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The Weekly Oskaloosa herald. [volume] (Oskaloosa, Iowa) 1855-1885, April 25, 1878, Image 1

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The Weeelt Oskaloosa Herald
la by far the
Best Advertising Mein
in Ofrkaloosa, having
2000 Circulation,
.-nost of tv.iieh jaro to persons in Mahaska
county. Our facilities for
Book and Job Work
Are as complete as othoe in the State. All
the new styles of type ami
four lob presses.
ATTORN E YS- AT-L A W.
JAMES A. KICK.
ATTORN E V-AT-I.A W,
Mayor’s Office. nsitf
AP. HITTENHOUSE.
• Attorney at Law.
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office up stairs in Union
block. North side public square. l&nittpd
\tT»t KENNEDY.
V> ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Prompt attention given to collections. Office
(> vei Mitch Wilson’s store. t>so
U?M. P. HKLLINUS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
and Notary Public; collecting and Real Estate
agent. Office in oh! savings haul, on High St.,
Oskaloosa, lowa.
1 >OBFRT kISSICK,
i V ATTORNEY AT LAW,
aud Notary Public. Oskaloosa, lowa. Office
iu Centennial Uloek, over Franker* Clothing
Store, north side square. Will give special
attention to collections, probate business, and
conveyancing. Practice in all the courts of
l tie Stale. 8
F. MARK,
ATTORNEY AT LA W and NOTARY PUBLIC,
and Collecting Agent. Office Exchange block,
over W. 11. Shaw Jt Co’s store, Oskaloasa. lowa.
nil
\%T R. LACEY,
» . ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office with John F. Lacey, above Boyer &
llarnes’ store, Oskaloosa, lowa. All kinds ol
i<*gal business promptly done. Collections made
i nd soorej mmlh done.
IV RON V. SUVEBS. JOHN O. MAECOEII.
*JKEVERS A MALCOLM.
O ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office over Frankel’s new
‘iauk,.tiorth side of square. 3d
I OHN A. HOFFMAN,
ATTORNEY - AT - LAW,
»nd Nota. v Cublic, over Levi's store, south-west
orner pc do square, Oskaloosa, lowa. 42
E. <l. HOLE. H. Hit.LIS.
I I OLE & HILLIS,
I l ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Prompt at ntion given to
collections. Probate business and convey
ancing carefully attended to. Office, up-stairs.
Union block, north side square. Oskaloosa,
lowa. 39
Holton a mcOoy,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office in Savings Rank block,
over Briggs’ drug store. Business attended to
in all the courts of the State. Conveyancing
c o.iecting promptly attended to. 29
l' W. RICK,
111. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Aud solicitor of American r.nd European pat
•uts. Office No. 1420 F. street, near treasury
budding, Washington, I>. C. Practice in the Su
preme court of the Uni’AMl States, Court of
Claims, Courts of the District of Columbia.
Business before any of the Executive Depart
meuts of the Government promptly attended to.
Patents obtained in Washington, Loudon, Paris,
Brussels, Vienna, and St. Petersburgh. 33
IOHN F. LACEY.
9 ATTORNEY AT LAW. *
nd Government Claim Agent, office in Boyer
* Barnes’ block, Oskaloosa, lowa. Prompt
mention given to collections. Probate business
fill receive careful attention. Business attend
'd to iu the C. S. and State courts. 19
fk C. G. PHILLIPS,
(/. ATTORNEY AT LAW, j
killed mg. Insurance, and Real Estate Agent,
Oskaloosa, lowa. Office over I.C.Green A Son’s
boot and shoe store, south side square. 16
IRA J. ALDER.
1 ATTORNEY AT LAW,
lowa City, lowa. Successor to Judge W. E.
Miller. 16
110. w. LAfg.tr. i. BHi i.v Johnson
I AFFF.RTV A JOHNSON,
1 i ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
. iskaloosa, lowa. Office over Mitch Wilson’s
stme, north-west coraerol square. 47
ME. CtTTs,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Savings Bank Block, up-stairs, north - i
west ouraet public square. 21.
I. A. L. CCUKKBAM. H. W. QUUSOa.
i tROOKIUMJt GLEASON,
Ky ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office live National State bank. Oskaloosa U.*»
C. F. Ksovlton. - 11. L. Thatcher,
.W*w Sharon. Oskaloosa.
Know, ton a thatch eb. \i
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Notaries Public, and Ileal Estate Agents, at
Oskaloosi and New Sharon. Will pay taxes,
make eoleetions, and attend to legal business
in all tbeeourts of the state. Office over Ver
non’s stov in Exchange hli»ck, Oskaloosa. and
in Bank ilock. New Aharon. 22w1. j
JUSTICE OP THB PEACE. a
I M. HIATT,
♦J. JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, New Sharon
lowa. Special attention paid to the collection
of clam* and buying and selling real estate. 44
PHTSICIANSaad SUBG E< )NsT
QKS. (gAJIWff
Areriw permanently located in Oskaloosa,
L wa, tir the treatment of Cancer, Scrofula, i
Fever Sires, Piles, Tetter. Rheumatism and all
chronic disease. Office on the North side -
of squre, in Union block, where one of us £
wIL beound at all times during office hours. e
which re from 10 to 12 a. in., and from 1 to 3 .
p. m. 'roiu past experience we llatter our- ;
selves tail we sliall beable to give satisfaction ?
to such is may place themselve' under our <-are. ?
We restßctfully solicit those who arc afflicted r
to give is a call. Consultation free For fur- ;
ther patfculars send stamp for circular. J
nisniC
UK. V PAKDCN,
MAGNETIC HEALER. “
hi < offlot at his residence three blocks directly 7
south otPost-office, is prepared to treat all dis- f
eases exept deafness, with general satisfac- ?
lion. Trins. $S per month. He will always be u
found a«bome. 16
Okt. JU. BARRINGER, l
PHYSICIAN AND BUKGE3N. ~ r
Office on west side public square. Resi
lience oi west Higi street, one block west of ;
square, ipgtfnn McCall’s Block, 41* •
t. l. ooanK. ■. o. j. w. M. HAWKS, M. I*. S
/ tOFFII & HAWES, IIOM<EPATHI<: \
V > PHYSCIANS AND SURGEONS. :
'Sucoessrs to Dr. Lucy.) s
special attentioofiven to diseases of women
and children, also o Electric Magnetic treat- i
men for Neuralgia Rheumatism, Chorea, Paral- 7
ysis. Epilepsy, diaenes of the lungs, Ac. t
Night and countr calls promptly attende<l.
Office North side ofsquare over B. F. Shields A
4,o’s Grocery Store, Iskaloosa, lowa. 46tf
| TENS’AM j“
Office Herald bloc. Main street, Oskaloosa,
lowa. Dr. TeiinauCan be consulted |*-rs*mal
iy <»r by letter uponill chronic diseases, or of a
ant Mtsn. haw, nts. ■srofala.giarsL
dropsy, piles, ear art eye, nasal catarrh, paral
ysis, blood dlseasesjiseiws of the nervous sys
tem, consumption, and diseases of a private
ii.it i j re. ■ueowwfuUitrorttJ. Coot unleaUoni
by letter strictly cofldential. Best of city mid
country rtjlercnoea.ind testimonials can tie fur
nished. Send for crcular.
Oskaloosa. March®. 1«77. n3l
I t SCOTT. If. D.
19. offi<a- in W. H Nugent’s drug store <\ here
he may be found at II hours both day and night
when not professinally engaged. Diseases
or WOMXN AM; Cfll.bKKN M AI»K A SPKi'l AI.TV.
v25n!4-
|)U. E. STAFFOIO
Will devote his ertre attention tothe prac
tice of medicine, kiy be found at his residence
drst iloor north of k-th«*dist church, north of
public stjuare.or atiitford a drug store, west
High street. 35
nA. HOFFMAN
. PH SICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office in KhineharF new building, south-west
3orner public squat. Oskaloosa, lowa. Resi
dence on Main strec. three blocks east of pub
ic square. 21
PIETISTS.
I vR. M. L. JACKSff,
19 suite EON DENTIST.
Office in Exchange
HmL on High street,
Oskaloosa. lowa, over
-- - • .
wSgiSkx&SJf n. i. -• o 11,- ' t
traction ol teeth.
ABS'KACTS.
ABSTRACTS
Of Titles to Laris and Town Lots,
of Mahaska countv. finished on short notice
and on reasonable tens, by
R. DUMOIT & CO.
Office in L Frankel AT Jo’s building, on eth
west side of the public fuare, Oskaloosa, lowa
Abstractoiof Titles,
1 have two commplete Us of hooks contain
ing titles to all the Lands H Town Lots in Ma
i..,ii. county, carefully «en up from the re
cords and compared, and Ic two sets compared
with each other.no that tin must he as near
iNTtef t u aui be uitde. funiUlHHi
on reajftonjtble Utirh. A ll* titW.*# piffwlw
ttfiitt.ll oom|K*natttujffis
Money to Loan t 8 per cent.
Annual Intrest.
C. P. SEAtLE,
2d door west of National u te Rank
lOMEI l« UNI
Wr ran furnish money on al applications
within 15 days,
WOODY k HELUGS.
Office, Old Savings Uik. 3t
; , _ ... ,
VOL. 28. NUMBER 24.
REAL ESTATEAGENCY.
John F. Lacey's
LAND AGENCY.
I have on my books a large number of
farms and houses in town. Also many thous
-1 and acres of wildland. If you have real estate
1 to sell or wish to buy, give me a call. 1 pay
taxes in any part of the State. Conveyancing
done. Office in Boyer A Barnes’ block,Oskaloo
sa lowa. 10
100 nice building lots in Lacey’s addition to
Oskaloosa.
HIDE HOUSE.
CHICAGO HIDE
HOUSE
Will pay the highest pnee lor
Hides, Pelts,
TalloWtGrease
and bead Hogs.
OFFICE A. WAREROOM,
One half block east of square. Call on us be
fore you sell.
ncyl CECNEW BROS. & CO.
GHIST MILLS.
EUREKA MILLS.
Beacon, lowa.
1 have thoroughly retltted the above mills at
Beacon, putting in new machinery and repair
ing old until second to none in the country, and
they are now running again. I have had 35
years experience in the business, and think I
thoroughly understand it, and propose to do
GOOD WORK ONLY,
treating my customers fairly, aud giving them
good FLOUR. Give me a trial.
52 J. M. JONES.
FURNITURE.
Miller & Harbach,
Manufacturers and dealers in
FURNITURE
of all kinds.
Wooden and Metallic
Burial Cases and Caskets
constantly on hand.
UNDERTAKING DONE.
East room “Herald Block.”
M BBCHANT TAILORIN’(jj.
AGAIN AT WORK.
Thanking my many friends and custom
ers for tneir patronage in the past,
1 desire to inform them
tiiat I am now
established
iu tlie room formerly
occupied by Frankel, Bach
& Co., as a bank, where I will carry
on the
lERRHANT TAILORING :
I
BUSINESS
I
in all Branches.
1 have a splendid line
CLOTHS,
CASIMERES,
BEAVERS, J
and all goods used in making gentlemen’s * t
garments.
I GUARANTEE PERFECT FITS.
Call and see me. *
T. WILLIAMS. „ <
A lfoiliTECTSand BUILHKitsl ~
K W '
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2 o 2 P 2 T*
C ’”*s cc fl
2. * S-t- ,
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LUMBER YARDS.
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■ i>> ...'• • « Mfe; ,
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald.
OMNIBUS LINE.
Best of rigs ntjrcasonable rates; and ’busses to
all trains.
LOAN AGENCIES.
W. Qurnsme,
Land *** d Loan Aaent,
Oskaloosa, lowa.
MONEY AT 8 PER
CENT.
ON
FARM IVIORTCACES,
In Sums Not I.erM Than SSOO
F. M. DAVENPORT.
Oskaloosa, lowa. l-l
John W.Wikhiy. \V. P.Hki.i.inus,
Attorney.
WOODY k HELLINGS,
Abstracters of Titles,
Real Estate and Insurance
Agents,
< Ibkaloosa, lowa.
MONEY TO LOAN.
We buy and sell real estate on commission,
pay axes, and take care of property of non
residents, make collections, negotiate loans,
make investments. e<>ll<a-t reiits, furnish ab
stracts of title, having a complete set of ate
-tracts of title to all the land und town lots of
Mahaska County, give Information and trans
act a general land agency business. Correspon
dence solicited, and charges reasonable. Apply
to or address
Woody &Hellings,
Office In old Savings Bank, Oskaloosa, low?
80
BANKING.
F. Ci.akk, l’res. W, A. Lindi.v, Cash.
M. E. Cutis. Vice Pres. P. E.Ci.akk, Asst. Cash
Mahaska Co. Havings Bank.
General Banking business transacted.
New Fire-proof Building, N-W cor square.
Savings Deposits Received
on the billowing terms:
Each depositor will be furnished with a hook.
Deposits may be made ii> sums of one dollar
and upwards. Interest will be allowed al 6 per
cent, per annum op Hie tirst of January and
July, on all sums not previously withdrawn.
Deposits made on the tirst of the month will
begin todraw interest from the time thedeposit
is made.
Deposits made after the tirst day of the month
will not commence to draw interest till the first
of the next month.
Banking House
—<> t-
Frankel, Each & Co.
Will receive deposits and transact a general
banking, exchange und collection business, the
same as an incorporated hunk.
Interest allowed on time deposits. Exchange
on all partsof Europe bought and sold in sums
to suit purchasers.
Collections will receive prompt attention.
We do a strictly legitimate banking business,
and give he wants pf customersspecial atten
tion.
Correspondents-
International Bank, Ciiieagq; Kuhn, Loeb A'
Co., N, Y.; State National Bunk Keokuk,
Respectfully,
FRANKEL, BACH & CO.
Oskaloosa, Nov. 13 1873.
Seth Richards, Pres. Gao. W. Hals, V. Prog.
E. D. Lindi.v, Cush.
National State Bank
OSKALOOSA, IOWA.
Paid up Capital £IOO,OOO.
SURPLUS SIO,OOO.
con RESPOV DE NTS :
Gilman, Son & Co., New York.
Commercial National Bank, Cliica go.
Valley National Bank, St. Louis.
National Bank of Redemption, Boston.
Keokuk National Bank. Keokuk.
Jon mu l. C, Blanchard,
President. Vice President.
THE
Farmers and Traflers Bank
OF
Oskaloosa. lowa.
(Organized under the Slute Laws.)
Stockholders Liable for Double the Amount of
Capital Stock. Correspondence Solicited.
Collections made anil Remitted on day
of Payment
DI RECTORS.
John Sierei., Peter Stumps,
K. 11. Gibbs. J. a. L. Crook ham,
P. W. Phiei.h r, John H. Smith,;
C. T. Wieeaud, G. B. McFaee,
.James Bkmkjes. St
O. A.WKEUE 0.0. WEEER. J. N. EEEIOTT
WELLS BROS. & - ELLIOTT
successors to Wells Bros.,
dealers iu and manufacturers of
Tin, Copper, and
Sheet-iron ware,
Galvanized Iron Cornice
and
Window Caps.
Cornice, K K>fin«r, and
all kinds <>t‘ job work a
specialty.
Agents for the
New Mansard,
Lady Cay,
and Active
Cook Stoves.
These stoves are new in the market, und we
would like them examined by all wishing stoves.
Call and see tlu-in before you buy.
We will take contracts for Cornices
Hoofing, and Spouting in all parts of
the country, at the
lowest possible rates.
The Best is the Cheapest!
High Class Poultrv
consisting cf
Hlff Cochins and Dark Du .Aim as
selected from the best importer stock.
Eggs for Hatching.
J. M. HIATT,
New Sharon, lowa.
CORSETS.
Our
Stock Of Corsets
Is tho largest
IN THE CITY.
And Wo keep all tho host goods in
Tho market.
Dr. Warner’s
“HEALTH CORSET”
“BORTREE’S DOPLEI AD
JUSTABLE.”
MD. FOY‘
And many other kinds.
C. T. WILLARD CO.
III VERY,
BASHAW LIVERY
DOWNING, McMULLIN & Co.
TINWARE.
*/•- -
Sprinkle, sprinkle, comes the rain.
Tapping on the window-pane;
Trickling, coursing.
Crowding, forcing
Tiny rills
To the dripping window-sills.
Laughing rain-drops, light anti swift.
Through the air they fall and silt;
Dancing, tripping,
Bounding, skipping
Thro’ the street,
With their thousand merry feet.
Every blade of grass around
Is a ladder to the ground;
Clinging, striding,
Slipping, sliding.
On they come
With their busy zip and hum.
In the woods, by twig and spray,
To the roots they ttnd their way;
Bushing, creeping,
Doubling, leaping,
Down they go
To the waiting life below.
Oh, the brisk aud merry rain,
Bringing gladness in its train!
Falling, glancing.
Tinkling, dancing.
All around—
To its cheery sound!
—Fleta Forrester, in St. Xicholas for April
MAl’ll PENNYFEATHER'S AMBITION
It was an exkilerating spectacle that
the people of Chepachet b. hJd one Janu
ary afternoon; the picture of a grown
mau pulling and tugging a small boy
aloug Main street. The man was Mr.
John Denike; the boy Terry McGuire,
Of the ludicrousness of the scene Mr,
Denike was not unconscious. His face
was red, aud wore au expression of min
gled vindictiveness and shame. To add
to his discomfiture, a youug lady, coining
in an opposite direction checked her
steps as she observed his plight, and then
stopped short in his way.
• Why, Terry!’ she exclaimed in a tone
of reproach, ‘what is the matter?’
Denike had stopped but still held the
boy who was crying with all his might
aud main,
The lady looked up inquiringly from
Terry to the gentleman.
‘This boy has been trying to pick my
pocket,’ he said, ‘and I am going to make
an example of him.’ Then he added, ‘are
you particularly interested in him?’
‘He is one of my Sunday School schol
ars,’ she added quietly.
Joliu Denike shrugged his shoul
ders, aud the girl saw and resented the
motion.
‘You mean he doesn’t do credit to my
teachings,’ she said hotly; ‘1 don’t sup
pose he does. 1 have him just one hour
iu the week. You expect that I should
offset that against the one hundred and
sixty-seven, when he is under other in
fluences.’
John felt uncomfortable. This em
phatic young person was certainly not
afraid to speak her mind. He looked
down at the boy.
‘Will you ever steal anything again?’
he asked. The child could hardly speak
through his tears.
-‘No, I won’t,’ he cried, ‘if you’ll le’me
g°.’
John loosed his hold and the boy did
not wait for permission. Iu a breath he
was around the corner and out of sight.
The young lady bowed gravely. ‘Thank
you very much,’ she said. John stepped
aside, raised his hat, and in a moment she
was gone. He smiifcd to himself as he
went on his way. Indeed he was rather
relieved. It had been au episode, and
the girl was certainly bright and pretty.
He pul his hand in his pocket and drew
it out again with an air of satisfaction.
The handkerchief was there. It occur
red to him that he might also confirm
the safety of his pocket-book. He felt
iu the opposite pocket—felt in vain. The
pocket-book was gone. He stopped short
in the street. lam afraid his thoughts
were not strictly evangelical. ‘The little
beast!’he exclaimed with angry empha
sis. ‘There was at least thirty dollars in
it—aud Nellie’s picture besides!’ and
then reviling his folly in letting the boy
go, and wondering if it would be of auy
use to sock the police, he turned slowly
toward his home.
Miss Pennyfeather, as she went on her
way, was scarcely less disgusted than
Denike himself, without knowing as yet
the depth of Terry’s turpitude. She
could not deny that his conduct was
the saddest kind of commentary on her
teaching. Fancy her added annoyance,
when, on going to Sunday School the next
day, she detected Terry McGuire exhibit
ing to the other boys a pocket-book which
she kue w could not be his, and which,
under compulsion, he tearfully confessed
to have stolen from the gentleman the
day before. Miss Pennyfeather appro
priated the pocket-book. There were
papers in it, a photograph of a wonder
fully pretty girl, but not a cent of
money.
‘Where is the money, Terry?’ she asked
imperatively.
The boy blubbered. He knew Miss
Pennyfeather too well to attempt any
denial.
‘I took it out,’ he cried.
‘How much was it?’
‘Do’no,’ sullenly.
‘Yes you do, Terry,’ emphatically.
There was a minute's silence.
‘Come, Terry, you might as well tell
me.’
Another pause.
‘Terry McGuire!’
The boy fairly jumped.
‘There was five dollars,’ he stammer
ed.
‘Any more?’
‘There was teu dollars in another
place.’
‘How much more,Terry!’
The boy looked at Mi<s Pennyfeather
and learned from her expression the use
lessness of deceit.
‘There was a place inside,’ he growled,
in a barely audible tone, ‘as had seventeen
dollars and a half in it.’
Miss Pennyfeather went over the items
in her mind.
‘That makes thirty-two dollars and a
half,’ she said. ‘Now, Terry McGuire,
give that money to me.’
And Terry, with another side look at his
determined teacher, extracted it from his
pocket and did as he was told. The sum
was correct. Miss Pennyfeather restored
it to the pocket-book, and looked Terry
severely iu the eye. ‘For next Sunday’s
lesson/ she said, ‘you will loam the eighth
commandment.’
‘Know it already,’ growled Terry, ‘yer
taught it to us last Sunday.’
So she had. And Miss Pennyfeather
felt all t ie more discouraged.
For two days John Denike carried re
sentment in his heart. He went so far
indeed as to hold the girl altogether re
sponsible for his misfortune. ‘lf she
had taught the boy not to steal/ this was
his argument, ‘1 shouldn't have lost Nel
lie’s picture. So, on Monday afternoon
when ho met her again at almost the
same spot, he looked across the street
and would have passed on, but that sho
put herself again directly in his way.
‘Excuse mo/ sho began, her face all
aglow with a senso of her disagreeable
position, ‘but I came this way on purpose
to meet you.’
John bowed. Frank, he thought.
Perhaps the girl interpreted his reflec
tion, for the color deepened on her face,
as she continued:
‘I was very much grieved yesterday,
to find that you Had lost your pocket
book. lam glad to be able to restore it
to you.’ And with these words she
placed the article in his hand. ‘Will you
please see if the contents are right?’ she
added.
He opened it mechanically, glanced at
tho picture, and seemed to draw a satis
fied breath. ‘I dare say it’s all right,’ he
said.
‘Will you please count the money?’
Here was certainly a very positive
OSKALOOSA, IOWA. THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1878.
MERRY RAIN.
young lady. John did as ho was request
ed.
‘is it right?’ she said.
‘Oh yes,’he said, ‘quite right;’ and
then, after a second’s pause—‘quite right.
I’m sure I’m much obliged to you. It
didn’t make so much difference about the
money, but should have hated to lose the
picture.’
What did Miss penny feather care
about the picture? ‘Oh, certainly,’ she
said in an iudifferent way, and moved a
little apart, as though on the point of
leaving him.
‘Are you walking up Main street?’ he
asked.
Miss Pennyfeather bowed.
‘And may I accompany you!’
‘lf you want to.’
‘Perhaps 1 ought to introduce myself.
My name is Denike—John Denike.
Miss Pennyfeather bowed again. She
had heard of Mr. Denike, and knew him
to be a member of the State Legislature,
but of course, she did not say so. Proba
bly Mr. Deoike was now on bis way from
the State House at tho head of Main
street.
‘1 aui Miss Pennyfeather,’ she remarked
in a quiet way.
John Denike was now entirely reconcil
ed.
‘You will pardon me,’ he said, after a
moment, while they walked along together,
Tor my implied reflection in my manner
of Saturday.'
Of course 1 will/ she said calmly. ‘lt
was the most natural thing in the world.
There isn’t a man in Chepachet who
wouldn’t have expressed the same
thought, and if the boy, Mr. Denike,
grows up to be hung, some one will write
his obituary aud say, in early life he
went to Sunday school and enjoyed the
religious instructions of Miss Maud Pen
nyfeather. If Miss Pennyfeather had
done her duty by her scholar, would
Terry McGuire now be in a felon’s
grave?’
The girls’cheeks were flushed aud her
voice had a severe tone.
‘Excuse me, Miss Pennyfeather/ said
Denike, gravely, ‘I think you overrate your
own responsibility.’
She shook her head and looked him
earnestly in the face.
‘But somebody is responsible, Mr.
Denike; if not I, who is it? There are
hundreds of such children in Chepa
chet. They don’t go to school. I’m a
public school teacher, and there are not
half a dozen of that sort in the building.
They won’t come, the principal doesn’t
want them if they would. In Sunday
school my class is the only one of tho
kind, and that wouldn't be there if I
hadn’t gone out and picked it up my
self. The Superintendent doesn’t like
ragged, barefooted boys. He draws the
the lines just beyond shoes and stockings.
But these boys have souls, Mr. Denike,
and they’ll certainly go to ruin unless
they are taught, not only for an hour on
Sundays, but six days iu the week. If
the responsibility is not mine does it rest
with the church, or on the Soheol Board,
or on the Legislature, Mr. Denike? Af
ter all, arn’t you somewhat responsible
yourself?’
By this time she had stopped iu front
of a house, and was resting her hand on
the railing of the stoop.
‘This is your home?’ he said inquiring
ly, without having answered her last
question.
‘Yes/ she replied, ‘I live here with my
mother.’
‘And may I not call to see you some
me?’
Miss Pennyfeather hesitated—he was
certainly a very recent acquaintance, but
he promised to bo a pleasant one. To be
sure he was interested in another girl, but
that need make no difference, except as
it might define more clearly their own
relations. Miss Pennyfeather began to
feel quite a friendly interest in the pretty
face which Mr. Denike carried in his
pocket. So she only said with a half
smile, in almost the same words she had
used before:
‘Why, yes, if you waut to.’
Denike bowed.
‘Let me answer your question/ he said,
‘before I go. Of course I share the re
sponsibility with every one else who legis
lates for the people. But the problem is
a difficult one. Maybe you have some
proposition,’ as he noted her more eager
expression.
The girl gave a little low laugh,
perhaps half ashamed of her excite
ment.
‘Yes, I have, Mr. Denike/ she said,
‘indeed, it’s my hobby. Whenever I get
hold of people who have influence, I bore
them with it until their lives become a
burden. My notion is to start here in
Chepachet an industrial school, under the
school board, where vagrant children can
be brought in and taught some useful
trade. Its my highest ambition, Mr.
Denike, to have charge of a school like
that.’
Her eye kindled and her face glowed
with the words. John Denike, as he
looked at her, forgot for a moment the
face in his pooket-book, and thought he
had never seen a muoh prettier picture.
‘lndeed, Miss Pennyfeather/ he said,
as though protesting against her sugges
tions that he was bored, ‘l’m very much
interested. And I’d like to talk the
matter over with you, Perhaps I can do
something in the way of legislation. May
I come soon and continue the conversa
tion?’
Miss Pennyfeather nodded ‘yes/ and
bade him good-by. Then the door open
ed and shut, and Denike was left alone.
But the thought of Miss Pennyfeather’a
bright expression and the echo of her
fresh ringing voice lingered with him all
the way home.
Three months after’ that, the School
Board of Chepachet found itself in a
great quandary. It was seriously pro
posed—indeed it had become a law —that
in Chepachet, education should become
compulsory. More than this, for the va
grant classes and for children of poor
parents, an industrial school was to be
provided. The question that concerned
the board was not so much who had en
gineered the innovation, as whom they
should appoint as principal.
‘Properly/ said old Mr. Gallup, who
was the senior member of the board and
very slow of speech, ‘the place belongs to
Miss Williams.’
‘But, Miss Fairfield is very high
ly recommended/ put iu Deacon Or
wig.
‘Sho is very young/ remarked Mr.
Bushnell, who was himself verging on
eighty.
‘Well after all/ declared elder Knox, ‘it
amounts to about this. Denike has more
interest in this than anybody else. He
wants Miss Pennyfeather, aud she ought
to be appointed.’
And that settled it.
It all her life, Maud Pennyfeather had
never passed a happier time than those
three months. Never, indeed, had months
passed so quickly. In her relations with
Mr. Denike the industrial sohool had,
from the very first, been a topic of ab
sorbing interest. The legislation affect
ing it was drawn in Miss Pennyfeathcr's
neat little parlor, and all the details were
arranged from evening to evening be
tween the two conspirators. Having a
secret ef this profound and important
character, their friendship became peouj
liarly intimate and informal. Had it not
been for the picture in Mr. Denike’B
pocket-book, Maud might have imagined
there was some purpose in his attention,
but of oourse the fact of the
picture left no reason to infer anything
of the kind. And strange to say, while
she fancied she was glad of this, she
more than once found herself entertaining
a feeling of positive resentment against
the pretty original, and a vindictive de
sire to abstract the picture and tear it up.
It is only fair though to say that Maud,
when she recognized these improper sen
timents, would blush with shame and vex
ation, and crowd them down in her heart.
It used to annoy the girl; indeed, she
could hardly aooount foi it, that wh :n
she first knew Mr. Denike she was unem
barrassed in his presence, but that now
when she went down to meet him it would
be with a flush upon her cheek and a
tremor in her voice. Try as she might,
she could not gain the oomposure of their
earlier acquaintance. She hoped it es
caped his attention. Perhaps it did.
That she was being urged for the position
of principal of the new enterprise, she was
quite unaware.
The evening of the committee’s
decision, Denike found her in the par
lor.
‘You remember you told me once,’ he
said, when both were seated, ‘that it was
your highest ambition to have charge of
such a school as ours.’
Maud nodded and looked at him, with
a question in the look,
‘The opportunity has fallen to me/ he
went on, gravely, of gratifying your arnbi
tion.’
The color went all away at once from
her face. She did not say a word.
‘The school board, Miss Ptnuyfeather,
have concluded to offer you the appoint
ment as principal of the new school.
This letter/ and he handed her the en
velope, ‘contaius the official announce
ment’
The girl took it mechanically, holding it
unopened in her hand.
‘I have great pleasure iu congratulating
you/ he continued. ‘To attain one’s am
bition, Miss Pennyfeather, ought to be an
occasion for congratulation—ought it
not?’
She looked up at his question—then
dropped her eyes nerviously. ‘Thank
you/ she said. It was all she could
say.
This, then was the end of it all. To
be sure, it was the end Maud had wished.
Three months ago she had no dearer de
sire. Had anything taken its place?
Was Maud deceived about herself after
all, and did she have au ambition still
dearer than that?
And so Maud woke up—to find the
thing that had seemed best her now
within her reach, but stale and unprofita
ble; the thing for which she hadn’t cared
out of her reach, but of things in the world
the most to be deshed. And yet she
could not complain. Mr. Denike had
only taken her at her word, and interested
himself in a friendly way, to help her
realize her aspirations. Now he would
go off and marry the girl in the picture,
whom, by this time, Maud absolutely
hated; and she would be left to teach an
industrial school to the end of her days.
But she would never let Mr. Denike know
how it pained her—never. So she forced
back tho tears, and studied, aud said in a
low, quiet tone:
‘Thank you very much, Mr. Denike;
you’ve been very kind to me.
His own voice seemed to tremble a little
as he spoke.
‘But I’m going to offer you an alterna
tive/ he said.
Maud looked up. Sho was quite indif
ferent now as to what he might say.
‘I want to know,’ he continued, ‘if that
is still your highest ambition —or if, as
people sometimes do you have changed
it?’
Maui gazed at him with open eyes,
quite uncertain as to what he meant.
Was he going to offer her some other posi
tion. It was all one to her, which she
took.
‘I may be asking you to give up a good
deal/ he went on, but without waiting for
her reply; ‘indeed, it strikes me as rath
er impertinent on my part; knowing how
strongly you've set your heart on this
thing, but I must take my chance. I
want to ask you, Miss Maud, before you
conclude to settle down in life as a teach
er, if you wont consider the idea of be
coming my wife.’
Mr. Denike did not get any further
than that. If he intended to, ho was
summarily cut short. For Maud, mak
ing a vain effort to control herself, at
length gave way, and leaning back against
the sofa, cried as though her heart would
break. Happily Mrs. Pennyfeather was
out and there was no risk of interrup
tion.
John waited until the tears were
checked, very well persuaded as to their
meaning, and hardly knowing what to
say.
‘I didn’t mean to grieve you’—he be
gan.
But she put up her hand depreoatiug
ly.
‘I know —I know,’ she said in a broken
voice.
‘Of course it was impertinent in me,'
he went on, now savage with him
self. ‘I ought to have known your char
acter better. You are not the kind of a
girl to change.’
She covered her face with her
hands. *
‘Oh, lam!’ she cried. ‘lam! lou
haven’t any idea what my character is.
There isn’t a more vacillating girl in the
world. And I’ve lost every bit of inter
est in the school.’
He grasped her hands and drew them
away from the crimson tear-stained
face.
‘Have you transferred it to me?’ he de
manded.’
But Maud did not speak, and ho was
oontent to take her silenoe for an answer.
After a while, when she had gained her
composure in a tolerable degree, a thought
came to her, that sent the blood all out of
her cheeks. How could she have for
gotten it? She drew away from him and
looked up into his face with a frightened
glance.
‘But the picture —’ she stammered.
‘What picture— ’ in a perplexed tone.
‘Why, the picture in your pocket
book.’
John Denike leaned back and laughed.
‘You poor child!’ said he; ‘have you been
making a bugbear out of that? Whyit s
only my sister Nellie. She s a mission
or’s wife and lives in the Fejee Islands.
I was anxious about it, because it would
be hard to get another one.'
And so that cloud drifted away. And
if it had not been for Teddy McGuire 1
believe Maud would have been supremely
happy. Somehow or other the boy
learned the news and took it upon him
self to reproach his teacher.
‘I interduced yer to ’im,’ he complained,
‘and now ye’ve went baok on me.’
Whether she had or not, Maud could
not satisfactorily settle with herself. In
the contentment of her new experience
this was almost the only disquieting ele
ment
‘You must have a dreadfully poor opin
ion of me,’ she said plaintively to Mr.
Denike.
‘Why,’ ho asked with unaffected sur
prise.
‘Beoause I’ve let my ambition be so
easily upset.’
John smiled indulgently.
‘Not upset, dear,’he said, ‘only divert
ed.
And to this view of the oase Maud not
unwillingly consented.
The new blue book, just issued at
Washington, gives the total number
of persons employed in the federal
service at 85,880. This is about one
in 450 ot the total population, or one
to every ninety voters.
All About a Brick.
A well-known citizen living not
many blocks from Union Squaro re
lates an incident somewhat in this
wise:
One bright morning in the month
of November, some years ago, I was
preparing to go down town, when
the servant informed me that a man
was waiting at the front door to see
me. ‘Tell him I’ll be down in a mo
ment,’ said I. On going to the door
a man of tall stature and robust up
pearanoe, calling me by name, re
quested assistance, saying that he had
a large family, a wife in delicate
health, and no means to procure food
for them.
‘You appear to be strong and
healthy, why don’t you work?’ asked
‘Simply, sir, for the reason that I
cannot procure work.’
Not having any work to give him
I thought I would test the sincerity
of his intentions.
‘lf I give you work, what pay do
you want?’
‘Anything, sir, you choose to give
me, so long as I can obtain means for
my suffering family.'
‘Very well, sir/ said I, ‘I will give
you twenty-five cents an hour if you
will carry a brick on your arm around
the block for five hours without stop
you, sir; I will do it.’
After hunting awhile I found a
brick, placed it on the man’s arm,
started him on his walk, and then
went down town to my business.
Not having the least faith in the
man’s promise, I thought but little
more of it, yet as I knew I should be
back within the five hours I deter
mined to see if he performed his work.
My business kept me away rather
later than I expected, so I had to
forego my usual walk home, and took
a Fourth avenue car to be back with
in the five hours.
As I approached the corner of the
street where I reside 1 found a great
crowd of persons gathered—two fire
engines, a hose cart and a hook and
ladder truck. Upon inquiring where
the tire was I was informed that it
was a false alarm, and that what
brought the people together and oc
casioned tho agitation was the spec
tacle of a tall man carrying a brick
on his arm around the block for nearly
five hours. The neighbors were look
ing at him from the windows and
doors as he passed along; some
thought he was crazy, but when spo
ken to his answer was: ‘Don't stop
me; it's all right’ As he interfered
with no one, he was allowed to walk
on undisturbed.
‘Where is now?’ I asked.
‘There, you can see him at the oth
er end of the block, walking with his
head down,’ was the answer.
He was just about turning the cor
ner, and I waited till he had perform
ed the circuit, then, taking him quiet
ly by tho arm, 1 marched him to my
house, followed by a lot of boys. In
tho meantime, the firomen, engines
and hose cart rattled off. The man
was thoroughly tired out when I took
him into my hail and seated him on a
chair, while my servant went for a
little wine and something to eat. I
paid him forthwith a dollar and a
aalf. He informed mo that, while
making one of his turns, a lady came
out of a house and inquired why he
was carrying that brick, and on his
giving her the reason he received a
dollar. The object soon became
knowD, for, as he passed the houses,
small Bums were given him by differ
ent persons, and he was well satisfied
with his day’s work.
‘But,’ said ho, ‘what shall I do to
morrow?’
‘Why,’ I replied, ‘go early in the
morning to tho houses from which
you received tho money, and ask for
work, and no doubt you will find
some one who will put you in the way
of getting it; then report tome.' The
following afternoon ho informed me
that ho had been sent to a german,
who kept a pork establishment in
Third avenue, and who wanted a clerk
to keep his books. He was to get five
dollars a week if his work proved
satisfactory, and his dutios bogan on
the following day. Before leaving
me he asked for the brick which had
brought him such good luck, and I
gave it to him. Within tho year I
ascertained that the man had been
transferred to a larger establishment
of the same kind, with a salary of
SI,OOO.
Three or four years after this, I
was riding in a street car, when a well
dressed man accosted me, with a
smile, and asked mo if I knew him.
Seeing me hesitate, he said:
‘Don't you recollect tho man who
carried the brick?'
He then informed me that he was
doing a prosperous .business on his
own account, had laid up money, and
expected soon to build himself a
house up-town.
‘What became of the brick?’ I in
quired.
‘That brick, sir, has always occu
pied a place on our mantlepiece, and
we value it as the most precious of
our little possessions. It has made
our fortune.’—JV. Y. Evening Post.
What Statesmen hare thought of Paper
Money.
GEOROE WASHINGTON ; 1786.
“Some other States are, in my opinion,
falling into the Very foolish and wicked
plan of emitting paper money. 1 cannot
however, give up my hopes and expecta
tions that we shall ere long adopt a more
just and liberal system of policy.”
JOHN ADAMS; 1786.
“I cannot but lament from my inmost
soul that lust for paper money which ap
pears in some parts of the United States.
There will never he any uniform rule if
there is any sense of justioe, nor any clear
credit, public or private, nor any settled
confidence in public men or measures, un
til paper money is done away.”
THOMAS JEFFERSON; 1813.
“Capital may be produced by industry
and accumulated by economy, but jugglers
only will propose to create it by legerde
main tricks with paper.”"’
madison; 1786.
“The value of money consists in the
uses it will serve. Specie will serve all
the uses of paper; paper will not serve
one of the essential uses of specie.
JAMES BUCAANAN; 1837.
“The evils of a redundant paper circu
lation arc now manifest to every eye. It
alternately raises and sinks the valu t of
every man’s property. It makes a beg
gar of the man to morrow who is indulg
ing in dreams of wealth to-day. It con
verts the business of society into a mere
lottery; while those who distribute the
prices are wholly irresponsible to the peo
ple. When tho oolapse comes, as it must,
it oasts laborers out of employment,
crushes manufacturers aud merchants,
and ruins thousands of honest and indus
trious citizens.”
TIIADDIUS STEVENS; 1862.
“No one would willingly issue paper
curreuoy not redeemable on demand and
make it a legal tender. It is never de
sirable to depart from the ciroulating
medium which by the oommon consent of
oivilized nations forms the standard of
value.”
MEDICAL.
VEGETINE
CHILLS. SHAKES,
FEVER AND AGUE.
Tariioru, N. C., 1878.
Dr. H. R. Stevens;—
Dear Sir.— l feel very grateful for what your
valuable medicine, Vegetine, has done in niy
famlly. I wish to express my thanks by in
forming vou of tne wonder! Jl cure of mv son:
also, to let you know that V igetine is the best
medicine I ever saw for dills, Shake*. Fever
was sick with measles in
1873, which left him with Hip-Joint disease. My
son suffered a great deal of pain, all ot the time;
the pain was so great he did nothing but cry.
The doctors did not help him a particle, ho
could not lift bis foot from the floor, he could
not move wthout crutches. I read your adver
tisement In the “Louisville Courier-Journal.”
that Vearetine was a great Blood Purifier and
Blood Food. I tried one bottle which was a
great benefit. He kept on with the medicine,
gradually gaining. He has taken eighteen bot
ues in all, and he is completely restored to
health, walkes without crutches or cane. He
Is twenty years of age. I have a younger son,
fifteen years of age. who is subject to Chili*.
whenever he feels one coming on, he comes In,
takes a dose of Vegetine and that is the last of
the cbUl. Vegetine leaves no bad effect upon
the system like most of tho medicines recom
mended for chills. I cheerfully recommend
Vegetine for such complaints. I think it is the
greatest medicine in the world.
Respectfully, MRS. J. W. LLOYD.
V iotTiNi. —When the blood becomes lifeless
and stagnant, either from change of weather or
of climate, want of exercise, Irregular diet, or
from any other cause, tho Vegetine will renew
the blood, carry off the putrid humors, cleanse
the stomach, regulate the bowels, and impart a
tone of vigor to the whole body.
VEGETINE
FOR
DYBPEPSIA, NERVOUSNESS,
And General Debility.
Bebnardsto.v, Mass., 187 S.
We, the undersigned, having used Vegetine,
take pleasure in recommending it to all those
troubled with Humors of any kind. Dyttutpttia.
Nervousness or General Del-ility, it being the
Great Blood Purifier, sold by R. L. Crowell &
sons, who sell more of It than all other patent
medicine put together.
MRS. L. F. PERKIN'S,
MRS. 11. W. SCOTT,
JOSEPHUS SLATE.
Vegetine is the great health restorer—com
posed dxclusively of barks, roots and herbs. It
is very pleasant to take; every child likes U.
VEGETINE
FOR
NERVOUS IHEADAQHE
Andtßheumatiam.
CINCINNATI. 0., April tt. 1877.
H. K. STEVENS, Esq.:- V '
Dear Sir,— l have used your VEGETINE for
Nervous Head iche, and also for Itheumatixm,
and have found entire relief from both, and
take great pleasure in recommending it to all
who may be likewise afflicted.
FRED A. GOOD,
. 108 Mill St., Clnn.
VEGETINE has restored thousands to healtli
who had been long and painful sufferers.
VEGETINE
Druggists’ Testimony.
MR. 11. R. STEVENS:-
Dear Sir,—Wc have been selling your reme
dy, the Vegetine. for about three years, and
take pleasure iu recommending it to our custo
mers. and in no instance where a blood purifier
would reach the case, has it ever failed to effect
a cure, to our knowledge. It certainly is the
ne plus ultra of renovators.
Respectfully.
E. M. SHEPHERD & io., Drumsts,
Mt, Vernon, 111.
Is acknowledged by all classes of people to be
the best and most reliable blood purifier in the
world.
VEGETINE
Prepared by
H. R. STEVENS,JBostonJMass.
Vegetine is sold by All
Druggists.
MONEY TO LOAN!
10 Per Cent. Per Annum,
No Commission.
A few Thousand Dollars to loan on five
years time at toper cent, per annum-No Com
missions. Also wilt buy a few mortgages.
Km 3 E. H. GIBBM.
1878—REAL ESTATE AGENCY—IB7B
W. TENNANT
DEALER IN
Beal Estate,
Property Bought and Sold,
City property traded for Improved
or Wild Lands in lowa or Kansas.
ALSO
Agent for the Sale of the
raison, Torou s suite fie
R. lands in Southwest Kans-
Splendid land and soil from $2.00
to SB.OO an aero, on 11 years time
Climate delightful, and thousands
moving there this season.
Excursions from Oskaloosa every
month,
Next Excursion, 10th and
24th of April, to KINSLY
S. W. KANSAS. ROUND
TRIP TICKET, 30 Days 1
Call for circufars, maps of Kansas
and full information as to Routes,
Freights, Tickets, &c., &c.
JLose no time to secure a
good cheap home.
FIRST S BIAS:S L E PIA NOS,
Taylor & Farley ana other Or
gans at HARD TIMES Prices.
Good stock or notes taken in ex
change. Every instrument warrant
ed by Manufacturers. All business
promptly attended to and
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
P. S. A tew Organs for rent.
Office Rooms, Remington Head
quaaters, West High Street,
OSKALOOSA, IOWA.
MONEY TO LOAN.
on Improved (arms by
WOODY A HEL.LINGS.
Office, Old Savings Bank.
D. W. LORING
Is now receiving
New Goods
Mild
OFFERS TO THE
CASH TRADE
at prices
Never so LOw.
Inspection Solicited.
BmiUs lrliclota,
To Close Out Stock.
( will sell at 11.00 per label, sacked and de
livered at express office f »ee of charge. A sup
ply wlil be kept at Wm, Nash'a agricultural
warehouse. Order* left with Pierce Katliff. New
Sharon, or Cole k Bro., will receive prompt at
tention. Address,
W. W. MOOKB.
83w« Bveland Urove, lowa,
ESTABLISHED 1850.
W. M. WELLS,
CATARRH,
Throat and Lung Physician.
AND
SPECIALIST FOR CHRONIC DISEASES GEN
ERALLY.
office in Phienix Block, South side public square,
over Abraham & McKinley's store.
All who are alllicted are invited to call for a
FREE CONSULTATION. I will not undertake
a case unless I feel satisfied that I can give re
lief.
Having made Chronic Diseases a special
study for 2o years and having practiced more
or less during that time, andean give reliable ref
erence as there are to l>e had as to what I have
done. Those who cannot call personalty can
consult by letter. n:il
TfoundkyT -
W. C. Johnson. o*o. E. Collins.
Johnson & Collins
PROPRIETORS OF
lOIELTY IRON MB
Light Casting a Specialty.
All Work Finished or Japauued and made
to give as good Satisfaction as
Work Manufactured Fast.
All kinds of stove repairing done.
OSKALOOBA. IOWA
n 4
plumbing:
Oskaloosa das Light Co.
Are prepared to do all kinds of Plumbing
Steam and Gas Fitting, also keep an assortmen
of
Steam I Water Pipe
* and
Cas Fittings,
Rath Tubs, Iron Sinks, Iron Pumps, eto.
Office West High St., McCall Block.
BAKERY and RESTAURANT.
GROGfiBT INIfMIIY,
Persons Who Love
The very l>est bread, pies, cakes, rolls, etc., will
do well to call on
“MARTY” THE BAKER,
South-east corner square, where you wil al
ways Mud everything desirable in the
way of all goods kept in a
lirst-class Ba
kery,
I also have a full line ot
STAPLE AND FANCY
Groceries of all kinds.
VEGETABLES
in their season.
CHOICE FRUITS
at all times.
CANDY AND CIGARS,
Which I well ns low as the lowest.
CALL
and see me at the South-east corner of
square.
i I l MASTINSTEIN
22 MANAGER. *
DRUGS.
WILLIAM BEARDSLEY,
druggist;
Beacon lowa.
Drugs, PatentMcdicines, Paints
Varnishes,Glass, Putty, Dye Stuffs, and Toilet
Goods.
School Books, Stationery,
|Notions, Soda Water, Mineral Waters,Choi*
Cigars, and a small quantityjof everythin
kept in the Largest Drug Stores.
TERMS being CASH and expenses light, DIS
COUNTS on AVERAGE PRICES are guaranteed
on all sales. Prescriptions and receipts care
full v miedat ALL HOURS.
WILLIAM BEARDSLEY,
BEACON - IOWA
~ STOCK ~ FOR SALK
FINE STOCK!
1 have for sale on reasonable terms, a lot of
POLAND CHINA HOGS
OF PURE BLOOD.
Also
THOROUGH BRED SHORT HORN
BULL CALVES.
Also a flno lot of
DARK BRAMHA CHICKENS
AND EGOS FOU HATCHING.
Call anil see me at store on north west cornet
or at farm 1 mile south of town, where tht
M . WIIISO N.
THE ORIGINAL ft ONLY 6ENUINI
Vibrator” Threshers,
with nmorm - v
MOUNTED HORSE /POWERS,
And BUua Thresher Enftaw,
Hade only by * »
NICHOLS, SHEPARD & CO.,
BATTLE CREEK, MICH, f
h-.ki? s/f M Savin*
■ punllg*. Beyond *ll Rivalry tot RapM Wotfc,
hot CioMiln*, aiid for terise Orels tram VuU|*
BRAIN R.lsere will net Satanic ta the
ruonuoua «UUo of Orels a tta, Interior work doo, by
Ihe when oacK peste4 os ike dlffirttMTi
THE ENTIRE Threshing Bxyeaeee
(and often S to » Time* that amount) ann ba mad* by
lb* KjUrn Orals SAVED by thaaa Unproved Machinate
||o BetaWlnt Shafta Inaide Che Setta
|| retor. Kntlrely frw from Baalare. Ptckare. RaAdtea,
" and a. anch ttme-waatln* and sreln-wastlsc rompU
cat lona. Fartaatly adapted to nil Kindauand OondHloua of
Orafn, WalarDry. or abort, Maada« or Bound.
HOT only Vastly Superior hr Wheat,
■ oma, Barter, Kyo, and Ilka Oreloa, but iha o,n Soo
"* reaafnl Ibwahar In War, Ttmoihy.Mlltet, Oiwr, and
flk, toaitojtojttren no “aUacliiminU '* «c - retail btln* *
*" MakaanoUMartnaaorSoallartnca. 4
* lionsted Hoaaa fevrare to watch,
W’XJstW&lsstS&ttA
| Ptotoren, hr baynnd any otbar maka or kind.
* ato, one , ‘Tmnaron , ‘Threat.r ovUAtearetemre>ir*>lte
PHYSICIAN.
The Weekly Oskaloosa Herald,
Published every a hursday by
LEIGHTON, LEE & LEIGHTON,
H. C. LEIGHTON, OEO. H. LEE, W. MqLEIGUTON
Steam Printers,
19 THB
Largest County Paper
IN IOWA.
Office in “Herald Block” over Poet Office
Tbrms--$2.00 a Year in Advance.
MISCELLANEOUS
‘Maternity Made Easy. tNSHssi
paid for 28 cents. Oskaloisa? lowi. P ° Bt
FOR SALE.
One business lot, 20x120, on Main etreet ou
posite Herald Block occupied by namt-ahon ’
rti2?«ii ,U^De TK% 20x60, on street, on
first alley south of square. Call on
84 T. LEIGHTON.
COKE! COKE!!
For sale at 6 cents per bushel dellvere
Leave orders at office or Gas Company for this
economical fuel for your cook-stoves.
42 D. W, HUNT. 3ec*y
AUCTIONEER.
The undersigned announces to the public that
he offers bis services to Mahaska and and ad
jointng counties as Anctioneer. Office with O.
G Phillips, Oskaloosa, lowa.
23m3pd E. D. Stratton.
0ll)PAf| A TEAR. Agents wanted. Bosl-T
A/ni|ll nf '“legitimate. Particulars free.
WOXTH* CO . St Lonfe. Uo.
A PHYSIOLOGICAL
View of Min-Hace f
E233Ha^-“=«
*m that unfit tor itTt)w *«-
fr * t * °f Hsproduetionand
of Women.
tfb WATCH K». Cheapest
ktkWu world. Sample Watch Free to
jPUjggk. Address, a Co., Chicago.
NO BUSINESS
PAYB AS WELL!
Tiffin, O.
~ AGENTS
“TELL IT ALL.”
Is the startling experience and true history
ot womans life in polygamy, by the wife of a
Mormon High-Priest. This book contains the
Lite, TRIAL, Conviction, CONFESSION and
Execution, of the Mormon Bishop, JOHN I*.
LEE. It contains also, the “True Ntory ot
Eliza Ann,” BRIGHAM YOUNG'S 19th Wile,
Mplendldly Illustrated. Only $3.00. a
rare chance for Agents. Sells on Sight. Write
at once for terms and circulars,
J. H. CHA.WBEKN A CO..
n3l tf St. Louis. Mo.
"" AGENTS
wanted to sell a new and interesting
Life of Pope Pius IX.
The most popular book ever published. It is
highly recommended by both clergy and Press,
and contains not only the LIFE and DEATH of
POPE PIUS IX, but also Biography of POPK
LEO XIII. handsomely Illustrated. Territory
free. Write at once tor terms to
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
smTmszsmMY
Mg kSm Tobacco
Awarded hujhett prim at Centennial Exposition for
A‘* chewing qualities and *r eeUence and lotting char
acter of tweet* ning and Jtaeoring. The b«»t tobacco
e»er made. A* our blue atrip trade-mark Is cloaely
Imitated on Inferior goods, tee that Jncktou't B**t ii
ou every plug. Sold by all dealers. Send for sainpic
fcee, to C. A. Jackson k Co., Mfra, Cetera burg, Vu.
Before Buying or Renting a
CABINET OR PARLOR ORGAN
Be sure to send for our LATEST Catalogue and
Circulars with New Styles. Reduced Prices and
much information. Sent Free. MASON &
HAMLIN ORGAN CO., Boston, New York or
Chicago.
FOWLER Ac FULTON*
General Agents ror the
UNITED BTATES CARTRIDGE CO.
Manufacturers of the
Solid Head* Reloading,! Military and
Sporting, Central Fire
CARTRIDGES!
Also Rim Fire Ammunition for Pistols and
Rifles. C artridge Cases, Swagged end Patched
Bullet 9, Primers, Re-loading Tools, etc. etc.
Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 200 Broadwav,
New York City.
The Co-Operative
Newspapers.
It has heed asserted that one-half of all mon
ey paid by New York advertisers for advertising
outside of that city goes to the Co-Operative
Newspapers.
If this statement is true there is no occasion
for surprise that prominent papers which are
still charging war prices for advertising feel
called upon to abuse a rival with which they
find themselves unable to maintain a comiteti
tion.
Full particularsabout the Co-Operative News
papers, together with catalogue and advertising
rates mailed free on application to BEALS &
FOSTER, General Agents American Newspa
per Union, 41 Park Row, New York.
4LO Cards with name, 10c. Agts'
out fit 10c, L. JONES & CO. Nassua.
nn n 111O retail price $230 only $65. PIANOS
11 nll A N \ retail Price $5lO only $135. Great
UllUnllUbargains. BEATTY, Washington,
New Jersey.
9"\ Fancy Cards, Snowflake, Damask, etc., no
eatf 2alike, with name, lOj. Nassau Card Co.,
Nassau, N. Y.
MIXED CARDS, with name, 10 cents. i>ost
paid. Samples 3 cents. J.MinklerA Co.,
Nassua. N. Y.
YOUNG MEN Learn Telegraphy, and
lUUliu iUull earn from S4O to slixi
a month. Small salary while learning. Situa
tions furnished. Address aronee H. VALES*
TINE, Manager, Janesville. Win.
Consumption Can Be Cured,
! For proof of the fact see my circular, which
will be sent Free to any address. OSCAR G
MOSES, 18 Cortlandt Sreet, New York.
No. :U-w4
jySSOLUTION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that the firm of Leigh
ton Sc Moore is this day dissolved by mutua 1
consent. H. C. Moore will continue the busi
ness at the old stand. All debts due the old
firm are payable to the retiring partner. C.
Leighton, who will also pay all outstanding in
debtedness of the old firm.
Chas. Leighton.
H. C. Moore.
Oskaloosa, lowa, April sth, 1878.
To the citizens of Oskaloosa and surrounding
country. I wish to express my sincere thanks
for the liberal patronage of the past five years,
and cheerfully recommend H. C. Moore, as
worthy and deserving of a continuance of your
patronage. For the next 60 days the books and
notes will be found at the old stand and 11. C.
Moore is authorized to receive and receipt for
any moneys paid him: an early settlement of
all accounts due the firm of Leighton A Moore
is earnestly requested.
32 Chas. Leighton.
lIERIFF SALE.
Notice is hereby given, that by virture of a
transcript execution directed tome from the
office of the clerk of the circuit court of Mahas
ka County, lowa, and dated April 13, A. D.
1878, I have levied upon and will offer at Sher
iff's sale to the highest bidder for cash in hand,
at the door of the house In which the last Dis
trict Court was held in Oskaloosa in said county,
on Saturday, the 18th day of May, A. I>. 1878.
at the hour of 2:3i> o'clock, P. M , the following
described real estate in said county, to-wlt:.
Commencing 120 feet west of the southeast
corner of block No. two (2) Tolbert’s addition t->
the city of Oskaloosa, lowa, thence north 12»
feet, thence west 164 feet, thence south 120
feet, thence east lt>4 feet to place of beginning.
Taken as the property of R, M. Tracy to satis
fy the above mentioned execution in favor of
Phillip Huffman and against Tracy St Stephen
son.
Marquis Barr.
Hieriff Mahaska County lowa.
J. R. Baku, Deputy. SI
pROBATE NOTICE.
In matters of the estate of Wilson Han is
deceased.
Notice is hereby given th t there is now on
Hie in the office of the clerk of the e‘rcuit court
ot Mahaska county. lows, an Instrument of
writlnir purporting t<> le the last will
anil testament of Wilson Harris, deceased,
slid the same is set for hearing on the Ist
day of the s|Hvial term of the etrei.it court, to
liebegun amt held In «»-kal< osa, on the 13th day
of Mav, ls;s, at which t me objections can
Ik' made to the approving of said will and its
admission to proliate.
D. U. Moouk.
33w3 Clerk.
VCtICK OF AMEN l)M KNT OF AKTIC’LKS
OF INOOItFOKATION.
Public notice is hereby given that on this Hd
day of April, A. O. 1878. at an adjourned uioet
iiiK of the stockholders of the Consolidation
Coal Company, held at the office of the Com
pany at Muchacbinock, lowa. Article VI of the
Articles of Incorporation of the above comtiany
was amended to read: “The business of this
oompanv shall lie manaired by a board of seven
directors," the requirements of Article X hav
ing been oomplien with.
Attest: W. A. McNEILL, Seo y.
Mitchachinock, lowa, April a. 187 b.
j MtoUATK NOTICE.
In matters of the last will and testament of
Fila A. .iohnsou. deceased.
Notice is hereby givea that there Is now on
tile in the office of the clerk of the circuit court
of Maha-Wa county. lowa, an instrument of
writing purporting to he the last will and testa
meut ol Fila A. Johnson, deceased, aud the
same Is set for hearing on the Unit day or the
next term of the circuit court to be begun aud
held In Oakalooaa, otr the 13th dny of May,
1878. at which time objections can be made
to the approving of said will and its admission to
probate. „ „ „
D. K. Moors,
33 Clerk.

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