorney ruin Ueuuhelloi.- a .1 hU Heal Estate
Agents, 1st iloor eaet ul W murnliei k -tiouae, Uecorah,
Iowa. *«r\v ill pr.irtice ill the several court* o| the
State alao attend to 1 oiler tious,
and the payment of
tuxes in Winiieaheik county. 606
MURDOCK & STONEMAN,
*T K I'OI'K. J. T.
Attiirm-ys .ui ». u 1
isTTJor^ law, will pi aclice iu the
Supreme and iJi-sti ii 1 Courts ot «liiis ^tate.
Office opposite ]*t National Ha: k. McOREOOR.
THOMAS UPDEGRAFP,
Attorney at U». 1. ii lU-:«iOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney end Counsellor at i Mt-URliOOB.IOWA.
J. C. HOXSIE,
J11
stice ot'tUf e. Uilu with 1'. L'j1
,*graff.
DOUGLAS LEFFIN6WELL,
Attoruey at Law. Mctitvgor. »-JWII. ntliee uter P«tat
son A Laiaon? ii ie 311
LOUIS MTANDRICK.
Attorney at Law. Key nold'e block r.iitran.-e »-el wtU-B
I4laud l-iH iJearUiin Sti'wc-t alau ou MJJU-'II street
mid Cuatoiu House (1*. O.) place, Chicago.
COOK &. BRO.,
O. T. TRBUO
GBLSTOPT. TREOO 6l CO.*
Seaaral Couiiiiissioii Merchauts,
NJ. 13 S. Commercial Street,
Bs-hauijo Uuildingr, ST. Ll'UlS. J10.
9. M. HOISINaTON,
O O K I N E
AHDBim BOOK MAMUfACTUREB,
OYKB TUB TIME8 OFFICE, XcQSiSGOfi.lOWA.
SPKOIALoks
ittsution paid to the manufacture of
lilnuk for Ooiiatles. Banks, Merchduts.etc.
MH--ic,1'inzlnes.P'iriodlcals. A j.,&c.t Cyiiud with
dispatch.
J. Q. Merrill, Prevt.
Wm. Larrabec, Vice Preet.
O.Uul verxon, Cnekler.
I'IH ranis
!iu rts.
R. C. AMBLER,
Attorney «t Law.Ciilunii lowu. Will ymttee in
the CourU of the ^t.iK. CIS
OUR HOUSE,"
(Late MMOD IIou«.) "nnoiia, Iowa. Refitted and
KurninUed. Gootl l.m-i v.
6W W11.1,1 MS A WISK. Proprietors.
H. BRUNNER Id. D.
Offlce, Bank Corner, Muitii'* liloik. np stairs.
041 WiORKUOR, IOWA.
DAVIS HOUSE,
Elkader, Iowa. (»i-7 I'. K. i KANB, proprietor.
A. J.JORDAN,
Attorney at Law,(etllce In ilank Tllock)
639 MctiR Jill oil, IOWA.
R.NoMn, I*. O. INfi-h. 0 Hi-nry Fiese.
NDBL E.HATCH & FRESE,
Attorney* al L.iw. Mcoi .11
FOR SALE
T»mAVMm all the Litrge Cities in KCKOPI, by
Bteiimer and FastSnilina VeK.sels.
All Kinils of OOVKKN'M KM' SECURITIES bought
and sold. 645tf
X1XBBEM
131 South Water street,
OPPOSITE
NORTH IOWA TIMES.
At current rates for sale on all the Piincipul Citiejof
England, Ireland,
Germany, Norway,
France, Sweeden,
And Other Parts of Europe.
Passenger Tickets
WE MARGH WITH THE FLAG AND KEEP STEP TO TIIE MUSIC OP THE UNION.
W. R. Kloniard, Asst. CasLler
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
or UcOXLSOOR.
Capital $100,000.
CO.,
61
TEAS,
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS,
235 Ruiidulph Street,
Oeo. Tliliben, Chicago.
N llei roil. 1
Lewii M.i ldux, New York,
W. It. Maddax. (Cincinnati.
CHICAGO.
II. A. 110MEYKR. W. YOUNa. H. R. WHIT.
HENRY A. BOZaYER
CO.,
6l
Commission Merchants
NO 10 CITY BUILDINGS,
II.
SAINT LOUIS.
Special Attention CITM to the Sale aud Purchase ef
PLOITR mirtniMT*:
SON,
SEXTON &
Wli- Ualw Dealers ia
IRON, STEKL. NAILS,
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters'
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners7 Stock,
Agri,
Liiltiiril 1 n i i-i.-ient- mid I?1 u kmitlis' Tools
338 £ast Water Streets
MILWAUKEE, WI&CONSIN.
DURAND BROS POWERS,
Wholesale Grocers,
CHICAGO, ILL.
WHAT IS IT 1
FRANK XERZMAN
PRASSALL FT CHUKCN'S UTXRY
Stable,
IMEain Street, McGregor*
Ii. readi to inn isli
ALL KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Sve Troughs, Tin Pipes,
All (Hn tact KVKRYTIilNG inhisliueoi buMtietfSwil
bv UEL! uiaUc aud put U]J.
STOVES STOVE PIPES furnished AND set »pto
order.
MEAT MARKET!
CAWELTI&BEnGIKAN.g^
CAWELTI'S BLOCK.
FULL^Inuutnesri
cttleU o usi 2icvv T'.uij iirnut) ula MMI kul»
witK Ice room, ami everythiug whichcouvini
euci aud could suggest, aud toteteruiiued
alwu.vi^to
Secure the Very Finest Animals for the
use of our Patrons,
we
reel
isatirei. luii we are offering tl •-peopli ofthis
cltv git ateu udncements tbau everbefore topatrou
i/.e li -Q-teeo of Markets. Fat Cattle bought at the
highest price. 654
The Wagon has Come!
AND THE CARRIAGES TOO!!
PEARSALL & CHURCH
^INC£ Octohei 1859, havi been
"Wail
IIUBBARD, W.M
448
s a y i n
iu tlieTllilt
foi the Wajiou." They uo»
announce
to
thi pnLilii thultieii itock of Uorseh aud Caiii»e
eithei foi biishii'fcK or pleasure, is uot excelled iu the
West.
The moM reasonuMi price.-characteriit theii" I'lO
NEK I. I.IVKKV STABLK.' locmd ahout half-way
up M.Iin Street IH-KI the Flanders House Call ou
them if you would be suited with team or Haddl*
horse* PEARSALL A CUURC11
McOrecor. Iowa.
German Lumber Yard.
.Stauei & Daubenberger,
Dealers iu
Zinmber, Timber, Z»ath, Shingles,
Doors, Sash and Blinds.
WE SUPPLY CITY AND COUNTRY TRADE ON THE
MOST REASONABLE TERMS
HAD-.or-ati
VE u ui i-stioiiai. I i he largest stock of Sash
Uiiii'U ever kepi ui (lie west—ever)
style ind rm tusiii' unv 'mi'diu^ thai cati heevect
*%.OurKis
the
ONLY LUMBER YARD ou. iie.ioi ii.
ed «r%.Ouriisth
side of Hal ii Street Me C. II KC Olt IOWA 434
JAMES GLENNON,
I \tUAI. IlKALtR IX AM. KINDS OF
Family Groceries
PROVISIONS. FLOUR & FEED.
Alwaysi u lull buj ply of
a&sssr and BXLI£9 TTLVTTB
AND CONFECTIONCIti,
"Wh it-li will be *old Ht the lowest murkVlprTcei.—
In llellwiK's llrick lilnck, ou cor. Maiu and 2d
Streets. McGregor, Iowa.
W. H. BLACKER,
Millwright & Draughtsman.
l'laas.apccillcatuins and Estimutcs madeonshort
notice.
Steam nud Water Mills built on contract or other
wise
to suit.
AVilU'umitih frooi the beat Manufeotarersalblasscs
of
Mill mSachinery—Mill Stones,
bpindleM. Curtip. lloppors. Stands, Shoes.Damsels
Ac. Smutitud Br.iu clsanors, Separators JiiUPecks,
Cups and Beliln/.
Dufuiir 4 Co.'s Old Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloths,
Extra sud Kxtrn IIIHVV
ltiut
Double Extra Heavy.
Pateutee the North W"ceti»m Turl-ine, alej I'gent
btftlie J-UEJfti#.WiUii^L, AUIutUts4JUf6s*ed«4
||cQ
ireg«r or tansipp.Xo
wpu
De*tb of Henry J. Raymond
NEW YORK, June 18.—Thesudden death
of Henry J. Raymond, editor-in-chief of
the Times, created a profound sensation in
newspaper and political circles. He
leaves a wife, a son of 22, and three
younger daughters.
The 1'ost gives the facts of Mr. Ray
monds death, from the best authoiity. as
follows:
"Mr. Raymond, accompanied by his
daughter, went to Green
wood cemetery, on
yesterday afternoon, for the purpose of
selecting a family plat. He intended to
have the body of one of his children, who
died a few weeks niro, r-moved frout the
to his associate editors that he never felt
better in his life, except a slight feeling of
fatigue, consequent upon his loag walk
through the cemetry.
"He left the office about 8 oclock, and
proceeded to his residence, in West Ninth
street, where he remained until 8 o'clock,
to recover from the fatigue of the after
noon. Mr. Raymond left the hnut-e about
9 o'clock, remarking to the members of
his family that he had an appointment to
attend a political meeting. He was seen
shortly alter, walking up Broadway, and
one or two friends, who stood in front of
Wullack's theatre, noticed his elastic step
and general appearance of robust health/'
"After attending the meeting, Mr. Ray
mond returned to his residence, about II
o'clock, and as soon as he had closed the
door after him, *he fell heavily upon the
floor. None of the inmates of the house
heard the fall, however, having retired for
the night.
"Aliout 4 o'clock this morning, one of
Mr. Raymond's children became restles,
and, upwn becoming fully aroused, re
marked that she heard sotnepereon breath
ing heavily. The persons in the house
were immediately awakened, and on de
scending the hall-way, Mr. Raymond was
found extended on the tloor, entirely un
conscious, breathing heavily, and appar
ently with great difficulty. He was car
ried to his room, placed upon a bed, and
physicians sent for.
"Four physicians arrived soon after
ward*, who pronounced him beyond all
medical aid. They also declared the case
to fie apoplexy.
"i«r. Raymond lingered in IUI uncon
rcious state until a o'clock, when he died,
surrounded lv the members of his family.
He passed away apparently with but lit
tle pain.
The news of his death caused much ex
citement and a very general rpgret
throughout the city. All the down-town
hotels and newspaper offices displayed
their flags at half mast, as a mark of're
sppct.
The Associated Pres» to-day adopted
resolutions ?xpr«i8sive of profound sorrow
at the death of Mr. Raymond.
Tbe Lt| Drama*
One of the greatest shames in the shape
of an excuse for indecent theatrical per
formances is that which asserts that the
people decline to patronize the legitimate
drama. Tho same precise argument
lai^ht ba put forward by any other model
artist exhibitor than the one who now con
tiols tbe opera*house.
Moreover, tbe assertion that the legiti
mate drama will not pay is not true.
If we are not mistaken, the engage
ments of Booth, llistori, Kean, Murdoch,
Bandmaiiti, and other first-class exponents
of the legitimate drama, have alway
crowded the house* in which they occur
red.
Admitting even that indecency pays
butter than its opposite, this is no excuse
for the prostitution of Chicago's noble op
era house to its present uses. The saute
precise reason is heard every day from
criminals, wl o urtie that tin y steal I ecause
it pays them Letter than honest efforts lo
obtain a livelihood. Every scamp who
may open some "anatomical "museum,"
or some model-artist exhibition, may
plead that be does not present Elizabeth,
or Mary Stuart, or Hamlet, for the reason
that it pays him better to pander to the in
decent elements in human nature. This
tiling of charging certain moral obliquities
upon the public is as old as the career of
footpads and sneak-thieves. Each of this
cla*s is always ready to refer his ime to
the world, in place of putting the respons
ibility where it belongs—in his own
vitiated uature.
It is a base libel on the majority of the
people of Chicago to assert that they pre
fer lewdness, and the libidinous sugges
tiveness of naked women, to the presenta
tions of the master exponents of the high
er drama. It is not the better class of
people who support these exhibitions. On
the contrary, the better class—those who
wish to preserve their daughters and sit*
ters from imbibing the poison which fills
the atmosphere of the opera-house like a
subtle perfume—give the performances
row in vogue at tbe place of amusements, a
wide berth.
It is a noteworthy fact that not a singls
newspaper in Chicago has come forward
as the apologist of the degradation to
which the opera-house has been subjected
under its present management. Most of
them, with that true currjsh instinct which
necessitates barking at something, set up
a vigorous yelp at the Times but none of
them venture to contrudict the charges
which we made against the opera-house
management. Our position is substanti
ally that of the public. It is for
the interests of society that these charges
were made. It is true that the interests of
decency begin to have precedence over
those of a private individual.—Chicago
Tuius.
SAV*D BY LATIV.—A certain Milanese
doctor, remarkable for his credulity, fan
eied that birds flew, not at the sound of a
voice, but at the sense of the words utter
ed. He one day had the curiosity to ac
company a bird-catcher, with nets,
for the purpose of proving his favorite
theory. Just as a large flock were about
descending into the Bests, the doctor
shouted loudly from his place of conceal
ment, in Latin, "You'll be caught, my fine
fpllows." The birds of course were
alarmed, and flew away. When the en
raged bird catcher sternly rebuked the
not believe
Latin."
V
that the birds understood
OBSEQTIES OF A BEE.— A gentleman wri
ting to a friend from Glasgow, Scotland,
relates the following incident:—"Whilst
walking with a friend in a garden near
Fabrick, we observed two bees issuing
from one of the hives, bearing between
them the dead body of a comrade with
which they flew for the distance of ten
yards. We followed them closely, and no-
the earth—and the solicitude with which
they pushed against it two little stones,
doubtless in memoriam. Their task being
ended, they paused for about a minute,
perhaps to drop over the grave of their
little friend a sympathising tear, and then
tbeytew#wa$»w
ted the care with which they selected a n.aid having heard of it, proceeded to a
convenient hole at the side of the gravel ..
walk—the tenderness with which they I ®us,^8hoP'
Or I (Ion of TarllT.
What is the mcaniax word Tariff
It has not the classical modulation of the
Greek or Lariii, nor the sturdy vigor and
Spain, you will take note, as in southern
811 18
admiral"'7
•nult and re-interred. He returned to the i 'nf5 entrance of the Mediterranean tion did not exceed a million and a halt'
Times office about 5 o'clock, and remarked Sea, and watching the exit and entrance
of
all ships. A fortress stands on the prom
ontory, called now, as it was also called in
the times of the Moorish denominations
in Spain, Tarifa. The name, indeed, is of
Moorish origin. It was the custom of the
Moors to watch from this point all mer
chant ships going into or coming out of
the Mediterranean Sea and, iseueing from
this stronghold, to levy duties according
to a fixed scale on all merchandise passing
out of the Straits, and this was called
from the place where it was levied 'tarifa'
or tariff, and this is the way we have ac*
quired the word."
How pleasing to the philological student
to find that this word "tariff./ through all
the mutations of time, since those grim
old Moors, perched in their rocky eyrie,
from which they swooped down on the
commerce of the world, ha* remained un
changed in its meaning and significance
Nations may change, governments be
overturned and others founded on their
ruins, but the disposition of man to prey
upon the industry of his fellow-man,
changcth not.— Western Monthly.
Look Ont.
Wa are handed the following lithograph
ed circular which was addressed to a gen
tleman of this city. It tells its own story.
We publish it to put people on guard
against such organized counterfeit arrang
ments.
P. S. e place reliance in you so far as
offering this business, but were we t« send
samples it would make our business to
public, as disinterested paities would send.
Therfore in justice to ourselves we do not
send samples nor sell in less quantities to
any one, or on any other terms.
The oldest prisoner in tho Massachusetts
state prison is George Hunnewell, who
has been incarcerated 21 years. The war
den calls him "the Rip Van Winkle of the
institution." The other day, while the
workmen were engaged in fainting the
cupola of the prison, he asked to be allow
ed to go up and look off. Ilis request was
granted, and furnished with an opera
ulass, he made tbe ascent. It was the
first tune he looked out upon tbe world
for twenty one years, lie turned his glass
towards his old home in Cambridge. "It
is all changed," was his only comment.
The St. Louis Republican says that one
of th« most striking peculiarities of the
American people is their love and respect
for the dead that we select the most
beautiful locations for our cemetries, and
embellish them with the works of art
which in other countries adorn public gar
dens and popular museums, and that what
is truly genuine and universally national
in our relijiious sentiment is clus.ored
around the thought of death.
During tho first days of the hotel wai
ters' strike in New York, many funny ta
ble scenes are reported to have taken
place. In one, a salad maker in difficul
ties, says to Johnny Raw at his elbow,
"This is not what I ordered, but it will do.
How's your celery "Thirty dollars a
month aud found, sir," was the reply. "I
tuk the place of one of tho sthrikers, sir.
They wanted thirty five dollars a month."
VAMOOSED.—A highly perfumed
and fair looking gent who gave his
name as H. Reed, came to this city
several days ago and set about organ
izing a singing class, lie succeeded in
securing about forty scholars, got the
tuition fee and then skedadled between
two days, leaving his board bill unpaid.
Reed is a short built, round faced, and
rather fair looking man, anil don't
have the appearance of being the shark
that he is. Look out for him.—Lan
sing Mirror.
A new song entitled "Kiss Mf/* was
lately'published. A sweet and blushing
a°d
ssud to a
committed the body, head downwards, to want 'Rock me to sleep.' The piece
of xnusio was laid before her. "Now,"
said she, "I want the 'Wandering Refu
gee,' and it was produced "and," she
bluntness of the Angle Saxon i but is a is now the most florighing part of America
sibilant, uncouth sound, as though it were I was known as the country around the
of barbarous origin. And so it is.
"If you turn," says Dean French, in
his "Study of Words," "to a map of
1
point, and running in the Straits of Gib- not settle until twenty years after this
raltar, of a promontory which, from its po. I time. A hundred years ago Canada be-
i,
C9 Wall St. X. Y.
Mii Dear Sir: We have a large stock of
exact copies of the genuine U. S. Treasury
Notes on hand (executed by the most
skilled men in the art outside of the States
Prison) which we desire to immediately
dispose of on the following very liberal
terms, viz
Packages representing $-0® in various denominations
priee 15.
Packages rspresentaig $1000 in Tariaus denomination"
prim jiO.
P.ick.ig'ts representing $2000 iu various denominations
pi ice fnO
tuni so on for every package thereafter.
If you order a £50 package we will sell
to no one else in your yicinity or town
tnerefiy giving you the exclusive right to
circulate or appoint agents to do so in a
town. Fur a county right you must order
au tSO package. In order to induce you
to assist us in circulating these notes we
propose to send you any package on re
ceipt of one third the price we charge
aliove, you paying us the balance two-thirds
as soon utter you have received the package
as possible. We trust only, partly to
your honesty to do this, at the same time
thiukirg. that as you will consider it to
your interest to deil with us further, you
will comply with our request. If you aie
afraid to send money to us by mail we will
send you tbe package by Express C. 0. D.
collect on delivery one-third of the price
wi- charge for a package, you sending i s
tue balance two-thirda us toon alter same
is received as possible. However, it is
preferable to have the money sent by mail
as it saves express charges, and it is sure
to come safe if you have the letter register
ed or send Post office order, you may send
money in this way to any amount at our
risk as we prefer it to all other ways, your
orders receive more attention and you get
your goods quicker. Should you desire to
avail yourself of this opportunity you
must do so at once and addiess in confi
dence, Guiubridge .t Co.. 09 Wall St. N.Y
™deBt shopman
continued, "Now 'Kiss Me.' The young
WAN BLUSHED, AND S&HTOI SQ
be exQo«id This last we doubt
WHOLE No. 663.
On« Hnndrtd Yeafi Afo.
One hundred and ten years n*o, there
tras not a single white man in Ohio, Ken
tucky, Indiana, or Illinois. Then, what
mountains of tho moon. It was not un
til 1717 that lioono left his home in North
Carolina, to become the first settler of
Kentucky. The first pioneers of Ohio did
adapted for command- longed to trance, and the whole popula-
of people. A hundred years ago, the
great Frederick of Prussia was performing
those great exploits which have made him
immortal in military annals, and with liis
little monarchy was sustaining a single
handed contest with Russia. Austria and
France, the great powers of Europe com
bined. A hundred years ago, Napoleon
was not born, and Washington was a mod
est Virginia Colonel, and the great events
in history of the two worlds, in which
these great but dissimilar men took lend
ing parts were then scarcely fore shadow
ed. A huudred years ago, the United
States were the most loyal part of the
British empire, and on the political hori
zon no speck indicated the struggle which
within a score of years thereafter estab*
lished the greatest Republic of the world.
A hundred years ago, there were but few
newspapers in America. Steam engines
had not been imagined, and railroads and
telegraphs had not entered into the remotest
conception of man. When we look back
at it through the vista of history, we find
that to the century passed has been alloted
more important events in their bearing up
on the happiness of the world than almost
any other that has elapsed since the cre
ation.
Wo DERS OF TIIE IIEAKT'S ACTIOX.—The
effect of everything that touches the heart
is multiplied by the intensity of the heart's
own changes. Hence it is so sensative—
so true and so quick an index of the body's
state. Hence, also, it is that it never
wearies. Let me remind you of the work
done by our hearts in a day. A man's to
tal outward work, his whole effect upon
the world, in twenty-four hours, has been
reckoned at about three hundred and fifty
foot-tons. That may be taken as a good
"hard day's work." During the same
time, the heart has been working at the
rate of one hundred and twenty foot-tons.
That is to say, if all the pulses of a day
and night could be concentrated and wel
ded into one great throb, that throb would
be enough to throw a ton of iron one hun
dred and twenty feet into the air. And
yet the heart is never weary.
Many of us are tired after but feeble
labors few of us can hold a poker ont j»t
arm's length without, after a few minutes,
dropping it. But a healthy heart, and
many an unsound heart, too—though
sometimes you can tell in the evening,
by its stroke, that it has been vexed dur
ing the day, that it has been thrown off
its balance by the turmoils and worries of
life—goes on beating through the night
while we are asleep, and when we awake
in the morning we find it at work, fresh as
if it had only just begun to beat. It does
this because upon each stroke of work
there follows a period, a brief but a real
period of rest because the n«xt stroke
which comes is but the natural sequence
of that rest, and made to match it be
cause, in fact, each beat, is in force, in
scope, in character, in everything, the
simple expression of the heart's own en
ergo and state.—Appleton's Journal.
SLIBP ALONE.—Miss Susan B. Anthony
is out with a paragraph in the Revolution
recommending that married people should
no longer sleep together that every man,
woman and child, should have a bed that
those who are just going to house-keeping
should buy no double beds and she ex
claims with enthusiasm "Cribs, cots, and
single beds for health and happines!"
Here is the paragraph upon which she
ba^es her advice:
The Laws of Life says "More quar
rels arise between brothers, twten
listers, between hired girls, between
apprentices in machine shops, between
clerks in stores, between hired men, bo
tween husbands and wives, owing to
electrical changes through which their
ervous systems go by lodging togethei
night after night under the same bed
clothes than by almost any other disturb
ing cause. There is nothing that will so
derange the nervous system of a person
that is eliminative in nervous force as to
lie all night in bed with another person
who is absorbent in nervous force. The
absorber will go to sleep and rest all night
while eliminator will be tumbling and
tossing, restless and nervous, and waken
in the morning fretful, peevish, fault
finding, and discouraged. No two persons,
no matter who they are, should habitually
sleep together. One will thrive and the
other will loso. This is the law, and in
married life it is defiued almost univers
ally."
In regard to this Idea the N«t York
World remarks that "it is time enough to
sleep alone when one is dead." There is,
however, some truth in what Mis* Anfcbo*
ny says.
One Sabbath evening, at a Sunday
school concert, the pastor of a popular
church said "Boys, when I .heard your
beautiful songs to-night, I had hard work
to keep my feet still. What do you sup»
pose is the trouble with them "Chil»
blaius, sir,'' said ft little sixyear old boy,
and the answer, notwithstanding the
solemnity of the eocasion, set tbe whole
audience in a roar.
Lowry, who married Anna Suratt, has
been dismissed from the Surgsoa Gener
al's employ, bj older 01 the Secretary of
War.
A Boston paper sires the dimensions of
Parepa-Rosa's voice, as follows "500
(&6t
bog, 200 feet
fcbe Colwemw,"
Minister 10 Htij t».
A. W. BASSET is appointed "Minister to
llayti. lie called ou the President a few
days ago and bade bis excellency fare—
ivell. An Iowa contemporary—the Gazette
And Argus, ot Burlington—introduces tbe
extract below with some unkind
Words toward the distinguished gentlemin
ivho^is Representing our country in llayti.
Mr. BASSET is a negro or of strnnge mi*
tvith that,unfortunate raue. We have not
the honor of his acquaintance, but we are
free to sny that nothing could be more ap
propriate than the dispatch of a colored
gentleman to a^'colorcd people. If we
are 11 on the samo plane—tho
negro ahead, by the way—wby!!not didido
liberally with our political "brothers."
They ought to havo Post Offices and judi
cial positions. Do not be illiberal, Mr.
Argus. Has not the colored man been
the "card" wbich won for our
country its present untaxed position
and its anticipated prosperity
If ko, why not play him for tramps iu
the future 1
Minister Bassett relates as follows &bOttt
his good-bye to Grant.
"When I went ^to Mr. (Irant't office
found him talking with Mr. Cresswell,
both sitting down and both smoking ci
gars. (Here Bassett smiled.) They both
received me pleasantly, and I was given a
cigar by Mr. Grant, the remains of which
I still have5(exhibiting a cigar stump.)
Our conversation WHS free and ccrdiuL*
Mr. Grant asked me several questions
about the resources of llayti, its history,
customs of people, Ac., wbich I an
swered as well as I knew how. Mr.
Grant opened a map of the West Indies
as big as that tabl ?, and referred to it.
During our conversat on Mr. Cresswell
also examined a cyclopaedia regarding
some points that arose. The president
was very emphatic, and at the same time
very cautious about expressing himself
about the policy of annexation. He said
his own views were in favor of such poli
cy, but that he thought in all cases th«
people of the country tube anrexed should
first show themselves anxious for union
with us, and that then it would be a sub
ject for the considetation of onr govern
ment. You see he was very careful in bis
expression on that subject, saying that
even after a people showed themselves fa
vorable to annexation, it would still be a
question for our consideration. He said
he had no particular instructions to give
me. I told him I could only bring to the
office, with which he had honored me, pat»
riotism, honesty, ffdeiity and industry,
lie replied that he felt there could be some
advantage to be derivsd from my appoint
ment to llayti that being accredited to
the people of the same race as myself, I
would be received with more cordial
and be enabled perhaps to be of more ser
vice to the United States. -I told him I
had assurances that I would be welt re
ceived. The interview, I supposed, oce»*
pied altogether about three-quarters «f
an hour.
Flaw il nut
era
There are people who have a natural
faculty for detecting evil, in every man's
character. They have a fatal scent for
carrion. Their memory is like a museum
I once saw at a medical college, and illus
trates all the hideous distortion* and mon
strous growths* and revolting diseases hj
which humanity can be troubled or afflict
ed. They think they havo a wonderful
knowledge of human nature. But it is a
blunder to mistake the "Newgate Calen
dar'' for a biographical dictionary.
A less offensive type of the same
dency leads some people to find appat
satisfaction in the discovery and procla
mation of tl.e slightest defects in the hab
its of good men and the conduct of public
institutions. They cannot talk about the
benefits conferred by a great hospital,
without lamenting some insignificant blot
in its laws, and some trifling want of pru
dence in its management. Speak to them
of a man whose good works everybody is
admiring, and they cool your ardor by res
glutting that he is so rough in his manner,
or so smooth—that his temper is so hasty,
or that he is so fond of applause.
They seem to hold a brief requiring
them to prove the impossibility of human
perfection. They detect tbe slightest alloy
in the gold of human goodness. That
there are spots in the sun is, with them,
something more than an obverse fact—it
takes rank with apriori and necessary
truths.
There are people who, if they heaiMm
organ, find out at once which are the poor,
est stops. If they hear a great speaker,
they remember nothing but some slip
ia
the construction of a sentence, the con*
sistency of a metaphor, or the evolutions
of an argument. While their friends are
admiring the wealth and beauty of a tree
whose branches are weighed down with
fruit, they discovered a solitary bou^U
lost in the golden affluence, ou Which no#
is hanging.
Poor Ilazlitt was soroly troubled with
them iu his time. "Littleness," he aid^
"is their element, and they give a char
acter of meanness to whatever thej
touch."
Id
New York city, on Wednesday Ipat,
tho Methodist churches chose trustees of
the camp-meeting, to be held at Sing Sing
next August. Women were allowed to
vote, though but few availed themselves of
the privilege. A lady member of the
Allen street church observed her husband
coming to vote, and at once rushed over
to him and took the ticket out of his hand.
Having examined it carefully, she gave
it
back to him and exclaimed: "You m*f
vote that, dear that's all right."' This
incident created considerable merriment.
Brother Barker remarked, "That's
what
we're coming to."—Exch.
One hundred feet on State street, CM»
eago, was sold recently for 83,400 a front
foot, or $3-10,000 for the entire lot. Itw&s
bought by John P. Farwell, and he will
erect upon it a mammoth store. We ba»
lieve that the highest prico that has yet
been paid for property in St. Paul is about
$500 a foot on Third street, but it is not a
wild prediction t!vat many of our readers
will live to sec the day when the same
property will sell foe si* tiiee# tfi$|
amount.—Pioneer.
A Traveler, in Pennsylvania, asked the
landlord if they had any cases of sun
stroke in that town.
t42vo,
sir," tsuid the
landlord, "If a man gets drunk here, we
Other nam*,"
Jk

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