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The weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, April 11, 1878, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027329/1878-04-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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Teh Weekly Oskaloosa Herald
Is by far the
Best kMrni Mu
•'* * *-k »(<*•>«. *, bavins
2l J 0 Circulation,
.iii. ij Jin- t«» person* in Mabaaka
o > intv. Our facilities for
Book and Job Work
i- 'inpletoiu office iu the State All
the new styles of type ami
Lfour lob presses.
A T TORN E Y S-AT-LA W.
I A ties A. KICK.
'J ATTO RNEY - AT-LA W.
Mayer's Offiee. naitf
» I*. BITTEN HOUSE.
A* Attorney at Law,
• •■a.UiMisa. lewa. Olhce up dairs in I'uion
. •t it, Vortti side public square. K>uit>|*l
W’M KENNEDY.
> » ATTORNEY AT LAW.
t‘. utieutiou g.ven to collection*. Office
,v e Much WiDoa's store. niu
. ’ * M. I*. HELLINGS,
1 ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Notar\ I'ultlß-; collecting ami Real testate
Uukc iuold 'aiiitfJ Uni. on limb St.,
• ,41 -AH*. lowa.
utHirr kissick,
1 ATTORNEY AT LAW,
. . Notary Public, tYalcslnoM. lowa. Office
. . . ,i .l over Fr.uikel's ClutUiif
. . a >.*;U »i - quart*. Will give sqwciai
to {• •licetions, probate business, ami
•'aiKrinjr. t*racUce in all the courts of
•v "lute. 23
t*"! LHC It F. MARK.
4 \
.ID* INKY VT LAW ami NOTARY PC It I.IC.
: ■ t 2 Agent. Oloe Exchange block,
•• ■ W. H. Shaw .v Co’s store, Oskaloasa. lowa,
nit
t \ T tt. LACEY,
' ' • ATTORNEY AT LAW.
>..■•• with John F. Lacoy, above Royer A
o.irues’ 'tore. Oskaloosa, lowa. All kinds of
-a business promptly done. Collections made
t ud eui.veyan .einx doue.
Hi. N V. SSEVEBB. JOHN O. MAIX'OLM.
' SEVERS A MALC‘ ILM.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
• »...! .o»a. lowa. Office over Frankers new
uk..north side of square. 33
IN A. HOFFMAN,
ATTORNEY -AT-LAW,
i Not i üblic, over Levi's store, south-west
<r pi* lie square, Oskaloosa. lowa. 43
t_ ■<. doi.E. n. nu,t.is.
, I OLE A HILLIS,
i 1 ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
:- . imo-.t, lowa. Prompt at ntion given to
■ till*. Probate business an>l oonvey
iin* carefully attended to. Otbce, up-stairs,
L niou block, mirth side square, Os-uiloo.su,
39
• N a M or,
I> ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
■ ~.i, lowa. Office in Sa\ iugs Rank block.
;• iirurjrs' drug dore. Business attended to
1 the >urts of the State. Conveyancing
•Jocting promptly attended to. 39
I'' W. RICE,
i-. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
: i. i rkmn and European pat
■ Office No. 1430 F. street, near treasury
W |rt Practice in the Su
•.;te urt of the United States, Court ot
.. in-. Courts of the District ot Columbia,
less bcl ireanyof the Executive Depart-
G .• r:i:ue:it promptly attended to.
aients .rained in Washington, Loudon. Paris,
Brussels, Vienna, and St. Petensburgh. 33
JOHN F. LACEY",
J ATTORNEY AT LAW,
i Government Claim Agent. Office in Royer
ii.imes' block, Oskaloosa, lowa. Prompt
: t ntion given t< > collections. Probate business
ir 1 tl attention. Businessattend
to in the U. S. and State courts. 19
v C. G. PHILLIPS,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW, ,
;e ting. Insurance, and Real Estate Agent,
i-kaloosa, lowa. Uffieeover I.C.Green A Son’s
>t and shoe store, south side square. 1#
| UA J. ALDER.
I ATTORNEY AT LAW,
City, 1 wa. Successor to Judge W. E.
liUer. ___ _1«
i. w. ukrrximr. j. nurMnioi
I AFFEKTY A JOHNSON,
i a ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Office over Miteh Wilson’s
nerof - |uare. 47
ML. CUTTSk _
. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
ill. in Savings Rank Block, up-stairs, north -
31
i CKoOKHAM. S.V.OUUKm,
l Ob yoKHAM A GLEASON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, j
r . State bank, Oakalooea 35
C. F. Knowlton. 11. L. Thatchek. |
New >haron. Oskaloosa. i
IZ - m LI INS r;i \t Jo BR, i
in ATTORNEY’S AT LAW, '
« :!<•- Public, anl Real Estate Agents, at
n I New Sharon. Will pay taxes, j
:;i ik<- eollecti >n«. and attend to legal I
11he< lurtsofthe state. Office over Ver
non's store in Exchange block. Oskaloosa. and j
!'• mk 11. s k. New diaron. itwl.
U STICK OF :HE PEACE.
f •! HIATT. 1
• * • JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. New Sharon
I i. Special attention paid to the collection
• i.:n« and buying and selling real estate. 44
>HYSICIANS . : SURGEONS.
|y 1 r
Yre now permanently located in o*-kal<w**a.
for t intent of i uoer, Scrofula. •
r ><re*. Pile-. Tetter. Rheumatism and all
. -uic d.-ea-e. Office on the North side
f juare. ;n Union block, where one of us
! '-Mound at all times durinar office hours.
a‘ . i -re from lk to 12 a. in., and from 1 to 3
ji. i ■ t From pest experience we Hatter our
• m - that we shall tumble to (five satisfaction
-u *h as may place theinseive- under our care.
>V.- respectfully solicit those who are afflicted
tOKive ns a c ill. Consultation free For fur
r ■ r ilar.
ntxmfi
I v:t. V. PARDUN.
• ' MAGNETIC HEALER.
u. offp-e it hi? residence three blocks directly
south of Post-office, is prepared to treat all dis
• except deafness, with general satbfao
»i ui. Terms. ?' per month. He will always be
toun 5 at home. 1H
1 YK. J. C. HA It KING KR
I t PHYSICIAN ANI> SUHGEGN.
<i". r- «,n west side public square. ttesi
m west lliith street, one block west of
. •, iij* stairs in McCall's Block. 4W_
. . M p. J. W. M. HAWI.S, M. D.
• i IV i HAWES. IIOYWEPATHIC
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
'Successors to Dr. Lucy.)
-,* «. attention «iven to diseases of women
.1 . Ir-n. also to Electric Magnetic treat
i. i *r Neuraliria Rheumatism, Chorea. Paral
-. Epilepsy, diseases of the lung's, Ac.
\i-iit arid country calls promptly attended.
• North side of square over 11. F. Shields :
•G. •tv St *r»-. o-kaloo-a. b*wn. PUf
| yi K.TENNANT.
Herald hi >c-k. Main street. Ork ilooaa. |
l .a a. Dr. Tennant can tie consulted |*crsoaal- j
>r by letter i on all chronic direasi/s, or<*f a !
.■1 lilt ri itore. C ;ii|i:cr, tits, scrofula, gravel.
• ■■*>•. p ! *s. ear and eye, nasal catarrh, paral- i
...... ,t ;be nervi• >s> -
consumption, and disease* of a private.
i- ire. s .<■—f ill;, treated. ComaunicoM >n« j
•:* vrrMy eonfld uitial. Hist of *in and I
cr*j.. -ry r.-'-renees, and testimonial* can b fur- i
to he 1. S**?i t for circular.
i ■'< tl rf i. M i —*i **. \*7i. nll
t i scott. m. d.
J /. <j !l —in W. It. Nugent's drug store .there
i • ’><• t Mind at all hours both -lay and night j
n*t pro! •- i irjitlly engaged. DIMKAMEk I
» , ' \VI. CIIILTIKI-N M APE A SPKCi AI.TY.
filnit
{ Ji: K. STAFFORD
. ..I devote hie entire attention to the prac-j
t ,< in .;ie. \l*f la* found at his residence I
I* *r .nil if M- ihodi-t church, north of j
i i u—.ur at Gifford's drug store, went
if h -r.-t. :» j
! I A. HOFFM AN.
\ f. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
* . < in Itblnebart’s n<-w buildiiur. south-west
; . . r public square. Qskaloosa, lowa, ttesl
d*. hi Main street, three blocks eaat of pub-
I • (iiare. *1 I
J)»t M FLO« K.
W .i r- »p*-et fully announce to the citizens
< { i•• k. -i ind vk-inity, that he has perma
tly . cat*.-! * th- city, and will treat cancer
w;th* t p ioi or the i, • of the knife. Scrofula.
* i ~! !t« f rc.s. - irvy. Salt Rheum. Epilepsy,
i.ravel. Drop**y, Pile-. Krysip*das. Neuralgia.
F* male Debility. k>\ Office on southwest cor
i)i r of Jeff**r- >n and North streets. S2ra-J
DENTISTS.
1 ir. L. J.tCKSON.
f ) SURGEON DENTIST.
Office in ExehanK*
Block, on H;*rh street,
(Mk ai.xisa. lowa, over
/.• Nitrous oxide xas ad
.V BSTRACTSI
ABSTRACTS
Of Titles to Lands and Town Lots.
s»l Maba*ka countv. funiishe*! on short notice
a o>l on reasonable terms, by
R. DUMONT & CO.
Oftooe in 1. Frankel k Co’s buildiny. on eth
»r»i sideof the public juare, oskalooaa, lowa
Abstractor of Titles,
1 have two column tele set# of Vxiki oontain
iujf titles to all the latnds and Town I»ts In Ma
•i uka cx>uoty, carefully xotten up fr*nn the re
i *rds and o*unpared. and the two sets compared
with each otiier.su that ther must be as
i.rrlrrl as can be made. Alsitracta furnished
•>n reas<»able terms. Also titles perfected for
small compensation.
M oney to iuoan at 8 per cent.
Annual Interest.
C. P. SEARLE,
M door aest of National state Bsak
•fs. "£M
VOL. 28. NUMBER 32.
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
LAND AGENCY.
1 have on my books a large number of
farms and houses in town. Also many thous
and acres of wildland. If you have real estate
to sell or wish to buy, give me a call. I pay
taxes in any part of the State. Conveyancing
done. Office in Boyer A Barnes’ block,Oskaloo
sa lowa. 10
100 nice building lots in Lacey’s addition to
Oskaloosa.
mm: house?
CHICAGO HIDE
HOUSE
Will pay the highest price tor
Hides, Pelts,
Tallow, Grease
and Dead Hogs.
OFFICE* WAKKHOOM,
One half block east of square. Call on us be
fore you sell.
nCy i CECWER BROS. & CO.
GRIST MILLS.
EUREKA MILLS,
Beacon, lowa.
1 have thoroughly relitted the above mills lit
Beacon, putting in new machinery and repair
ing old until second to none in the country, and
they are now running again. 1 have had 36
years experience in the business, and think 1
thoroughly understand it. and propose to do
GOOD WORK ONLY,
treating my customers fairly, and giving them
irxid F U >UR. Give mo a trial.
52 J, M. JONES.
FURNITURE.
Miller & Harbach,
Manufacturers and dealers in
FURNITURE
of all kinds.
Wooden and Metallic
Burial Cases and Caskets
constantly on hand.
1 1 N DERTAKINi G DON h.
East room “Herald Block.”
MERCHA N ¥ TAILORING”
AGAIN AT WORK.
Thanking my many friends and custom
era for tneir patronage in the past,
I desire to inform them
that I am now
established
iu the room formerly
occupied by Frankel, Bach
A- Co , as a hank, where I will carry
on the
MERCHANT TAILORING
BUSINESS
in all Branches.
I have a splendid line
CLOTHS,
CASIMERES,
BEAVERS,
and all goods used in making gentlemen’s
garments.
I GUARANTEE PERFECT FITS.
Call and see me.
T. WILLIAMS. ..
ARCHITECTS and BUILDERS.
S 3 W
f2> If IT §
wr * ® S’. Z 3“ CQ
• o <? g - w
5 -x "* » nr a v —i
“os:' i H- u ; W
; “Sll § I s f
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r (« S
O
2.
LUMBER YARDS."
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f« B B
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
John F. Lacey's
Id VERY.
BASHAW LIVERY
OMNIBUS LINE.
Best of rigs at?reasonable rates; and ’lmimcs t<»
all trains.
DOWNING, MeMI'LLIN At Co
LOAN AGENCIES
W. Burnsiae,
Land Loan Agent,
Oskaloosa, lowa.
MONEY AT 8 PER
CENT.
FARM MORTCACES,
In Sun Ni It- M:i SSOO
F. M. DAVENPORT,
Oskaloosa, lowa
John W. Woody. W. P. Hei.mnos,
Attorney.
WOODY k HELLINGS,
Abstracters of Titles,
Real Estate and Insurance
Agents,
Oskaloosa, lowa.
MONEY TO LOAN.
We buy an«l soil real estate on eomtuisston,
pay taxes, and take care of property of non
resklents. make collections negotiate loans,
make investments, collect rents, furnish ab
stracts of title, inn ing a complete set of ab
stractsof tilleto all the laml and town lots of
Mahaska County, give information and trans
act a general land agency business. Correspon
dence solicited, and charges reasonable. Apply
to or address
Woody &Hellings,
Office in old Savings Bank, Oskaloosa. low*
SO
BANKING.
E.Clahk, Pres. W, A. Lixdi.y, Cash.
M.E. Cutis. Vice Pres. P. E.Ci.ahk. Asst.Cash*
MattaCo. Savings Bank.
General Banking business transacted. (
New Fire-proof Building, N-W cor square.
Savings Deposits Received
on the following terms:
Kru-h depositor will bo furnished with a book.
Deposits may be made in sums of one dollar
and upwards. Interest will be allowed at e per
cent, per annum ot the ttrst of January and
July, on all sums not previously withdrawn.
Deposits made on thefirst of the month will
begin todraw interest from the time the deposit I
fs made.
Deposits made after the first day ot the month
w ill not commence to draw interest till the first
of tlu next month.
Banking House
—or— ]
Frankel, Bach & Co.
Will receive deposits and transac t a general
tanking, exchange and collection business, the
same as an incorporated bank.
Interest allowed on time deposits. Exchange
on all parts of Europe bought and sold in sums
to suit purchasers.
Collections will receive prompt attention.
Wedoa strictly legitimate banking business,
and give he wants of eustomeraspecial atten
tion. , i
Correspondents-
International Bank. Chicago; Kuhn, laa tt A
Co., N, Y'.; State National Rank, Keokuk,
Respectfully,
FRANK EL, BACH A CO.
Oskaloosa, Nov. 13 PCi.
skth Richards, Pres. Geo. \V. Hai,k, V. Pres.
E. D. Lindly, Cash.
National State Bank i
OSKALOOSA, IOWA.
i
Paid up Capital SIOO,OOO.
SURPLUS SiO.OOO.
correspondents:
Gilman, Son & Co., New York.
Commercial National Bank, Cliica
Valley National Bank, St. Louis.
National Bank of Redemption, Boston.
Keokuk National Bank. Keokuk.
_ John Siebf.e, L. C. Blanchard,
President. Vice President,
rni:
Farmers ait Traflers Bank
or
Oskaloosa. lowa.
(Organized under the State Laws.)
Stockholders Liable for Double the Amount of
'Capital Stock. Correspondence Solicited
Collections made ana Remitted on day
of Payment
Id RECTORS.
JohnSiebel, Wm. Lotioniiidoe. i
E. 11. Gimbs. J A. L. Ckookham.
p. \v. Phillips, John 11. smith.
r. T. YVillakd, G. B. McFai.l,
James Bridges,
stockholders.
Win I.oaghri tge. J A L Crookhum,
John Siebel. P W Phillips,
GBMcFull. lames Bridges. 1
IT Willard. John H Smith, (
E II Gibbs, T J Ulackstone.
If W Gleason. 1 has Miller.
F M Davenport. W K Nugent.
Henry Howard, HG'rookham,
M Crookhum. Jonathan Atkin-n
JW Walton. Robert Mitchell,
II S Howard, A Shnngle.
Thos Ballinger. Mc.3es Nowles.
Jesse Stuart. Henry P Nindc.
W H II Pillsbury. W C Ithinehart,
A J Baughman, J M Jones,
M Wilson, Clias Blattner.
John Voorhees. II C Rockwell,
Win Siebel, J M Loughridge.
Peter Stump. G II Baugh.’
John Mitchell, J W liowen,
R R Heard, G W Brewer.
Harry Brewer. John Waggoner.
Jacob Harper, thos K Brewster,
David Thateller. John C Tucker.;
Alfred Barr. CJ Jacksou,
J N Davis. W W llaskell.
Jacob Coffin, John Look art,
G M Mott, J K Woods,
Robert Bass. Jas E Snowden,
H E King. -I W McMullen.
J A Stewart. J A Williams.
M Picket!. L C Blanchard.
J A McCurdy, J H Jenkins,
W H II Rice*. Wni N Hoover.
Isaac Whaling. Hardin Tice,
L C Tanner, Alfred Roland.
L A Scott. Christian Houtz,
CYrus Phillips. W M Crookham.
C C Joy, I»avid Hoover.
KC Harris, Isaac Mills,
James M Hoover. Martin Bacon,
E Baker, John Nash.
Lewis illllery. A S Nichols.
Thompson Hanna. K T Ryan.
J C Hiatt. Martha Jane VI hife.
Wells Bros. James Fisher.
Pierce Itatclift. Mary' McFall.
John Shipley, David Stanton
George Bennett C M Smith,
A A Kendig, H P Martin.
TG Phillips. GFLunt,
G W France, M F Ben net.
John Algoud, P* H Shields.
Alex Hanna
TIN WAKE."
O. A. WELLS. 0.0. WKLLB. J. N. ELLIOTT
WELLS BROS.! ELLIOTT
successors to Wells Bros.,
dealers in and manufacturers of
Tin, Copper, and
Sheet-iron ware,
Galvanized Iron Cornice
and
Window Caps.
Coniice, Rjofing, Spouting, and
all kinds of job work a
specialty.
. Agents for the
New Mansard,
Lady Gay,
and Active
Cook Stoves.
These stoves are new in the market, and we
should like thorn exuininod by all wishing stove*.
Call and *e<: theta before you buy.
We will take contract* for Cornice »
Hoofing and Spouting in all parts of
the country, at the
loireat possible rates.
Fall He Not Dead.
He who dies at Azim seels
This to comfort all bi 9 friends.
Faithful friends, It lies. I know.
Pale and white, and cold as snow;
And ye say, “Abdallah's dead"—
Weeping at the feet and head.
1 can see your falling tears:
I can hear your sighs and prayers.
Yet 1 smile and whisper this:
1 am not the thing you miss!
Cease your tears and let it lie;
It was mind, it is not I.
Sweet friends, what the women lave
For the last sleep of the grave
Is a hurt which I am quitting.
Is a garment no more tltting;
Is a cage from which at last
(.ike a bird my a soul has passed.
Love the inmate, not the room;
The wearer, not the garb—tbo plume
Of the eagle, not the bars
That kept him from the splendid stars,
L<>\ mg friends. Oh rite and dry
■Straightway every weeping eye!
What ye lift upon the bier
N not worth a single tear.
'Tin an empty sea-shell--one
Out of which the pearl has gone.
The shell Is broken, it lies there;
The pearl, the all, the soul is here.
'Tis an earthen Jar wli, -elid
Allah sealed, the while it hid
That treasure of his treasury—
A mind that loved him ! t it He,
Let the shards be earth once more,
•ince the gold Is In his »t. •> e.
Allahglorious! Allahgood!
Now the world is understood
Now the long, long wonder ends;
Yet we weep, my friends.
While the man whom you call dead
In unbroken bliss instead
Lives and loves you—lost, lost ’tis true
In the light that shines for you;
Hut in the light you cannot see.
In undisturbed felicity—
In perfect paradise.
And a life that never dies.
Farewell friends, yet not farewell.
Where I go, you too shall dwell,
I'm not gone before your face- •
A moment's worth, a little space.
When you come where I have slept.
Ye will wonder why we wept;
Y’e will know by true love taught.
That here is all and there ie naught.
He who died at Azim gave
This to those who made his grave
A BRILLIANT ADVENTURE.
*\Yliut lk) You Take Your Old liad Fori”
Harper's Weekly.
The time was about a fortnight be
fore Christmas. There were not
many travelers, and 1 had a compart
ment in the early tidal train to my
self. My destination was Paris, my
errand to convey from ray father (a
London jeweler and silversmith) to
his agent in that city a very valuable
brilliant ring.
‘The diamonds in it are worth live
hundred pounds if they are worth a
penny,’ my father had said to me; ‘so
I hope you will take special care of
the ring, Ned, and neither lose it on
the way nor allow youself to he
robbed of it.’
I smiled a little superciliously as
ray father spoke. As if it were at
all likely that 1 should either lose it
or allow it to he stolen from me! I
was just one and twenty, and father
had no right to speak to me as if 1
were still a boy.
1 had got the ring in an inner
pocket of ray waistcoat, as 1 took care
to make it doubly secure. I had not
soon it since my father put it into a
little velvet-lined box, in which it was
still shut up. When I had finished
my first cigar and had got through
the morning news, the thought struck
me that I might as well have another
look at the ring. There could be no
harm in that, you know. 1 took the
box out of its hiding place and open
ed it. My eyes were dazzled as I
looked. There luid the darling in its
nest of purple velvet. Who could re
sist the pleasure of taking it out and
trying it on? Certainly not I. First
on one linger and then on another 1
tried it. llad it been made for the
third finder of my right hand it could
not have fitted better. It looked sim
ply exquisite.
Now I came to think of it, was
there or could there ho a safer hiding
place for the ring than my finger? 1
had only to keep my glove on and
not a soul would know anything about
it. It was far safer there than in ray
pocket. In such a case to hesitate
was folly. 1 placed the ting on my
finger, and put the empty box baca
into my pocket. As I was alone,
there was no occasion to put my glove
on just then; so I mused and smoked,
and watched the many colored rays
of light that flashed from the brilli
u..4-, and wondered what great
swell’s finger it was destined to dec
orate. How I wished I could call it
mine.
There was no harm in dazzling the
eyes of the ticket collector with it.
lie was only a railway official. But
I took care to pull on my glove and
button it before alighting from the
train. A quarter of an hour later we
were steaming swiftly out of Dover
harbor.
There were not more than a dozen
passengers on deck. The day was
cold and clear, with just enough sea
on to make the voyage unpleasant for
had sailors. Only two ladies were
visible. One was a stout middle-aged
person, who wa.i eating and drinking
nearly the whole way across—evi
dently an old salt. The other was—
well, simply the most charming crea
ture I ever set my eyes on. In point
of fact, I could not keep my eyes off
her. I passed and repassed her as I
paced the deck from end to end, and
every time that I passed her I looked
at her. What lovely gray eyes! What
superb yellow hair! But as for her
complexion, it would need a poet to
describe its wild-rose tints. Once or
twice her eyes met mine just lor a
moment, and it struck me that they
were full of wistful sadness. So far
as I could judge she was entirely
alone. We were about half way
across when, as I passed her for about
the fifteenth time she spoke:
‘Would monsieur have the goodness
to ask the steward to bring me a little
cognac?’
She spoke it in French. As the
song says, ‘her voico was low and
sweet.’ 1 was too flattered to answer
her. I could only how and grin, and
make a holt to the steward’s den. Of
course I took the cognac to her my
self. You should have seen how pret
tily she thanked me. She sipped at it
as a canary might do, if that bird
were in the habit of drinking brandy.
‘I hope that mademoiselle is some
what revived/ I ventured to observe
presently.
‘Yes, very much revived, thanks to
monsieur. But I am not mademoi
selle. I am madame. I am a widow.’
She pressed her handkerchief to
her eyes as she spoke, flow inter
esting, nay, how, touching, was this
simple confession. The wistful sor
row in her eyes was at once account
ed for. Would that it had been my
happy lot to comfort her!
There was a camp-stool close by.
Presently I ventured to draw it a lit
tle nearer and to sit down on it, blush
ing at ray temerity as 1 did so. She
did not seem at all offended, and we
were presently in the midst of an an
imated and interesting conversation.
There was no hauteur about raadame.
On the contrary, she was candor it
self. She had only been three days
in London, she told me. She had been
staying with Sir Henry Fitx Evans,
who had charge of her husband's in
terests in England. Sho was now go
ing back into seclusion—going back
to the little cottage in which sno had
dwelt over since her dear husband’s
death. She would not be able to go
forward by the tidal train, she told
i me, having a business call to make in
OSKALOOSA, iOWA, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1878.
Calais. She would go forward by the
evening train. All this was told me
with charming frankness. There was
no reason why I should not wait and
go forward with her by the evening
train—if she would allow me to do so.
When I threw out a hint to that effect
she offered no objection. She admit
ted at once that she was fond of soci
ety, and then she looked at me, and
—well, I could almost have sworn
that she blushed. I had already told
her that I was bound for Paris on a
special errand tor my father; but I
had not said a word about the riiif,
nor had she even seen it. 1 had put
on my gloves before leaving the train
at Dover, and I still wore them. A
little while longer and we found our
selv >ut Calais. When we landed
uiudame admitted that she was hun
gry, and that luncheon would be a
desirable feature ol tbo programme.
According!}’, while she went about
her business, I took a voitvre and drove
to the Hotel Dessin. There, in the
courseof half an hour, madame joined
me.
Now, one can’t very well partake
of luncheon in kid gloves. The ques
tion was whether 1 should partake of
mine with the ling on my finger, or
whether I should put it carefully
away in the box and hide it out of
.Mght. If you have any knowledge of
what human nature is at twenty-one,
especially when there is a pretty wo
man in the case, you will know the
decision I arrived at.
Madame pecked a little at this a* d
that, but hardly ate more than a
sparrow might have done. How swift
ly the minutes seemed to fly! I could
have lingered in that cozy little room
for a year. When the cloth was
drawn and we were left to ourselves,
with a bottle of hock on the table be
tween us, somehow our chairs seemed
to gravitate toward each other. Or
perhaps it was the stove that attracted
us, for the afternoon was chilly. In
any case we tound ourselves in closer
proximity. Then said madame:
‘Do you smoke, monsieur?’
‘Y"es, considerably more than is
good for me, I’m afraid.’
‘Then smoke now. Oblige me. I
like to see a gentleman smoke.’
I rose in order to get my cigar case
out of the pocket of my overcoat.
Madame laid her hand lightly on my
arm —and what a charming hand it
was.
‘Teniz. lam going to make a con
fession,’ she said, ‘1 smoke, too— moi.
Cigarettes. 1 lived for several years
in Spain, where nearly all the ladies
smoke. You are not shocked, I hope,
at the idea of a lady smoking a cigar
ette?’
‘Shocked, madame-^’
‘No, of course not. You are too
much of a man of the world. You
are above such insinular prejudices.
Eh lien, you shall smoke one of my
cigarettes.’
From the sachet by her side she
drew an embroidered case, which she
opened and bade me choose a cigar
ette. I did so and she took another.
Then with her own fair fingers she
struck a match and held it while I
lighted the weed,
her own.
She could not fail to see my ling
as she lighted the mulch.
‘1 dare say you find the flavor a
little peculiar/said madame, a min
ute or two later. ‘These cigarettes
are made of perfumed tobacco. I
never smoke any others. I hope you
don’t find yours very disagreeable?’
‘On the contrary, madame, lam
quite in love with it As you say, the
flavor is quite peculiar, but aromatic
and pleasant —very pleasant.’
To tell the truth, I didn’t liko it at
all, but I wouldn't have said so for
worlds.
We smoked on in silence. What
would this superb creature say to me,
I wondered, if I were to tell her how
madly I had fallen in love with her?
Would she reject me with scorn, or
would she —I gavo a sudden start,
and was shocked to find that I had
been falling asleep. Fortunately
madame had not noticed me. Her
large melancholy eyes were bent up
on the stove. There was certainly
something very soothing, something
that inclined to slumber and happy
dreams about madame's peculiar
cigarettes. If I had hut two thousand
a year now, and this sweet creature
to share it with me, how happy could
I be! Certainly she must have been
some six or seven years older than
myself, but 1 never was one to care
for your chits of school girls, who set
up for being women before they aie
out of their teens. Here was an an
gel who had been left desolate, who
had been cast on a bleak and unfeel
ing world, who had pined for a heart
and a home —fora heart that brim
med over with love. Gracious good
ness ! I had a heart that yearned to
ward her —that —that —
Why—eh —how was this? And
where was 1?
1 awoke with a shiver. But for the
lamp in the courtyard,the room would
have been quite dark. My head was
aching frightfully. I got up and
staggered to the window. When I
looked out and saw the familiar court
yard, everything came hack to me
like u flash of light. Where was mad
ame? Why had I slept so long?
What a bore she must take me to be!
I groped for the bell and rang it vio
lently. Up came the waiter with a
candle.
“Whore is madame? 1 1 demanded.
‘Madame/ he answered, ‘went out
nearly three hours ago, saying that
she wanted to make a few purchases,
and would bo back in a little while.
On no account, she said, was her
brother, who had suffered from vial
de mer in crossing, to bo disturbed.
Madame/ he added, ‘has not yet re
turned.’
‘Gone three hours ago! Her broth
er! Alai de mer! What could it all
mean? As I sat down utterly bewil
wered, my arm pressed against the
little box in my pocket. Mechanically
I glanced at my finger. The ring was
no longer there! My heart turned
sick within mo. I sank down and
buried my face in my hands. The
waiter thought I was ill, and ran to
fetch some cognac. I saw it all now.
Fool—fool that 1 was! I had allowed
myself to bo swindled, and by a com
mon adventuress.
At 9 o’clock next morning I stood
before my father, a miserable, hag
gard, woe begone wretch. I told my
tale, but as 1 did so 1 could not keep
down my tears—tears of shame and
vexation. He listened to me with a
curious cynical smile. When 1 had
done he went to his bureau and opened
a drawer.
‘Set your mind at rest, Ned/ ho
said. ‘Here is the ring, safe and
sound.’
I could only stare at him in open
mouthed astonishment.
‘When madame, with the ring in
her possession, left you asleep, she
was just in time to catch the boat
back to Dover. The ring was in my
hands again before 10 o’clock last
night.'
‘But —but,’ I stammered out; ‘1 don’t
understand. When she had once got
the ring in her possession, why did she
bring it back to you?’
‘Because she was paid to do so. Be
cause she was hired by me through
the agency of a private inquiry office
to act as she did aof. Madame by pro
fession is not a thief, hut a thief
; catcher. You had grown so solf-con
' ceited, of late, Master Ned, you had
go: such a mighty tall opinion of
yourself and your abilities, that I
thought it would do you no harm to
take you down a peg or two. I have
| succeeded in convincing you that
there are people in the world quite as
clever, or maybe clever, than a cer
tain young nincompoop of one and
I twenty. Jf you profit by the lesson
i my money will have been well spent.’
An hour or two later 1 said: ‘But
wasn’t it a rather risky tiling to do
with a ring worth tive hundred
pounds?’
My father winked at me with the
solemnity of a judge. ‘My dear Ned,
what do you take your old dad for?
the diamonds were nothing but paste.’
CHAPLAIN Met ABE’S BREAM OF IV
GKKSOLLVILLK.
Christian Advocate, New York.
“I had a dream which was not all a
dream. 1 thought I was on a iong jour
ney through a beautiful country, when
suddenly 1 came to a treat city with walls
fifteen feet high. At the gate stood a
sentinel, whose shining armor reflected
beck the rays of the morning sun. As I
was about to salute him and pass into the
city, he stopped me and said:
‘•Do you believe in the Lord Jesus
Christ?’’
I answered. "Yes. with all my
heart."
“Theu,” said he, “you cannot enter
here. No man or woman who acknowl
edges that name can pass in here. Stand
aside!” said he, “they are coming. ’
I looked down the road and saw a vast
multitude approaching. It was led by a
military officer.
“Who is that?” 1 asked of the senti
nel. i
“That,” he replied,’’ “is the great Col. I
Ingersoll, the founder of the City of In- j
gersollville.
“Who is he?” I ventured to inquire. !
“He is a great and mighty warrior,,
who fought iu many bloody battles lor
the Union during the great war.”
I felt ashamed of my ignorance of his-
and stood silently watching the pro- ;
cession. I had heard of a Col. Ingersoll,
who resigued in presence of the enemy, j
but, of course this could not be the man.
The procession came near enough for
me to recognize some of the faces. I 1
noted Wilbur Story oFthe Chicago Times.
A great wagon followed him, containing a
steam-press. Then came Charles A.
Dana, also followed by a pref-i
All the noted infidels and scoffers of
the country seemed to be there. Most
of them passed in unchallenged by the
sentinel, but at last a meek-looking indi
vidual with a white necktie approached,
and he was stopped. 1 saw at a glance
it was Frothingham.
“Do you believe in the Lord Jesus
Christ?” said the sentinel.
“Not much,” said Frothingham.
Everybody laughed, and he was allowed
to pass in.
There were artists there with glorious
pictures; singers with ravishing voices; ;
tragedians and comedians, whose names
have a world wide fame.
Then came another division of the infi
del host. Saloon-keepers by thousands, ■
proprietors of gambling hells, brothels. I
and theatres, all—all marching on.
I looked on, and high afloat above tho
mass was a banner on which was inscsibed,
“What has Christianity done for the
country?” and another on which was in
scribed, “Down with the Churches!
Away with Christianity—it interferes
with cur happiness!” And then came a
murmur of voices that grew louder and
louder until a shout went up like the
roar of Niagara: “Away with him!
Crucify him, crucify him!” I felt no de
sire to euter Ingersollville.
As the last of the procession entered, a
few men aud women with broad brimmed
hats and plain bonnets made their appear
ance, and wanted to go in as missionaries. 1
but they were turned rudely away. A
zealous young Methodist exhorter with a
Bible under his arm asked permission to
enter, but the sentinel swore at him aw- !
fully. Then I thought I saw Brother
Moody applying for admission, but he |
wasjrefused. 1 could not help smiling to j
hear Moody say as he turned away,
“Well, they let me live and work in
Ch : cago; it is very strange they wont let
me in logersollville.”
The sentinel went inside the gate and
shut it with a bang; and I thought, as
soon as it was closed, a mighty angel
came down with a great iron bar and bxr- j
red the gate on the outside, and wrote up- j
on it in letters of fire, “Doomed to live |
together six month* Then he went,
away and all was silent except the noise j
of the revelry and shouting that came j
from within the city walls.
I went away and as l journeyed:
through the land I could not believe my
eyes. Peace and plenty smiled every- 1
where. The jails were all empty, the j
penitentiaries were without occupants.
The police of great cities were idle.
Judges sat in court rooms with nothing
to do. Business was brisk. Many great
buildings, formerly crowded with crimin
als, were turned into manufacturing es
tablishments. Just about this time j
the President ot ,th e United States
called for a day of Thanksgiving.
I attended services in a Presby
terian church. The preacher dwelt upon
the changed condition of affairs. As he
went on, and depicted the great prosperity 1
that had come to the country, and gave
reasons for devout thanksgiving, I saw
one old deacon clap his handkerchief over
his mouth to keep from Bhouting right
out. An ancient spinster, who never did
like the Methodist —a regular old blue
stocking Presbyterian—couldn’t hold in.
She expressed the thought of every
heart by shouting with all her might,
“Glory to God for Ingersollville!” A
young theological student lifted up his
hand and devoutly added, “Esto perpe
tual Everybody smiled. The country
was almost delirous with joy. Great
processions of children swept along the
highways singing,
Then she lighted
We’ll not give up the Bible,
God’s blessed word of truth.
Vast assemblies of reformed inebriates,
with their wives and children, gathered
in the open air. No building would hold
them. I thought I was iu one meeting
where Bishop Simpson made an address,
and as he closed it a mighty shout went
up till the earth rang again. O, it was
wonderful! and then we all stood up and
sang with tears of joy,
All hail the power ot Jesus' name!
Let angels prostrate fall;
Bring forth the royal diadem.
And crown him Lord of all.
The six months had well-nigh gone. I
made my way back again to the gate of
Ingersollville. A dreadful silence reigned
over the city, broken only by the sharp
crack of a revolver now and then. I saw
a man busy trying to get in at the gate,
and I said to him, “My friend, where are
you from?”
“I live in Chicago,” said he, “and
they’ve taxed us to death there; and I’ve
heard of this "city, and I want to go in
to buy some real estate in this new and
growing place.”
He failed utterly to remove the bar,
but by some meens he got a ladder about
twelve feet long, and, with its aid, he
I climbed up upon the wall. With an eye
to business he shouted to the first person
he saw:
“Hallo, there!—what’s the price of real
estate in Ingersollville?”
“Nothing," shouted a voice, “you can
have all you want if you’ll just take it
and pay the taxes."
“What made your taxes so high?" said
the Chicago man. T noted the answer
carefully; I shall never forget it.
“We’ve had to build forty new jails
and fourteen penitentiaries—a lunatic asy
lum aud an orphan asylum in every ward;
we’ve had to disband the public schools,
and it takes all the revenue of the city to
keep up the police force.”
“Where’s my old friend Ingersoll?"
said the Chicago nan.
“0, he’s going about to day with a sub
scription paper to build a church. They
have gotten up a petition to send out for
a lot of preachers to come and hold revi
val services. 11 we can only get them
over the wall we hope there’s a future for
Ingersollville yet.”
The six months ended, lustcad ol
opening the door, however, a tunuel was
dug under the wall big enough for one
person to crawl through at a time. First
came two bankrupt editors, followed by
Col. Ingerso'l himself; aud then the whole
population crawled through. Then I
thought, somehow, great crowds of Chris
tians surrounded tfie city. There was
Moody, and Hammond, and Earle, and
hundreds of Methodists preachers and
txhorters, and they struck up, singing al
together,
‘Come, ye sinners, poor and needy.’
A needier crowd never was seen on
earth before.
I interviewed some of the inhabitants
of the abandoned city, and asked a few of
them this question:
“Do you believe in Hell?”
1 cannot record the answers; they were
terribly orthodox.
One old man said: ‘ I’ve been there
on probation for six months, and 1 don’t
want to join.”
I knew by that he was an old Metho
dist backslider. The sequel of it all was
a great revival that gathered in a mighty
harvest from the ruined city of Ingersoll
vilie.
“81-ttOSKS.”
How the ‘•Policy” Affects Northern
“Mudsills” and Confederate “Pa
triots” Who were Soldiers.
New York Tribune
\Ye ought to have, here and there, a
by-goue for the purpose of history. For
instance, we might as well have out the
fact that there has been a war; and with
out being invidious, that there were two
sides toil; aud without Ixing offensive,
that the side which icon is not the one to
ie Jor given. But at the rate Congress is
going on everything will be swept out
shortly, and nothing left but history.
The present door-keeper of the House
has conciliated himself to such an extent,
and forgiven and forgotten, and paased
his by gones to that degree that he scarce
ly knows which side triumphed. There's
a class of his employes made up of dis
abled soldiers, who are ou what is called
the “Soldiers’ Roll.” The object of this
classification was to furnish employment
to disabled Union soldiers. By way of
letting by .gones be bygones, the Union,
soldiers have been removed. To show
that he had forgiven everybody, and for
gotten that there were two sides in tl.*
war, Doorkeeper Polk appointed a Mr
Patton, who was a soldier for two years—
in the Confederate army. Then he ap
pointed a Mr. Dulin, who was never in
the army, but served in the navy, which
he entered four years after the war closed.
Then Mr. Holt, who was never in the
army at all, but had been in the State
militia, but finding his name on the sol
diers’ roll, drew his pay like a little major.
More instances might be cited, but these
are enough to show how zealous Mr.
Polk is in the great work of forgiving him
self and his friends, and forgetting which
side they fought on, aud sweeping by
gones out into the limbo. To the crippled
Union soldier whom he removi*, and to
whoever expostulates agaiust putting
Confederate soldiers on the pension
rolls, he says in his laige-hearted way,
“Let by gones be by gones.” With which
gush of sentiment he issues orders for
the removal of several other pensioners,
and puts members of his own famlies in
their places. No man ever buried the
past with such discrimination.
Meantime, the disabled Union soldier,
thrust out from the position a grateful
people *had given him for his serviojs in
putting’down rebellion, looks meditatively
on as the rebel soldier whom he had lately
met in arms steps smartly up to take his
place and pay. To him the muse of his
toryjturns a wondering face, and asks the
meaning of this sudden change. And the
worn soldier sadly answers, “1 dont pre
tend to understand it, but they call it let
ting by-gones be by-gones.”
THE TItAMP.
Same Facts for Those who Feed Him
Liberally.
R ck la'and Union,
It was nearly dark when a dusty tramp
who was canvassing at the hack doors of
people of good means, sat down on a cin
der heap in an alley, behind the residence
of one of our most charitable citizens, j
He was a healthy-looking, weather-beaten ;
young man. who looked as if, when hun- 1
gry, he could “eat a horse.” After sit- j
ting down, with his back resting against |
the fence, he produced a variety of eata
bles, such as bread and meat, bread and
butter, biscuit and cake of two or three '
kinds, from various pockets and from a
cloth. He made a nice selection and be
gan to eat slowly. Soon, however, he laid
down his victuals, and took some coin
from his pocket. He counted his change,
slung it carelessly back into his pocket,
and went on eating, readine a folded
newspaper as he did so, and evidently not
having the least idea that liis actions
were being watched. His appetite was
soon satisfied, and he then arose and went
in the direction of the heart of the city.
Seeing that he had left his stock of eata
bles behind him, the lady who had ten
watching him, not wishing that any one
should think she was so wickedly waste
ful as to throw good food away—for the
eatables were left close by the garden
gate—was about to take steps to have
them removed, when her attention was
thwarted by two new comers. These
were a decent looking woman and her
young daughter, the wilo and child of a
man who has kept up self-respecting ap
pearances throughout the hard times, but
who *has been able to get little or no
work, and yet has not been compiled
to ask for relief. She saw the furtive
glance around,to see if eyes were watching,
the nimble hands which pioked up the
food and stowed it in a corner of the scan
ty shawl, and the rapid stops which left
for home with the prize.
The man who would Rhut up his
shop, says the London Mail, to save
his expenses, when business was
slack, would bo accounted a fool, and
yet he could hardly damage his repu
tation more than the advertiser who,
for similar reasons, withdraws his an
nouncements. The people who read
the papers in dull times are those who
buy yvhen trade revives, and he who
will get most of their custom is the
man who has kept his name well bo
fore them when their attention was
unoccupied;
MEDICAL.
VEGETINE
KOR
CHILLS. SHAKES.
FEVER AND ACUE.
Takboho, N. C., 1878
i)K. 11. U. n-KVKNs;
lJMrSir,—l feel very grateful for what jmir
valuable medicine, VeKetuie, lias done in my
fatnilv. I wish to express my thanks by in
forming you of tne wonderful cure of inv -ton;
also, to let you know that Vegetlue is the je-t
medicine I ever saw for ( hillx. Shale*. Ftrer
and Ague. My son was sick with measles in
1873, which left him with Hip-joint disease. My
eon suffered a great deal of pain, all ot the tune;
the pain was so great he uid nothing but cry.
The doctors did not help him a particle, lie
could not lift bis foot from the floor, he could
not move wthout crutches. 1 read your adver
tisement in the “Louisville Courier-Jounml,"
that Vegetine was a great Blood Puritierand
Blood Food. I tried one bottle which was a
great benefit. He kept on with the medicine,
gradually gaining. He has taken eighteen bot
tles in all, and he Is completely restored to
health, walkes without crutches or cane, lie
is twenty years of age. I have a younger son,
fifteen years of age. who is subject to Chill*.
whenever he feels one coming on, he conn s in.
takes a dose of Vegetine and that is the last of
the chill. Vegetine leaves no bad effect upon
the system like most of the medicines rcoom
mended for chills. I cheerfully recommend
Vegetloe for such complaints. 1 think it is the
greatest medicine in the world.
Kespectfully. MKS. J. W. LLOYI).
VgGETiNE.—When the blood becomes lifeless
ami stagnant, either from change of weather or
of climate, want of exercise, irregular diet, or
from any other cause, the Vegktine will renew
the blood, carry off the putrid humors, cUan.-e
the stomach, regulate the bowels, and impart a
tone of vigor to the whole body.
VEGETINE
FOR
DYSPEPSIA. NERVOUSNESS,
And General Debility.
Beknardkton. Mass., i*7--.
We, the undersigntid, having used Vegetine,
take pleasure in recommending it to all’hose
troubled with Humor * of any kind, Du*t» i*ia,
Xtrvtjwme** or General DeMUly, it 1 icing the
Great Blood Purifier, sold by It. L. Orov/ellA-
Sous, who sell more of it than all other patent
medicine put together.
Mlts. L. F, PEIIKISS,
MBS. 11. \V. SCOTT.
JOSEPHUS SLATE.
Vegetine is the great health restorer—com
posed dxclusively of harks, root# and herbs. It
i-i very pleasant to take; every child likes t.
VEGETINE
FOB
NERVOUS HEADACHE
And Rheumatism.
CINCINNATI. 0., April 9, 1817.
H. tt. STEVENS, Ewj.:-
Dear Sir,—l have used your VEGETINE for
Xervowi HewUchf, and also for RheumaUmn.
and have found entire relief from lioth, and
take great pleasure in reeoinmendlng it to all
who may be likewise afflicted.
FEED A. GOOD.
108 Mill St., (’lnn.
VEGETINE has restored thousands to health
who had been long and.painful sufferers.
VEGETINE
Druggists* Testimony.
MR. 11. It. STEVENS:
Dear Sir,— We have been selling your reme
dy, the Vegetine. lor about three years, and
take pleasure in recommending it to our custo
mers. and in no instance where a blood p jrilier
would reach the case, lias it ever failed to effeet
a cure, to our knowledge. It certainly is the
ne /An* ultra of renovators.
Respectfully.
E. M. SHEPHEIH) A Druuyi*tt.
Mt, Vemon, 111.
Is acknowledged by all classes of people to la
the best and most reliable blood purifier in the
world.
VEGETINE
Prepared by
H. R. STEVENS,iBoston Mass.
Vegetine is sold by All
Druggists.
187*—REAL ESTATE AGENCY-1878
W. TENNANT
DEALER IN
Beal Estate,
Property Bought and Sold,
City property traded tor Improved
or Wild Lands in lowa or Kansas.
ALSO
Agent for the Sale of the
nsot WEH t SUITE FEE
R. lands in Southwest Kans
Splendid land and soil from $2.00
to SB.OO an acre, on II years time
Climate delightful, and thousands
moviug there this season.
Kxoursions from Oskaloosa every
month,
Next Excursion, 10th and
24th of April, to KIN SLY
S. W. KANSAS. ROUND
TRIP TICKET, 30 Days
$23.50,
Call for circulars, maps of Kansas
and full information as to Routes,
Freights, Tickets, Ac.,
JLosc no time to secure a
good cheap home.
ALSO DEALER IN
FIRST CLASS PIANOS,
Taylor & Farley andjother Or
gans at HARD TIMES Prices.
Good stock or notes taken in ex
change. Every instrument warrant
ed by Manufacturers. All business
promptly attended to and
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
P. S. A few Organs for rent.
Office Rooms, Remington Head
(piaaters. West High Street,
OSKALOOSA, IOWA.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
REMOVAL
GEO. P ROWELL * CO’S
News|iaptr iMsi){ Du,
From N. Y . Timer- Building to No. 10 Spruce st
Oi-positk the Tribune Bi n. »isu.
NEW YORK.
st ihe
nrnrrpT is recommended by the Agricultural
tnrivl press, mid used by thousands of the
DIITTC D very beet dairymen. It gives ft perfect
DUIII n j une color, and la a» harmless as salt. A
>ni not 85 cent Imttle color* 3<JO |<oundr*. and
rULUn. adds 5 cents per pound to its value.
Ask your druggist or merchant for it or send lor
descriptive circulars.
RKIJA, RICHARIINOK A CO., Frnpr t»,
BURLINGTON, VT.
Uf a VT/Ywl Retail price. $9 *> only
X AAA fhirlor Organ*, price f34<-
only $95. Paper free, Daniel F. Beatty-
Washington- N. J.
Rltrd I'arrti with name. 10c. Agts
Tfc%J out fftlOc. L. JONES A CO. Nassua.
N. Y.
SWEET mssm NAVY
Chewing Tobacco
Awarded higkrnt prim M Cwiteootal *
/if chewing qwlUU* and txfditnc a*>d
•uttr of mmeent„g mud Jkt*ori»y. 7b, Im»«.tobuiri,
r.rr matte. A» our blue atrip trude-mark •• eloaaly
Imitated on Inferior rood*. #aa that J'i *»«’• Mm* la
oa «»er» plug. Sold by all dealer.. He rd for aarol-l.
(me. ti c: A Jacxao.N A Co.. Mfrt.. Patarabtug, Va.
THE “WHITE”
Sewing Machine ia the easiest telling in the
inurket. it ha* a very large aliuttle; makes
the lock-stitch; ia simple in construction; very
light-running, ami almost noise eas. it is al
most impossible fOr other machines to sell in
direct competition with the Whitk. Agents
Wanted. Apply for terms to White stewing
Machine Cs., Cleveland, «*.
V/YTTWfI YUTffXJ Learn Telegraphy, and
iUUrIU M&JN earn from »*•> to *IOO
a month. Small salary while learning. Situa
tions furnished. Address at onoc R. VALEN
TINS. Manager, Janesville, Wts.
Q*r Fancy Cards, Snowflake, Dtonask. etc., 110
JmO i alike, with name, 10*. Ntasau Card Co.,
Nassau, N. Y.
QA MIXED CARDS, with natn*, 10 coats, pool
OU paid. Sample* 3 ceota. J. Minkier A Co.,
NMaua. V V.
ESTABLISHED 1850.
PHYSICIAN
W. M. WELLS,
CATARRH,
Throat and Lung Physician.
•BPECIA LisT FOH CHRONIC DISEASE* C I \-
EKALLY.
Office in Phumix Block, South side public square,
over Abraham A McKinley’s store.
All who are afflicted are invited to rail for a
FREE CONSULTATION. I will not undertake
a case unless I feel satisfied that I cmii u-i \ e re
lief.
Having made Chronic Diseases a epc lal
study for 2" years and having practiced more
or less duriiiK that time, andean give reliable ref
erence as there are to be had as to what I h tvt
done. Those who cannot call personally can
consult by letter. i,3l
FOUNDRY.
w. c. Jommaom. BSait
Johnson & Collins
PROPRIETORS OF
NOVELTY IRON MS
Light Casting a Specialty.
All \\ ork Finished or .Japanned anti made
to give as good Satisfaction as
Work Manufactured Hast.
All knuts of stovt* i <*p;iii iii*r tloiir.
OSKALOOSA, IOWA
n 4
PLUMBING.
Oskaloosa Gas Light Go.
Are prepared to do all kinds of Plumbing
Stetim him! (in* Fitting ai*o koep an a««ortruon
of
Steam ! Water Pipe
and
Cas Fittings,
Bath Tubs. Iron Sinks, Iron Pumps, etc.
Office West High St., McCall Block.
BAKERY and RESTAURANT.
NEW PROCESS
UNION BAKERY,
you can purchase
BREAD, BETTER FLAVORED,
keep longer moist, than bread made after
the old process, try and be convinced, we
work no sponge,
USE THE BEST MATERIAL in
MARKET.
5 and 10 cent loaves of bread delivere
to all oarts of the citv.
MOT COFFEE, LUNCH, WARM
MEALS, OYSTER STEWS.
FRESH OYSTERS
constantly ou hand.
„ , J. . McNEILAN,
.Market street, adjoining .Mayor’* ottlci
GROCERY AND BAKERY.
Persons Who Love
Tho very U-st bread, pies, calcs, mil-, etc., will
do well t«. call mi
“MARTY" THE BAKER
-South-east corner square, where you wil tl
wnystlnd everything desirable in the
way of all goods kept In h
tirst-class Ba
kerv.
I also have a full line ot
STAPLE AND FANCY
Groceries of all kinds.
VEGETABLES
in their -eason.
CHOICE FRUITS
at all times
CANDY AND CIGARS.
Wliifli f soli as low as (he lowest
CALL
and sec me at the South-east corner <>f
square.
1 W. MARTINSTEIN,
2 MANAGER. *
DRUGS.
WILLIAM BEARDSLEY.
niU'GGISTJ
Beacon lowa.
Drugs, Patent Medicines, Paints
Varnfahee.Glass. Putty, Dye Stuffs, and Toilet
Goods.
School Books, Stationery.
Soda Water, Mineral Waters, t ho»
Cigars, and a small quantityfof everythin
kept in the Largest Drug Stores.
TEKM9 being CASH and expenses light. DiS
COUNTSon A V EH AGE PRICES are guaranteed
on all sale*. Prescriptions and receipts care
fully filled at ALL HOUHB.
WILLIAM BEARDBI.EY,
BEACON - * IOWA
STOV ES and HA RD WA RK.
R. J. SUITE a CO.
No. 8, Centennial Block, North Side of Square
Respectfully tender their thanks to the pub
lic tor the liberal patronage bestowed upon
their house in the past, and take pleasure in
calling attention to their enlarged stock of
llnt-d w are, Htove*,
Tin, Sheet Iron, and Hollow-ware,
Fresh additions to which arc being made week
ly. In the variety, beauty and
durability of the
COOK and HEATING STOVES,
(For either coal or wood).
They have long excelled, and their stock ha
never been so large and complete as during the
present year. For the sole ot the unrivalled
CHARTER OAK. STOVES and
Wrn. Resor’s Celebrated Monitor Cook
A J - I > *!=» A ZEB,
Vhey are the manufacturer's exclusive agent
for this part of lowa.
Ranges, for Hotel use. Healing Staves of the lar
gest Patternk for Churches, Hall* and School
liuihlingt, always iu Stock; also elegant
styles of Healers for Parlors, Sitting
Rooms. Sleeping Rooms, ami
Small Apartments.
Clothes-wringer s repaired.
Old Kubber Rolls re-set, and new rolls fur
nished and put on.
Evjry taste can t»e suited, at prices within
the reach of all. Examine their immense stock
before purchasing. Have the sole proprietor
ship of the
MODEL BAKER
for Mahaska county: tho most perfect dcvicc
for baking purposes ever placed before the
public.
O O
Promising to use every endeavor to meet
the wishes of all who utay visit their ostab
lishment, the ttrm hope for a continuance and
even Increase of the flattering patronage of
wulch they are the recipients.
Very Respectfully,
N. J SMITH A CO.
Oskaloosa, J»n. St, 18T7. 22
at the
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald,
Published every * burs. Jay by
LEIGHTON. LEE & LEIGHTON,
II.C. LEIOHTON, Oru. K. LI.K, W. M. I.EIOIITON
Steam Printers,
IS THE
Largest County Paper
IN IOWA
Offloe in “Herald Block” over Post Office
Terms—s2.oo a Year in Advance.
MISCELLANEOUS.
II 1 11 || I r .12 Have itook.
Maternity musi, ivv”'wtaa:
J J M. D. Sent post
paid tor B coat*. Oskaloosa, lowa.
FOR SALE.
One business lot, 20x120, on Main street up
posite Herald Block occupied by oamt-shop.
One business lot, 20x»i(i, on Mai -et street, on
first allev south of s<|uare. rail on
24 T. LEIOHTON.
COKE! COKE!!
For sale at »; cents j>er bushel delivere
Leave orders at office of Gas Company for this
economical fuel for your oook-stoves.
42 D. \V. HUNT. Sec’y
AUCTIONEER.
Tae undersigned announces to the public that
be offers his services to Mahaska and and ad
joining counties as Auctioneer. Office with O.
C. G. Phillips, Ookaloosa. lowa.
2Sm3pd K. I). Stratton.
Boarders Wanted.
Mrs. J. N. Cooper wants two good boarders,
i .<><*! t-mrding given at reasonable rates. Call
at her residence, two blocks south and one east
of the square. tfOw':
WOOD WANTED.
loot ords of good seasoned shell I >ark Hickory.
Ouk and Hacklicrry wood wanted at tho Wood
Yard. Oskaloasa. Also alsnit 10 oords of dry,
soft wood. For.which I will pay CASH on
delivery.
[ 29ml WRIGHT
PHH 4 V kMt. Ay» nts wanted. Uu»l
ness legitimate. Purticulirsfree.
WOBTHSCO .81 I.A U..
AAC PREMIUM WATCH A.MI CHAIN-*
w!nder.Frec w ithevcryoider. Out
“ ■sPnt J. It. Ciuvlord 4 Co., Chicago, Hi.
A PHYSIOLOGICAL
View of Marriage I
Wedlock and
K T I all.’.rta . g<-.jnrt<l.:ijt«l on (hr
un.l tn»-
ui.flt 1.,r it; the «•-
-infix''!, ”*cret* ot Reproduction and
Diseases of Women
I T I 1.1 •] V V J J A book lor private, con,id
ftliUduU9J“£ reaJ> "*
PRIVATE MEDICAL ADVISER
,»n all di.orilcr. ol a Private Nature ar..u:* irom Self
Abuse, Excesses, or Secret Discuses, »itu U»c b.»i
mtana of cure, JG:4 lar/c pace,, price M eta.
A CLINICAL LECTURE.... the above diaeaara and
ihoae of the Throatand Lungs, Calorrh.RuDture the
Opium Habit,Ac., pri- e 10 <•(,.
Lilherbook sent postpaid nn receipt ot price; or all three,
oontsininit 500]>«?•>», beautifully illustrated, tor 73 eta.
Andrew SB. BUTTS, No. Li N. sth St. St. Louie. Mo
AfafiOLD PLATED WATI'B KM. Cheapest
wk win the known world. Satnpit Waic\ Fret to
VDVAgente. Address. AaCoCLraa * Co., Chicago.
NO BUSINESS
PAYS AS WZlala!
Aa Borina Wells with the Tiffin Well Boring
and Rock Drilling Machine. The Labot i>
ail done bv horse power. S2B tos3o per da>
easily made. Send for Book, Ac., free
LOOMIS 8 NYHAN, Tiffin, O.
AGENTS
“TELL IT ALL,”
Is the start ling experience and true history
of wotnaus life in polygamy. by the wife of a
Woi-iuoii High-Priest. This Itook contains the
Lite, TBIAL. Conviction. CONFESSION and
Execution, of the Mormon Bishop, JOHN M.
LEE. It contains also, the “True M«*r> ol
KII/r Ann,” BBICIIAM VOUNG’s l'fth Wife,
splemlldl) Illustrated. Only $-‘I.OO. a
rare chmia- for Auente. Sells on Sight. Write
at once for terms and circulars,
J. H. f'HAMBKRa A CO.,
u ilti St. Lons. Mt>.
AGENTS
wanted to sell a new and interesting
Life of Pope Pius IX.
The inoat popular I took ever pubiislied. It is
highly recommended by both clergy and Press,
end contains not only tlie LIFE end DEATH ot
POPE PICS IX, but also /lioynqjiy of POPE
LEO XIII, handsomely illustrated. Territory
free. Write at once for terms to
Anchor Publishing Co.,
:;ltf -'P»S Locu*t .street. St. Louis, Mo.
s \LE.
Notice is hereby given tliat by virtue ol a
special execution directed to me from the office
of the clerk of the circuit court ol Mahasku
county. lowa, and dated March 2Ltb, A. D.
ISTH, I have levied upon and will offer at sher
iff’s sale to the highest bidder for cash in hand,
at the door of the house in which the lust district
court wa« held in Oskaloosa, in said county,
on Saturday the Uh day of May, A. D. I*7B, at
the hour of I:3b o'clock, p. in., the following: de
scribed real estate In -aid county, to-wlt:
Lot No. nine (9) in block No. two (2; in the
town of Leighton.
Taken as the property of James It. Johnson
to satisfy the above mentioned execution iu
favor of w.. 1. Reaves and against Jame* It.
Johnson.
MARQUIS BABB
.Sheriff Mahaska Co. lowa.
by.J. It. BAKU. Dep. 31
S SALE.
Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of a
s|M*ciai execution directed to me from the olßce
of the clerk of the circuit court Of Mahasku
county, lowa, and dated March •L",. A. D,
1-7*. I have levied unon and will offer at Sher
iff's sale to the highest bidder for cash in hand,
at the door of the house in which the last dis
trict court was held in Oskaloosa. in said count).
on Saturday the Ith day of May, A. D. IST*,
at the hour of 2:30 o’clock, p. m.. the following
described real estate in said county, to-wit:
l,ot three (3i Drake’s sulnlivision of Normal
school lot-Oskaloosa, lowa.
Taken ns the property of B. Block to satisf y
the above mentioned execution in favor of I
W. Walton and against B. Block.
Marquis Bark,
Sheriff Mah"ska Co,. lowa.
31 J. K. Baku. Deputy
OHEKIFF's SALE.
Notice is hereby given that by virtue of a gen
eral execution directed to me from the office <*t
theclerk of the district court of Monroe eountv.
lowa, and dated March 22, A. D. 1 STB, I have
levied upon and will offer at sheriff's sale to the
highest bidder for cash in hand, at the door of
the house in which the last district court wa» held
in Oskaloosa. in said county, on Saiurda). the
4tli day of Ma) - , A. D. I*?*, at the hour of
o’clock p. m., the followingdescribt d real estate
in Mahasku county, to-wit:
All the right title interest and churn whatso
ever of Mrs. Mary A. Long, in and to the north
half and the south-east quarter of the north
west quarter of section 22 township 74 north ot
range 17 west.
Taken as the property of Mrs. Mary A. l-on*
to satisfy the above mentioned execution iu la
vor of B. F. Elbert, Cashier of Ist National
Bank of Albia. lowa, and against Nelson Cone
and Mrs. Mary A. Long.
MAHOI'IS BARE,
sheriff Mahaska county lowa.
31 By J. R. Barr, deputy.
SHERIFF’S SALK.
Notice is hereby given tliat by virtue ol a
special execution directed to me from the
office of the clerk of the circuit court of Maha--
ka county. lowa, and dated March 27>. A. D.,
ls« 8, 1 have levied upon and will offer at Sher
iff's sale to the highest bidder for cash in hand.
; at the door of the house in which the last dis
trict court was held in Oskaloosa. in said coun
ty, on Satuntay. the 4th day of May, A. D..
i 1878, ai the hour of 2:30 o’clock, p. m., the fol
! lowing <lewribed r*?al estate in said county to
. I Wit:
I j The south ten acre* of the south half of tho
. j south-east quarter of section thirty-six. town
• ship seventy-live, north range si.xtien wcst.de
scribed as follows: Commencing at the south
east corner of section 3»! running thence north tib
1 rod*, thence west 180 rods, thence south ou rods
| thence east IGO rods to place of beginning.
' 1 Taken as the property of Josi&b Emmons and
I Cyrcnius Emmons to satisfy the above mention
-1 tionod execution in favor of Alexander Mcßride
; and against Josiuh Emmons and Cyrcnius F.tu-
I mens.
Marquis Barr.
Mahasha county. lowa.
J. It. Baku, Deputy. 31
J \ RTICLEB OF INCORPORATION.
1 Amended articles of Iruorp>nntioH of the
Hrrelnior Cmil t\>ini*inu-
At a meeting held iu Oskaloosa. lowa. March
13th. I*7B, by written consent of stockholders
of the Excelsior Coal Company the following
articles of Incorporation were amended to read
as follows:
ARTICLE 111
The capital stock of this compam shali bu
limitisl to thirtr thousan<l dollars ,30,'uSD) and be
divided into shares of oat hundred dollars each.
The indebtedness of the company shall never
exceed one-thlnl the amount of capital stock.
ARTICLE X.
This corporation shall have the optiou to pur
chase any stock of said company at same price
e for nintey day* after the same is offered for sale,
information of said option shall be at once
be given to the board of directors. No person
shall hold the office of director in said coal com
pany unless he is a ”bonaffde” owner of live
'hares of said stock. No person shall beadirec
or in >aid board, who D a director or officer in
i ny other «x>al company in lowa.
29w4 11. C. Rockwell, Secretary.
i —i i
ST( >CK KOK HALTi.
FINE STOCK!
I have for sale on reasonable terms, a lot of
POLAND CHINA HOGS
r ’’ 'Vi ijiAisiT "* ii ‘
OF PURE BLOOD.
Also
THOROUGH-BRED SHORT HORN
SBULL CALVES.
Also a line lot of
„ DARK BRAHHA CHICKENS
nd ABl) BOGS FOB HATCHING.
Ol j
I tall and see me at store on north west cornet
' or at farm l mile south of town, where the
stock is kept.
M. WILSON.

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