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The Weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, August 15, 1872, Image 1

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The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
POBLUUD ITUT THUBOIT BY
LEIGHTON St NEEDHAM.
H. C. Utctfc»- W * H *
Omoi In “Hemid Block," over Port Office.
TBBMS.-$2.00 a Year k Advance.
CITY DIRECTOR*-
Street Commissioner w * “* u
WWJJL .D^°L®^V D H R §Si“
4th Werd..H.C. HUNTSMAN.
~ MASONIC.
mviLITXINAB A P- AA. M—Stated
T communrcati .n Frida, evening on or before
each full moon. _ , •• M. JONitS. W. M.
H C LEIGHTON, Sec’y.
Amity lodge, no. lse, a. p. and a. m.—
Stated communication Monday evening
before the full moon.
U. K. KENDIO, W. M.
W. E. GKEBNLE, Sec'y.
HIRAM CHAPTER. No. 0 —SUted communi
cations Wednesday evenings before full
moon. W. M. WELLS, H. P.
H. K. KBNDIG, Sec’y.
DE PAY COMM ANDERY, K. T.. No.
Stated communcications Tuesday evenings
before full moon. I>. A. HOFFMAN. E. C.
M. T. WILLIAMS, Recorder.
Transient brethren of any degree invited to
meet with ns.
I. O. oC F.
Mahaska lodge, no. lft, l o. o. r.
REGULAR MEETING, SATURDAY
Evening of each week. Brethren visiting the city
are invited to meet with ns. „ „ _
J. O. MOORMAN, N. G.,
HAM. DUKE. Sec. nit
COMMERCIAL LODGE, No. 128, LO. O. F.
\j holds its regular meetings every Wednes
day evening. Brothers visiting the city are Invited
to meet with us. C. A. BEARDSLEY N. G.
GEO. W. ROUSE, Sec’y. 3-
Oskaloosa encampment. No. 13,1. o.
O. P., meets IsfTniw’WliSiSrhlghts In
each month. SAMUEL MCWILLIAMS, C. P.
R. Q. PIKE, Scribe.
ADD FELLOW’S PROTECTIVE ABSOCIA-
U TION of Oskaloosa, meets regularly every
8d Thursday in each mouth. The Brothers are
invited to meet. B. BACH, Sec’y.
J. A. YOUNG, Prea’t.
HOTELS. ______
Madison house.
M. J. PALMER, Othaloosa, lowa.
S LEMMONS HOUSE IN NEW HANDS.
I have purchased this hotel with a design, of
making it a comfortable and pleasant one. lam
aware of its reputation, yet feel confident that my
extended acquaintance will overcome it. The
house will not be entirely refitted till spring
opens, yet lam prepared to entertain all who
may call, comfortably. Give me a trial.
80. H. J.LUICK.
fddyville.
PHOTOGRAPHY.
WARRINGTON,
PHOTOGRAPHER, has re
moved bis Picture Galiy to his new rooms west
of the Square. He has the hast light in the city.
All styles of pictures taken and good workgnar
anted in all cases, Terms reasonable.
Hi A. W. WARRINGTON.
1 ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
ROBT. KISSICK.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW and Notary Public.
Oskaloosa. lowa. Office with Seevers A Cutts,
in Union Block, north Bids of Public Square, up
stairs. Wilifgive special attention to collections,
probate business, and conveyancing. Will prac
tice In all the Coarts of the State. nrttf.
WS. KEN WORTHY.
• ATTORNEY AT LAW. New Sharon.
lowa. n 22.
W, W. HAS KILL. L. A. SCOTT.
Haskell a scott.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office up stairs In the Old Court House, north
west corner of Public Square. n4O-tl
MT. WILLIAMS,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW, and Notary Pub
lic, Oskaloosa, lowa. Office In Street's Block,
room recently occnplsd by Connty Judge. FT
IRA J. ALDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, lowa City, lowa.
(Snocessor to Judge W M Miller,)
nl6-tf
TkA VENPORT, A BOLTON,
U ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Owen, on the west side of the Public Square,
in the room recently occupied by Z. T. Fisher.
nßyl
CSUARLES J. DODD,
j ATTORNEY AT LAW, Peoria, lowa.
Special attention given to the collection of
claims. Business attended to promptly. 28
eno. W. UATTHBTT. 1. KIUT /OHKSOM.
r AFFERTY A JOHNSON.
Li ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office in Union Block, North side of the Pub-
Uc Square, up stairs. 47
w, a lutiu. x. a. cutts.
Seevers a cutts,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office in Union Block, in room recently occupied
by Seevers A Williams. n2I
t. A. L. CROOK HAM. H. W OLEASOH.
CROOKHAM A GLEASON.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Notaries Public
and Government Claim Agents. Will practice in 1
the several Courts of the State. Collections
Sromptly attended to. Office over National State
an It, Oskaloosa, lowa. »88
fOHM P. LXCST. W. 1. SBiraißD.
Lacey a shepherd,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, AMD GOVERN
MENT CLAIM AGENTS. Prompt attention
given to collections. Probate business will re
ceive careful attention, Business attended to Un
the U. S. and State Courts. Office over tne
National State Bank. Oskaloosa. lowa. 21
PHYBICIANB A BURQBONB.
TJt H. CAMERON,
Li. PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, ACCOUCHEUR,
OCULIST AND AURIST. Office in Herald Block
over Ketner's Store. Entrance next door to Post
Office. May be consulted from 10 to 12 a. m., and
Ito4p. m. Cases requiring surgical aid wi 11 en
deavor to report on Mondays. Fridays from 2to
4 p. m. devoted to those in indigent circumstan
ces, free of charge. 42
L. MCALLISTER.
• PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, New
Sharon, lowa. nSS.
Yj C. HUNTSMAN, M. D. D. A. HURST, M. D.
Huntsman a hurst, physicians a
SURGEONS, Oskaloosa, lowa. Special attention
given to the Practice of Sargery. Office four doors
east of north-east corner of pnblie square. 82
DR. P. A. HOFFMAN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, Oskaloosa, ]
lowa. Office over N. Dodge's Boot and Shoe
•tore. Residence on Mala street, throe blocks
east of the pnbllc square. n2l ,
T H. WILEY, M. D., Office and residence Cor
el . ner of Liberty and Lafayette sts., Oskaloosa,
lowa. Special attention paid to the treatment of ,
Catarrh, Bye and Ear, Cancer, Scrofula and all
Chronic Diseases and Diseases of Females. Dr.
W. has effected many cures of Chronic cases -
which other physicians had pronounced hopeless.
Certificates of enchcan be shown to those inter
ested. Country business promptly attended to. (
llmt
E. CHAMBERLIN. A. M.. M. D., wUI at
• tend professional calls to all. day and night
(except to those who do not TRY to pay him, or
are given to quibbling). Fees will correspond to .
those of “Regular Physicians” and will be due
when the patient is dismissed.
Capt. Evans is collector of my unsettled ac
counts of the six years previous to Dec. 1, 1871.
Let his visit be final so that there will be ns addi
tional expense.
Office at Drag Store and at residence one block ,
north. Osk&looea Station. lowa. 13tf 1
JL, COFFIN, M. D., Homeopathic Physician,
• Oskaloosa, lowa. Office on Main street,
south-east corner efpubllc square, 4 doors east;
Residence, corner or Marion and Main streets, 1
block north Baptist church. Office hours from
7)4 to 0 a. m., from 12)( to 2 and 7to9p, m.
Country business promptly attended to.
Hrrxßxwoxsß C Mains, MD, Portage City,
Wis ; Ex Gov T Lewis, Columbas. Wm: Hon
Alex Mitchell, M O, Milwaukee, Wls ; O T Palm
er, MD. lowa City, Iowa: a C D Racine
Wis; G F Newell, MD. Waterford, Wla ; Rev N
Woodworth, Principal of Rochester Institute ; T
i Du *4?. w le; Hon Wm R
Smith, Kx StaUTreasurer, Pox Lake, Wis : Hon
Geo Bremner. Union Grove. Wls. 4-ly
“AVINGS BAN it.J I
TTNION SAVINGS BANK.
U OSKALOOSA, IOWA
Money Loaned, Notes Discounted, Government
Bonds, Gold. Silver and Sight Drafts on tks Prin
cipal Citlea of the United States and Europe
bought and sold. Also passage tickets to and
from all the principal titles in Europe. Interest
allowed on deposits oi one dollar and upwards.
Revenue stamps for sale. Office hoars from •a.
m. to 4 p. m.
R. H. GIBBS, Prss.
H. L. GIBBS. Vice Pres.
ISRAEL M GIBBS. Jr.. Cash.
DENTISTS.
TVB. M. L. JACKSON,
U Surgeon Dentist.
Office West Bide of the
Public Square, over
Kimnai! a Co.
Nitrons oxide Ga* ad
ministered In the extrac
tlon of teeth. alO-tf
dental office.
Kead the following and remember that
wm „
any Other first Class dentist in the city, and w.r '
oskaloosa, lowa.—Sign of teeth chewing at foot
f stoire. i 26.
BAKERIES.
STEAM BAKERY,
IN KNOWLTON'B BLOCK. BOUTS BIDS
or TON BECAME,
where we keep the best
BKI £D. p ns9, cakes, crackers,
Foreign end Domestic Fruit*,
tetoon*, Orange*, Pate*,
**«*. ShftdiMfi, md
* <vj kinds of Cto-
Worm MuU al aS tuw'iKmvk UU da,.
maSH OYBTBRB,
%
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
Volume 22. Number 49. t
LIVERY.
Downing a momulun, a oo„
CITY LIVERY AND BUS LINK.
Oskaloosa. lowa.
JEWELER.
OH. CHAPMAN,
g* fe. WATCH-MAKER^
Mr.M jeweler.
Booth Bide Public Square. Oskaloosa, lowa. SOtf.
MILLINERY.
mi* TOMLINSON dk CO.
jg'EEF MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS,
make Dresses, and everything else generally
made in a
MILLINERS AND DRESS MAKERS SHOP,
PUT UP SWITCHES, CURLS, *C.,
North east corner Pnblic Square,
OSKALOOSA
HAIRDRESSING.
LADIES' HAIR GOODS,
8. B. Corner Square, Oskaloosa, lowa.
MISS MIND A LARSU again calls the attention
of ladies to her stock of lfair Goods, Chignons,
Switehes, Braids, Carls, Ac., made to order from
the very best imported Human Hair, and in the
latest style. I Dilution goods so closely resemb
ling real hair as to answer Its purpose for those
who desire a less expensive article of ornamental
hair goods. Hair Jewelry of any design made
from hair relics of departed friends, and finished
in the most artistic manner at the very lowest
prices. Orders from a distance for this kind of
work or hair goods of any description will receive
prompt attention. Can fill any order with due
B Anapprentice girl wanted, for terms apply to
S. E. corner Square, Oskaloosa, lowa. 27 >
PAINTERS.
J. W. BEACH,
HOUSE and SIGN PAINTEB!
GLAZING,
PAINTING,
GRAINING,
PAPER HANGING,
KALSOMINEINQ, BTC.
ALL WOR|L WARRANTED
Shop and residence opposite High School
Building, Address P. O. Box 88. 27
4IITY PAINT SHOP.
[ S. PERRY,
Has fitted up the shop formerly occupied by
George Acomb, a few doors South of the south
west corner of the square, and Is prepared to exe
cute all kinds of
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING.
GRAINING AND PAPER-HANOINO,
In first-dam stylo, on short notice and the moat
reasonable terms - nfil
CIGAR MANUFACTORY.
Cigar Manufactory.
I desire to say to lovers of GOOD CIGARS,
that I keep constantly on hand, of my own
MANUFACTURE,
A supply of all the grades in market, and at as
fhlr prices as can be afforded in the city.
I bay my tobacco in Kaatern markets and am
ready at all times to vouch for its quality.
Dsa'ers supplied at
WHOLESALE RATES.
I have an Immense stock of
PIPBB OF EVERY OEBCRIPTI*
CIGAR HOLDERS,
TOBACCO POUCHEB, BOXES, Ac.
Call and examine my stock, east side public
square. |2d door south of Madison Boose, Otka
loeea lowa. V FRED. BECKMAN.
PLANING MILL.
Osialoosa Planing; Hill,
Comer of High and Madison Sts.,
OSKALOOSA. - - - IOWA.
H. Snyder &, Co,
KAUFAGTURKRB OF
SASH,
DOORS,
BLINDS,
WINDOW AND DOORFRAMES
MOULDINGS, Ac.,
Planing, re sawing, scroll-sawing, etc., done ot
short netice.
All orders will receive prompt attention. Job
work done to order.
Corn-shelling done at all times.
n22tf
PHOTOGRAPHY.
J. J. MERRILL,
PHOTOGRAPHER!
Oskaloosa, lowa,
Keeps constantly on hand a good assortment of
WALNUT
AND
ROSEWOOD
OVAL FRAMES.
Photographs and Gems taken in the best of stylo
and guaranteed satisfactory. Also
Old Picture* of every dea
led to suit.
27 Street’s Block, west side square.
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
W. BURNSIDE & CO.,
CENTRAL IOWA REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
axi> sxaLXßs ix
WESTERN LANDS,
Office in County Recorder’s Office,
Oskaloosa, lowa
We have the enly Set of Abstracts for
Mahaska Co., ana are prepared to furnish
Abstracts of Title to any land or
City Property In the Co.
Special attention given to paying Taxes In this
Stole. n*-tf
J«BX W. LX on.
LACEY A SHEPHERD’S
AGENCY.
We have on ear books a large number
FARMS, AND HOUSES IN TOWN.
Also many thousand acres ot
WILD LAND.
if yomhave Real Estate to sell, or wish to buy
five ue a call. We pay taxes in any part of the
tote. Conveyancing done nfil
G. W. LAFFKRTY, J. KELLY JOHNSON,
Attorney at Law Attorney at Law,
and and
Notary Public. Notary Public,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Oakalooaa, lowa.
LAFFBETY i JOHNSON,
Real Estate Agents
Will our and sell Real Estate on commission,
examine titles, and do Conveyancing of every de
scription.
We already have a good assortment of City
and country property on enr books, but desire to
increase oar list sad to this end request those
having property tor sale to give ue a call.
Office in Union Block, over M Wilson's store.
OSKALOOSA, - - IOWA.
Geo. W. Lafferty of the above firm, and late *
the firm of Needham A Lafferty, is also an author
laed agent for the collection or Pensions, Bounty,
Back Pay, Ac. Prom bis long experience in this
business he can confidently say to those dealring
his services that their business will be promptly
und carefully attended to.
Semi-annual payments of Fenalons also collect
ed. . al«
STATIONERY.
SNIDER & HOLMES
DBALUM IN mil DMOBimOM or
PAPER,
PRINTING INK,
CARD STOCK,
-in-
ENVELOPES.
108 N. Second 5t.,.. .Bt. Louis.
uiffiomiu ov m
FBJURUS AHDFAIB 080VE
CELEBRATED
PUN) raw PAPER
Lumber Yard!
WRAY & SON.
SULIM IX ALL KINDS OT
LUMBER,
SHINGLES,
LATH,
Keep constantly on kand a fall assortment of
DOORS. A SASH ,
DRESSED SIRING,
CEILING AND FLOORING.
FENCING, SHEETING,
BARN BOARDS,
PALING, JOIST,
SCANTLINO, AND
FRAME TIMBERS,
FINISHING LUMBER, ETC., ETC-, ETC.
if you wish anything in our line give us a call
and examine our stock and prices.
lyLnmber delivered to all
parts of the city free of charge.
Office on west High street; ine door east
of City Mansion.
n4Btt.
• IOWA.
PINE LUMBER
keep constantly on hand a fhll assortment of
Finishing Boards, Dressed Sid
ing, Flooring And Ceil
ing, Fencing, Common
Boards, Sheet
ing, Pailing,
Joist
and
SCANTLING
FRAME TIMBERS,
We have on hand the largest stock In the city,
and Invite all wishing anything in our line to call
O UR PRICES WILL BEFO UND REASONABLE
Lumber delivered in city free of charge.
Office a few blocks sonth-west of Square. ae%
In addition to the above we call attention to
our Lumber Yard at New Sharon, where we keep
constantly on hand all articles above mentioned,
and at Oskaloosa prices.
Xj
TT ZE2
X (L B
X ES
T 3R,
JOISTS,
FENCING,
SHINGLES,
STOCK BOARDS,
PICKETS, DOORS,
L S
A A
T S
H H
ETC., ETC.
Thankful for past favors, I respectfully solicit a
share of patronage.
Office and Yard corner of Perry
Land Liberty Streets.
UMBER DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF CIT |
Oskaloosa, April 14. 1872. n 32
C. B. GRUWELL’S
DRUG AND PAINT STORE.
PURE DRUGS, CHEIUrAUIi MEDI
CINES, FINS TOILET SOAPS,
BRUSHES, COMBS, AO.
PurfmerF is great variety.
Pure Wine* and Liquors for medicinal
Purposes.
wx. s.
Physician** Prescriptions carefully
Compounded.
COLORS,
PURE LEADS,
MINERAL PAINTS,
VARNISHES,
PUTTY,
LINSEED OIL.
Glass of Every Size.
nfifl West High Street, Oekalooea. lowa.
Db. G. N. Bikbub.
BEECHLER BROS.,
Successors to Dr. S. B. Rhinehart.
DxxLnua ut
PURE DRUGS!
Oils
of all
kinds,
Chemi
cals, all
kinds of
Fancy and
Common Toi
et* Soape, Pcr
tnmery of Ameri
ca*, English and French
manufactures, HairOUs. Pom
ades,!Coemetiquee. Combs, Hair,
Cloth, Tooth and Hand Brushes in
great profusion. Lamp Chimneys, Family
'Dyes, Pocket Book# of every description,
P ena. Inks, Stationery, a complete assortment of
Toliet Powders, Rouge Infant Powder. Puffs and
X Boxes, Tooth Powder and Paste, Barbers’
-''VsAp. Shaving Boxes and Bnrahea, Hand Mir
rors or American and French plate glaaa.
Cigars of the very choicest brands, a
full line of Druggists'! sundries of
the very choicest grades. Our
stock is complete. We
buy for cash and
, defy competi
tion in quali
ty and price.
We keep a
larg e
stock
ofpa
tent
MEDICINES!
We keep, in fact, everything usually kept la a
FIUT nut out STOIC.
Wo porchuie oiu drugJbcuaea
• HMto MM »pr«iento4 •▼cry*
mzup that Imtm our atoro.
o*ll and in Wit
tkaDrnp Stare
BOCB*. JLUJT UDM OF BQJJAKF,
maBOBLXRBROS. ’
LUMBERYARDS.
ISAAC KALBAGH & SON
BIiLIXI IX
Shingles. Lath,
Doors, Sash.
nSSI tf.
D. H. LeSUER,
Dealer in
DRUGS.
MIXED PAINTS
SCOTT COUNTY FAIR.
Scott Go. AgMml Soc.
SIO,OCO Offered in Premiums.
Opentotlie World
THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL FAIR.
Will be held a. Davenport, lowa,
SEPTEMBER 2. 8, 4, 6, and .6, 1872. M
Street cars run From the center oi the city di
rectly-I the grounds.
Railroads centering 'n Rock Island and Daven
port w’M carry stock and treigbi.ree, and passen
gers at reduced rates.
For Prem'um Lists, or any information, apply
to O. 8. McNEfL, Secretary,
n 47 ml Davenport. lowa,
Oskaloosa College.
This Institution, with improved pros
pects for the future, will enter upon its
eleventh College year, Sept. 4, 1872.
There is now in connection with the Col
lege aiQ" and competent corps of instruct
ors. Its scheme of study embraces a Clas
sical and Scientific course; a Ladies ; a
Commercial; a Normal; and a Bible course.
Very superior facilities for private clubs,
or se l^ boarding are afforded. Board in
pr vate families from $3.00 to $3.50 per
week. Club boarding from $1.50 to $1,75,
and self board at still lower rates if the
student so elect.
TUITION.
Thirty dollars per session of ten months
the session being divided into three terms
of 16,12,12 weeks respectively, beginning
as follows:
First term (16 weeks) Sept. 4, 1872.
Secod term, (12 weeks) Jan. 6, 1873.
Third term, (12 weeks) April 2, 1873.
The usual extra charges will be made
for Music, Painting, Drawing, and Com
mercial Instruction.
Tuition for a term and one dollar contin
gent fee must be p?id in advance, except
that students in the Normal Department
may enter for a half term.
For Catalogue « further particulars ad
dress M. P. Givens,
Secy of Faculty,
or F. M. BRUNER,
President. 45
TIJBUSINESS AGAJjy
SOUTH-EAST COR. SQUARE
Having removed my Grocery to the Dix
on brick on south side m the room former
ly occupied by G. D. Cook & Co., I am
belter than ever prepared to supply
all my old customers, and as many
new ones as I can get, with anything they
desire in the Grocery line. I keep on
hand a mil Block of
S F
I A
£ and N
L ©
GROCERIES,
WOODEN & WILLOW WARE
Choice Teas, Coffees | Syrups,
PURE GROUND Sc WHOLE BPICBS,
CANNED FRUITS, EXTRACTS, BAK
ING POWDERS,
Smoking and Chewing Tobac
cos of the best brands,
All of which I will sell at lowest living
prices for
CASH FOR FRODDGR ONLY.
Highest Market Price paid for all
kinds of Country Produce. Give
me a call and see what I can do for
you.
n!5 S. C. PURDY.
GIVENS BROS.,
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
PROVISIONS!
Are now prepared to offer to the cltixena of Oa
kaiooea and vicinity, for
o o
.A. .A
S S
CHOICE TEAS. SUGARS, COFFEES
AND SYRUPS,
at prices which will defy competition. Onr stock
o f
CANNED FRUITS, OYSTERS, AC.,
are of the beet brands, aleo Extracts and Baking
Powdere, with a full line of unadulterated epicea.
TOBACCOS,
We call particular attention to our large stock ot
Chewing and Smoking Tobaccos ae being
nnequalled'for variety and quality
in the city. A large atock of
FLO GRAND FEED
la kept constantly on band which will be
delivered fJV Ift 17
OI vvC freeof ex-
pense anywhere in the city. We are now selling
FOBOASH" d SVv' , “ ,t “®BJECT
for all of those whox A I Tor their groceries to
give ns a call. Highest market price paid
Butter, Eggs, Lard and other produce.
GIVE US A CALL.
GIVENS BROS.,
b 9 North of Siehel’s Mil l .
J. O. Exkchlm.
Mattison & Bro.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES.
OUEENSWARE,
GLASS, LAMPS, LAMP-FIX
TURES, POCKET AND
Have on hands a large and well selected stock
of everything in their line, bought for the Spring
trade. Onr terms are
Cash or Produce,
which enables us to sell strthe very lowest price*.
Our facilities for haudllug
11® Bittir, lie, Baa
FEATHERS, BEESWAX, Ac.
MnabUastOfsythe
Highest Market Price,
ta GASH or GOODS. Thankful tot port teTora
«« solicit s conUaßstlo&of o shore of the petroo
**High Street, West of Sqtutre.
M MATTISON * BRO.
Ids. Qbkald Please ouobscs the bobs of
L. J. MOBHJIB. of Prairie Tp., os o con didst e for
Becordsr of Mohosho county; subject to the de
cisiM of the Primonr Section. Mr. Mosher iso
wounded settlor oaa well qualified tor the poei
ion. Murr Fwnw.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15,1872.
GROCERIES.
S. C. PURDY.
STONE)
DEALERS IN
FLOUR, FELD,
AND
TABLE CUTLERY
NOTIONS, &o.
EXCLUSIVELY
XL-TES
ONLY.
BT OXBXUT.
It was only a woman's cry—
It was only a woman’s moan—
Only a woman’s be&rt that broke.
Let her alone.
It was only an idle tale—
What if it does her wrong t
What will her words avail t
Numbers alone are strong ;
She is hut one. Yon need not fear,
The shadows will follow her many a year;
Let her alone.
It was only a woman’s tsars ;
Meet them with sneers and frown ;
It la nothing te you if ehe stand or fall;
Let her go down.
It ie nothing to you it it be a lie
That tarnished her spotless fame—
Nothing to you If she drop or die
'Neath the weight of the cruel shame.
’Twae only a woman ; ’tie nothing to you;
Besides, she is friendless— it would not do ;
Let her go down.
Ther* waa a little mn, and he had a little ax
And he went to trees up among the Chap-
paquacka;
Ou a Democratic branch he was sitting for a
■pell. '
And he chopped away the branch—so the littla
man fell.— N. Y. Cbmmercial Advert iter.
RAIBINC THE DEVIL.
An Incident in the life of Peter Cartright.
It was a dark and tempestuous
night, a night to fill the seul with
fright; the lightning flashed, the
wild beasts squealed, when a poor
preacher of the gospel wended his
way through the dismal intrioacies
of a Western forest many years ago.
The poor man felt anything but
comfortable, for he was wet through
to the skin, and almost tired to death.
He had been tramping about since
morning, besides he had lost his way
so the reader oan imagine what state
of mind he was in, and also appreci
ate the sadden transition from des
pair to hope which he experienced
on seeing the glimmer oflight ahead.
He quiokened nis flagging footsteps,
and soon came up to the light, which
issued from the window of a solitary
log cabin in the forest.
Remembering the scriptural in
junction, “Knock and it shall be
opened unto you,” he did so, but
without any response. He rapped
again, louder than before, and this
time a gruff female voice asked :
‘Who’s there ?’
‘lt iB I,* was the indefinite reply of
the rain soaked person.
‘Well, who are you and what do
you want ?’ asked the voice gruffer
than before.
‘A poor benighted preacher of the
gospel who has lost his way, and
who wishes to stay here all night,’
answered the preacher, in a dolorous
voice.
‘Well—stay there, I don’t see
what's to hinder you.*
‘But lam almost starved, and I
will pay yon liberally for some sup
per,’ he responded, his teeth chat
tering with cold, and not in the least
appreciating the joke.
The words ‘liberal pay* acted
like a charm, and after a few mo
ments of delay, caused by the unfas
tening of the door, it was opened and
our pastor entered.
He found himself in a rough apart
ment with a large fireplace at one
end, on whioh a great log was blaz
ing ; a rough deal table and three
chairs, besides a box filled with dry
flax, composed the furniture.
But all minor deficiencies seemed
to be made up by the landlady of the
house, for she was fully six feet in
height, and weighed nigh unto three
hundred pounds.
After having placed some food on
the table, she turned to the parson,
who stood shivering before the fire,
making futile attempts to dry him
self, alternately turning one side and
then the other to the fire.
‘Now, I want you to eat this grub
as quick as you know how, and then
tramp, for it is utterly impossible for
me to keep you here over night.’
‘But, my good woman,’ said the
parson anxiously, ‘I shall perish in
this inclement weather. I have been
wandering in this fearful storm since
morning, and if you have any com
passion or pity at all you will try and
give me some plaoe where I can be
sheltered from this storm for the
night ;* and he offered her a five dol
lar bill.
‘ Wall,’ said the woman, avaricious
ly clutching the money, 'if yon think
you oan stay in the garret, maybe
you oan stay ; but hurry up, for I ex
peot my husband home every min
ute, and it’s as much as your life is
worth if he he should catch you here
for he’s a perfect devil incarnate ;
he would think no more of mnrder
ing you than he would of shooting a
grizzly bear.'
The woman prodnoed a small lad
der as she spoke, and bade the par
son get up in the garret.
There was a small ‘drop,' or trap
door in the ceiling, which raised of
its own acoord on the parson’s head
pressing it upwards, and not without
some difficulty he managed to
squeeze himself through the aper
ture. After he was up the woman
told him to shut the trap and not to
make any noise, for his life, and then
taking the ladder away, the preach
er was left to his own reflections.
Wet and uncomfortable as he was
his fatigue was such that he had al
most fallen asleep when he was dis
turbed by some knocking at the
door.
Being somewhat curious to know
what kind of a looking man his un
known host was, he rose and peered
through a small crack in the floor of
his room to the room underneath.—
He saw the woman open the doo r
cautiously, and after admitting a
short, thick set man, in a heavy coat,
lock it again.
From the mysterious notions and
whisperings that ensued, our parson
rightly concluded that the person
that had just entered was not the
woman’s husband, but her paramour,
who had taken advantage of her hus
band’s absence to pay her a nocturn
al visit After whispering together
a while the woman went to the cup
board and produced a bottle of whis
ky, and a plate of ham and bread,
whioh she set on the table and the
two were soon engaged in a loving
repast While the parson was
watohing the guilty couple, there
oame a thundering knock at the
door, which oaused them both to
jump to their feet with the greatest
consternation. Without a moment’s
loss of time, the woman ran to the
box ol flax, and emptied it upon the
floor. Then she bade the man, who
was almost soared to death, to get
into the box, whioh he was only too
glad to do, and when he was in she
rapidly covered him up with the
flax. The woman then ran to the
door and unbolted it all the while
rubbing her eyes as if she had just
awakenen from sleep.
‘I was asleep and didn't hear you
before,' whimpered the woman. —
‘And don’t for God’s sake curse so
mnoh, for there's a Methodist presoh
er asleep in the garret.'
'Who oares tor a Methodist minis
ter, I'd like to know. But I’ll Boon
have him oat of his hole. Here,
yoa old oanting hypocrite, come oat
and shew yourself, or I'U make yoa,'
he exolaimed, with many impreca
tions, as he set the ladder before the
i^,
trap door. The poor parson, almost
dead with fright, slowly descended
the ladder, looking as white as a
ghost, for, from the ruffian’s manner,
he expected he would be a ghost
soon.
‘Don’t hurt the poor man. See
how sickly he looks.’ exolaimed the
woman, pitying the preacher’s dis
tress.
‘Yon shut up and mind your own
business, or it will be worse for you,'
was the gracious reply of her lord ;
then taming to the trembling par
son, he asked: ‘Are you a Meth
odist preacher, and do you believe in
hell and the devil ?’
Tbe parson replied in the affirma
tive.
‘Well, by the eternal, I don’t, and
if you believe in the devil, you will
either have to make him appear, or
I’ll out your lying throat and make
you appear before him,' and he
drew his bowie knife in a threatening
manner. The poor preacher was in
anything but an enviable situation,
and thoughts of another world began
to fill his mind with anzions forebod
ings ; for it is a remarkable faot that
however muoh clergymen may talk
and preach of the future world, they
prefer to have others go and enjoy
it. This may be self-abnegation or
pure selfishness; Heaven knows.
'Are yon most ready ?’ asked the
ruffian, raising his knife as he saw
the other hesitated. ‘l’ll give yon
last three minutes, and if the devil ih
not here you’ll be with the devil.'
‘My friend,' said the pastor, into
whose head a brilliant idea had
popped, 'that there is a hell is a well
established faot, as I oan prove by
hundreds of writers, and that the
devil exists allows of no contradic
tion ; and that I have the power to
make him appear is also true ; but
dreadful to you will be the conse
quences if he does I Better tor yon
had you never been born than to see
Satan faoe to face in the wicked state
in which you are in.'
‘D—n you, stop your preaohing,
and call the old boy ! I’ll stand the
consequences, and be quick, for the
time is up.'
The parson went to the fireplace
and took a brand, which he applied
to the box of flax. It blazed up al
most like gun-powder, and the un
earthly yeu that issued from the poor
devil in the box was truly appalling.
With an aorobatic power, of the
possession of whioh he was himself
unaware, he leaped out of the box,
covered from head to foot with burn
ing flax. With roars and howls of
ageny he made straight for the door,
but he was not so quiok as the owner
of the premises, for with one look of
terror at the burning figure, he fled
out of the house, closely followed by
his ‘Satanic Majesty.'
When they were both gone the
parson gave his hostess a short bnt
effective leoture on oonnubial duties,
after whioh he seated himself oom
fortably before the fire.
When the woman’s husband re
turned he treated the parson with
the greatest respect, fully convinced
that he had the power to raise the
devil at will.
A SAFE COUNSELOR!
How Horace Greeley would haye “Saved
the Union” between 1860 and 1864.
A Warningfrom the Past.
[New York Times, 16th.]
We generally form an idea of a
man’s fitness to give advice in sea
sons ot emergency by the judgment
he has displayed on previous critical
occasions. Test Mr. Greeley by this
standard, and who would be rash
enough to intrust the work of gov
ernment to his hands ? What would
have happened to us io 1870 if Mr.
Greeley’s counsel had been adopted
may be gathered from his own pub
lished works at that time, a portion
of whioh we publish below. We
commend the following literal quota
tions, whioh have no little historical
value, to the calm consideration of
all of our readers :
STATE SECESSION FULLY VINDICATED.
[From the Tribune, Not. 9, 1860.]
And now, if the cotton Stateß con
sider the value of the Union debata
ble, wejmaintain their perfect right to
disouss it. Nay, we hold with Jeffer
son to the inalienable right of com
munities to alter or abolish forms of
government that have become op
pressive or injurious ; and, if the
ootton States shall decide that they
can do better outside of the Union
than in it, we insist in letting them
go_in peace. The right to secede
may be a revolutionary one but it ex
ists nevertheless ; and we do not see
how one party oan have a right to do
what another party has a right to
prevent. We must ever resist the
asserted right of any State to remain
in the Union, and nullify or defy the
laws thereof; to withdraw from the
Union is quite another matter. And,
whenever a considerable 'Section of
onr Union shall deliberately resolve
to go out, we shall resist all ooercive
measures designed to keep it in. We
hope never to live in a republic
whereof the one section is pinned to
the residue by bayonets.
But, while we thus uphold the
practical liborty, if not the abstract
right of secession, we must insist that
the step be taken, if It ever shall be,
with the deliberation and gravity
befitting so momentous an issue. Let
ample time be given for refleotion;
let the subject be fully oanvassed be
fore the people; and let a popular
vote be taken in every case, before
secession is decreed. Let the peo
ple be told just why they are asked
to break up the confederation ; let
them have both sides of the question
fully presented ; let them reflect,
deliberate, then vote ; and let the
aot of secession be the eeho of an
unmistakable popular fiat. A judg
ment thus rendered, a demand for
separation so backed, would either
be acquiesoed in without the effusion
of blood, or those who rushed upon
the carnage to defy and defeat it,
would place themselves dearly in
the wrong.
THE SOUTHERN STATES HAD AS MUCH
RIGHT TO LEAVE THE UNION AS THE
COLONISTS HAD TO REVOLT IN 1776
—THE ARGUMENT USED BY SOME
BRITISH STATESMEN IN 1861-62.
[From tbe Tribune, Dec. IS, 1860.]
We have repeatedly asked those
who dissent trom our view ot this
matter to tell at frankly whether they
do or do not assent to Mr. Jeffer
son's statement in the Declaration of
Independence, that Governments
“derive their just powers from the
consent of the governed ; and that
whenever any form of government
becomes destructive of those ends,
it is the right of thepeople to alter or
abolish it, and to institute a new gov
ernment," Ao., Ao. Wo do heartily
aooept this doctrine, believing it in
trinsically sound, benefioent, and one
that, universally accepted, is oalou
lated to prevent the shedding of
seas of hnman blood. And if it jus
tified the secession from the British
JEmpire of three millions of colonists
in 1776, tee do not see why it would
not justify the secession of Jive mil
lions of Southerns from the Federal
Union in 1861. If we are mistaken
on this point, why does not some
one attempt to Bhow wherein and
why ? For our own part, while" we
deney the right of slaveholders to
hold slaves against the will of the
latter, we cannot see how twenty mil
lions of people can rightfully held
ten, or even Jive, in a detested union
with them, by military force.
Of course we understand that the
principle of Jefferson, like any other
broad generalization, may be pushed
to extreme and baleful consequences.
We oan see why Governor’s Island
should not be at liberty to secede
from the State and nation and allow
herself to be covered with French
and British batteries, commanding
and threatening our city. There is
hardly a great prinoiple whioh may
not be thus ‘run into the ground.'—
But if seven or eight contiguous
States shall present themselves at
Washington, saying: “We hate
the Federal Union ; we have with
drawn from it; we give you the
ohoioe between aoquiescing in our
secession and arranging amicably
all inoidental questions on one hand,
and attempting to subdue on the
other”—-we could not atand up for
coersion, for subjugation for we do
not think it would be just. We hold
the right ot self-government saored,
even when invoked in behalf of those
who deny it to others. So muoh for
the question of principle.
Now as to the matter of policy.
South Carolina will certainly se
cede. Several other ootton States
will probably follow her example.
The border States are evidently re
luctant to do likewise. South Caro
lina has grossly insulted them by her
dictatorial, reckless course. What
she expeots and desires is a clash of
arms with the Federal Government,
which will at once oommend her to
the sympathy and co-operation of ev
ery slave State, and to the sympa
thy at least, of the pro-slavery mi
nority in the free States. It is not
difficult to see that this would speed
ily work a political revolution, whioh
would restore to slavery all, and
more than all, it has lost by the o&n
--vass of 1860. We want to obviate
this. We would expose the seceders
to odium as disunionists, and oom
mend them to pity as the gallant,
though mistaken, upholders of the
rights of their seotions in an unequal
military oontest.
We fully realize that the dilemma
of the incoming administration will
be a critical one. It must endeavor
to uphold and enforce the laws, as
well against rebellious slaveholders
as fugitive slaves. The new Presi
dent must fulfill the obligations as
sumed in his inauguration oath, no
matter how shamefully his predeces
sor may have defied them. We fear
that Southern madness may precipi
tate a bloody collision that all must
deplore. But if ever ‘seven or eight
States' send agents to Washington
to say, “We want to go out of the
Union,” we Bhall feel oonstrained by
our devotion to hnman liberty to say
Let them go 1 And we do not see
how we could take the other side
without coming iu direct oonfliot
with those rights of man whioh we
held paramount to all political ar
rangements, however convenient and
advantageous.
NO RIGHT TO COERCE THE SOUTHERN
STATES.
[From the Tribune, Dec. 26, I 860.)
Most oertainly we believe that
governments are made for peoples,
not peoples for governments —that
the latter “derive their just power
from the consent of the governed,”
and whenever a portion of this Union
large enough to form an independ
ent, self-subsisting nation, shall see
fit to say, authentically, to the resi
due, ‘We want to get away from you,’
we shall say—and we trust self-re
spect, if not regard for the principle
of self-government, will constrain
the residue of the American people
to say—“Go 1” We never yet had
so poor an opinion of ourselves or
our neighbors as to wish to hold oth
ers in a hated conneetion with ns.
But the dissolution of a government
cannot be effeoted in the time re
quired for knocking down a house of
cards. Let the Cotton States, or any
six or more States, say, unequivocal
ly, “We want to get out of the Uni
on,” and propose to effeot their end
peaceably and unoffenßively, and we
will do our best to help them out, —
not that we want them to go, bnt
that we loathe the idea of compelling
them to stay. All we ask is, that
they exercise a reasonable patience,
so as to give time for effecting their
end without bloodshed. They mnst
know, as well as we do, that no
President can recognize a mere State
ordinance ot secession, nor negleot
to enforce the laws of the Uaited
States through their whole geograph
ical extent. It takes two to make a
bargain, whether of admission or se
cession ; but with reasonable for
bearance all may be brought about.
THE MORAL RIGHT OF SECESSION.
[From the Tribune, ot February 28d. 1861, five
days after the “inangaration” of Jeff Davla.]
We have repeatedly said, and we
once more insist, that the great prin
oiple embodied by Jefferson in the
Declaration of American Independ
ence, that governments derive their
just powers from the oonsent of the
governed, is sound and just; and
that if the slave States, the ootton
States, or the Gulf State sonly choose
to form an independent nation, they
have a clear moral right to do so. —
We have said, and still maintain,
that provided the ootton States have
fnlly and definitely {pade up their
minds to go by themselves, there is
no need of fighting about it; for they
only have to exercise a reasonable
patienoe, and they will be let off in
peace and good will. Whenever it
shall be clear that the great body of
the Southern people have become
conclusively alienated from the Uni
on, and anxions to esoape from it, we
will do our best to forward their
views.
MR. GREELEY IN 1862.
In a letter to H. MoChesney, ot
Troy, N. Y., dated September 23d,
1862, and published In the New York
Tribune , ot the 26th of the same
month, Horace Greeley, speaking of
the right of seoession, thus declared
himsell:
“But I still insist that, if it had
been proved that the people of the
slave States—-or even ot the ootton
States alone—had really desired to
dissolve the Union, and had peace
fully, deliberately and authoritatively
expressed that wish, we should have
assented to it. At all events I
should.”
The above quotations may doubt
less help Mr. Greeley’s'oanse to-day
in the Southern States and with the
"Bourbon" Democrats, whose alli
ance he is oonrting, and therefore he
may thank us for republishing them.
Bat what oan the balk of the people,
the thrifty, industrious classes, who
dread to see the country thrown into
fresh oonvnlsions, think of the pro
pose! to eleot as president a man who
] Established July 1850.
would have destroyed the Union in
1860, and would unquestionably
bring upon it irretrievable disasters
by his present bargainings with the
Democrats ?
SHAVING A MILLIONAIRE.
Everybody who lives in New
Jersey will recollect Bill Gibbons,
the millionaire. He was an ecoen
trio man, and numerous stories are
told of his freaks. Here is one of
them: -
It seems that Billy, while in a
oountry village, in whioh he owned
some property, stepped into a barber
shop to get Bhaved. The shop was
full of customers, and the old gen*
tleman quietly waited for his turn.
A customer who was under the
barber’s hands when the old gentle*
mao came in asked “knight of
the razor,” in an undertone, if he
knew who that was? and, on receiv
ing a negative reply, he informed
him in a whisper, that it was “Old
Billy Gibbons, the riohest man in
the State.”
'Gad/ said the barber, 'l’ll charge
him for his shave.'
Accordingly, after the old man
had had that operation performed,
tawas jomewhat surprised on ask
mg the price to be told 'seventy-five
cents.'
'Seventy-five cents 1” said he,
quietly, ‘isn’t that rather a high
price ?’
'lt’s my prioe,' said he of the lath
erbrush, independently, “and as this
is the only barber’s shop in the
place, them as comes into it must
pay what I ask.'
To the old gentleman this was ev
idently a knook-down argument for
he drew three quarters of a dollar
from his pooket paid them over to
the barber and left the shop.
A short time after he was in close
conversation with the landlord of a
tavern hard by, and the topic of
conversation was 'barber’s shops.'
‘Why is it,’ said he, there's only
one barber’s shop in town ? There
seems to be nearly work enough for
two.’
'Well, there used to be two,' said
the landlord, 'till last winter, when
this new man came up from the oity
and opened a new shop, and as every
thing in it was fresh and new, folks
sort of deserted Bill Harrington’s
shop, which had been going for nigh
fourteen years.'
'But didn't this Bill do good work?
Didn’t he shave well ana—cheap ?’
'Well, as for that,’ said the land
lord, 'Bill did his work well enough,
but his shop wasn’t on the main
street like the new one, and didn't
have so many piotures and fancy
curtains, and folks got in the way of
thinking the new shop was more
scientific and brought more oity fash
ions with it, though, to tell the
truth,’ said the landlord, striking a
ohin sown with a beard resembling
screen wire, 'I never want a lighter
touch or a keener razor than Bill
Harrington's.’
'City fashions—eh ?’ growled the
old man. 'So the new man’s city
fashions shut up the other barber’s
shops ?'
'Well, not exactly,' said the land
lord, ‘though things never seemed to
go well with Bill after the new shop
opened:—first, one of his little chil
dren died of fever; then bis wife
was siok a long time, and Bill had a
big bill to pay at tho doctors; then,
as a last misfortune, his shop burned
down one night, tools, brushes, fur
niture, and all, and no insurance.'
'Well,' said the old man pettishly,
'why don't he start again ?'
'Start again 1’ said the communi
cative landlord; 'why, bless your
soul he hasn’t got any-thing to start
with.'
*H—m—m l Where does this man
live ?’ asked the old man.
He was directed, and ere long he
was in counsel with the unfortunate
tonsor, who corroborated the land
lord’s story.
'Why don’t you take a new shop ?'
said the old man ; 'there’s a new one
in the block right opposite the other
barber’s shop.'
'What!' said the other, 'you must
be orazy. 'Why, that bloox belongs
to old Billy Gibbon; he’d never let
one of these stores for a barber’s shop
they are mighty sight too good; be
sides that, I havn’t got twenty dol
lars in the world to fit it up with.'
'Yon don’t know old Billy Gibbons
as well as I do,’ said the other.
'Now listen to me. If you can have
that shop all fitted up, rent free,
what will you work in it for by the
month ? what is the least you can
live on ?’
This proposition somewhat start
led the unfortunate hair dresser, who
finally found words to stammer out
that perhaps twelve or fifteen dollars
a month would be about enough.
'Pshaw ?’ said the old man 'that
won’t do. Now listen to me—l’ll
give you that store, rent free, one
year, and engage your services six
months, all on these conditions. You
are to shave and out hair for every
body that applies to you, and take
no pay; just charge it all to me, and
for your services I’ll pay you twen
ty dollars a month, payable in ad
vance—pay to commenoe now,' con
tinued he, plaoiug two ten dollar
notes on the table before the aston
ished barber—who, it is almost un
necessary to state, aooepted the prop
osition, and who was still more sur
prised to learn that it was Billy Gib
bon himself who hired him.
In a few days the inhabitants of that
village were astonished by the ap
pearanoe of a splendid new barber’s
shop, far surpassing the other in ap
pearanoe ana appointments, and in
which, with new mugs, soap, razors,
and perfumes, stood a barber and
assistant ready to do duty on the
heads and beards of the people.
Over the door was inscribed, ' WUI
- Harrington, Shaving and Hair
dressing Saloon.*
The people were not long in as
certaining or slow in availing them
selves of the privileges of his estab
lishment, and it is not to be won
dered that it was orowded and the
other deserted. The other held ont
some weeks, suspecting this free
shaving—for Bill kept his secret well
—was hut a dodge to entice custom
ers away, who would soon be charged
as usual; but at the end of six weeks
he found him working wav as usual,
charging not a oent for his labor, and
having money to spend into the bar*
fain, he came to the conclusion that
e must have drawn a prise in the
lottery, and stumbled upon a gold
mine, and was keeping a barber's
shop for fun, so he olosed his shop
in despair, and left the place.
Meantime. 'Bill Harrington' kept
on busy as a bee, and one fine morn
ing his employer stepped in and,
without a word, sat down, and was
shaved; on rising from the ohair he
asked to see the score for the six
months past The barber exhibited
It, and after a oareful examination,
the old man said:
'Plenty of customers, eh ?'
'Lots of 'em' said the barber;
'never did suoh a business in my
lifel’
'Well,' replied Money Bags, f yoa
i~-?4
vf* '* lL ,
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald
« ST SAB THI
Best Advertising Medium in Oskaloosa
copies
Most of which are to persons In MahMkaSnnJ
ou* TACTUTUi TOU
™?&o'£r W o%e d ° na °*
the account well. I see
thinA™ -
hundred
tore, and are to have this shop rent
free six mouths longer, and, alter to
day you are to charge the regular
price for work, for your pay from me
stops to-day.'
This of oourse the barber gladly
consented to. J
the mtiD > 011 taftf*
mg, take care you never cheat, a
man by charging ten times ti& usual
amount fora shave; for it may be
another 'old Billy Gibbons.*» J
A NOVEL DUEL. '■*
Among the reminisoenaes fold of
the Franco-Prussian war is the
**M»tween two
as*-*
‘Yes, Colonel. Words have passed
ss* sms##*- &
cowards.'
“Very well, y.n .hall fight, but it
®b»H be id this w.j : Tahe your ear
bines, plaoe yourself on a line faoing
Malmaison, where the enemy is.
You will walk upon their garrison
with equal step. When sufficiently
near their post you will then fir* up
on them. The Prussians will reply.
You will continue to advance and
tii'*. When one falls the other may
his heels and his retreat
snail bq covered by one of my com
panies.”
‘ In this way,” concluded the com
mandant, “the blood whioh both de
mand will be spilled with profit and
glory, and he who comes baok will
do so without regret, without the re
morse of haring killed or wounded
with his own hand a Frenchman,
at a time when Franoe needs all her
defenders and all her children. If
yon both fall, who shall say you are
cowards? 1 may also add that I
give you an excellent opportunity
for putting a couple of Germans ont
of the way, a servioe that will pro
cure for you a good recommenda
tion for reward and promotion.”
The matter was arranged as the
commander had dictated. At twen
ty paces from the wall at Malmaison,
one of the adversaries was wounded,
daggered and fell. The other ran
to him, raised him up, and carried
him off on his shoulders amid a per
fect hailstorm of balls—‘both, thence
forth, entitled to the greatest honor
and respeot from the whole regi
ment.
“Now then,” said a Democrat to a
oolored man in this oity the other
day, “I would like to have you tell
me what Gen. Grant has done for
yon, that you should vote for him in
preierenoe to Mr. Greeley ?”
“Well,” replied the man interro
gated, “I can tell you what the Re
publican party has done for me. It
found me a slave in a cotton patoh
down in Alabama ; it took me ont
made me a free man, and gave me the
privilege of going to the poll* and
voting right alongside of you. I have
faith in Gen. Grant, and shall vote
for him because he is the candidate
of the Republican party.” The Dem
ocrat did not think it worth while to
labor any more with that ‘nigger.*—
Haw key e.
A few years ago a prominent se
eessioniat wrote : “The right to se
cede may be a revolutionary one, but
exists nevertheless. And when a
eonsiderable section of our Union
shall deliberately resolve to go out,
we shall resist all coeroive measures
to e P them in. We hope never to
live in a republic where one section
is pinned to another by the bayonet.*
The writer’s name is Horace Greeley;
and he is now a candidate of a party
whioh hopes, through his election,
to re-open the doors for ultimate se
cession.
During the political campaign of
1868, Governor Palmer made a
speech at Pama, and at the conclusion
of his arguments, an inebriated
Democrat yelled out to him: “Who
went Jeff. Davis* bail?” “Oh, a
poor old fool in New York, who had
n’t a child or chick in the army,”
was Palmer’s sensible reply. And
yet Palmer is wearing himself ont in
the vain effort to elect the “poor old
fool” President of the United States.
Simultaneously with the roar of
Demooratio cannon over the first
election news from North Carolina,
come accounts of En-Klnx outrages
even in Missouri. Union men are
being whipped and driven from their
homes. How easily the old rebel
spirit is encouraged.
Judge Barnard, the corrupt New
York Judge, will get his resignation
aooepted, it ia said, in order to es
cape conviction and punishment It
is to be hoped he will not be suooess
ful. It is time one of these New
York jndioial rascals was made an
example of.
The oarpenters’ and joiners' strike
at New York oity has ended in a to
tal failure, and, after muoh costly
loss of time, these workmen are
about to resume operations on the old
terms. Comment ia unnecessary.
ssHsaassaasSß
“If any man attempts to haul down
the American flag, shoot him on the
spot,’* said Dix, some yeari ago. Dix
is of the same mind still, and trains
with Grant.
How to make the time go fast—use
the spur of the moment
A. Brewit says that if 'man ia a
mister-y, woman is a ntiss-ery.'
Lawyers are lucky. They can do
lots of courting aad net be engaged.
'Pardon my warmth,' as the red
hot poker said to the elown, when he
inadvertently put it in his pooket
Why oan a person, ooeupied in
canning fruits, store away more of it
than anybody else ? Because they
can.
How docs a dancing master differ
from a shoemaker ? One foots the
measure and the other measures the
foot
A veteran was relating his exploits
to a crowd of boys, and mentioned
at having been in five engagements.
'That's nothing,' broke in a little fel
low, ‘my sister Agnes has. been en
gaged eleven times.'
A Judge, in remanding a criminal
called him a scoundrel. The prisoner
replied : “Sir, lam not as big a
sooundrel as your honor’—here tho
culprit stepped, bat finally added—
‘tikes ms to b*.‘ <P»t jour
eloMt togottv,' mU tk« J«dg*

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