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North Iowa times. [volume] (McGregor, Iowa) 1867-current, December 29, 1869, Image 1

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MCQREGOR, CLAYTON COUNTT, IOWA.
ft. P. RICHARDSON JOHN W. ANORIC*.
One Copy, for one year, $22.00 'n advance.
K A E S O A V E I S I N
Space! lw |~2w 4w 3in 6m ly'r.
Vfqanro $1 601 f2 601 fS 6" I
^ttqnnrw fl50 3#0 4 50 7
y"ri»,8r.'g
N
60 00
r.o|luuu| i.,w
I a 00 I 4 00 fi "0 10 00 I In 00 I 20 00
4„i 4 oo I 5 00 I 8 00 I 16 00 I 25fMt 35^0
Xiri. la) I 10J*Tl.r00 I 2, 00 I 40 001 Vooo
1 urtinmn I iTooT 18 oo'l 25 00 I 40 00 70 00 I 12* 00
tines of Nonpreil make a'square. Businesacards
of Slines $8 per unnam each adlitiOBalline60 cts.
JAMBS DAVIS,
Sheriff of Clayton fonntv. Office with T. UpdefrralT,
two doors below the Hank, McGregor, Iowa. 779
McQREGOR HOUSE,
BrodtM^I'»lbrrR,Prop«.
(C6«) McC.ragor, Iowa.
E. HOLLINGSWORTH,
yqyKOIAg and BUROBOfV,
NATIONAL, IOWA.
All calls promptly attended to.
R. O. AMBLES,
Attorney i»t Law. '"almar, Iowa. Will practicein
the Court* of the State. 048
flAte
BOUSE,"
Mason
Ilonse.) Monona, Iowa. Refitted
9.
'la
3|
JJ O. B. BERRY,
Attorney at Law, fresco, Iowa. 686
DR. ANDROS,
Physician and Surgeon. Resilience over Petersen A
Aiaraon's Store. Office No. 3 Masonic Block. 678—99
CITY HOTEL,
(Late Allen House,)
McOTtTMOR, IGWAv
T. ATWOOD, Proprietor.
This house
will be
kept
aa
a first claae house in ev-
re*pect. Farmers are particularly iuvited to
••.all. Charges as reasonable aa any other house.
Qood Stabling and good care. Boarding
by
•r week. 641
R. HUBBARD & CO.,
Jewelers and dealers in Musical Instruments, M4^a
Vtreet, 494 McGRKUOR. IOWA.
NATIONAL HOTEL,
Paatville, Iowa. General Stage Office. C. Vanllooser,
Proprietor. 603
GEO. L. BASS,
.HMmiSSlON, STORAGE & FORWARDING BUSINESS,
public ^uare,
McQREGOR, IOWA.
MAT. McSINNlE,
Wholesale and Retail deaUu in Stoves, and Manufac
tarer of Tin, Copper and Sheet IrooWare, Main Street
McQREGOR, IOWA.
MURRAY HOUSE,
Slain Street, McGregor, T'wa. A desirable homefor
traveling public, with u"od barns and Shedsat
NMhed for the
safe protection i horses nuil wagons.
442 M. MURRAY, Proprietor.
J. McHOSE &. CO.,
ST0RA6E, FORWARDING AND COMMISSION.
Warehouse No. l,on lie l.ovee, McQREGOR
Consign in*'ut solicited.
JOS. M'HOSI. 476 O.M'UUEOOL^
McGREGOR FANNING MILL.
BlCKKY A WELLIVER,
Manufacturers of the M-Gregor FannirgMillandGrain
Separator, on West Market Square, corner Main and
Ann
Streets, 415y McQREGOR, IOWA.
415y
EVANS HOUSE.
[LATB AMERICA!*,]
Opposite ferry Lauding,- McGregor. Re-furnlsbed and
A
tied up in good style for guests. Patronage respect,
ftfly solicited. Q. H. FLANDERS, Proprietor. 474
BBZER LODGE No. 135.
Hnlds its Regular Communications on
Monday evening preceding the
lull tuoon
iu each mouth.
R. HUBBARD,W.M
OlO. B. McCARTY, Boc'y. r,F. 448
RATHBUN
& GILL,
WEST UNION HOUSB,
Comer Vino aud Kim ifts., WEST UNION,IOWA
H. J. INGERSOLL, PROPRIETOR.
Good .ttabliug aud charges moderate. Stages going
east.west.north and south, call aud leave withpae
sengers, moruing aud evening. y632
BOARDMAN HOUSE,
(LACK WASHINUTOM)
KL&ADRR. i XOWA
I^Saintxn Bx«p.ow( Proprietor.
RenftvatodlmM* »n4 out. Not excelled by any
Uotol in ine Weet. Good Stabling. 579
THOMAS ARNOLD,
fEAt ESTATE BROKER AND GENERAL A6ENT,C0N
VEVANCER, NOTARY PUBLIC,
A^nd^ luuniasionerof Deeds, Ac., for tlieNorthwes
rnd'Htee. Willattsud to the uurchaseand salooi
^'irn L.tuds,City Property .Stocks, Ac.,Ac.
iJAce in Auction Store, Main Street. McGregor,
w.. 669 LICENSED AUCTIONEER.
fRAVB BROIBIBR,
SHOTGUNS,Killes,Revolvers,
Pistols.Qaine Bags, Flasks,
Cartriil^es, Powder, Shot, Lead,
Caps, un-wads, ('utlery,Ac^Ac,
near National Kank.
McGregor, Iowa.
Kupairing of all kinds belonging to tbe gun and
vAp^k iiuitk line doue promptly.
pilot
1 bargee moderate aud all work warranted.
A CARD.
Dr. J. HUNT late of Syi icus^, No* Tork, re
spectfully informs the people nf Matt re.^or and vlcin
Hiy tliat he has opened au OlB ie in Chun-li A Liidwell's
klock, whore his nous U.ive their Dentistry Establish
v^nent. HUM is au oil iir.iciitiouur. Uucan be
,/tamn I day and night at bis office except when profes
aiou illv alwent. All who wish to ho treated upon
^CRB Hoaiepathic principles will please call on him.
All Female or Chronic div ides treated successfully.
McGregor, Iowa, fund 22d, lxti'.t. 662if
VLrxi.lt-u.irel
H. SCHOLER
|STILL ON HAVH,OFFERING A UIUGER SUP
PLY Til AN EVER, IN TUL LINE OP
hamber, Parlor and Kitchen
O I U E
^AiiSO, oomirai
fSk? gpeeeial attention paid to FRAMING PICTURES.
A beta* 9t«ok of fit* brnf Fashionable Moulding
£hr*yioa kand. i'JJO-
CALL AND DE COOVINCHDf
{FVEPEORSSMTOTVEWMU,
J. II. Merrill, Prest.
Win. Lnrrabee, Vice Prost.
0. Hulverson Cashier.
and
Varnished. Good I,ivory.
ft 18 WILLIAMS A WISE, Proprietor!.
1. BRUffffBK M. D.
Corner, Inlth'a Block, tip itain.
McORBOOR, IOWA.
JORDAN
Attorney
HW,(offlcc in RiiiiIt Block)
MctrllKGOR, IOWA.
Stable. L. O. Hatch. G. Henry Free©.
NOBLE, HATCH & FRESE,
Attorneys at Law, MoGRKGOK, IOWA. 639
the day
UNION HOUSE,
MAIN STREET, McQREGOR,IOWA.
BES. II. FRESH, Proprietor.
WINNESHE1K HOUSE.
Decorah, Iowa. General Stage Office
JOHN SnAW, Proprietor. 666
JOEK T. CLARK. CI1ARLET ALI.EN. O.J. CLUE.
JOHN T. CLARK & CO.,
Attomeynaud Counsellors at LIIW aad Real Estate
At outs,l»t lioor east of Winnesheik House,Decorah,
Iowa. 4^-Will practico in theseveralcourtsof the
State also attend to collections,aud thepaynieutof
taxes in Winuesbeik county.
MURDOCE & STONEMAN,
4/KMGKL MURD0CK. J. T. 8T0NIMAW.
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, will practice in the
Supreme aud District Conrts of this State.
Office opposite 1st National Bank, McOREOOR.
THOMAS UPDEGRAPP,
Attorney at Law, (424) MrGRKOOR, IOWA.
ELIJAH ODELL,
Attorney and Counsel lor at Law, McGREGOR.IOWA.
JTC. HOXSIE,
Justice ef the Peace. Office with T. Updsgraff.
DOUGLAS LEPFINQWELL,
Attorney at Law, McGregor, iOiv». Office over Peter
son A Larson's Store
LOUIS M. ANDRICE.
Attorney Law, Reynold's Block isntranoe between
146 and 111 Dearborn Street.alsu on Madison Street
*nd Custom House (P. 0.) place, ChicafO,
W. R. Kinnaird, Asst.CaaklW
FIRST BATIONAL BAM
or MeaxisicK
Capital S100.000.
A enrrent rates
tot sale an all tba Ptinctpal Cltieaaf
Bn^land, Ireland,
O-ermany, Norway,
France^ Sweden,
And Other Parts of Europe.
A.3LSO
Passenger Tickets
FOR S-A.X-.E
To and From all the Large Cities in EUROPE, by
Steamer and Fast Sailing Vessels.
All kinds of GOVERNMENT SECURITIES bought
and sold. 645tf
A CO.,
TEAS, TOBACCOS
Geo. fllbben, Chicago. 1
Lewis Maddux, New York.
AND CIGARS,
235 Randolph Street,
W. R. Maddux,Cincinnati. 619y
CHICAGO.
SEXTON & SON,
Wholesale Dealers in
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
F0REI6N AND AMERICAN CUTLERY.
Builders' & Carpenters'
Hardware & Tools,
Tinners' Stock,
Agricultural Implements and Blacksmiths' Tools
338 Hast Water Streets
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.
DURAND BROS. S POWERS,
Wholesale Grocers,
131 South Water streely
644
"i»"
CHICAGO, ILL.
WHAT IS XI I
A N K K E Z A N
OPPOSITE
PEARSALL A CIIURCII'S LIVERY
Stable,
Main Street, Mcdregor.
I«i ready
to
order.
furnish
ALL KINDS OF TINWARE FOR HOUSEHOLD USE,
Save Troughs, Tin Pipes,
An din fact EVERYTHING in hislineof business w
be well made and promptly put up.
STOVES
and
STOVE PIPES
MEAT
furnished and set npto
jgTSr CAWftTI & BERGMAN,g-A
A WELTI'S BLOCK. S3L
FULLTinttlediuourNuwand
IJeauty of a Market
withlce room, and everything w hicb conveni
enct aud ueatness could suggest, and luteterniiiied
alwaysto
Secure the Very Finest Animals for the
use of onr Patrons,
we feelassu red that we are offering tie peopleofthis
city greater
i ml nee men s than ever before to patron*
laetheQueen of Markets. Fat Cattle beuglit atthe
highest price. 564
German Lumber Yard.
St&uei & Daubenberger,
Dusters in
Lumber, Timber, Lath, Shingles,
Doors, Sash and Blinds«
WE SUPPLY CITY AND COUNTRY TRADE ON THE
MOST REASONABLE TERMS
HAVE
UB3STTX
McGregor. Iowa.
5SJ Office on Maiu St.. over Pobt Office.
Nitrons Ox
ids administered as a speciality.
unquestionably the largest stoclof Sash
Doorsand Minds ever kept in tliewest—every
Style and form to
suit anv building tliatcan beerect
«i. »i.OursistkeONLY LUMBER YARD onthenortb
side of EainStreet.McQREQOH IOWA. 484
W.H.BLACKMER,
Millwright & Draughtsman.
Plane,Specifications and Estimates niadeonshort
notice.
Steam and Water Mills built on contract oretber
wise to suit.
Willfurnish from the best Manufacturersallalasses
•f
Mill Machinery—MU Stoats,
Spindles, Curbs, Hoppers, Stands. 8hees,Damaels
Ac. Smutaud Rran cleaners.Separators,Hi I IPecks,
Cups aud Belling.
Dufotir A Co.'sOld Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloths,
Extra and Kxtra lleavy and Double Kxtra Heavy
Patentei of the Northwestern Turbine, alsoagent
forth* LKFKKL W11KKL. A)1 t0ttersaddressr!to
McQregoi or Landing,Iowa. 812
C.
U N
S Z O S V E N I S S
Office en Main Street, McGKKGOR, IOWA.
PEOPLE'S MARKET.
WZLLZAUS 4l BRO.,
IN
WILLIAMS'NEW BRICK BLOCK MAINBT..
MeOregor,Iowa,believe i fairdealing,ind wil
always be found on
hand readyjtodeal out the hoicest
cut s of all kinds of Meat that the country affords.
Ililth est market'price paid for all kinds of Stock.
Y O O S
OB.OOSB.XSS,
CROCKERY, BOOTS AND SHOES,
Am UQUOB.S*
Of er#r kind needed by tbe citiicns of oitv oreonn
tr*
ttlt SALE IT THE LOWKT MTU
1
E N K S
Sm-cessorto llencke A Itaadow. Southeastrorner
Of Public Square and one door South of Geo.L.
Bans' Ware
hour a .McQaegor. Iowa.
Passenger Agentfor thellambnrg American
Pnrket Company
r\AU» A «M)t(pi ta* CelehvB ed Patent »er faucet
LINES.
IMCRIBEDTO MY FRIHRD A.H.*.
Thank Ood for 'riends. true hearted I
Kind friends in joy, or sorrow
Who will not smile on me to-day,
And frown on me j-morrolTk
A friend that always is the
On whom I cau depend
When eiyry's shafts assail me,
And jisone 1 arrows send
To blast the rays of snntbin^ i
Th.it wit), the shadows VleiM^
Across my lonely pathway,
Oh then, thank Ood for friendt.
If life should be all happinesa.
If Ileaven Its blessing send
To share with me those blessiMQfc
Give me a faithful friend.
I ask not fame, I ask not wealth,
There's natifcht such lustre Imnde
To gild onr path-way through this life
Ai kind,
true-hearted friends.
And thle shall be my daily prayer,
rh .1 to High Heaven asi nds
Ood's choiscst blessings on the
Who flrlt invented friends
Once quarried, they loaded it on a vrag
qn, and conveyed it thereon forty miles to
a railroad. Thence it was sent to Chi
cago.
As geologists pronounce the giant noth
ing but a gypsum statute, and measures
about the same as the Ft. Dodge picee
considering that this same Hall was seen
near Newell's, (on whose farm the statue
wns found,) the same day that an iron
bound box was seen on the way near
Newell's, drawn by four hordes, and that
he was seen next morning about two miles
from there, his clothes all muddy and he
having to all appearance been out all
night, no other conclusion can he reached
but that the Syracuse or Cardiff giant was
manufactured out of Fort Dodge gypsum,
and that it was buried where it was found,
by this same llall, who purchased the
acre.
The theory is this: llall and Martin
went to Ft. Dodge, got the gypsum block
out, took it to Chicago where it was carved
and worked into a statue. It was then
boxed and taken to iinghampton, or some
other point, and from thence by wagon to
Newell's farm where it was found. Hall
was seen in Chicago three or four weeks,
and still after that by Gov. Gue, of Ft.
Dodge, and a number of other persons
living in Ft. Dodge. We have a strong
suspicion that Col. Wpod, of the Chicago
Museum, is concerned in the "sell," else
why should he happen around just at the
time they were digging the poor "giant"
out and a showman was needed to exhib
it it
The facts given can be proved by re
sponsible persons in Webster County. If
the two pieces of mineral are not one and
the same, the already mystified affair is
put in deeper obscurity. Two questions,
instead of one, will arise: What became
of the Fort Dudge statute? Whence the
origin of the Syracuse?
If the two are identical, what a mortifi
cation will be experienced by the wise
men of the East who have puzzled their
brains over this apparently wonderful
phenomenon, yet should themselves be
incapable of reading the Iowa Gypsum
Sphinx If they want any more such,
the Hawk-Eye State can furnish them
enough to till their Coliseum, and then not
create a "panic" nor ''corner" i» uypaum.
—Dea Moines Bulletin.
In a Horry.
We came in possession (no matter how),
last week of an incident illustrative of the
great haste now a days to slip the matrimon
ial noose,in order to have it tied again,which
is too good to keep. A lady who had long
borne the trials and tribulations of an un
congenial mate, applied for, and, after the
law's customary delays, obtained a decree
(o once more revel in the delights of
|neness, entered her attorney's office and
tnquired :—"Have my papers come yet?"
On being answered in the negative, she
f^ked, "when will they be here?" The
attorney replied that he did not know it
might be several days yet. "Several
days!" she repeated in amazement. "I
cannot wait! 1 must have them, to day
"Why," inquired the attorney, "are you
in such a hurry you have waited over two
years already, ard surely a day or two
longer can't make much difference
"Well," she replied, "I can't wait I must
have them papers to-day and seeing it's
you, I'll tell you I promised to take the
5 o'clock train to-morrow morning to go
up the road and marry a fellow, and if
them papers don't come, I may clip up on
it, I tell you I viust have them papers this
afternoon." The attorney promised to do
all he could to obtain them for her in due
season for the 5 o'clock train, and the
freed dame left the office with the strict
injunction to be sure and not fail. And
he did not fail, greatly to the delectation
of his interesting but hasty client, who
took the 5 o'clock train and another hus*
land the same day.— Cedar Rapid Times.
Life Assurance Companies nat only un
ilertake the equalization of life, but also
the return of the sums invested with com
pound interest. They are capitalists,
constantly looking out for long invest
ments, and well organized to deal profita
bly in securities.—lr, la*, iiwWub
iugtou is oue of tiicw.
VOLUME XIV—No. 12. McGREGOR, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 29, 1869.
man.
"VANNIR."
The Cardiff Giant.
As our readers are aware, the New
Yorkers, especially those who reside in the
vicinity of Syracuse, have lately been
frcately excited. The cause of it was the
discovery of a singular piece of statuary,
iuibedded in the etftth near Syracuse,
hich is ten feet three inches high,
and two inches broad. Common folks*
and uncommon folks—lord and plebeian—
Bavan and illiterate have visited the giant,
each giving his opinion as to the pedigree
of the thing, and its rise and full, as Gib
bon did of the Roman Empirn yet no
two could agree on any one explanation.
Some thought it a petrified giant, of aa
extinct race'which roamed over that sec
tion of America before Ilendrick Hudson
sailed up and gave his name to the pali
sade river that bears his name. Others
contended that it was a lost piece of stat*
uary that had belonged to Barnum. Some
local thought it bore a strong resemblance
to a Welshman he once saw in an exhibi
tion. Still they all differed.
Ilall and Martin,- the owners of the
What-i8-it, took it to Syracuse, associated
with them Col. Wood, of Wood's Chicago
Museum, and started a show. Latest re
ports from them say they have already re*
alized some ten thousand dollars from
their exhibition, and the crowd is increas-
inP-
A correspondent at Fort Dodge, in this
State, sets himself up as an inconoclast,
and gives what will probably prove to be
a correct account of the origin of the gi
gantic mystery. Ilis story is briefly
this:
In September two men appeared in Ft.
Dodge and paid John Demottone hundred
dollars for an acre of gypsum land. They
built a shanty and went to quarrying for,
as they said, a handsome pieoe to carry to
A*ew York.
NORTH IOWA TIMES
His Last Christinas.
It was very strange, thought old Joseph
Golding, that he couldn't be master of his
own mind. lie had lived a great many
years, and neither remorse nor memory
had ever been in the hnbit of disturbing
him but now it seemed to him as if the
very foundations of his life were breaking
up. He was well through with his day's
work—he had dined comfortably—he sat
in an easy chair in a luxurious drawing
rotJfti, whose crimson hangings shut out
the still cold of the December afternoon—
he had nothing to do but enjoy himself.
Mr. Golding liked to enjoy himself at this
season as much as others did, for it was
Christmas eve. What though he was in
the habit of spending it solitarily ?—he
likod solitude. Perhaps tneause nothing
more lively came in his way, and he was
too shy and proud to look out for it.
For many a year on Christmas eve he
fc*d sat balancing in his mind the great
accounts presented in his ledgers, the ac
cumulating coffers at his banker's, the
strokes of business he would make in fu
ture. Not so now. The year was draw
ing to a close some intruding voice kept
whispering that in like manner so was his
career. He could not pat it from him,
try as he would. The voice reminded him
of a coming time when his life's work
would be all done—even as his day's
work was all done now—when be would
be ready to sit down in the evening and
look over tho balance-sheet of his deeds,
good and evil. Curiously the old days
came trooping in slow procession before
him. And he h&d been able to forget
hem for so very long 1
Ilis dead wife. He had not loved her
much when she was with him, but how
vivid was his memory of her now I He
could see her moving round the house,
noiseless as a shadow, never intruding on
him after he had once or twice repulsed
her gruffly, but goinj. on her own mfck,
still ways, with her face growing whiter
every day. He began to understand, as
he looked back, why her strength had
failed and she had been ready, when her
baby came, to float out on the tide ami let
it drift her into God's haven. She had
had enough to cat and to drink, but he
saw now that he had left her heart to
starve. Heaven what a hard man he had
been He seemed to see her white, still
face, as he looked at it the last time before
they screwed down the coffin lid, with the
dumb reproach frozen on it the eyes that
would never plead vainly any uiofe, closed
for ever.
WE MARCn WITH THE FLAG AND KEEP STEP TO 'TIIE MUSIC OP THE UNION.
He recalled bow passionately the three
days-old baby had cried in another room
just at that moment, moving all the people
gathered together for the funeial with a
thrill of pity for the poor little motherless
morsel. She teas a passionate, wilful
baby, all through her baybvhood he
remembered that. She wanted—missed
without kno^feig what the lack was—the
love and sustenance which her mother
would have given her, and protested
against fate with all the might of her in
fant lungs. But as soon as she grew old
enough to understand how useless it was,
she had grown quiet, too just like her
mother. He recalled her, all through her
girlhood, a shy, still girl, always obedient
and submissive, but never drawing very
near him. Why Becasue he would have
repulsed her as he repulsed her mother.—
lie could see it now. It was very strange
these facts should come back to him to
day. and their naked truth with them.—
He had been a cold, hard, ungenial man,
without sympathy for any one human be
ing absorbed utterly in the pursuit of
money.making. And so the child, Amy.
Lad grown up in shadow without him.
But suddenly, when she was eighteen,
the old, passionate spirit that id luadn
her cry so when a baby, must have awak
ened again, he thought for she fell in
love then, and wished to marry. To
marry in defiance of his wishes. He re»
membered her standing proudly before
him after one of their quarrels, where he
had been harsh and bitter, and abusive of
the man she wanted to call husband. She
had borne in silence reproach of herself
but not of him who had become to her as
her best existence. Her words came back
to the old man now.
"Father, do you know anything against
Harry Charch
"Yes," he had answered, wrath fully
"I know that he is as poor as Job was
when he sat among the aahes. He canoot
keep a wife a* a daughter of mine must be
kept."
'"Anything else, father?" looking him
steadily in the eye.
"No, that's enough," he thundered.—
"I'll tell you, besides, that if you marry
him you must lie in the bed you will
make. My doors will never open to you
again, never."
He met with a will as strong as his own,
that time. She did marry him, and went
away with him from her father's house.
Mr. Golding had known the day the wed
ding was to take place, and disdained to
stop it. lie w.ashcd his hands of Harry
Church, and of Amy, his wile. She wrote
home afterwards over and over again, but
Mr. Golding sent all the letters back un
opened. Subsequent to that, they disap
peared from the town and he ha^ never
heard what bccame of thMft. It was at
least ten years ago now.
It Beemed very strange that these things
should have come back to-night to haunt
him—and with a wild remorse, a pitying
regret. He had done nothing to recall
them. Could
:t
be his sense of failing
health that brauolit them ?—if so, what
sort of anguish might he not look for as
he drew nearer and nearer to the ending?
He began to wish that he knew what had
been in those rejected letters—whether
Amy had bcon suffering for anything that
money could supply. The next thought
that struck him was, why he had opposed
tho marriage so virulently. It is true
Ilurry Church had been but a clerk in his
own employ but he was a well'educated
gentleman, and would rise with time.
Faithful, intelligent, persevering, respec
ted—but poor. In that last word lay the
head and front of Harry Church's offend
ing. He, Joseph Golding was rich then
he was far richer now but, he could not
help asking it, what sp ei 1 good were his
riches bringing him lie was an old
man, the span of life running quickly on,
and he was all alone. Who would take
his gold then He could not carry it
along with him. AH in a moment—he
saw it clearly—the dreadful truth stood
naked and bare: his life and its object
had been mistaken ones.
"All alone all alone he kept saying
to himself, in a sort of vague self-pity.
"I've toiled and worked for nought 1"
But during this time, even now, as he
sat there, a message of love was on its
way to him. Perhaps Heaven had been
preparing his heart to receive it 1
He heard a ring at the doorsbell.
Heard it without paying attention to it.
Rings were nothing to him people did
not come on business to his residence, and
of visitors he expected none. Down went
his head lower and lower with its weight
of thought.
Meanwhile, two people were admitted
in the hall below a man and little girl.
The man had the appearance of a staid,
respectable servant. He took off the
child's warm cloak and hood, and she
stood revealed a dainty, delicate creature
of some eight years old her golden cuils
dmoping softly round her face, with its
large blue eyes and its cherry lips. The
admitting maid, not knowing Vhat to
make of this, called Golding's housekeeper
old Mrs. Osgood. The latter went into a
tremor as she came forward and looked at
the face.
"It's Miss Amy's child I" she exclaimed
to the man, nervously. "I couldn't mis
take the likeness.'1
"Miss Amy's that was," be answered.
"Mrs. Harry Chnrch she lws been this
many a year." -t
"I know. It is as much as my place is
worth to admit any child of her's here."
"You are Mrs. Osgood." exclaimed the
little girl. "Mamma said I should be sure
to see you."
"Hear the blessed lamb 1 And oo she
remembers me."
"Shn talks oPyou often she says yoa
were always kind to ber nobody but you
loved her."
"Well, I did love her. The old house
bas neyer been sffrreehn went
out of il. What's your name, my pretty
oue?"
••Amy."
v
"A my f" repeated tho iionsekeeper,
lifting her bands, as if there were oome
wond in it.
"And mamnw said you would let me go
up alone to grandpapa."
"And so you shall,1' decided Mrs, Os
good, after a minute's hesitation. "I won't
stand in the way of it, let master be as
angry with me as he will. He is up in
the drawing-room, all by himself."
The man sat down, to volt. And tbe
child went up alone
"How did this come here?—who
brought it?" demanded Mr. Golding, in
his usual imperious manner.
"I did, grandpapa."
He sprang up at the s6ft timid yofati, as
if some fright took him, and started at
the lovely vision, standiug there like a
spirit on his hearthstone, with her white
face and her gleaming golden hair. Was
it real? AVhere was he? Who could
this child be? But, as he looked, the
likeness flashed upoa him—and he grew
hungry to clasp her to him. It was the
little Amy of the old days grown into
beauty—for Amy had never beettso won
drously fair as this.
"Come here, giy child don't be afiraid.
Tell me what your name is."
"Amy, grandpapa."
Another Amy I Grandpapa 1 He felt the
sobs rising up ia bis heart with a greai
flood of emotion but he choked them
back.
"What have they told you about me
he rejoined, after a long pause. "Have
they bid you hate me
"They always told me
that
yo« were
far away toward where the sun rose and
if I were good they would bring me to see
you some day. Every night I say iu my
prayers, 'God bless papa and mamma, aud
Gud bless grandpapa.1
"Why didn't they bring yotvf ^ffhat
mude thein let you come alone ?tV,
"Mamma sent me with John to give you
the letter," was the simple answer, -lhe
carriage is at the galp^ waitiog^jksp *e."
"Who is John
"Papa's servant."
"And—wh'ere are they staying
"At the hotel. We oni^ got here this
morning."
Mrs. Osgood, boverinf i* the hall,
looked on in wonder. Her master was
coming down stairs, calling for his hat
and coat, and leading the child. He got
into tbe carriage with her and it drove
away. Mr. Golding was wondering vag
uely whether it were real.
They arrived at last, and the child led
Vim in, opening a door at the end of a
lend corridor. She spoke cheeringly.
"Mamma, here's grand «pa. He said he
would come back with me."
Mr. Golding's head went off in a swim.
Advancing weakness tells upon people in
such moments as these. He sat down
and there were Amy's urrns—his own
Amy's—about his neck. Which of the
two sobbed the most, could not be told.
Why had he never known what he lost
through all those vanished years?
"Father, are wo reconciled at last?"
"I dou't know, my daughter until you
U1 me whether you forgeve me."
"There should be no talk about forgiv
enness," she said. "You wont according
to your own opinion of what was right.
And perliaps I was to blame, too. Fatt­
er, it is enough that God has brought as
together again in peace. I thought that
no one could resist my little Amy, least of
all, her grandpapa."
He looked up. Tho child stood by,
silently, the firelight glittering on her
golden hair, her face shining strangely
sweet. He put out his nrms and drew
her into them, close—where no child, not
even his own, had ever nestled before. Oh,
how much he had missed in life !—he I
knew it now. He felt her clinging hold
round his neck—her kisses dropped upon
his face like the pitying dew from heaven
and be—was it himself, or another soul in
his place?
"Father, see."
Arafj voice had a full, cheerful ring in
it. Her married life had been happy.
Mr. Golding turned at tho call.
"Here are Harry and the boys waiting
to speak to yoa," she said, in a less assur
ed tone.
lie shook his son-in-law's hand hearti
ly. Old feuds, old things, were over now,
and all was become new. fn his heart,
until that trouble came, he had always
liked Harry Church. Then he looked at
the two boys, brave, merry little fellows,
of wham he might be proud.
Explanations ensued. Fortune had
favored Mr. C'hurjh they had come back
for good,
ood were
already looking oat for
a house.
"No house but mine," interrupted
Joseph Golding. "It will want a tenant
when I am gone. You must come home
to-morrow."
"To-morrow will be Christmas day,"
said his daughter, half-doubtingly.
"All the better. If Christmas was nev
er kept in my house, it shall be now. I
shall not live to see another, Amy."
She looked up at the changed, thin,
face, and could not contradict him. Some
one, going out to the West Indies, had
told them how Joseph Golding was break
ing the news had caused them to huiry
home prematurely. Amy said to her hus'
band that if her father died, unreconciled
to her, she would bo fall of remorse for
ever.
"You will come home to-morrow, all of
you," repeated Mr. Golding. And mind,
Amy, you do not go away again."
"But—if the children should bo too
much for you, father I
"When they are, I'll tell you," he said,
with a touch of former gruffness. The
old house is large enough."
lie went out and found his wof to,
the shops—open to tbe lust on Christmas
eve in the old town—looking for Christ
mas gifts. Ntjw work for him!—but
he entered iato it Earnestly. Perambula
ting the streets like a bewildered Santa
Claus he went home laden with books,
and toys, and jewels, and bon bons. Mrs.
Osgood lifted her hands, and thought the
end of the world must be coming.
"Help me to put these things away,
Osgood. Don't stare as if you were
moon-struck. And, look here—there'll
be company to dinner to-morrow. Mind
you send in a good one."
"The best that was ever seen on a table,
master—if it's for them I think it may be
for."
"Well, it is. Miss Amy's ooming home
again."
"Heaven be praised, sir! The house
has been but a dull one sinoe she left it."
"They are all coming. And they will
not go away again, Osgood. If you want
more servants you can get them."
"It's the best Christmas Box you could
have given me, master."
And they came. Amy and Amy's hus
baud and the pretty boys were there: and.
best of all, the sweet little girl with the
golden hair, sitting next to grandpapa. It
was too happy a party for loud mirth.
And among them Joseph Golding saw, or
fancied he saw, another face, over which,
almost thirty years ago, he had watched
the grave-sod piled—a face wistful no
longer, but bright with a strange glory.
Close over beyond him she seemed to
stand and he heard, or fancied that he
heard, a whisper from her parted lips,
though it might have come only from his
own heart,
"Peace on earth and good will toward men."
Opening the door, she went softly in,
not speaking perhaps the stcru-looking
old man, sitting there with bent head,
awed her to silence. Joseph Golding,
waking up from his deep reverie, saw a
letter held out to him. He took it me
chanically, supposing its messenger, hid
den behind his large chair, was one of his
waiting-maids. With a singular quicken
ing of pulse, he recognized his daughter's
writing.
She had waited all these silent years,
she told him, because she was determined
never to write to him again until they
were rich enough for him to know that
she did not write from any need of his
help. They had passed these ten years in
the Indies,'and heaven had prospered
them. Her husband was a rich man now,
and she wanted from her father only his
love*—wanted only, that death should not
come between them, and neither of them
go to her mother's side without having
been reconciled to the other.
METHODISM.—The
Methodist Almanac
for 1870, publishes theso figures, showing
the strength of the denomination in the
Southern States
Traveling preachort 2,495
Local prtaohers 4,413
White members 503,590
Colored members 22,085
Total 542,589
Tho increase of travelling and local
preachers, and white members, in one
year was 31,079. The decrease of colored
Biembers in tbe same period was H2.087.
There are nine Bishops in the South,
j. Early is the oldest in tbe service, he
having entered the ministry in 1870, and
was elected Bishop in 1^.2.
The difference between Love and Law—
In love the attachment preceds tbe decla*
ration in law th« tbwhurnUi)*. .paceds
tho attachment,
WHOLE No. 689.
Wisdom for the Kitchen.
Good business habits m*y b« taught
over a kitchen stove. In tho first place
the stove ca'.ls one up early in the
morning to begin the regular work of the
day. If due preparation has been made
the night before, short time will suffice to
put our "Mutual Friend" or our "Stew
art" into a generous glow of warmth that
contains promise of hot coffee, etenming
potatoes, savory meats, and lucious batter
cakes. Here may one lsarn the true prin
ciples of thrift which begin with food.
Watch that executive woman as she stands
over this genius of the kitchen. Over
one hole is the tea-kettl?, over another,
meat is frying or broiling, the potatoes
and toast are heating on the back of tbe
stove: apples, perhaps, are baking in the
oven, and, without burning any of the
half-dozen dishes she is preparing, they
will be so timed, as to be all ready togeth
er and brought upon the table in due or*
der and "done to a turn." Will not such
a woman be likely to raise her sons to be
good business men Then again, a per
son who lives £orn hand to mouth by the
stove will do so in life. Some people you
will find who cook at one meal or for one
day just enough food for tbe time and
have nothing left over they are slways
behind with their work. But look at that
provident cook who lays up a store of
bread, and pies and meats she has leisure
for something beside kitchen drudgery.
In cold weather we advocate big bakings
and big stoves bread will keep a week,
pies two or three, cake all Winter, cold
meats can easily bo warmed, and thus the
labor of these short days abreviated. If
you cook when you have a fire you will
have something to eat when the fire is out
and you will have something better than
that, the consciousncss of amplitude of
resources and of managing your affairs
with prudence and discretion. The essen
tial difference between thrift and shiftless
ness may be found in the fact that one
always contrives to be ahead, however lit
tle it may be the other is almost up to
the mark, only a trifle behind, perhaps,
but just enough to miss its aim. The
most provident of races is the Anglo Sax
on to it all victories are given. The In
dian, on the other hand, feasts while there
is plenty, but makes no provision for a
rainy day, and when the abundance is
gone, hunger must come. The old saw
"dip and deal and have a little at every
meal" has no significance to him, and for
bis want of thrift he must pine away and
die, leaving this vast continent to his bold
and thrifty successor.
The 51nth Census Bill.
This bill provides for a General Super
intendent and Census Bureau, to be loca
ted at Washington. It provides that the
census, instead of being taken by the Uni
ted States Marshals, as heretofore, shall
be placed in charge of District Superin
tendents, one in each Congressional Dis
trict, to be appointed by the President.
Each District Superintendent is empower
ed to employ as many enumerators as
muy be necessary to take the census with
in the time fixed by the bill, viz between
the first and thirtieth of June.
Provisions are made for a careful col
lection of all facts regarding the commer
cial, agricultural, manufacturing, mining,
fishing, and indeed all the industrial and
provisions are believed to be ample for the
collection of all important statistics, if
the superintendency is placed in compe
tent bands and efficient district superin
tendents are selected. Statistics are to be
gathered regarding educational, religious,
social, reformatory and criminal matters,
and everything that affects society.
In regard to the apportionment of rep
resentation, the committee have left the
number of Representatives blank, al
though tbe number of 300 was talked of.
This, it was estimated, would give onfc
representative for every 133,000 inhabi
tants—the present aumbwr Leuag ono fur
every 228,000.
The Cost of the War.
The report of Commissioner Wells to
Congress, contains an estimate of the cost
of the war to suppress the rebellion. The
government spent, in war expenses and
expenses growing out of the war, down
to Jttae 30th, 1869, §4,171,914,498. This
excludes what the administration would
have cost had there been no war, and may
be called tbe net cost to the government
of the rebellion. The Commissioner adds
the following items, which rightfully en
ter into tbe cost: Pensions, capitalized
at eight years purchase, $200,000,000
increase of State dobte, mainly on war
account, §136,000,000 souuty, city and
town indebtedness increased on account
of the war (estimated), §200,000,000 ex
penditures of States, counties, cities and
towns, on account of the war, not repre
sented by funded debt (estimated), $000,
000,000 estimated loss to the loyal
States from the diversion.and suspension
of industry, and the reduction of the
American marine and carrying trade,
$1,200,000,000 estimated direct expendi
tures and loss of property by the Confed
erate States by reason of the war, #2,700,
000,000. These aggregate a total loss to
the country, directly resulting from the
war, of $9,000,000,000. There was spent
and wasted in the war money enough to
build ninety Darien ship canals or to
build a hundred Pacific Railroads or
nine times as much as would double track
every railroad in the United States.—
Syracuse Journal.
Governor J. W. Stevenson harboen
elected Senator from Kentucky by a
majority of 101, Hon. F. C. MeCreery
having withdrawn his name,
The papers announue tho failure of N.
H. Kattenburg, one of tho oldest mer-
1chants
of btillwater, Minn. Advaoceo-to
lumbermen caused his suspension
Tfrow Gems are Colored.
It is remarkable that rotmded sapphirw
•nd rubies are always tho densest, and of
the finest water and color, showing that
they are formed by different shemical for
Oes from the others. In short, there it
no more reason for supposing rounded
sapphires to be water-worn than for sup
posing that the boulders of jasper, tot
instance, on the Egyptian desert, are so
formed, when a fraction shows them to
have been formed in concentric layers,and
to be in their original state. The same
remarks apply to the crystals of soma
other minerals, as zircon, tourmaline, and
spinel. The oriental ruby, or red variety
of corundum, is the most osteemed, but
the rarest, and when large, and pure in
water and color, is of great value. The
oriental sapphire, or blue variety, ia only
inferior in value, but found in greater
abundance bnt so capricious is the color
ing, that it is very didicult to find two
stones of the same tint of blue, unless cut
from the same piece they vary from the
deepest violet blue, to the palest and
almost imperceptible tint—even losing
that and becoming colorless, when they
form a very beautiful g6m, remarkable for
its whiteness and the*abscnce of prismatic
colors. The commonest variety ia the
oriental topaz, which is of every shads of
yellow when pure it is highly valued,
but among hundreds of specimens it is
very few that are found without a milky
opalescence, that is intensified on the
stone being cut, which renders them
worthless. Tbese gems are colored 'bv
metallic oxides.
Marriage Cercmon/i
A Dutch Justice, of Sullivan County,
N. Y., was called upon a few days ago to
join a loving couple in the "holy bands of
wedlock," which ceremony he performed
in the following words, as taken down fegf
our correspondent.
Justice—We mite shust BO veil g»'©a
mit decs dings. Sthandt up a leed!e here.
But your hands togeder. Ilerr Grospy do
you like dees young voatans roll enulf Ii
beyourvife?
A— Yes.
Justice—Yill you sherish und noorish
ber in sickness und in healdth, un if dees
young vomans should have anvdings to do
mit annoder man, vill you sherish ber
and share mit bnt
A—Yes.
Justice—Mees Miller, do you likes dis
young mans veil enuff to be your hus
bands? 1
A—Yes.
Justice—^Viff^W l&wtah an noorish
him in sickness und in healdth, an if dis
young mans should have anydings to do
mit annoder votnpns vill you sherish
and share mit him in all dish
A—Yes.
Justice—Yell, stick to it I I bronoufieo
you mans und vifes, so help me Gott,
der United States ov America.
DON'T LEAN
Urov
OTHERS.—Half,
AWord to fathers.
material interests of the country, aud the suggested that the boy might ask for
himself. "I would," said the boy, "but
I don't feel enough acquainted with
hiin." There is a sharp reproof to that
lather iu the reply of his son. Many
a lather keeps his children so at a dis
tance from him, that they never feel
confidentially acquainted with him.
at
least, of the disappointed men one meets
are victims of ill grounded hopes and
expectations—persons who have tried to
lean upon others, instead of relying upon
themselves. This leaning is a poor busi
nesa. It seldom pays. Energetic men
(and they are the classes generally looked
to for aid) do not like to be leaned upon.
If you are travling in a railroad car, and
a great hulking fellow lays his head
against your shoulder and goes to sleep,
you indignantly shake him off. It is tho
same in business. The man who does not
at least attempt to "hoe his own row,"
need not expect any one to hoe it for him.
It is nonsense for any man to pretend to
the dignity of being unfortnnate who has
depended upon others when be might havo
cloven a way to fortuue for himself.—Ex.
v*
We have read a story of* little boj
who, when ho wanted a new suit of
clothes, begged his mother to ask his
father if he might havo it. The mother
They feel that he is sort of monarch
in the family. They feel no familiarity
with him. They fear and respect him,
and even love him some fur children
canuot help loving some, everybody
about them, but they seldom get near
enough to him to feel intimate with him.
They seldom go to liini with their little
wants and trials. They approach him
through the mother. They tell her
everything. They have a highway to
her heart on which they go in aud out
with perfect freedom. In this keeping
oft* plau, fathers are to blame. Children
should not be held off. Let them eomo
near. Let them be as intimate with the
father as mother. Let their little hearts
be freely opened. It is wicked to freeze
up the love-fountains of little one's
hearts. Fathers do themselves an in
jury by living with them as strangers.
This drives many a child away from
home for the sympathy his heart craves,
and often into improper society. It
nurses discontents and distrusts, which
many a child does not out grow in his
life-time Open your hearts and your
arms, oh, fathers be free with your
children ask for their wants and trials
play with them be father to them truly,
and then they will not need a mediator
between themselves and you.
YTc sometimes meet men who think
that any indulgence in an affectionate
feeling is weakness. They will return
from a journey and greet their family
with a distant dignity, and move among
children with the cold and lofty splen
dor of an iceberg surrounded by its
broken fragments. There is hardly a
more unuatural sight ou earth than ono
of these families without a heart. A
father had better extinguish his boy's
eyes than take away his heart. "Who
that has experienced the joy of friend
ship and values sympathy and affection,
would not rather lose all that is beauti«
ful in Nature's scenery than be robbed
of the hidden treasures of his heart
Cherish, then, your hca^t'a boot
tion.—Miss Mullock.
"It s all ver pretty talk." said a re
cently married bachelor, who had just
finished reading an essay on the 'Cul
ture of Woman,' just as a heavy millin
fr's bill was presented to him—"it's all
very pretty, this cultivation of woman
but such a charge as this for bonnets, is
rather
beovy tog urotoing, va my
tment,'' .. t...„ t,'-
hf." tt-j" J- -V

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