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The Weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, August 08, 1872, Image 1

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The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
PDBinno EVERY THURSDAY BY
LEIGHTON A NEEDHAM.
H. C. Laliktot. W. H. NMdhun.
Ornci la “Herald Block," over Font Office.
TEEMS.--$2.00 a Year in Advance.
CITY DIRECTORY.
Mayor...-T. WM. T. SMITH.
MaUal...: W. N • BOCHANAH.
Treitwt W. A. LINDLT-
SoHcltfr. J. KELLY JOUBfOS.
Street Commissioner “■ OtAi*.
let Ward D.TeITSSuR.
2nd Waid E. M. BKATT\.W.H VWAY.
IS C. M. T.‘wiLLIAMs!
MASONIC.
TRILUMINAR I.ODGB, A. V. & A. M—Stated
commnnicati n Friday evening on or before
each full moon. 5. M. JONES, W. M.
H. C. LEIGHTON, Sec'y.
Amity lodge, no. 186, a. f. and a. m.—
Stated communication Monday evening
before the foil moon.
11. R. KEN DIG, W. M.
\V. E. GKKBNLE, Sec'y.
HIRAM CHAPTER No. O. —Stated communi
cations Wednesday evenings before fall
iu"ou W. M. WELLS, H. P.
II K. KKNDIG, Sec'y,
DE PA Y EN'S COMMANDERY. K. T.. No.
Stnt.-d communcicutione Tuesday evenings
before full moon. D. A. HOFFMAN. E. C.
M. T. WILLIAMS, Recorder.
Transient brethren of any degree invited to
meet with us.
~ I. 0.0. F
Mahaska lodge, no. is, i. o. o. f.
REGULAR MEETING, SATURDAY
Evening of each week. Brethren visiting the city
are invited to meet with na.
J. O. MOORMAN, N. G..
HAM. DUKE. Sec. nil
Commercial lodge. No. üß,lo. o. f.
hold? ite regular meetings every Wednea
day evening Brothers viaiting the city are invited
to meet with ue. C. A. BEARDSLEY N. G.
GEO. W. ROUSE, Sec’y. 3.
Oskaloosa encampment, no. is, i. o.
O. F., meets let and 3d Monday nights in
etch month. SAMUEL MCWILLIAMS, C. P.
R. G. PIKE, Scribe.
fADD FELLOW’S PROTECTIVE ASSOCIA-
V/ TION of Oekalooea, meets regularly every
3d Thnreday la each mouth. The Brothers are
invited to meet. B. BACH, Sec’y.
J. A. YOUNG, Pres’t, _
HOTELS.
Madison house.
M. J. PALMER, Oekalooea, lowa.
S LEMMONS HOUSE IN NEW HANDS.
I have purchased this hotel with a design of
making it a comfortable and pleasant one. lam
aware of ite repntation. yet reel confident that my
extended acquaintance will overcome it. The
houae will not be entirely refitted till spring
opens, yet lam prepared to entertain all who
uiay call, comfortably. Give me a trial.
M. H. J.LUICK.
Sddyville.
PHOTOGRAPHY.
WARRINGTON,
PHOTOGRAPHER, has re
moved hie Picture Gaily to his new rooms west
of the Square. He has the best light in the city.
All styles of picture taken and good work gnar
anted in all cases. Terms reasonable.
*> A. W. WARRINGTON.
ATTORNEYS AT LA/wT
UOBT. KISSICK.
ATTORNEY-AT LAW and Notary Public.
Oskaloosa. lowa. Office with Seevere & Cutts,
iu Union Block, north side of Public Square, up
stairs. Will give special attention to collections,
probate business, and conveyancing. Will prac
tice in all the Courts of the State. n22tf.
S. KENWORTHY,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW, New Sharon,
lowa. n 22.
W. W. HASKELL. ETaTsCOtT.
Haskell a scott.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office up stairs in the Old Court House, north
s est corner of Public Square. n4O-ti
M T. WILLIAMS,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW, and Notary Pub
lic, Oskaloosa, lowa. Office in Street's Block,
room recently occupied by County Judge. 37
I RA J. ALDER,
1 ATTORNEY AT LAW, lowa City, lowa.
(Successor to Judge W E Miller,)
nl6-tf
Davenport, a bolton,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Owe*, on the west side of the Public Square,
in the room recently occupied by Z. T. Fisher,
niiyl
C CHARLES J. DODD,
j ATTORNEY AT LAW, Peoria, lowa.
Special attention given to the collection of
C laims. Business attended to promptly. 38
SSU. W. LirrtßTT. J. KELLY JOHNSOX.
LAFFERTY & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office in Union Block, North side of the Pub
lic Square, up stairs. 47
W, B. SBKVXKS. M. I. CUTTS.
SEEVERS A CUTTS,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office in Union Block, in room recently occupied
by Seevers A Williams. ntl
J. a. L CROOK HAM. H. W GLEASON.
CItOOKH AM & GLEASON.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Notaries Public
and Government Claim Agents. Will practice in 1
the several Courts of the State. Collections
Smmptly attended to. Office over National State
ank, Oekaloo?a, lowa. nSS
JOHN F. LAC XV . wTx. SHXrHIHD.
Lacey & shepherd.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and GOVERN
MENT CLAIM AGENTS. Prompt attention
given to collections. Probate business will re
ceive careful attention, Business attended tolin
lue U. S. and State Courts. Office over tne
National State Bank. Oskaloosa. lowa. 31
PHYSICIANS A SURGEONS.
Ll H. CAMERON,
Pi. PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, ACCOUCHEUR,
OCULIST AND AURIST. Office in Herald Block
over Ketner’s Store. Entrance next door to Post
Office. May be consulted from 10 to 12 a. m., and
Ito4p. m. Cases requiring surgical aid wl 11 en
deavor to report on Mondays. Fridays from 2to
4 p. m. devoted to those in indigent circumstan
ces, free of charge. 42
L. MCALLISTER,
• PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, New
Sharon, lowa. nBS.
TJ C.HLNTSMAN, M d7~d7a. HURST, M. D.
IJUNTBMAN & HURST, PHYSICIANS A
SURGEONS, Oskaloosa, lowa. Special attention
given to the Practice of Surgery. Office four doors
east of north-east corner of public square. 82
DK. D. A. HOFFMAN, •
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, Oskaloosa, j
lowa. Office over N. Hedge’s Boot and Shoe
store. Residence on Mail street, three blocks
east of the public square. nil ,
JH. WILEY, M. D., Office and residence cor
. ner of Liberty and Lafayette ste., Oskaloosa,
lowa. Special attention paid to the treatment of
Catarrh, Eye and Ear, Cancer, Bcrofula and all
Chronic Diseases and Diseases of Females. Dr.
W. has effected many cures of Chronic cases
which other physicians had pronounced hopeless.
Certificates of such can be shown to those inter-
Country business promptly attended to. (
E. CHAMBERLIN. A. M., M. D., will at
• tend professional calls to all. day and night
(except to those who do not TRY to pay him, or
are given to quibbling). Fees will correspond to .
those of “Regular Physicians" and will be due
when the patient is dismissed.
Capt. Evans is collector of my unsettled ac
counts of the six years previous to Dec. 1, 1871.
Let hie visit be final so that there will be no addi
tional expense.
Office at Drrg Store and at residence one block .
north. Oskaloosa Station. lowa. 13tf !
T L, COFFIN, M. D., Homeopathic Physician,
d• Oskaloosa, lowa. Office on Main street,
south-east corner of public square, 4 aoors east ;
Residence, corner of Marion and Main streets, 1
block north Baptist church. Office hours from
7)4 to 9 a. m„ from 12)4 to 2 and 7to 9 p, m.
Country business promptly attended to.
Kepbbxmcks E C Maine. MD, Portage City,
W is : Kx Gov T Lewis, Columbus. Wl* ; Hon
Alex Mitchell, M C, Milwaukee, Wis ; Ox Palm
*£* M low* City, Iowa; a C Barry, D D Keciae
Wis ; G F Newell, M D, Waterford, Wis ; Rev N
Woodworth, Principal of Rochester Institute : T
J J* p.Pon Du Lac, Wis; Hon Wa E
SroiUKKxStateTreaeurer, Fox Lake. Wis : Hon
Geo Bremner,Union Grove. Wis. 4-ly
SAVINGS * «*ji|
UNION SAVINGS BANK.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA
Money Loaned, Notes Discounted, Government
Bonds, Gold, Silver and Sight Drafts on the Prin
cipal Cities of the United States and Europe
bought and sold. Also passage tickets to and
from all the principal cities in Europe. Interest
allowed on deposits ol one dollar and upwards, i
Revenue stamps for sale. Office hours from 9a.
m. to 4 p. m.
E. H. GIBBS, Prea. d J
H. L. GIBBS. Vice Pres.
ISRAEL M gibbs. Jr.. Cash.
nryJss!"’
T'|R. M. L. JACKSON, «
U Surgeon Dentist.
Office West Side of the .
Square, over ,
? sk^aS^~ , t..JSf^Plianibleton Kimoall a Co. ,
j 7- Nitrous Oxide On- atl
m;ulstertd inthe extrac
tlon of teeth. nlO-tf
DENTAL OFFICE. j
“ DR'rr&MffiKßs" -
Sisttr'-to. .
rant satisfaction. Office over Brown V
Store, Union Block, North side of P n bile
Oskaloosa, lowa.—Sign of teeth chewing at foot ’
o f sulrs n 25. ,
BAKERIES.
STEJI BAKEkY,
Of KNOWLIVJTH BLOCK, tsOVTH SIDE
Foreign and Domestic Fruits,
kinds of Can- i
a. 1
fresh oysters,
. srrraMn* j
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
Volume 22. Number 48. (
LIVERY.
DOWNING A MoMULUN.A Co.,
CITY LIVERY AND bl'S LINE.
Oekalooea. lowa.
JEWELER.
Q H. CHAPMAN,
WK. O. WATCH-MAKER
1U JEWELER.
South Side Public Square. Oskaloosa, lowa. 20tf.
MILLINERY.
MRS* TOMLINSON A CO.
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS,
make Dresses, and everything else generally
made in a
MILLINERS AND DRESS MAKERS SHOP,
PUT UP SWITCHES, CURLS, *C.,
North east corner Public Square,
08KAL008A- : * IOWA.
HAIRDRESSING.
LADIES’ HAIR GOODS,
8. E. Corner Square, Oskaloosa, lowa.
MISS MINDA LARSH again calls the attention
of ladies to her stock of llair Goods, Chignons,
Switches, Braids, Curls, &c., made to order from
the very best imported Hnman Hair, and in the
latest style. Imitation goods so closely resemb
ling real hair as to answer its purpose for those
who desire a less expensive article of ornamental
halrguods. Hair Jewelry of any design made
from hair relics of departed friends, and finished
in the mast artistic manner at the very lowest
prices. Orders from a distance lor this kind of
work or hair goods of any description will receive
prompt attention. Can fill any order with doe
notice.
An apprentice girl wanted, for terms apply to
S. E. corner Square, Oekalooea, lowa. 27
PAINTERS.
‘ J. W. BEACH,
GLAZING,
PA I N TING,
GRAINING,
PAPER HANGING,
KALSOMINEING, ETC.
ALL WORK WAKIIANTED
Shop and. residence opposite High School
Building, Address P. O. Bax 89. 27
CITY PAINT SHOP.
L s. PERRY,
Has fitted up the shop formerly occupied by
George Acomb, a few doors south of the south
west comer of the square, and is prepared to exe
cute all kinds of
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING.
GRAINING AND PAPER-HANGING ,
In first-class style, on short notice and the most
reasonable terms. n2l
CIGAR MANUFACTORY.
Cigar Manufactory.
I desire to say to lovers of GOOD CIGARB,
that I keep constantly on hand, of my own
MANUFACTURE,
A supply of ail the grades in market, and at as
fair prices as can be afforded in the city.
I buy my tobacco in Eastern markets and am
ready at all times to vouch for its quality.
De&’ers supplied at
WHOLESALE RATES.
I have an immense stock of
PIPBS OR EVERY DESCBIPTIO
CIGAR HOLDERS,
TOBACCO POUCHES, BOXES, &c.
Call and examine my stock, east side public
square, {3d door south of Madison House, Oska
loosa lowa. 21 FRED. BECKMAN.
PLANING MILL.
Os&aloosa Planing Hill.
Comer of High and Madison Sts. t
OSKALOOSA. - - IOWA.
11. Snyder &, Co,
MAUFACTURBRS OF
SASH,
DOORS,
BLINDS,
WINDOW AND DOORFRAMES
MOULDINGS, &c.,
Planing, re sawing, scroll-sawing, etc,, done on
short notice.
All orders will receive prompt attention. Job
work done to order.
Corn-shelling done at all times.
n22tf
PHOTOGRAPHY.
J. J. MERRILL,
PHOTOGRAPHER I
Oskaloosa, lowa,
Keeps constantly on haDd a good assortment of
WALNUT
AND
ROSEWOOD
OVAL FRAMES.
Photographs and Gems taken in the best of style
and guaranteed satisfactory. Also
Old Picture* of every description cop
ied to suit.
27 Street's Block, west side square.
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
W. BURNSIDE & CO.,
CENTRAL IOWA REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
AND DKALXBB IN
WESTERN LANDS.
Office In County Recorder’s Office,
Oekalooea, • - . lowa
We have the only Set of Abstracts fer
Mahaska Co., and are prepared to furnish
Abstracts of Title to any Land or
City Property in the Co.
Special attention given to paying Taxes in this
Stale. nV-tf
John r. lacxt. wa. a. bhbfhnrs.
LACEY & SHEPHERD’S
AGENCY.
We have on our books a large number
FARMS , AND HOUSES IN TOWN.
Also many thousand acres of
WILD LAND.
If yoahave Real Estate to sell, or wish to buy
give us a call. We pay taxes in any part of the
State. Conveyancing done n2l
G. W. LAFFERTY, J. KELLY JOHNSON,
Attorney at Law Attorney at Law,
and and
Notary Public. Notary Public,
Oskaloosa. lowa. Oskaloosa, lowa.
LAFFERTY & JOHNSON,
Real Estate Age Tits
Will out and sell Real Estate on commission,
examine titles, and do Conveyancing of every de
scription.
We already have a good assortment of City
and country property on our books, but desire to
increase our list, and to this end request those
having property for sale to give us a call.
Office in Union Block, over M Wilson’s store.
OSKALOOSA, - IOWA.
Geo. W. Lafferty of the above firm, and late o
the firm of Needham A Lafferty. is also an author
ized agentfor the collection of Pensions, Bounty,
Back Pay, Ac. From bis long experlance in this
business he can confidently say to those desiring
his services that their business will be promptly
and carefully attended to.
Semi-annual payment* of tensions also collect
ed. n!9
STATIONERY.
SNIDER & HOLMES
DIAL KB 8 IK KTBBT DISC BUTTON OF
PRINTING INK,
CARD STOCK,
;,/ I f -hXM- \. «r |
ENVELOPES,
108 N. Second 8t.,.. .St. Louis.
XWfMOTOUM OF THK
FRANKUN AMD FAIB GROVE
CELEBRATED
Pliffl BSffS PM
LUMBER YARDS.
Lumber Yard!
WRAY & SON.
nXALKKS IN ALL KINDS OP
LUMBER*
SHINGLES'
LATH'
Keep constantly on hand a tail assortment of
DOORS. A SASH ,
DRESSED SI BING,
CEILING AND FLOORING.
FENCING , SHEETING,
BARN BOARDS,
PALING. JOIST,
SCANTLINO, AND
FRAME TIMBERS,
FINISHING LUMBER , ETC., ETC, ETC.
if yon wish anything in our line give us a call
and examine our stock and prices.
fcgT’Lumber delivered to all
parts of the city free of charge.
Office on west High street, one door east
of City Mansion.
n4Btt
~ISAAC KALBACH & SON
DEALERS IN
PINE LUMBER
keep constantly on hand a full assortment of
Finishing Boards, Dressed Sid
ing, Flooring And Ceil
ing, Fencing, Common
Boards, Sheet
ing, Pailing,
Joist
and
SCANTLING
FRAME TIMBERS,
Shingles, Lath,
.Doors, Sash.
■ We have on hand the largest stock in the city,
and invite all wishing anything in our line to call
OUR PRICES WILL BE FOUND REASONABLE
Lumber delivered in city free of charge.
IS'-Office a few blocks south-west of Square.
In addition to the above we call attention to
our Lumber Y'ard at New Sharon, where we keep
constantly on hand all articles above mentioned,
and at Oskaloosa prices.
üB9 tf.
D. H. LeSUER,
Dealer in
Xj R
TT IE3
XX IB
I IB
T R
JOISTS,
FENCING,
SHINGLES,
STOCK BOARDS,
PICKETS, DOORS,
L S
A A
T S
H H
ETC., ETC.
Thankful for past favors, I respectfully solicit a
ghare of patronage.
Office and Yard corner of Perry
Land Liberty Streets.
UMBER DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF CIT |
Oskaloosa, April 14, 1872. n 32
DRUGS.
C. B. GRUWELL’S
DEDG iIPABT STORE.
PURE DRUGS, CIIKitIirALS, MEDI
CINES, FINE 1 OILET SOAPS,
BRUSHES, COMBS, AC.
Perfimiery In peat variety.
Pure Wines and Liquors for TVedldnal
Purposes.
Physician’s Prescriptions carefully
Compounded.
MIXED PAINTS
COLORS,
PURE LEADS,
MIffEKAL PAINTS,
VARYISHES,
PUTTY,
LINSEED OIL.
Glass of Every Size.
nSO West High Street. Oskaloosa. lowa.
Db. O. N. Bxechlkb. J. C. SXKnHIiXR.
BEECHLER BROS.,
Successors to Dr. 8. E. Ithinehart.
Dxalkrs in
PURE DRUGS!
Oils
of all
kinds,
Chemi
cals, all
kinds of
Fancy and
Common Toi
et Soaps, Per
fumery of Ameri
can, English and (Trench
manufactures, HairOUs, Pom
ades,:Cosmetiques. Combs, Hair,
Cloth, Tooth and Hand Brushes in
great profusion. Lamp Chimneys, Family
Dyes, Pocket Books of every description,
Pens, Inks, Stationery, a complete assortment of
Toilet Powders, Konge Infant Powder, Puffs and
Puff Boxes, Tooth Powder and Paste. Barbers’
Soap. Shaving Boxes and Bursbes, Hand Mir
rors of American and French plate glass,
Cigars of the very choicest brands, a
full line of Druggists'* sundries of
the very choicest grades. Oar
stock is complete. We
bay for cash and
defy competi
tion in quali
tyand price.
We keep a
large
stock
of pa
tent
MEDICINES!
Wa keep, la Ret, everything usually kept In a
FIRST CLASS DRUG STORE.
We parcbase our goods of the best drag houses
on the Continent, sad ere willing to war
rant to be as represented every
thing that leaves our store,
t Call and tee ns at
the Drag Store
under
*ADiJWU| HOUSK, BAST SID* QV SQUABS.
~ 7 9SSOBLKR BROS.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8,1872.
SCOTT COUNTY FAIR.
Scott Co. Ajpllml Soc.
SIO,OOO Offered in Premiums.
Open to the World
THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL FAIR.
Will be held at Davenport, lowa,
SEPTEMBER 2. 8,4, 6, and 6, 1872.
Btreet cars run from the center ol the city di
rectly to the grounds.
Railroads centering in Rock Island and Daven -
port will carry stock and freight free, and passen
gers at reduced rates.
For Premium Lists, or any information, apply
to O. S. McNEIL, Secretary,
n47-ml Davenport, lowa,
College.
This Institution, with improved pros
pects for the future, will enter upon its
eleventh College year, Sept. 4, 1872.
There is now in connection with the Col
lege a full and competent corps of instruct
ors. Its scheme of study embraces a Clas
sical and Scientific course; a Ladies ; a
Commercial; a Normal; and a Bible course.
Very superior facilities for private clubs,
or self boarding are afforded. Board in
private families from SB.OO fo $3.50 per
week. Club boarding from $1.50 to $1,75,
and self board at still lower rates if the
student so elect.
TUITION.
Thirty dollars per session of ten months
the session being divided into three terms
of 16,12, 12 weeks respectively, beginning
as follows:
First term (16 weeks) Sept. 4, 1872.
Secod term, (12 weeks) Jan. 6, 1873.
Third term, (12 weeks) April 2, 1873.
The usual extra charges will be made
for Music, Painting, Drawing, and Com
mercial Instruction.
Tuition tor a term and one dollar contin
gent fee must be paid in advance, except
that students in the Normal Department
may enter for a half term.
For Catalogue or further particulars ad
dress M. P. Givens,
Secy of Faculty,
or F. M. BRUNER,
GROCERIES.
JJTBUSINESSACAJJJ
S. C. PURDY.
SOUTH-EAST COR. SQUARE
Having removed my Grocery to the Dix
on brick on south side in the room former
ly occupied by G. D. Cook & Co., I am
better than ever prepared to supply
all my old customers, and as many
new ones as I can get, with anything they
desire in the Grocery line. I keep on
hand a full stock of
S F
I A
p and N
L C
GROCERIES,
STONE,
WOODEN Sc WILLOW WARE
Choice Teas, Coffees | Syrups,
HI KE GROUND Ac WHOLE SPICES,
CANNED FRUITS, EXTRACTS, BAK
ING POWDERS,
Smoking and Chewing Tobac
cos of the best brands,
All of which I will sell at lowest living
prices for
CASH FOB FBODOCB ONLY.
Highest Market Price paid for all
kinds of Country Produce. Give
me a call and see what I can do for
! you.
I nls S. C. PURDY.
GIVENS BROS,
DEALERS IN
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
FLOUR, FELD,
AND
PROVISIONS!
Are now prepared to offer to the citizens of Os
k&looeaand vicinity, for
c o
.A. A.
S S
h:
CHOICE TEAS. SUGARS, COFFEES
AND SYRUPS,
at prices which will defy competition. Our stock
of
CANNED FRUITS, OYSTERS, AC.,
are of the best brands, also Extracts and Baking
Powders, with a full line of unadulterated spices.
TOBACCOS,
We call particular attention to onr large stock ol
Chewing and Smoking Tobaccos as being
unequalled for variety and quality
in the city. A large stock of
FLOUR AND FEED
is kept constantly on hand which will bo
delivered OV Iftl?
Ol vUH free of ex
pense anywhere In the city. We are now selling
FO B GASH*° 4 p»v ke “ “OBJECT
for all of those whor A I for their groceries to
give us a call. Highest market price paid
Butter, Eggs, Lard and other produce.
GIVE U 8 A CALL.
GIVENS BROS.,
n 9 North of Siebel’s Mill.
Mattison & Bro.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES.
QUEENSWARE,
GLASS, LAMPS, LAMP-FIX
TURES, POCKET AND
TABLE CUTLERY
- NOTIONS, <fco.
Have on hands a large and well selected stock
of everything in their line, bought for the Bpring
trade. Oar terms are
EXCLUSIVELY
Cash or Produce,
which enables ns to sell at the very lowest prices.
Oar facilities for handling
lm, Butter, Bides, Bags,
FEATHERS, BEESWAX, Ac.
Enable as to pay the
Highest Market Price,
in GASH or GOODS. Thankful for poet favors
we solicit a continuation of a share of the patron
* High Street, West of Square.
22 MATTISON A BRO.
Bos- Hebald Please announce the name of
L. J. MOSHER, of Prairie Tp., as a candidate for
Recorder of Mahaska coanty ; subject to the de
cision of the Primary Election. Jar. Mosher is s
wounded soldier and well qualified for the poei
fcm. lUht r simps.
I'TTr
GAZETTED.
The typesetter stands before his case.
The gas burns low and the night is deep;
And over the staggering chimney stacks
Darkness and shadows creep.
And the city is lost in sleep.
The type setter stands there gaunt and gray.
With dim old eyes and weary brain ;
And he sings a cadence solemn and low,
To the beat of the bitter rain
On the rattling casement and pane.
Trembling the rafters, roof, and floors.
As he fingers the types (in his desolate way);
And he hears the music faintly borne
From the theater over the way,
At some strange old tragedy play.
The old man sighs, and tremble the floors
With the bellowing engine down beiow,
And the crash of the whirling axle-bars.
And the thunders that from them gow.
Echoing to and fro.
As he'fingers the types (in his desolate way)
He sets them up with a heavy lead ;
And a marge of black encircles his work—
The name of the man just dead ;
A soul in the battle sped.
And he sighs as he thinks, this man so gray,
Winking and blinking before his case.
How, out in the dark and desolate night,
Some form of womanly grace
Is weeping upon her face.
Lower and lower the gas light burns.
And grow the shadows dusky and gray ;
And the storm is hushed and the music's swell.
And the theater over the way,
Aud finished the tragedy play.
And the type-setter wipes his dim old eyes ;
The types no more with his fingers move;
And he smiles that while setting the name below,
The angels in tender love,
Were setting it up above.
LETTER OF A REBEL E MISSARyT
How Democratic Leaders Bridged the
Bloody Chasm in 1864.
Disclosure of Rebel Policy.
Cognizance of Northern Democrats with
Town Burners and Boat
Thieves.
Time for Holding Democratic National
Convention Changed to Advance
Confederate Interests.
Democratic Peace Meetings Sustained
by Rebel Gold.
;[From the New York Times, Thursday July 25.]
We publish below, in full, the re
port of Jacob Thompson, the rebel
agent in Canada during the year
1864. It will be readily seen by it
why Mr. Greeley’s organ does not
desire its publication as a campaign
document by the Republican Con
gressional Committee. That Mr.
Greeley is afraid of it is to bo seen
from the following which appeared
in the Tribune yesterday morning:
“So it seems that the rebel arch
ives, purchased by the government
for $75,000, are to be published as a
campaign document by the Grant
party. There has been already a
great deal of history-writing at pub
lic expense, of which the most shi
ning example is Mr. Badeau’s use of
war department records and clerks
in making his eminent work. But
this rare and new publication is a
new attempt to tire the northern
heart, for the net sura of $25,000.
The slender pretext, that the pur
chase of the documents was made so
that the treason of rebel claimants
for damages to the government
might be exposed, disappears. It is
intended to reopen the old sore again;
we are to have the city-burning , well
poisoning, and the contagion-spread
ing business all re told, for fear peo
ple might forget there had been a
war, and make up their minds to live
at peace with their countrymen. Is
this worth while f Must these dead
and-gone quarrels be revived everlas
tingly that demagogues may thrive
No one who reads the document
will doubt that it is “worth while”
to make it public, and for these rea
sons :
1. It is the first conclusive direct
evidence of the connivance of Dem
ocratic leaders with the rebel scheme
of a northern insurrection, showing as
it does, that they were furnished
with large sums of money, which
were used in furthering peace meet
ings, in purchasing arms, and in per
fecting the concentrated plan for
violent resistance to drafts.
2. It is the first conclusive, di
rect evidence of the responsibility of
the rebel government for the infer
nal plots to burn New York, Brook
lyn, Cincinnati and other northern
cities, showing, as it does, that mon
ey was paid to those engaged in the
hellish business, and that some of
them held positions in the rebel
army.
3. It is conclusive, direct evi
dence that the success of the Demo
cratic ticket in 1864 was agreed by
the rebel government as equivalent
to comederate victories, and that to
that success the peace conference
sought by Horace Greeley was
known by the rebel government to
contribute largely.
Finally, it shows that the rebel
Democratic efforts at aiding the
rebel cause in the north took place at
the same time, and probably in con
cert with Mr. Greeley’s attempt to
defeat Mr. Lincoln’s election by pro
posing his withdrawal from the can
vass.
Is it any wonder that Mr. Greeley
shrinks in terror from the publication
of documents containing such revela
tion as this does ?
The letter, as given below, is
from a photographic copy ol the
original, which is endorsed with
Benjamin’s initials. It may, there
fore, he implicity relied on :
Toronto, C. W. Dec. 3, 1864.
To lion. J. P. Penjamin, Secreta
ry of State ;
Sir: —Several times have I at
tempted to send you communica
tions, but I have no assurauce that
any of them have been received. I
have relaxed no efforts to carry out
the objects the government had in
view in sending me here. I had
hoped at different times to have ac
complished more, but still I do not
think my mission has been altogeth
er fruitless. At all events, we have
afforded the northwestern States the
amplest opportunity to throw off the
galling dynasty at Washington and
openly to take ground in favor of
State rights and civil liberty. This
fact must satisfy the large class of
discontents at home of the readiness
and willingness of the administration
to avail itself of every proffered as
sistance in our great struggle for in
dependence.
On my arrival here I heard there
was such an organization as the “Or
der of the Sons of Liberty” in the
Northern States, and my first efforts
was to learn its strength, its princi
ples, and its objects, and, if possi
ble, to put myself in communication
with its leading spirits. This was
effected without much difficulty or
delay. I was received among them
with cordiality, and the greatest con
fidence at once extended to me. The
number of its members were large,
but not so great as Mr. Holt, in his
official report represented it to be.
Its objects were political; its prinei-
Sles were that the government was
ased on the consent of the parties
to it; that the States were the par
ties, and were sovereign ; that there
was no authority iu the general gov
ernment to coeroe a seoeding State;
the resolutions of 1796 and 1799
were set forth as presenting the true
theory of the government. Its or
fanization was essentially military,
t had its commanders of divisions,
of brigades, of regiments, of com
panies.
A PLOT TO SEIZE THREE STATES.
In the month of June last, the nni-
ISfiS
versal feelings among the members,
leaders and privates, was that it was
useless to hold a Presidential elec
tion. Lincoln had the power and
would certainly elect himself; and
there is no hope but in force. The
belief was entertained and freely
expressed that by a bold, vigorous
and concentrated movement the
three great Northwestern States of
Illinois, Indiana and Ohio could be
seized and held. This being done
the States of Kentucky and Missouri
could be easily lifted from their pros
trate condition and placed on their
feet; and this in sixty days would
end the war.
While everything was moving
smoothly to supposed successful
consummation, the first interruption
in the calculation was the postpone
ment of the meeting of the Demo
cratic Convention from the 4th of
July to the 29th of August; but the
preparations still weDt on, and in one
of the States the 20th of July was
fixed as the day for the movement.
But, before tho day arrived, a gener
al council from the order from the
different States was called, and it
was thought that the movement on
the 20th of July would be premature,
and the 16th of August was fixed for
a general uprising. This postpone
ment was insisted upon on the
ground that it was necessary to have
a series of public meetings to prepare
the public mind, and appointments
for public peace meetings were made,
one at Peoria, one at Springfield, and
one at Chicago. On the 16th the
first one was held at Peoria, and, to
make it a success, I agreed that so
much money as was necessary would
be furnished by me. It was held,
and was a decided success. The
vast multitudes who attended
seemed, to be swayed by one leading
idea—peace. The friends were en
couraged and strengthened, and
seemed anxious for the day when
they would do something to hasten
the great goal of peace.
HORACE GREELEY AND TEACE.
About this time that correspond
ence between our friend and Horace
Greeley made its appearance. Lin
coln’s manifesto shocked the coun
try. The belief prevailed over the
North that the South would agree to
reconstruction and the politicians,
emphatically the leading ones, con
ceived the idea that on such an issue
Lincoln could be beaten at the bal
lot-box. At all events, they argued,
the trial of the ballot box should be
made before the resort to arms was
made, always a dernier resort. The
Springfield meeting came off, but it
w as apparent that the tire exhibited at
Peoria had already diminished. The
whole tone of the speakers was that
the public must rely on the ballot-box
for redress of grievances. Thefterves
of the leaders of the order began to
relax. About this time a large lot
of arms were purchased and sent to
Indianapolis, which was discovered,
and some of the leaders charged
with the design to arm the members
of the order lor treasonable purpo
ses. Treachery showed itself at
Louisville. Judge Bullet and Dr.
Kalfus were arrested and sent to
Memphis. The day on which the
great movement was to be made be
came known to McDonald, candidate
for Governor of Indiana, and, be
lieving it would mar his prospects,
for election unless prevented, he
threatened to expose all the parties
engaged unless it was abandoned.
Thus the day passed by, and nothing
was done. The Chicago Convention
came. The crowd was immense.
The feeling was unanimous for peace.
A general impression prevailed that
a reconstruction could be had, and
that it was necessary to bo far pan
der to the millitary feeling as to take
Gen. McClellan to insure a certain
success.
THE TROUBLES OF TRAITORS.
The nomination followed as it
was, by divers disclosures and ar
rests of persons who were promi
nent members, totally demoralized
the “Sons of Liberty.” The feeling
with the masses is as strong as ever.
They are true and brave, and I be
lieve are willing and ready, but they
have no leaders. The vigilance of
the administration, its large detect
ive force, the large bounty paid for
treachery, and the respectable men
who have yielded to the temptation,
added to the large military force
stationed in these States, make or
ganization and preparation almost an
impossibility. A large sum of mon
ey has been expended in fostering
and furthering those operations, and
now seems to have been so little
profit, but, in reviewing the past, I
do not see how it coaid have been
avoided, nor has it been spent alto
gether in vain. The apprehensions
of the enemy have caused him to
bring back and keep from the
front at least 60,000 men to watch
and browbeat the people at home.
In this view of the subject the same
amount of money has effected so
much in no quarter since the com
mencement of the war.
In July last Capt. Charles H. Cole
of Geu. Forest’s command, made his
escape from prison. He represented
to me that he had been appointed a
lieutenant in our navy. I sent him
round the lakes with instructions to
go as a lower deck passenger, to fa
miliarize himself, with all the chan
nels and different approaches to the
several harbors, the strength of each
place, the depositories of coal, and
especially to learn all he oonld about
the war steamer Michigan, and de
vise some plan for her capture and
destruction. This duty he performed
very satisfactorily.
THE PLOT TO CAPTURE THE MICHIGAN.
He was then instructed to return
and pot himself in communication
with the officers of the Michigan, and
feeling his way, to endeavor to pur
chase the boat from its officers. For
a time he thought he would suoceed
in this, if he could give guarantees
of payment of the sums stipulated,
bnt by degrees the question was
dropped. He asked permission to
organize a force to board and take
her. This was given, and Acting
Master John Y. Beall was sent to
him to aid in the organization and in
carrying oat the enterprise. Their
plan was well conceived and held
out the promise of success. It had
been previously ascertained from es
caped prisoners from Johnson’s
Island, that an organization existed
among the prisoners on the Island
for the purpose of surprising the
guard and capturing the Island. The
presenoe of the steamer Michigan,
whioh carried fourteen guns, was the
only obstacle. Secret communica
tions were had, by whioh they were
advised that on the night of the 19th
of September an attempt would be
made to seize the Miohigan. On
that night Capt. Cole, who had pre
viously established the friendliest re
lations with the officers of the steam
er, was to have a “wine drinking”
with them on board, and at a given
hour Acting Master Beall was to ap
pear on a boat, to be obtained for
the purpose, with a sufficient body of
CQnfederate soldier* to board and
take the steamer. Should they cap
ture the steamer, a cannon shot sent
through the officers quarters on John
son’s island was to signify to the
prisoners that the hour for their re
lease had come. Should they take
the island, boats were to be impro
vised, and Sandusky was to be at
tacked. It taken, the prisoners were
to be mounted and make for Cleve
land, the boats co-operating, and
from Cleveland, the prisoners were
to make Wheeling, thence to Vir
ginia. The key to the whole move
ment was the capture of the Michi
gan. On the evening of the 19th, by
some treachery, Cole was arrested,
and the messenger, who was to meet
Acting Mat-ter Beall at Kelly’s
Island, did not reach him.
SEIZURE OF THE ISLAND QUEEN.
Disappointed, but nothing daunt
ed, Acting Master Beall, having pos
session of the Philo Parsons, a pas
senger steamer running from Detroit
to Sandusky, he went on his way to
ward Johnson’s Island. Having land
ed at Middle Bar Island to secure a
supply of wood, the steamer, Island
Queen, with a large number of pas
sengers and thirty-two soldiers, came
up alongside and lashed herself to
the Parsons. An attack was at once
resolved upon. The passengers and
soldiers were soon made prisoners
and the boat delivered up to our
men. The soldiers were regularly
paroled. The passengers were left
on the Island, having given their
promise not to leave for twenty-four
hours, and the boat was towed out
into the lake and sunk.
The persons then started directly
for the Bay of Sandusky. Here the
men, for certain reasons not alto
gether satisfactory, but possibly
fortunately, refused to make
the attack on the Michigan. Beall
returned and landed at Sandwich,
C. W., and the men scattered thro’
the country. Most of them returned
to the Confederate States ; but a few
days since Acting Master Bennett S.
Burley was arrested, and the trial is
now going on for his delivery under
the extradition treaty. If we had
Cole’s, Beall’s, or his own commis
sion, I should not fear the result. As
it is, they will have to prove that
they acted under my order, and that,
will in all probability secure his re
lease, but it may lead to my expul
sion from the provinces. At least I
have it from a reliable source that
this last proposition has been pressed
upon the Canadian authorities, and
they have considered it. Should
the course of events take this direc
tion, unadvised by you, I shall con
sider it my duty to remain where I
am, and abide the issue. I should
prefer if it be possible, to have your
views on the subject. Capt. Cole is
still a prisoner on Johnson’s island,
in obedience to your suggestion, as
far as it was possible.
A FINANCIAL SCHEME.
Soon after the arrival here, I urged
the people in the north to convert
their paper money into gold and
withdraw it from the market. lam
satisfied this policy was,adopted and
carried into effect to some extent,
but how extensively I am unable to
say. What effect it had on the gold
market it is impossible to estimate,
but certain it is that gold began to
appreciate until it went to 290. The
high price may have tempted many
to change their policy, because af
terward gold fell in the market to
150. When it was about 180, and
exportation of gold was so small that
there appeared to be little or no de
mand for it, Mr. John Potterfield,
formerly a resident of Nashville, but
now a resident of Montreal, was fur
nished with SIOO,OOO, and instructed
to proceed to New York and carry
out a financial policy of his own con
ception, which consisted in the pur
chase of gold and exporting the
same, selling it for sterling bills of
exchange, and then again converting
his exchange into gold. This pro
cess involved a certain loss —the cost
of transhipment. He was instructed
by Mr. Clay and myself to go on
with his policy until he had expend
ed $25,000, with which he supposed
he would ship directly $5,000,000,
and induce others to ship much
more, an I then, if the effect on the
gold market was not very percepti
ble, he has to desist and return to
Canada, and return the money unex
pended. By the last report he had
caused the shipment of more than
$2,000,000, at an expense of less
than SIO,OOO ; but it seems that a
Mr. Lyon, who had been a former
partner of Mr. Potterfield, was ar
rested by Gen. Butler on the ground
that he was exporting gold, and, al
though Mr. Lyon had no connection
with Mr. Potterfield in his transac
tion, yet he thought it prudent to re
turn to Canada, and, while he retains
the unexpended balance of the $25,-
000 to carry out his instructions, he
has restored $75,000. I must con
fess that the first shipment had a
marked effect on the market. I am
inclined to the opinion that this the
ory will work great damage and dis
trust in the federal finances if vigor
ously followed up, and if no unto
ward circumstances should interfere
with the operation.
STEAMBOAT INCENDIARISM.
Soon after I reached Canada, a Mr.
Minor Major visited me and repre
sented himself as an accredited agent
of the Confederate States to destroy
steamboats on the Mississippi river,
and that his operations were sus
pended for a want of funds. I ad
vanced to him S2OO in Federal cur
rency, and soon after several boats
were burned at St. Louis, involving
an immense loss of property to the
enemy. He became suspected, as
he represented to me, of being the
author of this burning, and his men
have been in hiding, and consequent
ly have done nothing. Money has
been advanced to Mr. Churchill, of
Cincinnati, to organize a corps for
the purpose of incendiarism in that
city. I consider him a true man,
and although as yet he has effected
but little, lam in constant expecta
tion of hearing of effective work in
that quarter.
Previous to the arrival of Lieut.
Col. Martin, Lieut. Headly brought
an unsigned letter from you. All
the different places where our pris
oners are —Camp Douglass, Rock
Island, Camp Morton, Camp Chase,
Elmira —had been thoroughly exam
ined, and the conclusion was forced
upon us that all efforts to release
them without outside co-operation,
would bring disaster upon the pris
oners and result in no good. All
projects of that sort were abandoned,
except that at Camp Douglass,
where Capt Hines still believed he
could effeot their release. We yield
ed to his firmness, zeal and persist
ence, and his plans were plausible,
but treachery defeated him before
his well laid sohemes were devel
oped. Having nothing else on hand,
Col. Martin expressed a wish to or
ganize a corps to burn New York
oity. He was allowed to do so and
a most daring attempt has been
made to fire that city ; but their re
liance on the Greek fire has proved
I Established July 1850.
a misfortune. It cannot be depended
upon as an agent in such work. I
have no faith whatever in it and no
attempt shall hereafter be made un
der my general directions with any
such materials.
THE STEAMER GEORGIA.
I knew nothing whatever of the
raid on St. Albans until after it tran
spired. Desiring to have a boat on
whose captain and crew reliance
could be placed, and on board of
which arms could be sent to conve
nient points for arming such vessels
as could be seized for operations on
the lakes, I aided Dr. James T.
Bates, oi Kentucky, an old steam
boat captain, in the purchase of the
steamer Georgia. She had scarcely
been transferred when the story went
abroad that she had been purchased
and armed for the purpose of sinking
the Michigan, releasing the prison
ers on Johnson’s Island, and destroy
ing the shipping on the lakes and
oities on their margin. The wildest
oonsternation prevailed in all the bor
der cities. At Buffalo two tugs had
cannon placed on board, four regi
ments of soldiers were sent there,
two of them represented to have
been drawn from the army of Vir
ginia. Bells were rung at Detroit
and churches broken up on Sunday.
The whole lake shore was a scene of
wild excitement. Boats were sent
out which boarded the Georgian and
found nothing contraband on board,
but still the people were incredu
lous.
The bane and curse of carrying
out anything in this country, is the
surveillance under which we act.
Detectives or those ready to give in
formation stand at every street cor
ner. Two or three cannot interchange
ideas without a reporter. The Pres
idential election has so demoralized
the Sons of Liberty that a new organ
ization under new leaders has become
an absolute necessity. This is now
going forward with great vigor and
success. The new order is styled,
“The order of the Star.” There is
a general expectation that there will
soon be a new draft. It is purely
military and wholly independent of
politics and politicians. It is given
out that Stonewall Jackson is the
founder of the order, and the name
has its significance from the stars on
the collars of southern officers. There
is no reason to doubt that the masses
to a large extent, of the north are
brave and true, and believe Lincoln
a tyrant and usurper.
MORE INCENDIARISM.
During my stay in Canada a great
amount of property has been destroy
ed by burning. The information
brought to me as to the perpetrators
is so conflicting and contradictory
that I am satisfied that nothing can
be certainly known. Should claims
be presented at the war office for
payment of this kind of work not one
dollar should be advanced on any
proof adduced until all the parties
concerned may have an opportunity
for making out and presenting proof.
Several claim to have done the work
at St. Louis, New Orleans, Louis
ville, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and
at Cairo. Within the last few days
Dr. K. J. Stewart, of Virginia, has
reached this place, and very myste
riously informs me that he has a plan
for the execution of something which
has received the sanction of the pres
ident. He is in want of money, and
states to me that you gave him a
draft on me for $20,000 in gold,
which has been lost on the way. He
has sent back to Richmond for a re
newal He has rented a large house
and moved his family into it. I can
not doubt his word, but, of course, I
do not feel authorized to advance
him money without your authority
or that of the president. I have how
ever, been constrained to advance
him SSOO in gold on his written state
ment that, unless the money was
placed in his hands, the lives and
liberties of high confederate officers
would be imperiled.
Owing to the ill health of Mr. Clay
we separated at Halifax, and since
then we have not lived together,
though we have been in consulting
distance. As the money was all in
my name, which I supposed to be
controlled by us jointly, and as he
desired to have a sum placed in his
hands, and at all times subject to his
personal control, I transferred to him
$93,614, for which I hold his receipt
and for which he promises to account
to the proper authorities at home.
THREE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS
EXPENDED.
Including the money turned over
to Mr. Clay, all of which has not
yet expended, the entire expendi
tures as yet on all accounts, is about
$300,000. I still hold three drafts
for SIOO,OOO each which have not
been collected. Should you think
it best for me to return, 1 wouid be
glad to know in what way you think
I had best return with the funds re
maining on hand. I infer from your
“personal” in the New York News
that it is your wish I should remain
here for the present, and 1 shall
obey your orders. Indeed, I have
so many papers in my possession,
which, in hands of this enemy,
would utterly ruin and destroy many
of the prominent men in the North,
that a due sense of my obligation
to them will force on me the extreme
caution in my movements. For the
the future discarding all dependence
on the organization in the Northern
states, our efforts in my judgment,
should be directed to inducing those
who are conscripted in the North,
and who utterly refuse to join the
army to fight against the confeder
ate States, to make their way South
to join our service. It is believed
by many that at least a number suf
ficient to make up a division be se
cured in this way for our service be
fore spring, especially if our army
opens np a road to the Ohio. Some
are now on their way to Corinth,
which at present is the point of ren
dezvous. Also, to operate on their
railroads and force the enemy to
keep np a gnard on all their roads,
which will require a large standing
army at home ; and to burn whatev
er it is praoticable, and thus make
the men of property feel their inse
curity and tire them out with the
war.
The attempt on New York has
preduoed a great panic, which will
not subside at their bidding. This
letter, though long, does not, I am
aware, report many things of minor
importance which have occurred
sinoe my sojourn in Canada, but 1
shall omit them at present. Very
respectfully, your obedient servant,
J. Thompson.
We see the Tribune continues to
aoouse President Grant of receiving
presents. Again, and for the third
time, we ask the Tribune to name
one solitary instance where Presi
dent Grant has acoepted a present
Binoe his inauguration, or even since
his nomination tor President of the
United States in 1868. If it cannot
name one such instance, is it not
about time for it, as a simple matter
of deoency, to stop repeating the
slander ? Chicago Journal.
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald
is BY riß TB.M
Best Advertising Medium in Gekaloosa
Most of which are to £~ ® C '° l>les
io persons In Mahaska CouDtj
oua faoihtieb fob
Are
an official dispatch.
Sanator Schurz Convinced of Falsehood.
[Brom the St. Lonfa Globe.]
speech Mr v- Schurz’s late
speech in which he charges the Prp»
ident with offering toTy tithnal
rouage his support of the San Do
mingo measure, was telegraphed to
Washington Saturday night, and in
returnour Washmgton correspondent
answered, as published in the Globe
yesterday, that the President was on
his way to Long Branch, and that an
authortaitive rebuttal and denial could
not be made until the matter could
be laid before him the following
morning. Meanwhile the cabinet
members had no hesitation in de
claring their absolute cnnviction that
Senator Schurz’s charges were with
out adequate foundation in tact,
i esterday the following dispatch
authorized by the President, and ap
proved by the members of the Cabi
net in Washington:
Washington, D. C., July 23.
To the St. Louis Globe: The
charges made last night by Senatar
Schuns, in his St. Louis speech, to
he had been offered
official patronage by the President,
or by his friends, to vote against his
convictions of his duty in regard to
the annexation of San Domingo, was
laid before the President by Secreta
ry Belknap on General Grant’s ar
rival here this morning.
The President announced the
whole statement, as far as it attempt- 1
ed to reflect upon him, absolutely un
founded on fact.
Senator Schurz was either imposed
upon or is the utterer of a Malicious
fabrication.
In no way was any one authorized
to tender to either Mr. Schurz or •
any other Senator, the control or use
of any patronage for his approval of
the San Domingo Annexation policy
or any other measure of the adminis
tration.
The President expresses his earn
est desire that Mr. Schurz will at
once publish the letter he claims to
have relating to the alleged aflair, in
order that, if anyone has so imposed
upon the Senator, it may lead to a
full exposition of the dishonest mo
tive and character of that person.
It ought to be added that the pas
sage of Mr. Schurz’s speech tele
graphed to Washington, and to
which the above reply is made, was
taken from advanced slips of his
printed address, and that this pas
sage was altered previous to its de
livery. __ The alteration modified
the original by referring to the per
sons who visited Mr. Schurz, ac
cording to his statement, as some
what intimate, instead of intimate ,
with the President, and by giving
an extract from the letter to which
the passage at first had only referred.
In the extract the writer refuses to
say more than he had spoken under
an “impression” of the President’s
meaning, and wholly fails to give
any reasons for the “impression.”
The President’s rejoinder applies
equally to this expurgated and
amended edition of Mr. Schurz’s
charges, denies them totally, and
calls for the publication of the letter
itself, which inclades the name of
the writer.
HENRY CLAY AND JAMES BUCHAN
AN.
Mr. Clay of all men, relished a
personal discussion —a duel, with
words for the weapons. He excell
ed in phillippic and retort, and nev
er flinched when he met an antago
nist who would give as well as take.
He was merciless in a skirmish of
this kind, aad had no hesitation in
alluding to physical defeots or nat
ural infirmities of any description.
He indulged frequently in coarse
pleasantries and unsparing ridicule.
Mr. Buchanan was his pet aversion,
and he expressed his dislike in sea
son and oat of season. Mr. Buch
anan had a defect in his sight, a
sort of wall-eye, or cross-eye which
gave him the appearance of obliqui
ty of vision. On one occasion when
the Democrats were in a majority,
Mr. Clay complained of some aot of
Mr. Wright alluding to him as the
“Leader of the Senate.” From the
spot where Mr. Clay was standing.
Mr. Wright and Mr. Buchanan
were nearly in a range in the semi
circle. Mr. Bnchanan rose to re
ply, supposing himself to have been
referred to. Mr. Clay with an ex
pression on his face, compounded
of derision and contempt, said:
“Mr. President, the tSenator from
Pennsylvania is giving himself a
deal of unnecessary trouble. I made
no allusion to him Sir, I spoke to the
leader of their Senate,” and point
ing unmistakably to Mr. Wright.
Mr. Buchanan with much embar
isment hesitatingly rejoined; Mr.
President, I did not intend to arro
gate to myself any such distinction.
I make no pretension to be the lead
er of the Senate, (I should hope
not,” interrupted Mr. Clay, without
rising); but the Senator from
Kentucky certainly looked at me.”
“No Mr. President I did nothing
of the kind. It was not that I look
ed at the Senator ( here he held up
his hand making a cross with his
two fingers); it was the way the Sen
ator looked at me.”
At another time Mr. Clay and
Mr. Buchanan fell into a controver
sial discussion in which personalities
were freeley exchanged. Mr. Clay
finally alluded to some transaction
involving Mr. Buchanan, greatly
to that gentleman’s embarrassment,
who hesitated, and stammered and
finally recovering himself, said that
he oould reveal a secret that he
would not like to have public, hint
ing at something that was understood
by Mr. Clay. Springing to his feet,
the latter exclaimed in a loud and
imperious tone.
“No sir, not a word 1 That Bubject
is taboo.”
“But the Senator has spoken of
my private affairs, and I must be
allowed a similar license.”
“Proceed Sir,” said Mr. Clay
“but understand that you proceed
at your peril, at your personal peril,
sir.”
M. Bnchanan sank into his seat,
turning the color of his white oravat,
without uttering another word. —
From “ Recollections of an Old Stag
er fin Harper'B Magazine for An •
gust.
The stealings in the United States
Treasurer’s office since General Spin
ner’s appointment have amounted to
precisely one dollar for every million
that have passed through it. Conld
“Honest Horace” do any better than
that ?
nil k——
A good sell on the Germ ans has
coma to light. The New York
j Evening Post states that the names
of the 15,000 Germans seat to Balti
more, asking the endorsement of
Greeley, were obtained some years
ago on an anti-temperanoe protest.
Now they are used to put up a pro
hibitionist !
• * J* * '*o X.,;' »

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