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The weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, August 01, 1872, Image 1

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The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
IjKIOHTOW IS KIuJ>HAM.
H. a Ul*hv>*. w.H.W-1.
Orrics In “HeraM Block," « ver P®" l °* ce ’
TERMS.~S2.OO a Year in Advance.
CITY DIK KCTOHV. , _ . ,
r ~ W>r. T. BM»TH,
Mayor N bUCHANAN.
Martliffi.V. W * w LINDLY.
Treasurer Y*‘vjti iV JOHNSON.
Recorder.. ...... K W n. DOR®.
Street Commissioner ” •
TBJJBTEKa p ROT'NDS
let Ward T». H. L«SM K > n . W KAY.
2nd Waid K *.****&'£ A . HURST.
:»rd Ward B ‘‘ 'KS 1 T WILLIAMS.
4th Ward..H.C. HUNTSMAN. M *•
masoii®*. .
TUI! UYINAR I <’DOR, A. f. 4A. I( Stated
Friday evening on or before
w J. M. JONES, W. M.
each tali moon. . ,
11. C’. LEIGHTON, Sec jr.
. \ixty IXiUdK, No. 186, A. F. and A. M,—
A "Ta'cd communication Monday eveninf
b. lore the foil 81008 1 l R KE hDIQ, W. M.
W. E. UKEKNLE, Sec y.
H iram CHAPTER. No. «. -stated communi
cation* Wedneadav before full
W. M. WELLS, H. I*.
it K. KKNDIO, Sec’jf,
nE PAY EN’S COMM ANDERY, K. T.. No. 6.
Stated commuucicatioue Tuesday evenings
before full moon. 11. A. HOFFMAN, K. C.
M. T. WILLIAMS, Recorder.
Transient brethren of any degree Invited to
meet with us.
I. O. O. F.
Mahaska lodge, no. w, l o. o. f.
REGULAR MEETING, SATURDAY
Kvening of each week. Brethren visiting the city
are invited to meet with us. „ ~
8. H. CHAPMAN, V.
J. C. DUKE. Sec. nl *
Commercial lodge. No. :*B, i. o. o. ».
holds its regular meetings every Wednea,
day evening Brothers visiting the city are invited
to meet with us. C. A. BEARDSLMY N. G.
GKO. W. ROUSE, Sec’y. 3
OSKALOOSA ENCAMPMENT, No. 13, I. O.
O. F.. meets Ist and 8d Monday nights in
each month. SAMUEL MCWILLIAMS, C. P.
R. G. PIKE, Scribe.
ODD FELLOW’S PBOTECTIVE ASSOCIA
TION of Oekaloost, meets regularly every
8d Thursday In each month. The Brothers are
invited to meet. E. BACH, Sec’y.
J. A. YOUNG, Pree’t.
HOTELS
Madison house.
M. J. PALMER, Oskaloosa. lowa.
BLEMMONS8 LEMMONS HOUSE IN NEW HANDS.
I have purchased this hotel with a design of
making it a comfortable and pleasant one. lam
aware of its reputation, yet feel confident that my
extended acquaintance will overcome It. The
house will not be entirely refitted till spring
opens, yet lam prepared to entertain all who
may call, comfortably. Give me atrial,
xi, H. J, LUCK.
SddyvUle.
PHOTOG K APIIY. •
WARRINGTON,
PHOTOGRAPHER, has re
moved his Picture Gaily to his new rooms west
of the Square. He has the best light in the city.
All styles of pictures taken and good yrot k guar
anted in all cases. Terms reasonable.
80 A. W. WAKBINGTON.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
nOBT. KISSICK.
At ATTORNEY-AT-LAW and Notary Public.
Orkaloosa. lowa. Office with Seevers A Cutts,
tn Union Block, north side of Public Square, up
stairs. Willigive special attention to collections,
probate business, and conveyancing. Will prac
tice iu ail the Courts of the State. u'iitl.
WS. KENWORTHY.
. ATTORNEY AT LAW, New Sharon,
lowa. n 22.
w. w. UASKCnn. L. a. scott.
Haskell & scott.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office upstairs In the Old Court House, north
west corner of Public Square. n4O-tt
MY WILLIAMS
. ATTORNEY AT LAW, and Notary Pub
lic, Oskaloosa, lowa. Office in Street's Block,
room recently occupied by County Judge. 37
JKA J. ALDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, lowa City, lowa.
tSnccesaor to Judge W E Miller,)
nl6-tf
0A VKN PORT, BOLTON A FISH Kit,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Oypica, on the west side of the Public Square,
tn the room recently occupied by Z. T. Fisher.
it9yl_
C'tllAH LEB T.“DODD,
j ATTORNEY AT LAW’, Peoria, lowa.
Special attention given to the collection of
claims. Business attended to promptly. 2h
•bo. w. nar»**TT. t. kvllt johnsok.
LAFFERTY & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office In Union Block, North side of the Pub
lic
w. u. saavKua. b. *• oijtts.
Seevers & cutts,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
•Office m Union Block, in room recently occupied
»y Seevers & Williams. ®kl_
i. A. L. CHOUKHAM. 11. W GLEASON.
HKOOKUAM & GLEASON.
iU ATTORNEYS AT LAW’, Notaries Public
and Government Claim Agents. Will practice In
the several Courts of the State. Collections
•promptly attended to. Office over National State
Bank, Oskaloosa, lowa._ n 35 ;
/oun r. lien. w. a. shkpubud.
Lacey a shepherd,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and GOVERN
MENT CLAIM AGENTS. Prompt attention
given to collections. Probate business will re
ceive careful attention, Business attended tolin
iue U. S. and State Courts. Office over the
National State Bank. Oskaloosa. lowa. 41
PHYSICIANS A SURGEONS.
E. t PHYSI(’IAN N SURGEON, ACCOUCHEUR,
OCULIST AND AURIST. Office in Herald Block
over Ketner's Store. Entrance next door to Post
Office. May be consulted from 10 to 12 a. m., and
Ito4p. m. Cases requiring sntgical aid wi 11 en
deavor to report on Mondays. Fridays from 2to
4 p. m. devoted to those in indigent circumstan
ces, free of charge. 44
Albert shannon, m. d.
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON and ACCOUCH
EUR, having located in this place, respectfully
tenders his cervices to the eitizcaß of Oskaloosa
and neighboring vicinity, for the practice or med
icine, eurtrery, Ac. Special attention given to
surgery. Office, west High Street, near St. James
Hotel. 37tr
L. Me A LUSTER,
. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, New
Sharon, lowa. - nSS.
C. HUNTSMAN,?*. D. D. A. HURST, M. D.
UNTSMAN A HURST, PHYSICIANS A
SURGEONS. Oskaloosa, lowa. Special attention
given to the Practice of Surgery. Office four doors
■east of north-east corner of public sauare. 33
DR. D. a 7 HOFFMAN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, Oskalooea,
lowa. Office over N. Dcdge'a Boot and Shoe
•tore. Residence on Mali street, three blocks
east of the public square. n3l
J 1 H. WILEY. M. D., Office and residence eor
. ner of Liberty and Lafayette ete., Oskaloosa,
iowa. Special attention paid to the treatment of
Catarrh, Eye and Ear, Cancer, Scrofula and all
Chronic Diseases and Diseases of Females. Dr.
W. nas effected many cures of Chronic cases
which other physicians had pronounced hopeless.
Certificates of such can be shown to those Inter
ested. Country business promptly attended to.
llm6
WE. CHAMBERLIN, A. M... M. D„ will at
• tend professional calls to all. day and night
(except to those who do notTRY to pay him. or
are given to quibbling). Fees will correspond to
those of "Regular Physicians’' and will be due
when the patient is dismissed.
('apt. Evans is collector of my unsettled ac
counts of the six years previous to Dec. 1, 1671.
Let his visit be final so that there will be no addi
tional expense.
Office at Dreg Store and at residence one block
north. Oskaloosa Sta’ion. lowa. 13tf
JL, COFFIN, M. D., Homeopathic Physician,
• Oskaloosa, lowa. Office on Main street,
couth-east corner of pnbllc square, 4 doors east;
Residence, corner of Marion and Main streets, 1
block north Baptist church. Office hours from
•7*4 to 9 a. m., from 12ft to 2 and 7to 9p, m.
A’ouutry business promptly attended to.
Kkpkrencbs K C Maine, MD, Portage City,
Wis ; Ex Gov T Lewis, Columbus. Wls : Hob
Alex Mitchell, M C, Milwaukee, Win ; O T Palm
er. M JJ. lowa City, Iowa: A C Barry, D D Racine
Wis ; G P Newell, M D, Waterford, Wis ; Rev N
Woodworth, Principal of Rochester Institute ; T
J Patcbin, M D, Eon Du Lac, Wis; Hon Win E
h until Ex State Treasurer, Fox Lake, Wis ; Hon
Geo liremner. Union Grove. Wis. 4-ly
SAVINGS BANK. ~
U NION SAVINGS BANK
OSKALOOSA, IOWA
Money Loaned, Notes Discounted, Government j
Bonds, Gold, Silver and Sight Drafts on the Prtn
cipal Cities of the United States and Europe
bought and sold. Also passage tickets to aud
from all the principal cities in Europe. 1 Interest
allowed on deposits ot one dollar and upwards.
Revenue stamps for sale. Office hours iroin 9a.
m. to 4 p in
K U. GIBBS, Pres.
IL L. GIBBS. Vice Pres.
ISRAEL M. GIBBS. Jr.. Cash.
11AIHDRESS1Ng7
LADIES’ HAIR GOODS.
~, **, Corner Square, Oskaloosa, lowa.
MISS MIN DA LARSH again calls the attention
of ladies to her stock of Hair Goods, Chignons,
Switches, Braids, Curia, Ac., made to order Irom
the very best maorted Human Bair, and in the
latest style. Imitation goods so cioeely resemb
ling real bair as to answer its purpose for those
who desire a less expensive article of ornamental
hair goods, llair Jewelry of any design
from hair relics of departed friend* aud* finished
in the moat artistic manner at the verv lowest
prices. Orders from a distant* (or this kind ol
work or hair goods ot any description will receive
prompt attention. Can fill any order with due
notice.
An apprentice girl wanted, tor terma apply u,
H. if. corner Square. Oskaloosa. lowa.
DRNTISTS. ~~~ i
nK. M. L. JACKSON,
LJ Surgeon Dentist.
Office West Side of the
P° bllc s, i“ arc - „ OVer
Kim bail a Co.
DT NT A L OFFICE"
“IrcjWßs “
Will make, fiil and axtract teeth )uit u efcean a*
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
Volume 22. Number 47, (
LIVERY.
Downing a mcMULUN, a co.,
CITY LIVERY AND BUS LINE.
Oskaloosa, lowa.
.1 KWKI.KK.
—. O 11. CHAPMAN,
g&a b. WATCH-MAKER
kV, Jk JEWELER.
Sout h Side Public Square. Oskaloosa, lowa. ««tf.
MBS- TOMLINSON * CO.
|£KKP millinery and fancy goods,
make Dresses, and everything else generally
made in a
MILLINERS AND DRESS MAKERS SHOP,
PUT UP SWITCHES, CUBLS, AC.,
North east corner Pnbllc Square,
OSKALOOSA- ’ : • IOWA.
PAINTERS. ~
J. W. BEACH,
HOUSE aid SI6NPAINTEB!
GLAZING,
PA IN TING,
GRAINING,
PAPER HANGING,
KALSOMINKING, ETC.
ALL WORK wA.«IAA-lM r X , k3l>
Shop aud residence opposite High School
Building, Address P. O. Box 88. 27
CITY FAINT SHOP.
k s. PERRY,
Has fitted op the shop tormcrty occupied by
George Acomb, a few doOBS south of the south
west corner of the square, and Is prepared to exe
cute All kinds of
HOUSE AMD SIGN PAINTING
ORAININti AND PAPER-UANQLNU,
la fint-dass style, on short notice and the most
reasonable terms- nSI
bakeriksT
STEAM BAKERY,
IN KNO WLIVIN'B BLOCK, SOUTH SIDE
OF THE SQUARE,
Where we keep the best
BREAD, PIES, OAKES, CRACKERS,
Foreign and Domestic Fruits,
Lemons, Oranges, Dates,
Figs. Sardines, and
all kinds of Can
ned Fruits.
Warm Meals at all /lours through the day.
FRESH OYSTERS,
By the Can or by the Dish,
33 W, E. VKEHOH.
CIGAR MANUFACTORY.
Cigar Manufactory.
I desire to say to lovers of GOOD CIGARS,
that 1 keep constantly on hand, of my own
MANUFACTURE,
A supply of all the grades In market, and at sb
fair prices as can be afforded in the city.
I buy my tobacco in Eastern markets and am
ready at all times to vouch for its quality.
Det’ers supplied at
WHOLESALE RATES.
1 nave an immense stock of
PIPES UK EVKHY OENCKIPTIO
CIGAR HOLDERS,
TOBACCO POUCHES, BOXES, &c.
Gall and examine my stock, east side public
square, |3d door south of Madison House, Oska
loosa lowa. 3< FRED. BECKMAN.
FUANING MILL.
Oskaloosa Planing Mill.
Corner of High and Madison • Sts .,
OSKALOOSA. - - - IOWA.
H. Snyder Co,
MAUFACTUBKRB OF
SASH,
DOORS,
BLINDS,
WINDOW AND DOORFRAMES
MOULDINGS, &c.,
Planing, re sawing, scroll-sawing, etc,, done on
abort nellce.
All orders will receive prompt attention. Job
work done to order.
Corn-shelling done at all times.
n22tf
"photography.
J. J. MERRILL,
PHOTOGRAPHER I
Oskaloosa, lowa,
Keeps constantly on hand a good assortment of
WALNUT
AND
ROSEWOOD
OVAL FRAMES.
Photographs and Gems taken in the best of style
andguaranteed satisfactory. Also
Old Plctirw of every description cop
ied to suit.
27 Street’s Block, west side square.
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
W. BURNSIDE & GO.,
CENTRAL IOWA REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
AMD DKALXRS IK
WESTERN LANDS.
Offico In County Recorder's Office,
Oskaloosa, ..... lows
We hare the only Set of Abstracts tor
Mahaska Co., ana are prepared to foreign
Abstracts of Title to any Land or
City Property In the Co.
Special attention given to paying Taxes in this
State. nlt-tf
john r. laoby. wi. n. snaPHiun.
LACEY & SHEPHERD’S
AND AGENCY.
We have on our books a largo number
FAHMN AND HOMES IN TOWN
Also many thousand acres ol
WILD LAND.
If youhave Real Estate to sell, or wish to buy
give us a call. Wc pay taxes In any part of the
State. Conveyancing done n2l
G. W. LAFFERTY, J. KELLY JOHNSON,
Attorney at Law Attorney at Law,
and and
Notary Public. Notary Public,
Oskaluoaa. lowa. Oskaloosa, lowa.
LAFFERTY & JOHNSON,
Heal Estate Agents
Will ouy and sell Real Estate on commission,
examine titlee, aud do Conveyancing of every de
scription.
We already hare a good assortment of City
and country property on our books, but desire to
increase our lirt, and to this end request those
haring property for sale to give us a call.
Office in Union Block, over M Wilson’s store.
OSKALOOSA, - - IOWA,
(too. W. Lafferty of the above firm, and late o
the firm of Needham A Lafferty, U also an author
lzed agentfor the collection or Pensions, Bounty,
Back Pay, Ac. From his long experiance in this
business he can confidently say to those desiring
his services that their business will be promptly
and carefully atteuded to.
Semi-annual payments of Pensions also collect
ed
STATIONERY^
SNIDER & HOLMES
DIALXBS IK KVIBY DBCSrPTIOM OF
PAPER,
PRINTING INK,
CARD STOCK,
—AT*—
envelopes,
103 N. Second 5t.,.. .St. Louis.
KAN UFA CT CnXMS OF TBS
FRANKUN AUD FAIR GROVE
CELEBRATED
1091 111 NEWS PUD
47-tf
LUMBERYARDS.
Lumber Yard!
WRAY & SON.
OBALxns m aix kinds of
LUMBER ,
SHINGLES ,
LA 777,
Keep constantly on hand a lull assortment of
DOORS, A SASH,
DRESSED SIBINO,
VEILING AND FLOORING.
FENCING, SHEETING,
BARN BOARDS,
PALING, JOIST,
SCANTLING, AND
FRANK 'TIMHERS,
FINISHING LUMBER, ETC., KIV, ETC.
if yon wish anything in our line give us a call
and examine our stock aud prices.
delivered to all
parts of the city free of charge.
Office on west High street "»ne door east
of City Mansion.
n4Btl
ISAAC KALBACH & SON
BKALKBS IK
PINE LUMBER
keen constantly on hand a full assortment of
Finishing Boards, Dressed Sid
ing, Flooring And Ceil
ing, Fencing, Common
Boards, Sheet
ing, Pailing,
Joist
and
SCANTLING
FRAME TIMBERS,
Shingles, Lath,
Doors, Sash.
We have on hand the largest stock in the city,
and invite all wishing anything iu oar line to call
OUR PRICES WILL BE FOUND REASONABLE
Lumber delivered in city free of charge.
pF-Offlce a few blocks south-west of Square. ap%
In addition to the above we call attention to
our Lumber Yard at New Sharon, where we keep
constantly on baud all articles above mentioned,
and at Oskaloosa prices.
D. H. LeSUER,
Dealer tn
Hi R
TT IE
js/l m
X IE
T R
JOISTS,
FENCING,
SHINGLES,
STOCK BOARDS,
PICK ET S, I) OOR S,
L S
A A
T S
H H
ETC., ETC.
Thanklnl for past favors, I respectful y solicit a
share of patronage.
Office and Yard corner of Perry
and Liberty Streets.
IIUMBEH DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF CIT I
Oskaloosa, April 14.1872., *32
DRUGS.
C. B. GRUWELL’S
DRUG AND PAINT STORE,
PLBE DRUGS, CHKMH'ALS. IMKDI
t'IKBS, FINE 1 OILKT SOAFS,
BRUSHES, COMBS, AC.
Mmm in great variety.
Pure Wluea and Liquor* lor medicinal
Purpose*.
Physldan’s Prescriptions carefully
Compounded,
MIXED PAINTS
UOI.ORS,
PURR LEADS,
MINEItAL PAINTS,
VAItNINIIKS,
PUTTY,
LINSEED OIL.
Glass of Every Size.
nBO West High Street. Oskaloosa. lowa.
DR. G. N. ItKEdlLKlt. J. C. Hkbohi.kb.
BEECHLER BROS.,
buccessorsto Dr. 8. K. Khlnebart.
Dealers ik
PURE DRUGS!
Gils
ofall
kinds.
Chemi
cals. all
kinds of
Fancy and
Common Toi
et Soaps, Pcr
lomery of Ameri
can, English and French
manufactures, HairOUs, Pom
ades,!Coemetiques, Combs, Hair,
Cloth, Tooth and Hand Brushes In
great profusion, Lamp Chimneys, Family
Dyes, Pocket Books ol overy description,
Pens, Inks, Stationery, a complete assortment ot
Toilet Powders, Honge Infant Powder, Pali's and
Puff Boxes, Tooth Powder and Paste. Barbers'
Soap. Shaving Boxes and Bnrshes, Hand Mir
rors of American and French plate glass,
Cifiara of the very choicest brands, a
full line of Druggist*'* sundries of
the very choicest grades. Our
stock is complete. Wc
buy for cash and
defy competi
tion in quail
tyandpriee.
We keep a
large
stock
ofpa
tent
MEDICINES!
We keep, in fket, everything usually kept in a
FIRST CUSS DRUG STORE.
We purchase our goods of the beet drug houses
on the Continent, and are willing to war
rant to be as represented every
thing that leaves our store.
Gall and see ns at
the Drag Store
under
MADISON HOUBX, EAST SIDE OF SQUARE.
BEECHLER BROS.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 1,1872.
_ STOVES.
ARK UNDOUBTEDLY THE
CHEAPEST TO BUY!
BEST TO USE !
EASIEST TO SELL!
AND
Never Fail to give
ENTIRE SATISFACTION
in any and all Localities.
58,168
SOLD IN PAST THREE YEARS!
Every stove offered as a proor that the
CHARTER OAK
IS
Doing more Work,
Doing it Better
Doing it Guicker
Doing it at less Expense
Than any other Cooking Stove made.
SOLD BY
ExcfilsiorliMmiCo,
SAINT LOUIS,
Wholesale dealers in all kinds of
Tinners’ Stock;
AND BY ALL
LIVE STOVE DEALERS
~ GROCERIES. ~
JJT BUS!NESS AGAjj|
S. C. PURDY.
SOUTH-EAST COR. SQUARE
■+.
Having removed my Grocery to the Dix
on brick on south side in the room former
ly occupied by G. D. (look &Co., I am
better than ever prepared to supply
all my old customers, aud as many
new ones as I can get, with anything they
desire in the Grocery line. L keep on
hand a full stock of
S F
T A
p and N
L C
E Y
GROCERIES,
STONE,
WOODEN & WILLOW WARE
Clioice Teas, Coffees | Syrups,
PI KK GROUND A WHOLE SPICES,
CANNED FRUIT 3, EXTRACTS, DAR
ING POWDERS,
Smoking and Chewing Tobac
cos of the best brands,
All of which I will sell at lowest living
orices for
CASH POE PRODUCE PALY.
Highest Market Price paid for all
kinds ot Country Produce. Give
me a call and see what I can do for
you.
nls S. C. PURDY.
GIVENS BROS,
DEALERS IX
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIE S
FLOUR, FEtD,
AND
PROVISIONS!
Arc now prepared to offer to the citizens of Ob
kaloosa and vicinity, for
C G
_A- .A.
S S
IT
CHOICE YEAS. SOGAKS. COFFEES
AND SYKUPS,
at prices which will defy competition. Our stock
of
CANNED KKUITS, OYSTERS, AC.,
are of the l>CHt brand*, also Extracts and Baking
Powder*, with a full line of unadulterated spice*.
TOBACCOS,
We call particular attention to our large stock oi
Chewing and Smoking Tobacco* a* being
unequalled for variety and quality
In the city. A large stock of
FLOUR AND FEED
U kept constantly on band which will be
delivered gy JQg free of ex
panse anywhere Ir. the city. We are now Belling
FOR GASH“ d nav k '"“OBJECT
far all of those whor I for their grocerieeto
give u* a call. Highest market price paid
Butler, Egg*, 1-ard and oilier produce.
GIVE US A CAL L.
GIVENS BROS.,
n 9 North ofSiebd’s Mill.
Mattison & Bro.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES.
QUEENSWARE,
GLASS, LAMPS, LAMP-FIX
TURES, POCKET AND
TABLjE CUTLERY
NOTIONS, &c.
Have on hands a large and well selected stock
of everything In thlelr line, bought for the Spring
trade. Our terma are
EXCLUSIVELY
Cash or Produce,
which enables us to sell at the very lowest prices.
Our facilities for handling
Elis, Billsr, Hilts, Rais,
FKATHEftS, BEESWAX, Ac.
Enable us to pay the
Highest Market Price,
in CASH or GOODS. Thankful for past favors
we solicit a eoutiu latiou of a share of the patron
age.
High Street, West of Square.
22 MATTISON Jt BRO.
ii rr
A SUMMER DAY.
There’s a gaping rent in the curtain
That longs for a needle and thread ;
There's a garment that ought to be finished,
And a hook that wants to be read.
There’s a letter that ought to be answered,
I’ll ere nr.- cloU.es to fold away, * a
And 1 know these task* are wanting
And ought io be done to day.
Bnt how can I mend the curtain
While watching the silvery clond 1
And how can I finish the garment
When the robin calls so loud ?
And the whiup’riug trees are telling
Such stories about my head.
That l cannot but lie and listen
And the book is all unread.
111 try to read the letter,
I am sure one-hall the words
Will he In the curious language
Of my chattering friend*, the bird*.
The lilacs bloom in the sunshine,
The roses nod and smile,
And the clothes that ought to be folded
And ironed, must wait awhile.
I lie in the cooling shadows.
And gaze at the summer sky.
Bidding the cares and troubles,
And trials of life pass by.
The beautiful summer blossoms
Are falling at my feet,
Aud the dreamy air is laden
With their odors rare and sweet.
The honey -bees hum In the clover,
The grasses rise and toll,
The robin stops and listens
As he hears the brown-thrash call.
And the birds sing to me softly,
lhe butterfly flies away—
Oh, what could be sweeter tba* living
This beautiful summer day ?
A GREAT OPERATION,
‘Say, John, —didn’t that woman
go way crying?’
‘She was snuffing a bit,’ answered
John Glenddin slipping around from
behind his counter.
J I should call it crying,’ said
George Austin, the first speaker.
‘What was it?’
‘Couldn’t do it ? Why not?’
‘Why—fact is, old fellow, she
pawned a brooch here a few weeks
ago, and just now she wanted to re
deem it; but the time was more than
up, and I couldn’t do it.’
‘Why—bless your soul! The
brooch was pearls and garnet in one
of the finest sittings I ever say—the
pearls pure oriental, aud the garnet
like a crimson ruby.’
‘And how much had you advanced
on it?’
‘Ten dollars.’
‘And it was worth— ’
‘Fifty, at least,’
‘And very likely, it was a keep
sake.’
‘So she said. But it isn’t safe to
believe the stories ot the poor crea
tures that come to pawn jewelry.
She liad her needs and I have my
rules. She knew the ruleß before
she left the brooch, aud she had no
business to come back after the time
w’as up.’
John Gleddin and George Austin
were cousins. George’s mother had
been a sister to John’s father; but
the mother and the lather were both
dead, and John aud George were or
phans. George had learned the
printer’s trade, and was at present
engaged upon a daily paper, while
John~ had worked his way into a
pawn-broker’s office; and, though
only five-and-twenty, had learned all
the”tricks of trade, that can extort
money from the poor and the needy.
But John Gleddin did not do busi
ness under his own name. The man
before him had used ‘Joshua Slurr,’
and the same name John used.
‘Joshua Slurr’ appeared beneath
the three golden balls over the door;
and it was also upon the business
cards ; and furthermore, all his re
ceipts and pawn tickets John signed
‘«7. Slurr.'
‘I don’t know, John,’ said George
who has his cousin’s junior by two
years, after a season of reflection,
‘but I think I would rather plod on
at my type-case than be in your bus
iness.’
‘Pshaw! You’re soft-headed. I
tell you, George, I am making
money. You have no idea of the
profit.’
‘For instance,’ said George, ‘you
have made twenty dollars on that
brooch.’
‘Aye,—thirty.’
Well, I wouldn’t have the weight
of that poor woman’s sobs and tears
on my conscience for ten times the
amount. So you can just see how I
feel.’
‘Pshaw !’
Shortly afterwards George Auston
went away to the printing-office and
as it was well into the evening John
made preparations for closing up.
He had put most of his jewelry into
his safe when the door ot his office
opened, and an elderly gentleman
entered —a good looking man he
was, and very respectably dressed,
though his garb was much worn, and
considerably soiled, and smelled
strongly of salt water.
‘ls the proprietor in ?’ asked the
gentleman.
John nodded assent.
‘Mr. Slurr, I think ?’
John repeated his assented nod.
‘I am caught iu a tight place,’ said
the gentleman with agiin and ghast
ly smile, a 9 though a pawn-broker’s
shop was about the most uncomfort
able place, ho could have selected
to escape from his tightness. ‘I
have just landed here in your city,
and discover that my luggage, by
moßt ridiculous oversight on my
fiart, lias gouo to New York. In
jondon I took a bill ot exchange on
Boston, and not only that, but a few
five and ten pound notes on the
Bank of England, which I had with
me, are by this time in the distant
metropolis. So lam forced (another
grim, ghastly smile) to have recourse
to an establishment where credit
may be had upon a ready collateral.’
John Gleddin bowed politely, and
said he would be happy to be of
service.
Then the gentleman took from
his pocket a morocco case upon
opening which he exposed a gold
watch. John took the watch and
turned to the gas jet, and upon ex
amining it, he found it to be a mas
terpiece of one of the most celebra
ted Swiss makers—a stem winder,
full ruby jeweled, of most exquisite
adjustment aud finish. He knew that
the first cost of that watoh was not
less than three hundred dollars in
gold.
‘How much did you want on this ?’
he asked returning the watch to the
case.
‘I want enough to get me safe to
New York.’
John started off on the many and
extreme risks of his business; but
the gentleman stopped him abruptly.
‘I ask you to run no risk on my
aocount. I do not propose to sell
the watch. I only wish to leave it
with you as security for a very small
sura. I have another just like it, —I
bought them as presents ior two
friends of mine, and would not sell
them for ten times their value. Fif
ty dollars will answer.’
John tried to cough down the idea
of advancing so much, but the
oough stuck in his throat
‘For how long do you want the fif
ty dollars ?’
’ ‘For—say—two weeks,’
Never mind the various dodges
has
attending the transaction on the part
of broker. Suffice it to say that he
at length counted out fifty dollars to
his customer and took the watch ;
and the ‘trade,’ as he termed i% stood
thußiatany time within the two
weeks the gentleman could redeem
hiw watch upon the payment of sixty
dollars.
‘Rather steep interest,’ said the el
derly gentleman, with a smile far
more grim aud severe than any
which had preceded it.
John would have again explained
the enormous risks of his business,
but the customer would not listen.
‘What name ?’ said John, holding
his pen over his entry-book.
‘l’ut it down, Simon Snibbs , if you
must have a name.’
So John put it down, and then he
put the watch away, and the custom
er departed with the fifty dollars.
After the man had gone JohnGled
din took out the watch and looked at
it again. His eyes sparkled eagerly.
Suppose any thing should happen
to prevent the prompt redemption
of the valuable pledge ? The thought
thrilled him through and through.
The days passed,—and a week
past. The days passed again, and
another week had sped by.
At length the elderly gentlemen
returned, and asked for his watch.
‘What name ?’ asked John profess
ing to have forgotten.
‘Snibbs — Simon Snibbs .’
‘Ah yes. I remember. Let me
see.’—And he looked over his book.
—‘Really, Mr. Snibbs, youmust have
made a mistake. I have no watch
of yours.’
‘How, sir,’ cried the customer in
blank amazement. ‘Did I not leave
with you a valuable gold watch as
security of a certain sum which I
borrowed of you ?’
John smiled blandly.
‘Not exactly as you put it, Mr.
Snibbs. If you will refresh your
memory, you will recollect that I
bought the watch, —that for value
received, you give me a regular bill
of sale, —with the provision, howev
er, that if, within two weeks from
the date thereof, you should pay to
me the sum of sixty dollars in cur
rent funds, the watch should become
again your property. The two weeks
expired yesterday, sir!*
‘But —sir! Will you— ’
John put up his hand reproving-
ly ‘ , . .
‘There is no need of going into a
passion, my dear sir, you see just
how the matter stands.’
From a tearing rage, the old man
descended to argument and explana
tion. He told how he had been de
tained in New York by an unavoida
ble accident, and how he embraced
the first opportunity to call for his
watch.
‘I had not worried much,’ he said,
because I had not thought that any
man could be consumately mean and
cold-bloodedly heartless as to rob
me upon such a pretext.’
At this John waxed wroth, and or
dered the man to leave his office.
And the old gentlemen, fearing
that he should be led to commission
of some foolish outrage if he remained
longer within the villainous influence
closed his lips together, and went
away.
On the afternoon of that very day,
John Gleddin sold the watch to an
agent of a Philadelphia house for
two hundred and seventy-five dol
lars.
‘Hi,yah !’be cried, as George Aus
tion dropped in during the evening.
‘Plod on at your type case, old fel
low, plod on!’
‘What’s up John?’
‘The greatest operation I ever
made,—two hundred and seventy-five
dollars in pocket at the single turn
of the die—interest on fifty dollars
for two weeks? What d’ye think of
that ?’
‘lf money were man’s chief end,’
said George soberly,—‘if money
were the sole source of happiness, —
I should say you were on the road.
But you know my sentiments, and
won’t argue the point. And, be
sides, we havn’t time. I come to
let you know that Uncle Moses has
got home.’
‘Uncle Moses !’ cried John, clasp
ing his hands
‘Yes. He has but just arrived, and
called on me this afternofin. He
wants you and I to call and see him
at the Tremont this evening.’
‘Of course we’ll go and see him,’
said John starting to put away his
valuables. ‘The old fellow must be
rich as mud, and you and I are his
only relatives.’
‘He is certainly rich,’ responded
George quietly ; ‘and we are his only
near relatives; but I don’t think of
that. I only remember how I used
to love him in the old days, when my
mother was alive and he used to
cheer and comfort her, and used to
play with me under the great trees.’
‘And I remember,’ added John,
‘how he used to tell me I ought to
have my ears boxed because I robbed
bird’s nests, aud stole apples and
peaches out of our neighbors’ gar
dens. But that was a long time ago.
I have forgiven him for all that. I
say George, if he should take a fan
cy to us, we’re in luck, ain’t we?
Yon won’t say anything about —
about —’
‘About what ?’
‘I was going to say about my
business; but never mind. Only
those who have been behiud the
scenes know the crooks and turns.’
‘You need not fear that I shall say
anything to your disadvantage,
John. You’ll find Uucle Moses one
of the jolliest and kindest hearted
men you ever saw.’
And as John had locked his safe,
and finished his toilet, the two cou
sins set forth.
Uncle Moses Gleddin had been
brother to John’s father and to
George’s mother, and for many
years he had been away in Europe
engaged in responsible agencies for
American houses; and it was known
that he had amassed a fortune. He
had married in youth ; but his wife
had died leaving no children, and he
had never married again ; so that the
expeotant nephews were not without
foundation.
At length the young men reached
the hotel, and as George had been
there before he led the way.
‘Uncle Moses,’ he said, upon en
tering a room where a genial faced,
smiling, portly, elderly gentleman
rose to receive him, ‘this is John. —
John, this is Uncle Moses.’
John looked and turned pale as
death.
Uncle Moses, looked and flushed
like a scarlet rose.
‘How—this —John?’
‘Of course it is John, Sir,’ said
George, in answer.
‘And not Joshua Slurr T
‘O,’ cried George, thinking that
by some accident Uncle Moses might
have seen John’s face beneath the
pawn broker’s sign, ‘that is the name
of the man who was in business be
fore him.’
‘And,’ added Unole Moses severe
ly, ‘if I mistake not, it is the name
under which he now does business for
himself.’
John Gleddin could not deny it,
for he saw, in his Uncle Moses, the
man whom ho had ho meanly taken
the valuable watch. He tried to say
something, but the words choked
him ; and he stood like a whipped
cur before his relative. Finally he
mustered up com age to ask his uncle
to forgive him.
‘I may forgive you,’ answered
Uncle Moses, ‘but I cannot lake you
into my confidence yet. I think yon
had better go borne and sleep upon
it. Let us both sleep upon it. 1
would rather not talk of it now. The
wound is too trenli.’
John Gledden was no more anxious
to stop than his uucle was to detain
him; and without further words he
took his departure. Once more at
the office he thought of the watoh he
had sold, and of the two hundred
and twenty-five dollars profit he had
made; and the conviction was forced
upon him that his great operation
was likely to prove a very heavy
settler upon his greater expectation.
And so it ultimately proved. Un
ole Moses could not take the dishon
est, unscrupulous nephew to his
confidence, nor to his love ; nor could
John muster the impudence to claim
the tender regards of one whom he
so meanly and bo unmitigatedly
wronged and abused. The result
was that the true-hearted printer ere
long left the type setting to assume
the wealth which Uncle Moses
deemed him worthy and well quali
fied to enjoy. What the pawn-broker
may gain in time we cannot say; but
if he ever regains the confidence he
has lost, it will be when he has
shown by his works that he regards
truth and honor as of more value
than the sordid profits of such op
erations as have heretofore soiled
his hands. —Ledaer.
POPULAR AMUSEMENTS.
Last Sabbath afternoon Rev. E.
L. Sherman, of the Methodist church
at lowa Falls, preached a sermon
on “Popular Amusements,” the
pitch of which we give below, fol
lowed by some comments of the Sun
day School Superintendent, who ed
its the lowa Falls Sentinel.
The speaker laid down the prem
ises “that recreation, to be much,
must follow work,” and therefore an
idler has no right to give judgment
or opinion in the matter. It is nec
essary for health and life that man
should laugh, and he that never
laughs needs either repentance or
pills —for the fault sometimes lies in
tho liver. Recreations should not
be expensive, not hurtful to health,
not tend to corrupt, not be surround
ed with evil associations. He thought
parcuts should provide home amuse
ments for their children, and make
home a happy place. Parents should
come down to a level with their
children and romp with them, make
them think that home is the center
of all happiness. The latter part of
the sermon was directed to croquet,
and we never heard the game so
well defended. He said it was em
phatically a “home game.” Simple,
inexpensive full of amusement and
pleasure, healthful and proper. In
fact the speaker talked as if he had
been playing croquet and some one
had been finding fault with him for it.
We cannot give even a sketch o!
the sermon in question, but will say
that it contained a groat deal of sound
sense, and some advanced positions
which the speaker is evidently right
in taking. It, after the above im
perfect Bketch we are permitted to
say a lew words on our own hook,
we will say that we agree with the
speaker exactly on croquet, although
we rarely play the game. Further
we will find no fault with the man
who has a billiard table in bis own
house away from the evil associa
tions of the saloon. Further, we be
lieve in letting your children dance
at home in good company if they
want to dance. Further that ail
these games and things, around
which the devil has thrown his arm
as ownership, and which he uses to
destroy and allure by mixing the
poison, should be wrested from his
grasp and taken home to be used
there. It is said that the devil has
all the nice music. This is all wrong.
Let us have the violin and all its
waltzes, marches, and quicksteps for
our amusements at home. The day
for long faced, vinegar visaged, Ah,
me! Christians is gone by, and the
straight laced, horrified and gloomy
Christians belongs to the age that
has passed. We want laughing,
merry christains to show the world
that heaven lends a part of its sun
shine and gladness to the believer’s
heart. The truth “to the pure all
things are pure,” applies here. Our
observation is that those boys and
girls who are straight at home, are
the very ones who go to excess in
after life. Let us open our hearts
and homes to these amusements and
our children will never steal away
to a hay loft to play cards, or go in
the dark to play billiards, or travel
miles to attend a disreputable shin
dig.
SOUTHERN OUTRAGES.
A specimen outrage appeared on
Independauce day near Chaltanoo
ga. The non-partisan account of the
affair is as follows :
A colored picnic, on the morning of the
Fourth, went to Allen’s Springs, forty-two
miles out on the Alabama and Chattanoo
ga Railroad. When they arrived there
they found some white men, mountain
roughs, armed with guns and clubs, having
oilier arms stacked in an old house a short
distance off. The colored people had paid
$lO for the use of the grounds The whites
sold whiskey to the blacks in the woods,
and disturbed the dancing. The blacks re
monstrated, causing ill feeling. Six more
whites came in the afternoon. At 2 o'clock
the blacks started for the tram, when the
whites attacked them. The blacks re
sisted with pistols, driving the whites to
the woods, where they rallied, and firing
with buck-shot wounded five, mostly in
the arms and legs. One who was wound
ed in the back will probably die. Three
whites were shot. John Smith, white, in
terposed m favor of the blacks and was
shot through the breast. The train was
fired on after it started, and one black was
shot in the hand. The roughs said they
had near cleaned out the Dutch who came
down once, and now they would clean out
the niggers. The roughs were not dis
guised.
Quite a number of similar affairs
occurred the same day ia other parts
of the South The notable thing
about these outrages is that not a
single arrest has been reported.
There is nowhere in the South any
dominant disposition to protect th.
negroes in their constitutional rights
The almost sole reliance of the black
man is upon national protection.
Place the General Government in
the hands ot the candidate of the
Ka-Klux Kian, and a desolating re
gion of terror would inevitably fol
low. This consideration should be
enough of itself to prevent any hu
mane and just citizen from support
ing the favorite of Tammany and the
Klan.— Chicago Journal.
Statistics show that one woman in
one hundred marries the man she
loves.
\ Established July 1850
NOVEL PAIR OF STOCKINGS.
‘1 believe women will do a good
<ieal lor a dance,’ said an old M. D.;
‘they are immensely fond of sport.
I remember once in my life 1 used
to flirt with one who was a great fa
vorite in a provincial town where I
lived, and who confided to me that
she had no stockings to appear in,
and that without them her presence
at a hall was out of the question.’
‘l'hat was a hint for you to buy the
stockings,’ said a friend.
*No; your’e out,’ said the dootor.
‘She knew that I was as poor as
heraidf; but, though she could not
rely on my purse, she had every eon
fidonet) in my taste and judgment,
and consulted me on a plan she had
formed lor going to the ball in prop
er trim. Now, what do you think it
was ?’
‘To go in ootton, I suppose,’ re
turned the friend.
‘Out again, sir. You'd never guess
it, and only a woman could have hit
upon the expedient. It was the fash
ion in those* days for ladies in full
dress to wear pink stockings, and she
proposed painting her legs.
‘Painting her legs !’ exclaimed his
friend.
‘Factsir,’ said the doctor; ‘and
she relied upon me for telling her if
the cheat was successful.’
‘And was it?’ asked his friend.
‘Don’t be in a hurry, friend. I
complied on one condition, namely :
that I should be the painter.’
‘Oh! you old rascal,’ said the
friend.
‘Don’t interrupt me, gentlemen,’
said the doctor. ‘I got some pink,
accordingly; and I defy all the hos
iers in Nottingham to make a tighter
fit than I did on little Jennie. A
prettier pair of stockings I never
saw.’
‘And she went to the ball?’
‘She did.’
‘And the trick succeeded.’
‘So completely,’ said the doctor,
‘that several of the ladies asked her
to recommend her dyer to them. So
you see what a woman will do to go
to a dance. Poor Jennie ! she was a
merry minx. By the by, she boxed
my ears that night for a joko I made
about the stockings. ‘Jennie,’ said
I, ‘for fear your stockinge should fall
down while you are dancing, hadn’t
you better let me paint a pair of gar
ters on them?”
A COMPARISON.
Two defalcations in New Orleans
under Johnson’s administration
amounted to a sum nearly equal to
the total amount lost by the present
administration since March 3, 1869.
For the benelit of the ‘faithless’ few,
we give the items :
The Sub Treasury, Treasury,
and National Depositary
defalcation of Whittaker
and May, in 1867, less ain’t
supposed to be recovered,
(gross amount, $1,150,000) $ 850,000 00
Steadman Internal Revenue
defalcation, First Louisi
ana District, discovered on
, his removal, April 13, ’O9, 212,836 93
Total $1,062,336.93
The total amount of defalcations,
covering over three years of General
Grant’s term, is about $1,091,963.64.
To steal this sum it required over
two hundred dishonest officials, and
out of this number one hundred and
thirty-seven were appointed by An
dy Johnson. Yet Andy is in favor
of ‘honest’ Horace, and with his
usual vigor drinks daily to the suc
cess of the reform movement. What
a happy combination of immaoulate
reformers! Bill Tweed wants an
honest treasury. Andy Johnson
wants free trade and the tax remov
ed from whisky. The pirate Semmes
wants a loyal navy, while Jeff Davis
and Alex. Stephens fill up the back
ground and desire a pure judiciary,
that can make theKu klux outrages
constitutional. Greeley can satisfy
them all.
ANYTHING TO BEAT GRANT.
The Savannah News very wicked
ly says : “The wheat harvest has
not been without some bearing on
the November elections. A contra
band in Clayton county recently got
his head tangled in a steam thresh
ing machine and went up in a show
er of chaff. Well—anything to beat
Grant.”—Talladega Watchtower.
Just so, this clipping taken first
from the Savannah News, and en
dorsed by the Talladega Watchtower
shows to what extent the Democrats
are willing to carry this miserable
senseless ‘battle cry’ ot ‘anything to
beat Grant.* It shows to colored
men that the Democracy don’t care
what overtakes the negro, so they
succeed in beating Gen. Grant.—
They don’t care it every negro were
driven into the sea, if it would bo re
duce the Republican vote, that Gree
ley, the champion of modern De
mocracy, can be elected next fall.
We ask you colored men to read this
carefully and see whether you can
support a party that is willing to have
every negro ground up in a threshing
machine in order to elect Mr. Gree
ley.—Alabama Republican.
DEATH OF PRESIDENT JUAREZ.
Matamobas, July 24.
General liacha telegraphed from
Monterey, this afternoon, that Pres
ident Juarez had died on the night
of the 18th inst., from an attack of
apoplexy, which had seized him at
5 o’clock in the afternoon of that
day, and ordered that, that the flag
of the government should be placed
at half mast. The news was receiv
ed by all classes with astonishment,
and was not credited until it was
confirmed by a second disptch trom
General Racha. The presidency of
the republic will devolve upon Teude
De Tejoda, jnstice of the Supreme
Court, and until recently secretary
cf the foreign affairs in President
Juarez’s cabinet, but lately in obpo
sition to the Government and re
garded as sympathizing with tho
revolutionists, although remaining
in the city of Mexico and taking no
active part with the insurgents until
oongress shall order an election to
fill the vacancy.
HOW THE QUAKERS WILL VOTE.
An old friend up in Keokuk county
under the date of the 15th inst.:
“Dkab Hawk-Eye :—I have been
of late frequently asked why ao many
Friends are going for Greeley ? To
put the matter to rest I think I can
safely say there is not a single sound
orthodox Friend in the United States
that will vote for Greeley. No, we
can’t go for Greeley when we know
if he is elected it will be putting the
Government into the hands of the
rebels. And, further, as President
Grant is the only ruler of auy nation
who has seen fit to recognize our
Peace principles, it would be a let
down and a reproach to the Society
of Friends to talk of going for Gree
ley. Friends have taken very little
stock m Horace since he bailed Jeff
Davis. As an individual, I would
as Boon vote for Davis as for Gree
ley. I h av ® no idea I have
written will be contradicted.”
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
~ II ej Faj* mi
Bast Advertising Medium in Uskaicoc*
It KTtfSO A 1 w Jlti T
ClrculuLlon 4. upics
Moft of which are to pcn-oi,* i„ Mahn-ka(.N,ui.iy
OtTB FACILITIES FOB
HOOK AND JOB WORK
Areas good as the rtilrtarifls of Mie place v ill
w*rr< at, and work- dene on as nusonahle raica
ae at any other otlico.
Of the cutting down of forest trees
which is so constantly going on in
this country, Wra. Cullen' 1% ant
says : It is a common observation
that our summers are becoming dry
er and our streams smaller. ~Vake
the Cuyahoga as an ilJustrnUo,.. Fif
ty y«*ri» *sro ittgi tout* of ~u
went up and down that river. Now
iu the ordinary stage of water, a
skiff can hardly pass down the
stream. M .uy a boat of filly tons
burden has been built and loaded on
the Tuscarawas at New Portage,
aud sailed to New Orleans without
breaking bulk. Now the ri\< r hard
ly affords enough water at New
Portage lor the canal. The * .me
may he said ot other streams. They
are drying up. Aud from the same
cause—the destruction of our forests
—the summers are growing drier
and onr winters coldor.”
The Des Moines Republican says:
“A funny joke, and all the more
palatable as its truth can be vouched
for, occurred at a prominent church
not far away, It seems that a wor
thy deacon had been industrious in
selling a new church book, costing
seventy-five cents. At the Bervico
in question, the minister, just before
dismissiag the congregation, arose
and said, —
“All those who have children to
baptize, will please to present them
next Sabbath.”
The deacon, who by the way was
a little deaf, having an eye to selling'
the books, and supposing the pastor
was referring to them, immediately
jumped up and shouted, —
“All you who havn’t can get as
many as you want by calling on me,
at seventy-five cents each.”
A wag was requested by an old
lady to read a newspaper for her.
He took it up and read as follows :
“Last night, yesterday morning,
about 1 o’clock in the afternoon, be
fore breakfast, a hungry boy about
40 years old, bought a big custard
for a levy, and threw it through a
brick wall nine feet thick, and jump
ed ove: it, broke his right ankle off
above his left knee, and fell into a
dry mill pond and was drowned.
About 40 years after that, on the
same day, an old cat had nine turkey
gobblers ; a high wind blew Yankee
Doodle on a frying pan, and killed a
sow and two pigs at Boston, where a
deaf and dumb woman was talking
to liis aunt Peter.” Whereupon tho
old lady, taking a long breath ex
claimed, “Do tell 1”
Disinfectants. —During the hot
season, in town and country, the free
use’of disinfectants, about the cellar,
out-houses and back-yards will con
duce very much to the health and
comfort of all. And you need not
pay five or ten cents per pound for
chloride of lime for this purpose.
A good article can be made at home
cheaply. Half a bushel of salt dis
solved in a half barrel of water, then
dissolve half a barrel of lime with
the salt water, and you have atonoe
enough chloride of lime for yourself
and your neighbors. There is no
patent on this prescription, and all
can by it have the atmosphere about
their premises pure and healthy.
An unscrupulous person writes as
follows to the New York Commer
cial Advertiser: “They tell this
story today of Dr. Henry, who is stay
ing at the Grand Union: The other
day he was called upon to attend
Gratz Brown in New York, when
Gratz facetiously and foolishly re
marked ; It is seldom, Doctor, that
you are so honored as to be called
to attend a Vice President?’ ‘Oh,
no,’ replied the Doctor, ‘I attended
Vice President (?’) Frank Blair in
,68, but your case is a good deal
worse than his /”
It has generally been supposed
that the softshell crab is indigenous
to the sea. Gratz Brown has ex
ploded this fallacy. Borboun coun
ty, Kentucky, is its favorite resort.
In winter the crabs are taken
“straight,” but in summer they
should be cooked in sugar, lemon
and ice, and eaten with a straw. It
is a remarkable genital fact that an
overstock of crabs in the head often
produces snakes in the boots — Chi
cago Journal.
The Republicans claim North
Carolina by 10,000 majority; tho
Opposition by 5,000. It depends
upon the Ku-Klux which prediction
shall prove true. If the Klan can
carry out their plots to overawe Re
publican voters in tho sparsely-set
tled portions oi tho State, the Dem
ocratic victory will follow. We
hope no effort will bo spared on the
part of the authorities to protect
every citizen in the free exercise of
the elective franchise.
The last issue of the Jasper Re
publican announces that Robert Ry
an, Esq, of Newton, a member of
the Liberal Republican State Com
mittee, has repudiated Greelyism,
and comes out squarely for Grant
and Wilson, Mr.'M. Howard, of the
same place, a delegate to the Dav
enport and Cincinnati Convention,
also deserts tho mongrel party and
returns to straight Republicanism.
In 1802 the rebel Gen. Beauregard
wrote : “It is high time to proclaim
the flag ; let the execution of aboli
tionist prisoners be by the garrote.”
In 1872 ho writes : “We must all
unite under the banner of the consti
tution and the laws, reunion and re
form, honesty and universal amnes
ty ; that banner has lately been
raised at Cincinnati uuder the lead
ership of Greeley and Brown.”
‘A purely selfish interest,* Mr.
Greeley once remarked, ‘attaches
the low, ruffianly, criminal and dan
gerous classes to the Democratic
party.’ And now a purely selfish
interest attaches Mr. Greeley to the
lewd, ruffianly, and dangerous class
es. Sic transit, etc.; and it is more
than probable that Horace will be
horribly sick of his lateßt transit.
The “Ida Greeley” is the name
of a Southern political olub, which,
we are informed, has adopted a gray
uniform and intends to make a tour
of the North. How the soreheads
and copperhead confederates will
rejoice at the sight of the rebel
gray ITo Republicans the spectacle
will be suggestive only of the livery
of well-whipped rebels.
A young lady caused a Clermont
photographer much trouble by per
sistently tucking her dress under her
feet* because some one had told her f
that the operator viewed his subjects j
upside dqwn in the camera. v
There are 1,150,000 sheep in lowa
in addition to that lost sheep’,—Hon.
J. R, Grinnell. — Cedar Ralls Qa
wstte. ' . • i>

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