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The weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, September 03, 1874, Image 2

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The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
PUBLISHED BVKBY THURSDAY BY
LEIGHTON & NEEDHAM.
H.C.L..***- W.H.E***—
Htearn Printers.
Office iu ’Herald Block." overPo*tO«ce.
TEEMS.-52.00 a Year in Advance.
CITY UIRBCTOKY.
- GKO. H. BAUGH.
Miyor CORNELIUS McCARTY.
Marshal . ...W. A. LINDLY.
Treasurer j KBLLY JOHNSON.
Solicitor GEO. It. LEE.
°,CAIN
i 4 £ lie 'WM 1 M W. ll! WRAY.
il? a k gksen, u f. ®d6wSSS:
CHURCH DIRECTORY.
BAPTISTCHUI.V.H.—Rev. J. F. Child*, Pas
tor. Servicer at 10* a. m., and 7* p. m. Sun
day Schools a. m-Trayei meeting, Thursday even
lD M E CHURCH—Rev. C. B. Clark, Pastor.
Services at 10* a. m.. and 7 p. m. Sunday
School, 2 p. m. Prayer meetings, Thursday eve-
UI SIMPSON CHARGE—(M. B.) Rev. C.L. Staf
ford Pastor. Services at 10* a. m.,and 7p. m.
Sunday School at *2 p. in. Prayer Meetings Thurs
div evynmir*.
OONGRENATIONAL CHURCH.-Rev. J. E.
Snowden, Pastor, services at 10* a. m. and 7 p.
m Sunday School at 12* p. m. Prayer
matings, ’’hursday evenings.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.—Corner
of Harr.son and Monroe Streets. H. S. Snod
grass. Pastor. Regular services at 11 a. m. and
fj4[i.n. Sunday School 9* a. m.
CUMBERLAND. P RESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
No pastor.
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. —Service on Sundays
at 10:30 a. m., and T:80 p. m. ; Thursdays al -SOP
m. Sunday school at 12:15 p. m. James Allen,
Rector.
UN IVKRSALISTSOCI ETY.—No regular servi
ces. Sabhathschool at 3p. m.
CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Elder B. W.
Johnson. Pastor. Services at 10* a. m. and
7p. m. Sunday School m. Prayer meeting,
Thursday evening.
U- P. CHURCH.—Rev. R A.
Pastor. Services 10* a. m. and 7p. m. Sunday
School 9* a. m. Prayer meeting, lhursdayeven
ngs, at 7 p. m.
SECOND M. E. CHURCH (Coloredl.-Ke^
Pastor. Services every Sabbath at 10*
a. m. Sunday School at 8* p. m.
FRIENDS MEETING.—Corner of Monro* and
High streets. On Ist and 4th days of the week, at
10 a. m.; on lstday at 7p. m. Sabbath Schoolim
mediatelv after services on Ist day morning.
MASONIC.
mitALUXINAR LODGE, No. 18, A. F. & A. M
Stated communication Friday evening on or
before each full moon. C. U. PHELPS, W. M.
T. H. Greks. Sec'y.
HIRAM CHAPTER. No. C.—stated communi
cations Wednesday evenings before full
moon H. R. KKNDIG, H. P.
E. Baker, Sec’y.
Oskaloosa council, R. & s m., no. 7,
meets at Masonic Hall on first Monday even
ing in each month. „
H. HOWARD, T. I. M.
R. P. Bacon, Recorder.
DE PA YEN’S COMMANDERY, K. T„ No. 6.
Staled communcications second Tuesday
evening in each month. 11. C. LEIGHTON, E. C.
John 11. Pkrkt, Recorder.
Transient brethren of any degree invited to
meet with ns.
I. O. O. F.
\ f AIIASKA LODGE, NO. 16, I. O. O. T.
31 REGULAR MEETING, SATURDAY
Evening of each week. Brethren visiting the city
are uvited to Civet with us. GRIER, N. G.,
W. B. Isokls, Sec. nl *
COMMERCIAL LODGE, No. 128.1.0. O. F.
meets in the third story of No. 6, Union
Blued, every Wednesday evening. Brothers visit
ing thecity are invited to meet with ns.
3 CIIAS. BIATTNKR, N. G.
Frank Kelly, Sec’y. 3 -
Oskaloosa encampment. No. is, i. o.
O. F.. meets Ist and 8d Monday nights in
each month. HAM DUKE, C. P.
A. Fiehkingee, Scribe
BEACON LODGE, No. 264, I- O. O. F., meets
every Saturday night. Visiting brethren
invited.
J. W. BOWEN, N. G.
S. W. Jones, Sec’y.
ODD FELLOW’S PROTECTIVE ASSOCIA
TION of Oskaloosa, meets regularly every
In Thursday In each month. The Brothers are
invited to meet. D. SHRIVER, Pres’t.
E. Bach, Sec'y.
I. O. G. T
Oskaloosa lodge, no. 66o.—The subordin
ate Lodge of this order, meets every Mon
day evening iu old Masonic Hall, over First Nat
ioual State Bank, i’egree Lodge meets every
evening of each month. Mem
bers of the order visiting In the city are cordially
inv.led to meet with us.
Wv. R. Lacey, W. C. T.
W*. P. Helling*, W. Sec’y.
FIR COMPANIES.
No. 1. The regular meetings are held on first
Wednesday of each month, at 7:30 p. m,
M. W. Edson, Foreman.
W. W. Douglass, Secy.
No. 2. The regular meetings are held on the
first Tuesday night in every mouth, at 7 110 p.
m. Ed. Steward, Foreman.
Fred lledokr, Secy.
No. 3. The regular meetings are held on the
let and 3d Tnuredays of every month at 7:30 p. m.
Frink Harvey, Foreman.
Frank Lindsey. Secy.
LIVERY'.
LIVERY' AND’BUS LINE.—For the beet liv
ery in town call at tte Bashaw or City Liv
ery of Downing, MeMuilin Jfc Co Omnibuses to
and from all trams on Central and D. V.K. R’s. 22
attorneys at LAW.
JOHN A. HOFF 4AN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, and NOTAKY
FUBLIC, North side puolic *quare, Oskaloosa,
lowa. «
L. U. HOLE, H. LULUS,
Oskaloosa, lowa. New Sharon, lowa.
oLh. & HILLIS, |
ATTORNEY'S-AT-LAW.
Oskalooea and New Sharon, lowa. Prompt at
tention given to collections. Probate business
and conveyancing carefully attended to. Office,
up etaira. south-west corner public square, Oska
looca, lowa, and with I)r. Page, New Sharon
Inn 3 “
T. M DAVENPOHT. IHA W. AUDEKbON.
DAVENPORT a ANDERSON,
ATTOHN KY S-AT-LA W,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office oyer Frankel, Bach St,
Co’s bank. Collections made a specialty. Busi
ness attended to in all the coarta of the State.
29
UOLTON & McCOY,
1J ATTOHN EYB-AT-L AW,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office in Exchange Block,
o er Veraon's store. Business attended to inall
the courts, and conve) ancing and collections
promptly attended to. 23tl
fj» W. KICK,
JC t. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
And Solicitor of American and-Kuopean Pat
ents. Office, N 0.1430 F. Street, near Treasury
building, Washington, D. C. Practice In the Su
preme, Court of the United States, Court of
Claims tud Courts of the District of Columbia.
Business before any of the Executive Depart
ments of the Government promptly attended to.
Patents obtained in Washington. London, Paris,
Brussels, Vienna, and St. Petersburg, 83m6.
JOHN F. LACEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW, and GOVERN
MENT CLAIM AGENT. Prompt attention giv
en to collections. Probate business will receive
cireful attention. Business attended to in the
U. S. and State Courts. Office over the National
State Bank, Oskaloosa, lowa. 1»
OC. O. PHILLIPS—ATTORNEY AT LAW,
COLLECTING A REAL ESTATE AG’T,
O.kaloosa, lowa, office, over Phelps & Gould’s
Boot and Shoe store, south side of square. n16v23
OBT. KISSICK.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW and Notary Public.
Oskaloosa. lowa. Office with Seevers A Cutts,
In Union Block, north side of Public Square, up
stairs. Will give special attention to collections,
probate business, and conveyancing. Will Drac
lce in all tbe Courts of the State. n»itf.
M. T. WILIAMS, LISTOIt K M ILLS*.
Notary Public. Notary Public
41/ILLIAMS St, McMILLEN, 7 ruDllc.
W , ATTOUNBYS-AT-LAW.
Office on west side of square, in William*’ old
office, Street's block. Oskaloosa. lowa. 31
WS. KENWORTHY.
. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Oskaloosa. lowa. Office in Herald Bock, over
T. K. Smith’s store.
w, w. Haskell. l. a. scott.
Haskell a scott.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oskaloosa, lowa.
Office upstairs In tbe Phoenix Block, South side
of Public Square. n4O-tf
IRA J. ALDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. lowa City, lowa.
(Successorto Judge W B Miller,)
nlfi-tf
•*O. W. LAVFEIITy. /. KKLLT JOBMSOK*
r AFFBRTY St, JOHNSON.
•Tm ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Oekaloosa, lowa.
ctt?- ln Union Block, North side of the Pub
c »uuare. un stairs. 47
w> " * «. a. oum
OSEVERS &CUTTS
UAW, Oskaloosa, lowa,
by Seevers * William. TOOm recently occupied
ell
3. A. L. CBOOKHAM
*“**“•
and Government Claim Agenti N ®Urle* PubJ! ;
tbe several Court* or the Bti* Wll jpractlc< In
promptly attended to. Office Collections
Bank. Oskaloosa. lowa. * er N ‘tlonalState
PHYSICIANS Sc, BURGEONS
WM. PULLER, M. D..
HOMfEOAPTHIC PHYsiin**,
«°? Ik !l. So Vi he, * 8t oornerof the square
Palmer’s old stand. Residence on Mata
south of the Christian church. 4®*’
DA. HURST,
. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
wViS>rtsw£!siM.nS2- “*“ *
O C. HUNTSMAN. —-
ll* PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
OmcedJh High Street. 4th door east of Northeast
_____ 4T
DR. D. A. HOFFMAN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, Oskaloosa
fowa. Office in Rhinehart’a new hnl/dlna sonth’
side public aanare. Residenee en M*°,’
hre* blocks eaatof tbe souare. 7*i
\IT L. CHAMBERLAIN, M D.
fY. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office with Dr. Coolldge in NaUoaal State ßank
bury,Oskaloosa, lowa.
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
Volume 24. Number 52.}
HOTELS
■Vf ADISON HOUSE.
iTI T. J. SHIPLEY & CO.,
Oskaloosa, lowa.
S LEMMONS HOUSE IN NEW HANDS.
I have purchased this hotel with a design of
making it a comfortable and pleasant one. lam
aware of its reputation, yet feel coßfldent that my
extended acquaintance will overcome it. The
honse will not be entirely refitted till spring
opens,yet lam prepared to entertain all who
may call,comfortably. Give me atrial.
26. H. J.LUICK.
Eddyvllle.
BANKING
Banking house
—OF—
FRANK EL,BACH & CO
Will receive deposits, and transact a general
Banking. Exchangeand Collection business the
same as an incorporated bank.
Seven per cent interest allowed on deposits
left for six months.
Exchangeon;alltheprincipalcitlesln neUnited
States, and on all cities of Europe lor sale in
sums to suit purchasers.
We pay the highest market price for Oskaloosa
C ity Orders, and Mahaska County Warrants.
Collections will receive prompt attention.
Wedoa strictly legitimate banking business,
andgive the wants of customers special attention.
Respectfully,
FRAN EEL, BACH « CO.
Oskaloosa, Nov. 13. 1873. 101 y
MEDICAL SOCIETY.
MAHASKA COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY,
Meets on the first Tuesday in each month,
at the office of Dr. Gruwell, at 2 o'clock p. m. A
By-law of the society reads as follows: “Any
member failing to attend a meeting for six
months loses bis membership. “Members are :
Drs. D. A. Hurst, office on Main Street.
H. C. Huntsman, “ High Street.
J. P. Gruwell, “ *’ **
Wm Butler, “ “ “
D. U. Hare, “ Main Street.
U. R. Page, office at New Sharon.
W. E. Chamberlin, office at Beacon.
W. L. McAllister, office at New Sharon.
W. L. Chamberlin, Sec’y, on Main Street.
n 46
DENTISTS.
i \R, M. L. JACKSON,
U Surgeon Dentist.
Office in Exchangeißlock,
Draper A Gilford s
astey; >rn c Store. Nitrous Ox
i.l.- « ,«s administered in
«■*“««>» °‘^T
ROUNDS & McCARTY,
Dentists.
all Dental operations as reasonably
ss any other first-class dentists in Oskaloosa. and
warrant satisfaction. Office over Bacon Bros’
Store, south side of Square, Oskaloosa, la.
Vitalized air administered and teeth extracted
without pain.
nlv23
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
JO UN F. LACEY'ii
Land Agency.
We have on our books a large number of
Farms and Houses in Town.
Also many thousand acres of wild land. If you
have real estate to sell or wish to buy, give me a
call. We pay taxes in any part of the State. Con
veyancing done. 10
W. BURNSIDE,
LAND AGENT.
Examiner of Land Titles,
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
I have the only set of Abstracts in Mahaska Co.
MISCELLANEOUS.
TIME TRIED AND FIRE TESTED.
Total losses paid over eight million dollars.—
Cash assets 1,738,921 98- Agency of the
PlHßiiix Insurance Comply
OF
HARTFORD, CONN.
For
Twenty years one of the leading Agency Com
panies in the United States,
J. M. LOUGH RIDGE,
Justice of the Peace and Insurance Agent,
30 Oskaloosa, lowa.
A. ANDERSON,
Merchant Tailor!
WITH
IIAWKINS & PARKER.
All styles of men’s and boys’ clothing
Cut and Made to Order.
All work warranted. A fine stock of piece
alwava on hand 11
WELL DIGGING
and
Pump Repairing.
Wells and Pumps and Wells-
am prepared to make every man a well. Give
me your custom and save money.
Pumps and Wells and Pumps.
Special attention given to repairing pumps and
putting pumps Into deep wells. All orders left
at fhe office of J.H. Green A Co., will receive
prompt attention.
33yl Henry Newton.
Gunsmith Shop.
East High Street, two doors
east of Snyder’s planing mill.
The undersigned will always be found ready to
accommodate all who may call on him. I am
prepared to make and repair
KlflN, Shotguns, Revolvers aud Pis
tols of all kinds on short uotlee
and in good style, and at lower prices than has
ever been done in Oskaloosa. All work warrant
ed to begood. If yon want to save money call
and see my work before you engage elsewhere.
Shop and residence on High Street, one block
east of square. DAVID SHKIVEK.
I will also repair door locks and keys, file saws,
make patterns asd models of all kinds. D. S. 30
E. E. TUCKER,
dealer in
Grain and Seeds,
Live Stock,
Hides, Pelts, & Eggs.
Oskaloosa and New Sharon.
Warehouse opposite Central depot. Office at
Hide atore. north of the square, Oskaloosa. Mr.
John W. Faxon will be found at Tucker's eleva
tor. New Sharon. 43
Oskaloosa Planing Hill.
Corner of High and Madison Sts.,
OSKALOOSA, - - * IOWA
IJ. Duty & Ham Me,
SASjj Manufacturers Of
* noons,
_ . BLINDS,
FRA Mva l ’£ oVr AND DOOR-
Etc.,
-hort notice. All oSlnZ2i»* wl “£* •**-. done on
lentloa. Job work don# pro “ pt at *
CWE-BhalH. r
Vsns at aU timet. "
CIGARS.
Cigar Manufactory.
I desire to say to overs of
Good Cigars,
That I keep constantly on hand, of my
OWN MANUFACTURE,
a full supply of
All the grades in the market,
and at as fair prices as can be afforded in the city
I buy my tobacco in Eastern markets and am
ready at all times to vouch for its quality.
Dealers supplied at wholesale
rates.
I have an immense stock of
Cigar Holders and Pips
of every description, also
Tobacco Pouches, Boxes, etc.
Call and examine my stock, east side public
square 2d door south ofMadison House, Oska
sa, lowa- FRED BECKMAN. 20
GROCERIES.
Mattison& Bro.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES,
QUEENSWARE,
GLASS, LAMPS, LAMP-FIX-
TURES, POCKET AND
TABLE CUTLERY
NOTIONS, <fcc.
Have on hand a large stock of everything in our
line, in which we do not propose to be under
sold.
Full set of granite ware,
pieces, for &5.50. Jgß}]
table sets. 6 pieces, 50c to *1.50
CannP pods rr (taps*
T EAS T EAS T E/vS
from the cheapest to the best.
Call and examine onr stock and prices. Al! kind
of country produce taken in exchange
for goods.
CASH PAID FOR BUTTER AND EGGS
High Street, West of Square.
33 MATTISON & BRO.
BACON & BRO.
Are now permanently located m.th«tr new room
21 door east of 1. l. Lori’s
Where they expect to keep a full line of
Staple and Fancy
GROCERIES
Fins Teas nle a Suci®.
The increasing demands for the beet brands of
Japan and Oolong Teas
have induced us to furnish a better article in
that line than is usually kept in west
groceries. Our price of teas
range from4octe. to
f 1.60 per tt>
so that
all
classes
can be accommodated. We also have a great
variety of spices, jellies, canned goods,, etc, etc.
Remember the place is on the south
side. 6
E. M. Beatty,
(Successor to Cyrus Beede,)
Is offering to the pnblic a first-class stock of
Boots and Shoes.
Styles OFj|
Ladies’ Gaiters and Misses and
Children’s Wear.
Labobbbe’ Gaiters—something new.
Rubber Goods.
LE&T1BB Ht FINDINGS!
CUSTOM p(\All Cl MADE TO
MADE DUU 1 0 ORDER.
For the next ninety days all goods will be sold
Very Low for Cash,
to make room for the fall stock. Consult your
own Interests by flying me a trial.
Store on No rth side Square.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1874.
FOUNDRY.
J. C. HARRIN GTON’
FOUNDRY
—AND—
STOVE SHOP.
Main Street, near Central depot.
Oskaloosa. lowa.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
200 PIANOS and ORGANS
New and Second-Hand, of First-class
.Rakers, will be told at Lowest Frlces/or
cath, or on Installment., or for rent,in City
or Country, during thl. month, by
HOKACK WATERS A SON, No. 4SI
Broadway, than ever before offered in
New York. SPECIALITY; : Flanos
and Organs to let until the rent money
pay* the price of the Instrument. Illus
trated Catalogues mailed. A large dis
count to Ministers, Churches, Schools,
Lodges, etc. 43w4
FOR
Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness,
AND ALL THROAT DISEASES,
ÜBK
WELLS’ CARBOLIC TABLETS,
PUT UP ONLY IN BLI7K BOXES.
TRIED AND SURE REMEDY.
Sold by Druggists. 4
HAVE YOU TRIED
JURUBEBA
Are you
Weak, Nervous, Debilitated,
Are you *o languid that any exertion requires
more of an effort than you feel capable of making?
Tnen try Jurubeba. the wonderful tonic and in
vigorater, which acts so beneficially on the secre
tive organs, as to impart vigor to all the vital for
ces It is no alcoholic appetizer, which stimu
lates for a short time, only to let the sufferer
fall to a lower depth of misery, hut it is a veg
etable tonic acting directly on the liver and
spleen.
It regulates the bowels, quiets the nerves, and
gives such a healthy tone to the whole system
as to soon make the inyalid feel like a new per
son.
Its operation is not violent, bvt is character
ized by great gentleness, the patient experien
ces no sudden change, ao marked results, but
gradually his troubles
“Fold their tents, like the Arabs,
And silently steal away.”
This is no new and untried discovery, bat has
been long used with wonderful medical results,
and Is pronounced by the highest medical au
thorities, “the mostpowerfnl tonic and altera
tive known.” Ask your druggist for it.
For sale by FULLER & FULLER.
48w4 Chicago, 111.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
ELIAS LYMAN, HENRY R. TRASK
Kewanee, Henry Co„ Ills. Oskaloosa, lowa.
Lyman & Trask,
Dealers in
Boots and Shoes
Clothing,
Hats, Caps,
Gents' Fnraislg Goods,
West side square.
Having added a LARGE, and ENTIRE
LY NEW stock of
Mi Made Clotlii!
Hats, Caps, and Gents’ Fur
nishing Goods
to our large stock ot Boots and Shoes, we
would cordially invite all to call and
examine our stock and prices. As
we are selling for
CAS.i ok ™
Equivalent,
we feel confident we can give you prices
that will please you. Call and see us
before purchasing. Respectfully,
LYMAN & TRASK.
New Store
New Goods,
AND
New Prices.
Just opened, a new and com
plete stock of
Groceries, Provisions, etc.
A fall assortment of everything In onr line at
our new store room on
SOUTH SIDE OF SQUARE.
WE DEPT COMPETITION
as our goods were bought on
the market at the
LOWEST CASH PRICE!
Give us a call and we will try
and make it an object for
you to trade with us.
Remember the place, South
side square. ARCH FRONT.
Highest market price paid for
country produce.
S. C. Purdy & Co.
price f LIST
S.C. PURDY & Co.,
No. 6, Phoenix Block, Oskaloosa,
SUGARS.
Loaf sugar 7lb for SIOO Extra C 9 lb for 100
Granulated 71 “ 100 Golden C 9 “ 100
Powdered 7| “ 100 N O 9 “ 100
Standard ABJ “ 100 Dark Brown 11 “ 100
Circle A BJ£ lb for 1 00
COFFEES.
Java O G lbs for f l 00
Rio, choice green 3% do 1 00
Rio, choice gold 8 % do .. 100
Rio,choice good do .... l 00
Rio, roasted 8 do 1 00
Rio, ground 4 do 1 00
DRIED FRUITS.
English currants, choice, 10t> for f 1 00
Black prunes, new, 0 lb for 100
Raisins, new, per box, fS.OO 6 lb for l 00
Raisins, loose muscatels 6 lb for 100
Raisins, best valentia 7 lb for 1 00
Peaches, best halves 6 1b lor 1 00
Peaches, Balt Lake 5 1b for 1 00
Peaches, California 4} 1b for 100
Apples, best N. Y 7 1b for 100
SOAP.
Oerman mottled, full weight, 12 bars for f 1 00
Kirk’s sterling 10 bars for 100
STARCH.
Pure Pearl starce... 12 1b tor 100
FLOUR.
Bestial 1 wheat, made of white wln’r w’t V sk 2 0
Sno wfiake, made of Siberian and winter w’t 2 0b
Best XXX 1 70
Good XXX 160
Save your money by buying goods where yon
can get them cheap.
Higheet market price paid hi cask for country
produce.
LUMBER YARDS.
W. H. WRAY,
DKALXB IK ALL KINDS Of
%
Pine Lumber
Doors, Sash, Ceiling and Floor
ing, Dressed Siding, Fencing,
Sheeting, Paling, Joists,
Barn Boards, Scantling
Frame Timbers,
etc., etc.
If you wifh anything in my line give me a ©all
and examine stock and prices.
Prices Low as ilie Lowest:
Office on west High street, one door east
of St. James Hotel.
nßtt
CHAS LEIGHTON,
!j DEALER IN
MINNEAPOLIS LUMBER,
SHINGLES AND LATH.
CHICAGO DOOHS AND SASH.
Will sell as
UP ‘siaoqi jOidj puu Xpiaqii jo latuca ‘mif 3a?uvi»l aqaoddo ’pusi*
LOW AS THE LOWEST.
ISAAC KALBACH. JNO. A KALBACH.
I KAIBACH * SON,
LUMBER DEALERS,
OSKALOOSA AND NEW SHARON,
Have on hand and are receiving a large stock cf the best grades
Minneapolis Pine Lumber.
PRICES AS;LO WAS THE LO WEST. n 4
WOOL.
Have you counted ud the cost.
What is gained, and what is lost ?
Buy home-made goods, it is at least,
A great deal better than buying East-
The undersigned pay the highest market price iu
cash for
WOOL!
Keep for sale at
WHOLESASE and RETAIL
all kinds of home-made
Woolen Goods!
Do all kinds of custom work as
CARDING, SPINNING. CLOTH
DRESSING and COLORING.
t
They pay the highest market price in cash for
WHEAT!
Sell at the lowest prices
FLOUR AND FEED
—A T
WHOLESALE OR RETAIL-
Seibel $c Co.,
OSKALOOSA, IOWA.
MILLINERY.
Mrs. J. M. ORVIS,
Dealer In
MILLINERY,
—and—
Ladies’ Furnishing Goods.
Stock always full of Seasonable Goods.
4
49 Northeast comer square, otintooM.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS MARRIED.
The shell that once has leiu-ned|to sing
The sweet song of the sea,
Never forgets the soughing notes
Of that deep symphony;
But ever from its winding throat
The lingering music sighs,
Soft as angel breath that bears
Celestial harmonies.
Thus through the spiral of the years,
As voices breathe from shells,
There come sweet notes of joy to day,
From distant marriage bells—
Sweet marriage bells, dear marriage bells,
That touch a chord so live,
It vibrates just as thrillingly,
Through circles twenty-five.
“The old is better,” bottled up,
As might be precious tears ;
The blusbiDg heart-drops of the vine
Draw flavor from the years ;
And so to day you taste a cup,
AS husband and as wife,
Of eighteen hundred forty-nine.
The wine of wedded life.
It, too, grows richer as the years
Thetr sweets into it pour;
The flagon may hold less and less,
Its worth is more and more.
Oh, may this coil of wedded years
Still wind and wind away
Until this silver song becomes
A golden roundelay.
May this blest flagon ne’er be drained,
This wine of life drank up,
Until twenty-five years more
It fills a golden cup.
BILLSMILEYANDTHE WIDOW.
“Wife,” said Ed Wilbur, one
morning as he sat stirring his coffee
with one hand and holding a plum
cake with the other, and looked
across the table into the bright eyes
of hie little wife, “wouldn’t it be a
good joke to get Bachelor Bill Smi
ley to take Widow Watson to Rob
inson’s show next week ?”
“You can’t do it, Ed, he would’nt
ask her, he’s so awfully shy. Why,
he came by here the other day when
I was hanging oat the clothes, and
he looked over the fenoo and spoke,
but when He saw me shake out a
night gown he blushed and went
away.”
“I think I can manage it,” said Ed,
but I’ll have to lie just a little. But
then it would’nt do much harm un
der the circumstances, for I know
she likes him, and he dont dislike
her ; but, as you say, ho is so shy.
I’ll just go over to bis place to bor
row some bags of him, and if I dont
bag him before I come back, then
dont kiss me for a week, Nellie.”
“So Raying, Ed started, and while
he is mowing the fields, we will take
a look at Bill Smiley. He was rath
er a good looking fellow, though his
hair and whiskers showed some
grey hairs, and he wore a set of ar
tificial teeth. But every one said he
was a good soul, and so he was. He
had as good a hundred acre farm as
any in Norwich, with a new house
and everything comfortable, and if
he wanted a wife, many a girl would
have jumped at the chance, like a
rooster on a grasshopper. But Bill
was so bashful—always was—and
when Susan Berrybottle, whom he
was so sweet with, though he never
said boo to her, got married to old
Watson, he just drew in his head
like a mud turtle into its shell, and
there was no getting him out again,
though it had been noticed that
since Susau had become a widow
he had paid more attention to his
clothes, and had been very regular
in his attendance at the church the
fair widow attended.
But here comes Ed Wilbur.
“Good morning Mr. Smiley.”
“Good morning Mr. Wilbur,
what’s the news your way ?”
“Oh, nothing particular, that I
know of,” said Ed, “only Old John
Robinson’s show that everybody is
talking about, and everybody and
his girl is going to. I was over to
old Sockriders last night, and I see
his son Gus has got a new buggy,
and w T as scrubbing up his harness,
and he has got that white-faced colt
of his as slick as a seal. I under
stand that he thinks of taking widow
Watson to the show. He’s been
hanging around there a good deal of
late, but I’d just cut him out, so I
w'ould. Susan is a nice little woman
and deserves a better man than that
young pup of a fellow ; though I
would not blame her much either if
she likes him, for she must be awful
lonesome, and then she has to let
her farm out on shares and it is not
half worked, and no one else seems
to have spunk to speak up to her.
By jingo 1 if I were a single man I’d
show you a trick or two.”
So saying, Ed borrowed some
bags and started for home to tell
Nellie whatiie had set in train.
About five o’clock that evening
they saw Bill go by with his horse
and buggy on his way to the wid
ow’s. He jogged along quietly,
thinking of the old singing school
days—and what a pretty girl Susan
was then, and wondering inwardly
if he would have the moral courage
now to talk up to her, until at a dis
tance of about a quarter of a mile
from her house he came to a bridge,
over a large creek, and it sohappen
ed that just as he reached the mid
dle of the bridge he gave a tremen
dous sneeze and blew his teeth out
of his mouth, and clear over the
dashboard, and striking on the
planks they rolled over the side of
the bridge and dropped into the wa
ter.
Words cannot do justice to poor
Bill or paint the expression of his
lace as he sat there, completely
dumbfounded at that startling piece
of ill luck. After a while he step
ped out of his buggy, and getting
down on his hands and knees look
ed over into the water. Yes, there
they were at the bot'om, with a
crowd of little fishes rubbing their
noses against them, liis beautiful
teeth that had cost so much, and the
show coming on and no time to get
get another set, and the widow, and
Sockrider. Well, he must try and
get them somehow, and no time to
lose, for some one might come along
and ask him what he was fooling
along there for. He had no notion
of spoiling his good clothes by wad
ing in with them on, and beside, if
he did that he could not go to the
widow’s that night, so he took along
look up tho road to see that no one
was in sight, and then quickly un
dressed himself, laying his clothes
in the buggy to keep them clean.
Then he ran down the bank into the
icy cold water. His teeth did not
chatter in his bead, he only wished
they could. Quietly he waded
along so as not to stir up the mud,
and when he got to the right spot
he dropped under the water and
came up with his teeth in his hand,
and replaced them in his mouth.
But hark ! What noise is that ?
A wagon and a little dog barking
with all his might, and his horse is
starting. *
“Whoa ! whoa ! you brute, stop !”
But stop he would not, but went off
at a spanking pace with the unfortu
nate baohelor after him and the little
dog yelping after the bachelor. Bill
waß certainly in good running cos
tume, but though he strained every
nerve he could not touch the buggy
or reach the lines that were drag
ding on the ground.
After a while his plug hat shook
off the seat, and the hind wheel went
over it, making it as flat as a pan
cake. Bill snatched it as he ran, and
after jamming his fist into it, stuck
it, all dirty and rumpled, on his head.
Aod now he 6aw the widow’s house
on the hill, and what, oh what will
he do ! Then his coat fell out, he
slipped it on, and them making a
desperate plunge he clutched the
back of the seat and scrambled in,
and putting the buffalo robe over bis
legs, stuffed the other things be
neath.
Now the horse happened to be
one that he had got of Squire Moore,
and he got it of the widow ; and the
animal took it into his head to stop
at her gate, which Bill had no pow
er to prevent, as he had not posses
sion of the lines, besides he was too
busy buttoning his coat up to his
chin to think of doing much else.
The widow heard the rattle of
the wheels, looked out, and seeiug
that it was Smiley, and that he did
not offer to get out, she went to the
gate to see what he wanted, and
there she stood chatting, with her
white arms on the top ot the gate,
and her face right towards him,
while the cold chills ran down his
shirtless back clear to his bare feet
beneath the boffalo robe, nnd the
water from his hair and the dust on
his hat had combined to make some
nice little streams of mud that came
trickling down his face. She asked
him to come in. No, he was in a
hurry, he said. Still he did not of
fer to go. He did not like to ask
her to pick up hie reins for him, be
cause he did not know what excuse
to make for not doing it himself.
Then he looked down the road back
ot him, and saw a white-faced horse
coming, and at once surmised it was
that of Gus Sockridcr. He resolv
to do or die, and hurriedly told his
errand. The widow would be de
lighted to go, of course she would.
But would’nt he come in. No, he
was in a hurry, he said, had to go
on to Mr. Green’s place.
“Oh,” said the widow, “yoq’re
going to Greeu’e, are you ? Why,
I was just going there myself to get
one of the girls to help me quilt
some. Just wait a second while I
get my bonnet and shawl, and I’ll
ride with you.” And away she
skipped.
“Thunder and lightning 1” said
Bill, “what a fix!” and he hastily
clutched his pants from between his
feet, and was preparing to wriggle
into them, when a light wagon,
drawn by a white-faced horse, driv
ed by a boy, came along and stop
ped beside him. The boy held up
a pair of boots in one hand and a
pair of socks in the other, and just
as the widow reached the gate again,
he said :
“Here’s your boots and socks, Mr.
Smiley, that you left on the bridge
when you was in swimming.”
“You are mistaken,” said Bill,
they are not mine.”
“Why, said the boy, “ain’t you
the man that had the race after the
horse just now ?”
“No sir, lam not. You had bet
ter go about your business.” Bill
sighed at the loss ot his Sunday
boots, and turning to the widow
said:
“Just pick up the lines, will you,
please, this brute of a horse'is forev
er switching them out of my hand.”
The widow complied, and then he
pulled one corner of the robe cau
tiously down and she got in.
“What a lovely evening,” she
said, “and so warm I dont think we
need the robe over us, do we ?”
“Oh my!” said Bill earnestly,
“you’ll fine it chilly ridiDg, and I
wouldn’t have you catch cold for the
world.”
She seemed pleased at his tender
care for health, and contented her
self with sticking one of her little
feet out with a long silk neck-tie
over the end of it.
“What is this, Mr. Smiley, a neck
tie?”
“Yes,” said he, “I bought it the
other day, and I must have left it in
the buggy. Never mind it.”
“But,” she said, “it was so care
less,” and stooping over picked it
up and made a motion to stuff it in
between them.
Bill felt her hand going down, and
making a dive alter it clutched it in
his own and held it fast.
They bad gone on quite a dis
tance he -still holding her hand in
his, and wondering what he should
do when they got to Green’s, and
she wondering why he did not say
something nice to her as well as
squeeze her hand, and why his coat
was buttoned up so tight on such a
warm evening, and what made his
hat and face so dirty, until they were
going down a little hill and one of
the traces came unhitched and they
had to stop.
“Oh, murder !” exclaimed Bill,
’’what next ?”
“What is the matter, Mr. Smi
ley!” said the widow, with a start
which came near jerking the robe
off his knees.
“One of the traces is off.”
“Well, why dont you get out and
put it ou ?”
“I can’t,” said Bill ; “I’ve got —
that is, I havn’t got —oh dear, I’m
so sick ! What shall Ido ?”
“Why, Willie,” said she tenderly,
“what is the matter ? Do tell me.”
She gave his hand a little squeeze,
and looked into his pale face. She
thought ho was going to faint, so
she got out her smelling bottle with
her left hand, and pulling the stop
ple out with her teeth, she stuck it
to his nose.
Bill was just taking in breath for a
mighty sigh, aud tho pugnent odor
made him throw hack his head so
far that he lost his balance and went
over the low backed buggy. The
little woman gave a little scream as
his bare feet went past ber head, and
covering her face with her hands
gave way to tears or smiles—it is
hard to tell which.
Bill was “right side up” in a mo
ment and was leaning over the back
of the seat humbly apologizing and
explaining, when Ed Wilbur with
his wife and baby drove up. Poor
Bill felt that he would rather have
been shot than have Ed Wilber
catch him in such a scrape, hut
there was no help for it now, so be
called Ed to him and whispered it
in his ear. Ed was like to hurst with
suppressed laughter, but he beckon
ed to his wife to draw up, and after
saying something to her, be helped
the widow out of Bill’s buggy into
his own, and the two women went
on, leaving the men behiud.
Bill lost no time in arranging his
toilet as well as he could, and then
with great persuasion Ed got Bill to
go homo with him, and hunting up
slippers and socks, and getting him
washed and combed, bpd him quite
presentable wheu the ladies arrived,
I need not tell how the story was all
wormed out of bashful Bill, and how
they all laughed as they sat arouud
the tea table that night, but will oon
olude by saying that they went to
the show together, and Bill has no
fear of Gas Sockrider now.
{ Established July 1850.
REFORM IN MISSOURI.
Davenport Gazette.
A few years ago the Republicans
were in power in Missouri, but the
notion got into the heads ot some of
them that it would be nice and liber
al to let in the disfranchised rebels.
So a side-show was inagurated, to
which Schurz attached himself, com
posed of Democrats and Republi
cans, which carried the State. That
was the last of Republican suprema
cy 'ii Missouri. The rebels got their
“rights” and uniting with the Demo
crats and such Republicans as
wanted to be on the winning side,
took control of what became the
Democratic party. Since that time
the way they have “reformed”
things has been curious. They have
made Missouri almost as safe for
robbers and cut throats as Arkansas.
Bourbonism has had full sway. As
this was more than the “reformers”
bargained for, they have been grow
ing uneasy, and a “People’s Move
ment” is now in progress, to bring
about a change. The plan is, to hold
a “People’s Convention,” composed
of Republicans, and Reform Demo
crats, while the Republicans as a
party, shall omit to take any action.
This is the same game the Demo
crats are playing in lowa, only the
parties are reserved.
We have doubts whether as many
votes can be taken from the Bour
bons of Missouri as the Republicans
will lose by non-action. The Repub
lican party is not composed of ma
terial that amalgamates easily. But
it may be different in Missouri, and
there is certainly need enough of
reform. The Republicans lost the
Slate by amalgamating, and perhaps
they can win it back it the same
way. The story of the man who
scratched out both his eyes by
jumping into a bramble bosh, and
scratched them back by jumping in
again, is applicable in this case, and
the fact should not be overlooked
that he was accounted “wondrous
wise.” The Republicans who are
in the People’s Movement can take
heart from this circumstance.
From Knoxville Journal.
A good story is told of E. N.
Dates, Anti-Monup nominee for Con
gress in this district, and is vouched
lor as true, by men in this place who
lived in his neighborhood and knew
him well at the time of the occur
rence. About twenty-five years ago,
when he did not aspire to greatness,
he was employed as an attorney in a
small case before a justice of the
Peace at Orange, Ohio. Jim Stew
art, an old man, and a lawyer of
some renown, then living at Mans
field, appeared on the opposite side
in the case. Gates had made his
and Stewart had the floor
in reply. He was too much for
Gates in argument, and had the sym
pathies of the audience. Gates saw
that the case must be decided
against him, and undertook to break
the force of Stewart’B argument by
interrupting bis speech. He had
jumped up a number of times,
and with Stewart’s consent had been
allowed by the Justice to speak, al
though out of order. Stewart bore
this for some time very good-natur
edly, being disposed to let Gates
have his own way and let himself
down as easily as possible. Finally
he notified Gates that he would not
give way for any further irrelevant
interruptions. Again Gates jumped
up with some petty quibble and pro
ceeded to harrangue the court.
Stewart did not object, but quietly
filled his mouth with tobacco, and
when it was well chewed into pulp
he dumped the enormous quid into
his hand, rolled it between his palms
into a ball and hurled it with a thud
and a splash into the face of Gates
with the remark, “sit down.” Gates
took his seat, and was not heard
again until the case was decided
against him. To this day his face
assumes a deeper red when the sub
ject is mentioned. Ho has never
forgiven Stewart.
A Fish Story.
The curious fate of a fish caught in
the Sassafras river, in Kent county,
Maryland, is thus related by a cor
respondent : A fish-hawk stole a
very fine pickerel from the seine of
some fisherman, when an eagle who
had been watching the operation
gave chase, and compelled the hawk
to drop his prey. This was seized
at once by the eagle and approbria
ted to his own use. William Shall
cross, who resides there, had been
looking on, and succeeded in fright
ening off the eagle. As the fish was
not injured, he took it home, intend
ing it for supper. While the cook
was looking another way the cat in
her turn captured the pickerel, and
began to devour it. Just then a
hound belonging to the family came
along, and concluded to assert his
rights in the matter. He drove
away the cat and ate the fish him
self—which closes its history. And
this is a true fish story.
Dont “Wait For the Wagon.”
The old Democratic wagon was
loaded with sin and iniquity—pro
slavery, anti emancipation, opposi
tion to all the amendments of our
National Constitution, repudiation
on the greenback question, and
many other national sins, that would
have made the pody politic sick nigh
unto death, if they had not been re
jected. They have many sympathi
zers in the opposition to-day. Hut
supposing that thE N. Gate(s) should
fall out of this old wagon and empty
even a part of this load upon this
District, what a calamity. Let us
avoid every appearance of evil, by
voting for Judge Sampson.— Head-
Light.
GATES SPEECH AT MOULTON.
Prom Moulton Record.
Never was there a weaker, more
ridiculous and contemptable effort
made by a candidate for Congress.
It consisted alone of a sing-song
charge of corruption and reckless
ness, without the merit even of a hint
of a remedy, save the sending of
Gates to Congress.
Should Gates make that speech in
every school district in this District,
the election of Judge Sampson will
be assured by 4,000 majority. To our
certain knowledge Gates made six
votes for Sampson in the small audi
ence that listened to him here.
Good bye, Gates ; good bye Joe,
dont stay long.
An Effectual Cure for Cancer.
From the American Volunteer.
Take red oak bark, born it to
ashes, and make lye ; then boil the
lye till it gets as thick as molasses—
spread it thin on a rag or piece of
leather, and apply it to the sore for
an hour and a half; then take it off,
put another of the same on, which is
to remain the same length of time,
when a third is put on, and also kept
on an hour aud a half. This will
perform an effectual cure. Then
take rosin, beeswax, and sheep’s tal
tow, and make a salve, which will
heal the sore. This has never fail
ed to cure the eating oauoer. Pub
lished by J. M* Lynch.
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald
IS BI PA It
Bast Advertising Mocii. . m Qska. oc:a
HAVING A
Circulation of 2,000 copies
»o*toi whichare to persons I! MabaskaConulS
odb racujvtiuroß
book and jo« wonlv
r,". 1
&s at any other office. ™
HOW THEf FINALLY COTMmRRIcD.
One long summer afternoon there
came to Mr. Davidson’s the most
curious specimen ot an old bachelor
the world ever heard of. He was
old, gray, wrinkled, odd. He hated
old women, especially old maids and
wasn’t afraid to say so. He and
Aunt Patty had it hot whenever
chance threw them together ; yet
still he came, and it w..s noticed that
- unt 1 atty took unusual pains with
her dress whenever he was expeot-
One day the contest waged unusu
ally strong, and Aunt Patty left in
disgust and went out into the garden.
‘That bear !” she -mattered to her
-elf as she stooped to gather a flower
which attracted her attention.
‘What did you run for?’ said a
gruff voice behind her.
‘To get rid of you.*
‘You didn’t do it, did you ?’
‘No, you are worse than a bur
dock burr.’
‘You won’t get rid of me, either,’
‘I won’t, eh ?’
‘Only in one way.’
‘And that ?*
‘Marry me.’
‘\\ bat ! us two fools get married !
What would people say ?’
‘That’s nothing to us. Come, say
yes or no ; I’m in a hurry.*
‘Well, no, then.*
‘\ ery well; good-bye, I shan’t
come again.’
‘Stop a bit—what a pucker you’re
in.’
‘Yes or no?’
‘I must consult—”
‘All right; I thought you were of
age. Good-bye.’
‘Jabes Andrews, dont be a fool.—
Come back, I say. Why, Ido be
lieve the critter has taken me for
earnest. Jabes Andrews, I’ll con
sider.’
‘I dont want any considering; I’m
going. Becky Hastings is waiting
lor me. I tUought I’d give you the
first chance, Patty. All right:
Good-bye.”
“Jabes! Jabes! That stuck up
Becky Hastings shan’t have him.—
Jabes, yes ! Do you hear—y -e-s!”
A Swindler at the West.
(Country Gentleman.)
We have the following letter from
Messrs. A. Hostetter’s Sons, dated
Mt. Carroll, 111., Aug. 3d :
“Please confer a favor to ourselves
and stock-breeders generally by cau
tioning all, in your widely-oirculat
ing paper, against trusting a man of
this description : Medium height,
rather sunburned, or of dark com
plexion ; wore a rather heavy gray
suit, Bomewhat faded, short sack
coat and soft light-colored felt hat;
small dark eyes. Said his name
(when at our place, in: May or June
last) was Archibald Long, son of
Archibald Long, of La Salle, 111., and
a son in-law of Charles Lowder, of
Indiana. We have lately had letters
from J. C. Kelser, of Oregon, Wis.,
who said a man of above description,
protending to be one of the Hostetter
Brothers, was at hia place and bor
rowed ten dollars of Aim, and a letter
to-day from Mr. Richard Wray, of
Richmond, 111., who said a man,
pretending to be one of A. Hostet
ter’s Son’s, bought some cattle of
him and decamped. He was at our
place in May or June last, negotia
ting for some Jerseys, borrowed a
thread and needle of the ladies (as
an excuse, I suppose, to get into the
bed-room.) The same day Mr. Long,
alias Hostetter, or any other name,
was missing, and my brother’s pook
et-book and our would-be Jerseyman.
This man seems to be acquainted
with Short-Horn breeders all over
the country, and no doubt traveles
extensively, so that there is no tell
ing where he may turn up. We hope
he has changed his cognomen ere
this.”
THE GRANGE HEAD-CENTER.
From Moulton Headlight.
It the prevalent stories afloat in
the land are true, there is a main
screw loose in the Grange headquar
ters at Washington. It has been
openly oharged that the whole agri
cultural Department at Washington
is “rotten,” and with so mnch show
of truth that Congress at its last ses
sion cut down the appropriation to it
nearly one-half, and in the debate on
the question fearful charges were
made against leading men in this
Department. One Saunders, Presi
dent of the National Grange, seems
to be the brains of this Department,
and is running things to the general
disgust of people who know what he
is at. One Kelly, the Secretary of
the National Grange, two or three
years ago was a poor clerk in one of
the Departments. Now he drives a
spanking team on Pennsylvania Av
enue, with gold mounted harness,
and other equipments to match.
Why is this thus? It is said these
men are paid largely for their confi
dential recommendations by manu
facturers. Will not this matter bear
a little investigation? Is the West
to be forever humbugged by East
ern demagogues and sharpers ?
A member of the Saginaw county
bar, was recently in one of our thriv
ing interior towns on profession bus
iness. In the office of the hotel he
was accosted by a very agreeable
gentleman, evidently of the genus
drummer, who wanted to know
“where he was from.” The legal
gentleman not exactly relishing the
stranger’s familiarity, answered
short; “From Detroit.” The next
question was, “For what house are
you traveling?” “For my own.”
“Are you ! May I ask your name ?”
“You may.” Pause—enjoyable to
the lawyer, embarrassing to the oth
er. “Well, what is yojr same ?”
“Jones.” “What line are you in ?”
“I do not understand you.” “What
are you selling ?” “Brains.” The
drummer saw his opportunity, and
looking at the other from head to
foot, he said slowly, “Well, you
appear to carry a deuced small line
of samples.” Blackstone says he
owes that drummer one.
Prom Bellfontain (Obio) Republican.
“We had a three year’s acquain
tance with Colonel Sampson in the
service, and he is a man worthy of
the houir bestowed upon him. He
will be an “Honorable” in the true
acceptance of the term ; and the boys
of the sth lowa would, to a man, be
glad to favor “Old Sorrel” with
their votes.
The St. Louis Disprtch , says :
“For the first time in torteen years
the Democratie party is beginning
to crawl out of the brash.” Exactly.
It went into the brash at the oat
break of the war, and engaged in the
basinesa of famishing bash whack
ers to make war upon the nation’s
flag.
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