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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, December 01, 1869, Image 1

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CUrtoi County Bible Society, Auxiliary
to tiie American Bible Society.
•V the Clayton County Bible Society con*
•ened for its Nineteenth Annivcrsary(
paraaant to previous notice, in the lecture
room of the Congregational church, a
McGregor, Nov. 23th, 1869, at 7 o'clock
P. M., J. II. Merrill, Esq., President, id
the chair Rev. W. P. Watkins led in
prayer, and after singing, the Secretary
XC.
C. Bioknell, read the Society's minutes,
which were approved.
The Depositary submitted the following
report
Value of book* on hand at ceotml depository
at commencement of the year $469
Value of book* returned {Turn bruuch deposi
tory 41 85
Book* received from parent aocIet/—~..»~..» 203 85
TAIM
do
do
do
do
do
4o
do
4o
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Ao
.4
#»»»h paid to Staff
k
$715
Value of botka Mtan41* branch societies... 101 68
of books IIOQLUU 12 50
Value of book* drawn by lift) member* 9 00
Value of books aolj at central depository 188 84
Talne of book* on hand at close or year 405 64
$715 60
fee Treasurer submitted the following
report:
Amount of collection In Crag*! church Mo»
regor
Amount of collection in Methodist Kpiscopiu
church, McUr?gof
Amount of cnkMvo in Qerman Presbyterian
church, MeOregnr...
Amount of eellecUen la Oerman Reformed
church, Olard *...,.
Amount«( ooileotlen it Oerman Methodist
•piscApfel afcnrek, Qiard
Amanqt of collection at auftaal moating, Nor.
16th,
Am't rec'd from Klkader branch,
SI S3
4 80
3 05
8 00
15
i» ee
is
Nolga City
JCIkport
Outtenbnf
Uarn&Tillu
Clayton
do

4lfotitory,
do
do
branch,
s n
1 70
16 20
IS 45
SI 90
19 03
Monona k taaaa do
Nati nal depository,
Qiard do
Books sold In central depot-
186 84
j120
2fl
Bf*l» ftgMitt 201 52
do do ffarentsociety...... 193 09
do do Transportation 6 36
A do Piloting,postage, Ac 19 26
S $120 C6
Which reports ware severally approved.
The Board of Managers, through the
(Corresponding Secretary, submitted the
following report, which was also approved:
The Clayton Co. Bible Society was or
ganized at Garnavillo, June 1G, 1850.
During the time it remained there, the
Board of Managers in their efforts to can
vass the county, and supply the destitute
with the Holy Scriptures, involved the
Society in a debt to the Parent Society
amounting to §183 78*100 owing to this
and other difficulties the Society became
inoperative.
On Sunday evening, Nov. I5th 1863, a
Union meeting in behalf of the Bible
cause, was held in the Congregational
Church, at McGregor, at which it was
lesolved to adopt the suggestion of the
friends of the cause at Garnavillo namely
to re-organize the Clayton County Bible
Society at McGregor. The socicty, as
re-organized, has been in operation six
years duripg this period, agents have
been appointed from time to time to can*
•ass in their several localities, but no
extended canvass of the county has been
attempted. At a special meeting of the
board of managers, held Nov. 10th JS08,
it was resolved to canyasa Mendon town
ship, but the matter was deferred, the
bo.vd desiring a thorough canvass of the
whole county, and tbe supply of the des
titute with Bibles as soon as the means at
the oommand of the 8eeiety would justify
it.
Branches of this Society are in opera
tion at Monona, Clayton, Elkader, and
Volga City. Books are left on sale at
Giard, Garnavillo, Elkport, and Gutten
berg. From the date of the organization
of the society, up to the year commencing
Nov. 14th, 1863, we find upon the records
no date of the Society's financial transac
tions. The receipts of the Society from
the sale of Bibles and donations since its
re-organization, are as follows
Jfor the year ending
do do
do do
NOT. 14,
Nor. 14,
NOT. 14,
NOT. 14,
NOT. 14,
NOT. 14,
Ai do
tie v do
d* do
Total
$65 S5
'to 369 88
6 6 4 1 9 i 9
'64 285 71
'68............ 418 66
'69 420 26
$1,989 11
Upon motion, tbe Chair appointed a
•Committee, consisting of W. I. Gilchrist,
IS. Odell and 0. C. Buck to recommend
.names for officerp for the ensuing year.
Tbe Committee recommended for Presi
dent, J. H. Merrill 1st Vice President,
J. M. Iloisington 2d Vice President, C,
F. Bell: Treasurer and Depository, Robert
Xi rant Corresponding Secretary, C. C.
.Bicknell Directors, 0. C. Buck and I. N.
^Gilchrist, who were declared duly elected.
On motion, it was resolved that the nest
Annual meeting be held at the MeUodist
Episcopal Church, in McGregor.
The following topics having been pre*
sented for discussion, upon motion, the
Chair appointed a Committee, consisting
of Dr John Low, II. II. Barnes and J. M.
Iloisington, to report by resolution at the
.close of tbe discussion the sense of the
jneeanjj upon tbe questions embraced in
*k« topics.
TOPICS.
1st. Is it necessary}** expedient, in
order that this Auxiliary may become
more effieieut, that the county should be
more thoroughly 01-gauized.
2d. Shall a canvass of the county be
made as sow A* praetioal, with a view of
supplying' with tbe Seriptures, all the
destitute individuals, families, and hotels,
found within its bounds.
.} $d. If *0, how can it be done? are there
', pa each towpship of tbe county, self*
denying volunteers, who will each take an
assigned district ip the performance of
ibis work
After the disoussion, which was partici
pated in by J. O. Crosby, Rev. S. P. Sloan,
E. Odell, l«*v. Jehn Gould, W- I. Gil
phrist, II. H. Barnes and the Preside^
Tbe Committee reported as follows
JitKolced, That it is necessary and ex
pedient, in order that this auxiliary may
j^e more efficient, that Branch Societies be
organized in every township in the county,
i Resolved. That tbe officers of this So*
oiety be a committee to confer with persons
of the different townships of tbe county,
to organize and carry out the purpose*
and plans of this Society.
a
r%
i
Resolved, That in each township, dis*
irict convassing should be had under tbe
direction of tbe offiosw pf tbe township
Branch.
Which were unanimously adopted.
Oa motion, it was resolved that all
olergymen residing in the county, oo'op*
grating with this society shall be ex-officio
^embers of tbe board of Managers.
After singing the Poxology, the meeting
"Vf^jouined to Sabbath evening.
'H* SABBATH ETSWN#, NOV. 14th.
Society re-assembled In the Congrega*
tfonal church. After singing, Rev. W. P.
Watkins read the Soripturos. Rev. John
Gould lad in prayer, a#d, tftqr again
mm
sented an abstract of the Board of Manag
er's report, after which the Rev. S. P,
Sloan delivered an address
After which a collection was taken,
amounting, with those taken during the
d*y, to 57 and 11-100 dollara*.
The Secretary announced the officers
chosen for the ensuing year.
Uncle Elisba Warner led in prayer a
hymn was sung Hon. James Wright
pronounced the benediction, and tbe
Sooiety adjourned.
J. II. MBRRH.L, President.
C. C. BICKNELL, Corresponding Seo'y.
Old Style.
Thomas Chittenden, the first Govern or
of Vermont, was a plain farmer, alike re
markable for strong native powers of
mind and the republican simplicity with
which he conducted everything in his
public duties and in his domestic establish
ment. He was once visited by a party of
traveling fashionables from one of our
cities. When the hour of dinner arrived,
Mrs. Chittenden, to the astonishment of
our lady guests, went out and blew a tin
horn for tbe workmen who soon arrived
when, to the still greater astonishment of
these fair cits, the whole company, gov
ernor, his lady guests, workmen and all,
were invited to sit down to a substantial
meal which had been provided for the
occasion.
After dinner was over and tbe ladies
were left to themselves, one of the guests
thought she would gently take Mrs. Chit
tenden to task for this monstrous violation
of the rules of city gentility to which she
had been, as she thought, so uncourteous
ly made a victim.
"You do not generally sit down to the
same table with your workmen, I suppose,
Mrs. Chittenden she commenced.
"Why," replied the Governor's lady,
whose quick wit instantly appreciated the
drift of the other, "why I am almost
ashamed to say that we generally have,
but I intend to amend soon in this partic
ular. I was telling the Governor this
very morning that it was an absolute
shame that the workmen wbo did all the
hard labor, should fare no better than we
who sit so much for the time in the house
earning little or nothing, and I am deter
mined hereafter to set two tables—the
first and the best foJ tbe workmen and
the last and poorest for
the Governor Mhi
myself."
Cackelan.
from
the
New York Coanerctol
Tet ffhen we
4dTertii«r.
With regard to lb* faot that a great
number of our prominent men in most
every walk of life have lived and died
bachelors, it is a very common practice to
seek to explain so common an occurrence
on very uncommon grounds. It is as
though men who had risen to name or
fortune by their own efforts, and passed
away without marrying, had been forced
into this species of self-abnegation for
reasons which were nothing, if not extra
ordinary. The most popular explanation
of this apparent mystery is the
Btory
BM
of
some early love some I lighted affection
whose memories forbade the intrusion of
any new interest and extinguished at once
either the hope or desire for connubial
happiness. The celibacy of Washington
Irving, Mr. Buchanan, Alexander Hum
boldt, and, lastly of George Peabody, is
thus accounted for. Tbe great banker, at
the age of twenty 'five, is said to have of'
fered himself to an American lady, living
in London, who accepted him but who at
the time was tbe fiancee of another man.
Upon making this discovery be annulled
the engagement, and ever after avowed
eternal indifferenoe to the sex. If the
truth were known, we dare say Mr. Pea'
body's experience would not differ much
from that of other bachelors who have led
active lives, and who, by the very engross
ing character of their occupations, over
looked this obligation to society until they
may have thought it was too late to make
such an alliance aB they could have wish
ed, or until the inclination to marry be
came absorbed in the ardor of other par*
suits.
Drunk.
What an awful word thnt monosyllable
is—drunk. Nothing good in it. Ittt very
sound is brutish its meaning is the syno
nym of beastliness. The sound and
meaning suggest nothing that is good,
but everything that is bad, cold, soulless
and vile.
the vfotim of the oap
aocompenied byjtbe innocence of youth—
his own children—the heart is touchcd
with pity, and the soul yearns for the
time when man shall no longer put the
cup to his neighbor's lip*.
Yesterday afternoon, in the city of Des
Moines, quite a erowd of men and women
gathered around a poor man who laid on
tbe sidewalk—drunk. Soon two little
children, between eight and twelve yeara
old, came along hunting their father.
They found him on the sidewalk, drunk,
and with their little hands dragged him by
his clothing away to their home. No
wonder their eyes filled with tears and
their lips quivered with sorrow as they
tugged hard te get hin^ out of the sight of
those who carelessly beheld his shame.
Yet what of it? Why say anything
about it? Only a loving wife and mother
in tears and agony—children in rags nod
starring for bred—a soul trembling on the
verge of eterpal ruin—that's all.—Bulks
tin.
A little boy net bis Sabbath School
teacher, and innocently asked if to say
"cofferdam" was swearing.
She replied* "no, my dear-vwhat makes
you ask that question
Ilis answer was, "I saw an old cow
down the street yonder she was nearly
choked to death' and I thought aba would
ooff^er-dam bead off."
The live stock in the State of Connecti
cut this year is valued at in
imtWM UWkW.
MoORKOOR, CLAYTON COUNTY, IOWA.
«. p. RICHAWDSOHT. .!7.~ .JOHV H. MDRICK.
One Copy, for one year,
$2.90
col. 7 50 10 00 15 00 25 00 40 00
1 column 14 00 18 00 25 00 40 00 70 00 125 00
9 llneaof Nonprnll make n'sqnare. nosinesscarda
ofSllnos $8 per annum: each additlonalline60 cts.
JAMBS DAVIS,
8h6rilT of Cl.tylon County. Office with T. UpdearkfT,
two doora below the Bank, McGregor, Iowa.
McOREOOR HOUSE,
Broaini A Hellbprg. Prop*. (666) McGregor, Iowa.
the Coarta of the State. 548
699
DOUGLAS LEFFINOWELL,
Attorney at I.aw, McGregor, xOwa. Office over Peter
son A L.irsou'n Store. 311
LOUIS M. ANDRICK.
Attorney at Law, Reynold's Block, entrance between
146 and 148 Dearborn Strvft also on Madison Street
and Custom lloutto (1*. 0.) Place, ClUCtfO.
B. HUBBARD & CO.,
Jewelers and dealers in Musical I ustrnments, Main
Street, 404 McGRKGOR. IOWA.
NATIONAL HOTEL,
Poetville, Iowa. General Stage Office. C. Vanllooser,
Proprietor. 60S
GEO. L. BASS,
COMMISSION. ST0RA6E I FORWARDING BUSINESS,
Public Square, McQRBGOR, IOWA.
MAT. McKINNIB,
Wholesale and Retail dealer In Stoves, and Mannfac
tnrer-of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron
Ware, Main Street
McOREOOR, IOWA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Main 8treet, McGregor, Inwa. A desirable home for
the traveling public, with good barns and Shedsat
tached for the safe protection of horned and wagons.
442 M. MURRAY, Proprietor.
J.McHOSE & CO.,
STORAGE, FORWARDING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No.
1, on the Levee, McGRBGOK.
Cousiguments solicited.
jot. m'HOSI. 476 o.M'oasaoB.
McOREOOR FANNING MILL.
P1CKKY WRLLIVER,
Manufacturers of the McGregor FannirgMillandQrala
Separator, on Wost Market Square, rerner Main and
Ann Streets, 415y McGRKGOR, IOWA.
EVANS HOUSE.
[LATC AMERICAN,J
Opposite Ferry Lauding, McGregor. Re-fornished and
fitted up in good style for guests. Patrouage respect
fully solicited. O. II. FLANDKRS, Proprietor. 474
VOLUME XIV—No. 8. McGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DEC. ,1 1869.
HOLLINOSWORTH,
and sxmosoxr,
NATIONAL, IOWA,
All calls promptly attended to.
R. O. AMBLER,
Attorney at Law, Cat mar, Iowa. Will practice
BBZBR LODGE No. 135.
Holds its Regular ComssunieatiensOB
Monday evening preceding the
(Wt. J. II. Merrill.
Prrst. Tknol1I..~ a—
in advance.
RATES 0V A V E TTB I N 0:
Space.
1 square
2 squares
3 squares
K'eol.' "I
6m
lw 2w 4w 3m
$1 sb'l $2 mT|350 I $5 50
2 SO 3 50 4*0| 7 60 10 00
3 00 4 00 0 00 I 10 00 15 00
4 00 6 00 800 1100 25 00
lyV
$8 60
112 00
15 00
20 00
35 00
70~00
ia
"OUR HOUSE,"
(Late Mason Ilotun,) Menona, Iowa. Refitted anil]
Furnished. Oood Livery.
648 WILLIAMS A WISE, Proprietors.
H. BRUNNER M. D.
Offlce, Bank Corner, Smith's lilock. np stairs.
641 McOREOOR, IOWA.
DAVIS HOUSE,
Elkader, Iowa. (607) P. F. CRANE, Proprietor.
A. J.JORDAN,
Attorney at Law,(office in Hank Block)
Mi OIlEOOR, IOWA.
ft.Noble. L.O. Hatch. O. Henry Frese.
NOBLE, HATCH & FRESE,
Attorneys at Law, McQREOOU, IOWA. 630
C. E. BERRT,
Attorney at Law, Cresco, Iowa. 63ft
DR. ANDROS.
Physician and Surgeon. Residence over Petersen A
Liirson'sStore. Offlce No. 3 Masonic Block. 67S-W
CITY HOTEL,
(Late Alloa Ilouse,)
McOREOOR, IOWA.
T. ATWOOD, Proprietor.
Thi* home will be kept as a ttrst class honae in ev
ery respect. Farmers are particularly Invited to
rail. Charge* aa reasonable as any other house.
Oood Stabling and good c&re. Boarding by the day
or week. 641
UNION HOUSE,
MAIN ITRXET McOREOOR,IOWA.
BEN. II. Fasss, Proprietor.
WINNESHEIK HOUSE.
Decorah, Iowa. General Stage OBce
JOHN SHAW, Proprietor. 666
JOHH T. CLAKK. CHARLEY ALLEN. 0. J. CLAIIK.
JOHN T. CLARK & CO.,
Attorneysami Counsellors at Law aad UealEstatO
Agents,
1st dooreast of Winnesbeik House,Decorah,
Iowa. 4^Willpractice in thsseveraleourtsof the
State also annul to collections,and tbe payment of
taxes in Winnesbeik county. 669
MURDOOK 8TONBMAN,
FTAMVIL KUKBOCK. t. *.
Attorneys and Connsetlorsat Law, will practice in the
Supreme and District Courts of this State.
Met opposite 1st National Bank, McGRBOOR.
THOMAS UPDEGRAFF,
Attorney at Law, (424) McOREOOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, McCiRBGOR.IOWA.
J. c.
full moon
in each month.
R. UCBBARD.W .M
GEO. B. MoCARTY, 8ec»y.
BATHBUN & OILL,
DENTIST,
McGregor. Iowa.
680 Offlce on Main St., over Peat 081c#.
llitroas Or ids administered as a speciality.
WEST UNION HOUSE,
Corner Tine and Kim Sts., WEST UNION, IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL, PROPRIETOR.
Goodstabling and charges niodttrata. Stages going
east, west,north and south, call and leave with pas*
songers,morning and evening. y632
90ARDMAN HOUSE,
(LAT« WASH1MQT0H)
BLKADIR,
Ufitim Bias
LOW, Proprietor.
Renovatedinsj^e and eut. Not excelled by any
Hotel in the West. Oood Stabling. 679
THOMAS ARNOLD,
RIAL ESTATE BROKER AND GENERAL A6ENT,
CON­
VEYANCER, NOTARY PUBLIC,
AndGSommisslonerof Deeds, Ac., for theNorthwesi
ternS'ate*. Willatttnd to the purchaseandsaleoi
Farm Lauds,City Property ,8tocks,Ac.,Ac.
OJBceln Auction Stons Main 8tre«t, McGregor,
Iowa. 66# LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
FRANK BB.OXBXBH,
McGregor, Iowa.
Repairing of all kiuda belouging totheg.waji4
lock smith line done promptly.
Charges uioderatf and all work warranted.
A CARD.
Dr. J. BVNT
n (act EVERYTHING in hinlineof business wil
bo well made and promptly put up.
STOVES
and
NORTH TIMES.
FIRST "RATIONAL BANK
or
At current rates for Ml* on all the Principal Cltieaoi
England, Ireland,
Ctermany, Norway,
Trance, Sweden,
And Other Parts of Europe.
Passenger Tickets
WP MARCH WITH THE FLAG AND KEEP STEP TO THE MUSIC OF THE UNION.
Win. Lsrrsbee, Vice Preet.
VtHulverson. Cashier.
W. R. Klnnaird, Asst.Cashier
KcORBOOK.
Cajrital $100,000.
V
ALSO
IS«AuIjEJ
To and From all th« Lnrpe Cities in EUROPE, by
Steamer and Fast Sailing Vessels.
All kinds of GOVKRNMKNT SECURITIES bought
and sold. 646tf
tamn
41 co»
TEAS, TOBACCOS AID CIGARS,
235 Randolph Street,
Geo. nibbea,
Chicago.
N. Ilerron,
Lewis Maddux, New York.
W. B. Maddax,Cincinnati. 8t9y
CHICAGO.
SEXTON* & SON,
Wholesale Dealers in
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters1
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners' Stock,
Agricultnral Implements and Blacksmiths' Tools
338 Bast Water Streets
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.
DUBAND BROS, POWERS,
Wholesale Grocers,
JUl South Water street,
148
OPPOSITE
HOXSIE,
Office with T. Updegraff.
Justice of the Peace.
CHICAGO, ILL.
"WH-A.T IS IT 1
PEARSALL CHURCH'S LIVERY
Stable,
Main Street, ZtffcOregoflfe
Is ready to furnish
Hit KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Save Troughs, Tin Pipes*
And
i
STOVE PIPES furuishad and sst up
to
order. II
MEAT MARKET!
WW CAWELTU BERGMAN,
CAWELTI'S BLOCS. ^EB»
FULLY-tettled
in oar New and Beauty of a Market
with Ice room, and everything whichconveni
encraud neatness could suggest, and Jeteterniined
iil way o
Secure tbe Very Finest Animals for the
use of our Patrons,
we foelassnredthat weareoffering thepcopleofthls
city greater
inducements than ever before to patron
ize tlieQueen of Markets. Fat Cattle bought at the
highest price. 654
German Lumber Yard.
Stauei & Daubenberger,
Pesters in
dumber, Timber, Lath, Shingles,
Doors, Sash and
Biindse
WE SUPPLY CITY AND COUNTRY TRADE ON THE
MOST REASONABLE TERMS
HAVE
unquestionably the largest stoclof Sash
Deorsand Bliuds ever kept in thawest—ever)
style andform tosuit any bHildingthatcan beerert
od *%_OurKisthe ONLY LUMBER YARD onthenorth
side of
r.ain.Ureet.McGRKGOR.IOWA.
484
W. H. BLACXMER,
Millwright & Draughtsman.
Plans,Specifications and Estimates made on short
notice.
Steam aad Water Mills builton contract orothor
wise to suit.
Willfuruisli from the beat M&uufacturersallclasaes
of
Mill Machinery—Mill Stones,
Spindles, Curbs, Uoppors, Stands, Shees.Damsels
Ac. Smut and Bran cleaners.
Separators,
USISIBI
IOWA.
IN
SlIOTGUNS.RifUs,Revolvers,
Pistols,Game Baps, Flasks,
Cartridges, Powder, Shot, Lead,
Caps, Gun-wads, Cutlery
near National Bank.
latu of Syracuse, New York, re­
spectfully informs the people of McGregor and vle-ln
ity that be ha# opaoed nuOttUc in Church A Uidwell's
block, where hip sons have their Deutistry Establish
ment. Dr. HUNT is au old practitioner, lie can be
found day and night at his otttce except when profes
sionally absent. All who wish to be treated upon
PUKB Homepathi* principles will please call on him.
All female or Chronic diseases treated successfully.
•miwinr, 19m, iw* iai M*
MillPecks,
Cups and Belting.
Dnfour A Co.'sOld Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloths,
Bxtraand Kxtra Heavy and Double fixtralleavy.
Patentee of the North Western Turbine, also agent
ferthe LEFFEL WHEEL. AP'ettersaddrcesr to
McGregoror Lansinn.Iowa. 012
O
it
A O V N
9Bir*ia*a
Office on Main Street, McGRKGOR, IOWA.
frfPEOPLE'S MARKET.
2QL
WniZAXI
4L BUOS,
WILLIAMS'NEW BRICK BLOCK MAINST.,
McGregor,Iowa, believe i i fair dealing and will
always be found ouhand ready^todeal eut tbechoicest
cuts of all kinds of Meat thut th» country affords.
Highest market'price paid forall kiudgof Stock.
Y O O S
aB.ooBn.zaa,
CROCKERY, BOOTS AND SHOES,
MSU«TOU,
Of every ki«d «e«4ed by the citlmaps,ofciJUr «r
chan
try
FOR SALE AT THE LOWEST RATES AT
& N O K S
Succesgorto llencke ABaodow, Southeastcorner
of Public Squaro and one door South of Oeo.L,
Baas' Warehoure
.McGaegor.Iowa.
«9Pnsseager Agentfor the Hamburg American
Packet Company
Also Ageut Tor the Celebrated Patent Beet Faucet
In the year of 183— there lived at Bor
deaux the last—or one of the last—of a
long line of scoundrels, who had mude that
part of France infamous (to our ideas) by
a succession of cold blooded murders,
committed under the sanction of what
people were pleased to call the Code of
Honor. There was a certain Comte de
V a man of great physical strength,
imperturbable sangfroid, and relentless
cruelty. Not a bad sort of companion,
as some said, when the fit—the duelling
fit—was not on him but this came on
once is about every six months, and
then he must have blood, it Blattered lit
tle whose. lie had killed aad maimed
boys of sixteen, fathers of families, mil
itary officers, journalists, advocates, peace
ful country gentlemen. The cause of a
quarrel was of no importance if one did
not present itself readily, lie made one
always contriving that, according to tbe
code aforesaid, he Bbould be tbe insulted
party, thus having the choioe of weapons
and be was deadly with the small sword.
It is difficult for us to realize a state of
society in which such a wild beast could
be permitted to go at large but we know
it to be historically true that such crea
tures were endured in France just as we
are assured that there were, at one time,
wolves ia Yorkshire, only the less noisome
vermin bad a harder time of it, as civili
zation progressed, than was dealt out to
the human brute.
The latest exploit of the Comte de
V previous to tbe story I am about
to tell, was to goad a poor student into a
challenge and when it was represented
to him that the boy had never held a
sword ia his life, so that it would be fair
er to use pistols, he replied that "fools
sometimes made mistakes with pistols,"
and tbe next aiorning ran him through
the lungs. The fit was on him but the
blood thus shed quieted him for another
half year, and rather more, for public
opinion was unfavorable, and the air of
Bordeaux became too warm for him.
But thp scandal blew over after a time,
and he came back to his old haunts, one
of which was a cafe by the river side,
where many used to spend their Sunday.
Into the little garden of this establish*
ment our wolf swaggered one fine summer
afternoon, with the heavy dark look and
nervous twitching of tbe hands, which
those who were acquainted with him well
knew meant mischief. The evil fit was on
him consequently he found himself the
centre of a circle which expanded aa he
went on. This did not displease him.
He liked to be feared. He knew he eould
make a quarrel -when he chose, no he
looked around for a victim.
At a table, almost in the middle of the
garden, sat a man of about thirty years of
age, middle height, and an expression of
countenance which at first si ruck one as
mild and good humored. lie was en
gaged reading a journal which seemed to
interest him, and eatipg strawberries, an
occupation which does not call foi th any
latent strength of character. Above all,
he was profoundly unconscious of the
presenco of M. le Comte de V and
continued eating his strawberries and
reading his paper as though no wolf was
in that pleasant fold.
As the Count approached this taWe, it
became sufficiently well known whom be
was to honor with his insolence and the
circle narrowed again to see the play. It
iB not bad sport, with some of us. to see a
fellow creature baited,—especially when
we are out of danger ourselves.
The strawberry^eater's costume was
not such as was ordinarily worn in France
at that time, and he had a curious hat,
which—Ihe weather being warm—he bad
placed on the table by his side. "lie is a
foreigner," whispered some in the dress
circle. "Perhaps be does not know Mon
sieur le Comte."
Monsieur le Comte seated himself
at
siiiMlliiitMliMS
tbe
table opposite the unconscious stranger,
and called loudly "Garcon."
"Garcon," he said, when that function
ary appeared, "take away that nasty
thing!" pointing to tbe hat aforesaid.
Now tbe stranger s elbows, as he read
his journal, was on the brim of the
(:nas-
ty thing," which was a very good hat, but
of British form and make. Tbe garcon
was embarrassed.
"Do you hear mef' thundered the
Count. "Take me that thing away! No
one has a right to place his hat on the
table."
"I beg your pardon," said tbe straw
berry-eater, politely, placing the offend
ing article on his head, and drawing bis
chair a li tle aside "I will make room for
Monsieur."
The garcon was about to retire- well
satisfied, when the bully called after
him,—
"Have I not commanded you to take
that thing which annoys me away
"But, Monsieur le Comte, the gentla
man has covered himself."
"What does that matter te
"But, Monsieur le Comte, it is impossi
ble."
"What is impossible
"That I should take the gentleman's
hat."
"By no means,*' observed the stranger,
uncovering again. 'Be so good as to
carry my hat to the lady at the counter,
and ask her, on my behalf, to do roe the
favor to accept charge of it for the pres*
«nt."
"You speak French passably well for a
foreigner," said the bully, stretching his
arms over the table, and looking his
neighbor full in the face—a titter of oon
tempt going round the circle.
"I am not a foreigner, Monsieur.'1
"I am sorry for that."
"So am I."
"May one, without indiscretion, inquire
why
"Certainly. Because if I were a for
«ionir.
iihnnM LA tmrftd iha nsin nf
rudely."
"Meaning me?"
"Meaning, precisely, you."
"Do you know who I am 7" asked the
Count, half turning his back upon him
and facing the lookersion as much as to
say, "Now observe how I will crush this
poor creature."
"Monsieur," replied the strawberry
eater, with perfect politeness in his tone,
"I have the honor not to know you."
"Death of my life 1 I am the Comte de
V ."
Tbe strawberry-eater looked np, and
tbe easy, jemod natured face was gone. In
its place \^ts one with two gray eyes,
which flashed like fire^4pAiid a month that
set itself very firmly.
"The Comte de V—he repeated in
a low voice.
"Yes, Monsieur. Aad what have you
to say against him
"I? O nothing."
"That may be well for you."
"But there are those wbo say he is a
coward."
"That is euough," said the bully, start
ing to his feet. "Monsieur will find me
in two hours at this address," flinging him
a card.
"I shall not trouble myself to seek
Monsieur le Comte," replied the strawber
ry
eater calmly teaiing the card in two.
"Then I shall say of Monsieur what he,
permitting himself to lie, said just now of
me."
"And that is?"
"That he is a coward."
"You may say what yea please, Mon
sieur le Comte. Those who know me
would not believe you, and those who do
not,—my faith! what ears I what they
think?"
•'And thou—thou art a Frenchman?"
No one but a Frenchman could have
thrown so much disdain as he did into the
The strawberry-eater made no reply, but
turned his bead and called "Garcon."
The poor trembling boy came up
again, wondering what new dilemma was
prepared for him, and stood quaking some
ten yards off.
"Garcon," said the Btrrngtr, "is there
a room vacant in the hotel?"
"Without doubt, Monsieur."
"A large one
,Most
certainly. They are all large-
own apartments."
"Then engage the largest for me for to
day, and another—no matter what—for
Monsieur le Comte.'1
"Monsieur, I give my own orders when
necessary,M said the Count, lofti'y.
"I thought to spare you the trouble.
Go, if you please, (this to the waiter), and
prepare my rooms."
Then the strawberry^eater returned to
his strawberries. The bully gnawed his
lip. He could not make head or tail of
this phlegmatic opponent. The circle grew
a little wider, for a bo rid idea got abroad
that tbe count had not found one who
was likely to suit bim, and that he would
have to seek elsewhere for what be wan
ted.
The murmur that went round roused the
bully.
"Mousing," be hissed, "has presumed
to make use of a word which among men
of bonot
"I be£ your pardon."
'•Which
amon* men of honor—"
"But wbat can Monsieur le Comte pos
sibly know what is felt among men of
honor ?r* asked tbe other, with a
shrug
.r:.
of
incredulity.
"Will you fight yoorself with me, or
will you not?" roared the Count, goaded
to fury.
"If Monsieur le Comte will give him
self tbe trouble to accompany me to the
apartment which, no doubt, is now pre
pared for me," replied the stranger, ris
ing, "I will satisfy hira."
"Good," said the other, kicking dovto
bis chair "I am with you. I waive tbs
usual prelitnina ies. I only beg you to ob
serve that I am without arms, but if
you—"
"O, don't trouble yourself on tbatscove,'
said tbe stranger, with a grim smile. "If
you ae not afraid, follow me."
This be said in a voice sufficiently load
for the nearest to
hear,
and tbe cii«le par­
ted li^ht and left, like startled sheep, as
the two walked toward the bouse.
Was there no one to call "police," no
one to try and prevent wbat to all seemed
imminent? Not a soul! The dreaded
duelist had his evil fit oo, and every one
breathed freely now that he knew the vic
tim was selected. Moreover, no one sup*
posed that it would eud there.
Tbe Count and his friend we*e ush
ered into the apartment prepared for the
latter, who, as soon as the garcon had left,
took off his coat and waistcoat, and pro
ceeded to move the furniture, so as to
leave the room free for wbat was to foN
low, tbe Count standing with folded at ms,
glaring at him all the while. The decks
being cleared for action, the stranger lock
ed tbe door, placed the key on the man
tlepiece behind him, and said
"I think you might have helped a little
but never mind. "Will you ive mo your
attention for five minutes?"
"Perfectly."
"Thank you. I am, as I have told you,
a Frenchman, but I was educated in Eng
land, at one of her famous public schools.
Had I been tent to one of our Lycees, I
should perhaps have loamed seme things
which wc do not teach, and one of them
is, not to take a mean advantage of any
man, bnt to keep my own bead with my
own hands. Do you understand me, Mon
sieur le Comte
"I cannot flatter myself that I do.1'
"Ha 1 Then I must be more explicit.
I learned, then, that one who takes ad
vantage of mere brute strength against
the weak, or who, practised in any art,
compcbi one unpractised in it to «ontan.i
I-
WHOLE No. 685.
with him, is a coward and a knave. Do
you follow me now, Monsieur le Comte?"
"I came here, Monsieur—"
"Never mind for wbat you came,—be
content with what you will get. For ex
ample,—to follow what I was observing,—
if a man skilled with the small sword, for
the mere vicious love of quarreling, goads
to madness a boy who has never fenced in
his life, and kills him, that man is a mur
derer and more, ft oowardly and knavish
murderer."
"I think I catch your meaning, but if
you have pistols here—" foamed the bully.
"I do not come to eat strawberries with
pistols in my pocket," replied the other,
in tbe same calm tone he had used
throughout. "Allow me to continue. At
that school of which I have spoken, and
in tbe Bociety of men who have grown out
of il, and others where the same habit of
thought prevails, it would be considered
that a man wbo had been guilty of such
cowardice and knavery as I have mention
ed, would be justly punished if, some day,
he should be paid in his own coin by
meeting some one who would take him at
the same disadvantage as he placid that
poor boy at."
"Our seconds shall fix your own weap
ons, Monsieur," said the count "let this
farce end."
"Presently. Those gentlemen whose
opinions I now venture to exju-ess, not
having that crazc for Mood which distin
guishes some—who have not bad a similar
enlightened education—will probably
think that such a coward and knave u* we
have been considering would best meet his
deserts by receiving a humiliating custi
gation befitting his knavery and coward
ice."
"Ah 1 I see I havo a lawyer to deal
with," sneered the count
"Yes. I have studied a little law, but
I regret to say that I am about to break
one of its provisions."
"You will fight me then?"
''Yes. At the school we have been
speaking of, I learned, among other things
the use of my bands and, if I mistake not,
I am about to give you as sound a thresh
ing as any bully ever got."
"You would take advantage of your
skill in the box," said tbe count, getting
a little pale.
"Exactly. Just as you took advantage
of your skill in the Email sword with poor
young ."
"Cut it is degrading—brutal!''
"My dear Monsieur, just consider. You
are four inches taller and some thirty or
forty kilogrammes heavier than I am.
have seldom seen so fine an outside. If
you were to hit me a good swinging blow,
it would go bard with me. In the same
way, if poor young had got over
your guard it would have gone hard with
yon. But, then, I shall only blacken both
your eyes, and perhaps deprive you of a
tooth or so, unhappily in front whereas
you killed Aim."
I will not accept the barbarous en
counter."
"You must I have done talking.
Would you like a little brandy before we
begin No Place yourself on guard
then, if you please. When I have done
with you, and you are fit to appear, then
you shall have your revenge,—even with
the small sword, if you please. At pres
ent, bully—coward,—knave, take that,
and that, and that 1"
And the very little Anglo-Frank was
as good as bis word. In less time than it
takes to write it, the great braggart was
rendered unpresentable for many a long
day. Thai number one caused him to see
fifty suns beaming in the firmament with
his right eye that number two presented
a similar phenomenon with his left that
number three obliged bim to swallow a
front tooth, and to observe the ceiling
more attentively than he had hitherto
done. And when one or two other ihals
hud completely cowed him, and he threw
open the window and callcd for help, the
strawberry-eater took him by the neck
and—well another and lower part—and
flung bim out of it on to the flowerbed
below.
The strawberry-eater remained a month
at Bordeaux to fulfil his promise of giving
the count bis revenge. But then, again,
the bully met with more than his match.
The strawberry-eater bad Angelo for a
master as well as Owen Swift, and, after
a few passes, the count, wbo was too eager
to kill his man, felt an unpleasant sensa
tion in his right shoulder. The seconds
interposed, and there was an ead of the
affair. It was his last duel. Seme one
produced a sketch of him as he appeared
being thrown out of tbe hotel window,
and ridicule—so awful to a Frenchman—
rid the country of him. The strawberry
eater was alive when the battle of tbe
Alma was fought, and is tbe only man to
whom the above facts are know? urb§
never talks about tbem.
TUB
LARGEST FAKK
in England contaius
3,000 acres. S. T. Alexander's famous
farm, near Homer, Illinois, consists of26,
500 acres. The latter is nearly in a squarpf
and is girded and iuterscctcd with hedges oi
Osage orange of two years' growth. There
are a hundred miles of hedge and eighty
five miles of board fence upon the premises.
Six thousand four hundred acres are under
cultivation.
"Why, dear me, Mr. Iiongswallow,"
said a good old lady, "how can you drink
a whole quart of that hard cide/ at
a
single
draught?" As soon as the man could
breathe again he replied: "I beg pardon,
Madam, but upon my sooi It was so hard I
couldn't bite it off."
A Parisian author has translated Shakes
peare's line 'Out, brief candle,' into Frenoh
thus "Get out you short candle."
Whisky paid a tax of $401,097 at the
Chicago revenue officc, for October. To-
Eccentric Connect lent Tanke«S|
BV GRACE GREENWOOD.
t)ne of the most marked personages
old Windham county Was a certain Revel*
lutionary pensioner by the name of Lid-.
coin—surnamed Jonas, I believe. Living
in the adjoining town, he was yet well
known in Lebanon, where he frequently
visited. Indeed, he was never at rest e4)
cept when tramping around and "stirring
about." lie was a harmless, good-natu^f1
ed, cider-drinking, story-telling old fellow,
whom everybody was glad to see, hore^
with, chatt-d with, laughed at ppd pitied|
for ho was alone in the world—a sad cos*
dition, which h", however, took veiy
philosophically, consoling himself fa#
sagely commenting on all the ills whicfc
married men and heads of families are
heir to.
Though usually idle and vagabondlsh
in his habits, he was a man of wonderfal
energy and perseverance when once hiq
spirit was up. On one occasion, when he
had extended a ramble to tbe vicinity
of
Hartford, hp found himself at tbe ferrj,
opposite the city, without a shilling in h||
pocket. He proposed to the ferryman te
allow him a free passage, promising to paf
on his next visit. But the Yankee Charoa
refused with a churlish "No, mister, 1
don't take you, nor no other old tramps
for notbin'. So down with your rhino or
clear eout t"
"Waal, then," exclaimed the old soldiei
"you go to thunder with your old skeowl
I won't be beholden to you, or anybody
of your sort for I'll just go reound yer
darn'd old river—see if I don't."
The ferryman laughed at what he took
for an idle threat but some weeks latcQf*
he was accosted at the city landing by tbft
same red-chceked, roughly-clad old sol*
dier, who triumphantly exclaimed
"Waal, I have been reound your old
river and here I am ii» spite of yeou, old
skin-flint 1"
It proved that he had actually perform^
cd the exploit of following the Connectici{|
river to its bead—of going around it, i£.
fact—with no other incentive than thede*
sire to show himself independent of the
ferryman.
On another occasion he applied for the
loan of a scythe, at the house of a neigh*
bor, who was a bridge-builder.
"I'm raly sorry, Mr. Lincoln," said tbe
wife of the mechanic, "that I can't ao
commodate ye but my husband ain't tq
hum, ye see, and he says to me, jest
before he went away, 'Betsy,' says he,
'don't yeou lend nothin' of mine to no
body, not on no account, while I am
gone.' So, Mr. Lincoln, ye see I can't ?et
that scythe go, not even to yeoti."
"Why, whereabouts is your* busband|
marm
"Ob, he's way dowtilft Pennsylvany,
buihlin' a bridge."
"Waal, I guess, if I go deown to where
he's to work, and get his consent, ye'll
lend me that are scythe ?'J
"Sartin, Mr. Lincoln. But, roan alive,
what on airth du ye mean I tell ye he's
way deown in Pennsylvany."
The old soldier laughed in his droll,
knowing way, then questioned her as to
the exact locality of her husband's bridge
building operations, and took bis leave.
That very afternoon he departed on one
of his "grand towers," with only a cbn a
of linen, tied in a blue checLed bnnJkecr
chief, hanging from a stick over his
shoulder, and whittling cheerily as he
left the dull old town behind bim.
About ten days or a fortnight later he
appeared before the astonished mechiinic^
exclaiming:
"Ilullo Billins, will you lend me your
scythe for a spell That are wife of yourn
won't let it go without you say so. Got
her pretty well under your thumb, hain't
ye Or. mebbe she's afeuvd to cut
friendship 'tween her and me by lendin'
an edj,ed tool."
Ten days lates Mrs. Billings was aston*
isbed to see her eccentric neighbor
appear,
al! du*ty and travel-worn, at her door,and
to hear him say quietly: "Yes, ma'am,
yer man s.iys I may take that ae scythe
and it's high time that little medderof
mine was mowedr"
Local iou of Ileaven.
We clip the following from the Scienti
fic American, of the 11th inwk.
"Theological writers have always been
pnr/led to fix upon any very definite idejj
ia regard to the geographical so to speak,
location in heaven. The Christian faith
associates it ^8 a final resting place for
redeemed souls, and preachers have drawt)
fiom it a lesson that revelation, for wise
reasons, has veiled it in ohrtcu-Uy. But
science is progressive, it digs deep iotq
the bowels of the earth, and soars away
into regions of infinite space, so that a^
lsst we havo a philosopher sufficiently
bold who undertakes to r.einove tbe per?
plexity, and solve all ear doubts upon
this sublime subject.
Instead of being a matter ef philosopbiq
and Christian speculation, we are now
provided with a scientific solution of tbo
whole difficulty by D. Mortimer, M. D.—
(not D. p.) According to his theory,
"there is a vast globe, or world, far with
in. from the surrounding photosphere of
etberial fire,which all denominate the sun,
which globe is estimated to be at least five
hundred thousand miles in diameter. Dr.
Mortimer stated that he has brought di«
vir revelation to bear ou this vast cen
tral globe, and is plainly convinced "thus
discerned is the Heavenly Empire wherein
the righteous from this earth find their
future home." Not to have made the
discovery of the exact locality of "our
Heaven," the Doctor has gone into a
mathematical calculation of the number of
minutes it requires for the spirit's flight
from earth to this celestial vbode for all of
which information doubting and believing
souls will forever thank the learned
doctor.
A party of eentimental young ladlef,
were recently ovorhoard by their teache|
rcciting the following arithmetics
exorcise :—Two glanccs make one look
two looks make one sigh four sighs make
one waltz three waltzes make one pal
pitate two palpitations make .one eall two
calls make one attention two attention*
make one fool (sometimes two) two fool*
make one flirtation one flirtation plus two
bouquets equal one engagement twf
en?agep}e^tt are equal to one mmrriagy
It is a av»plo thing, but not every honsfe
keeper knows it, that good eggs, if pet ity
water, invariably swim with the large eqj|
unu'ur.lv Amiftn will mvf.
ffpriWflET jpiprr fntr wtst mm
•J
s..

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