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The Tipton advertiser. [volume] (Tipton, Cedar Co., Iowa) 1856-1962, August 09, 1856, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027398/1856-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. HI:
mWTiffWIlTISHL
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Ct., I»WI.
oimt OFFICE"* COUNTING ROOM
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FL 50
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LEGAL NOTICEf.
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Hum
TIPTON ADVERTISER
OFFICE
JB/
ItBttof parchassd a good aad sufficient se
tecttoa or material, the Publiaher is now pre
putd to 4o Marly every description of
ii i n
—AND—
fiUKJIKS!!
la a aatiafactory uimt i aad can furnish at
O I I A*L* A K *,
•f every kiad axacutod with neatness and des
patch.
WELLS SMCEB,
A o n e y a a w
Aa* Nlieltor in Ckncery,
to ih w*w*l ihU Mm. a»e
I. Uwttsc «MM.ef
Cowy«inU|
THim «J Br»'« ____
jito. riAW,
(fwiiT or uoroKD, fa.^
AMarMV aai CBVuellar at Law
Tlp»a«, C«*ar tenant). Iowa.
«W f—well erfi II »rwne w k
i» »SI Mil ini' i
erri°K—1 ikriw Hmm «ia ii* ommtf tmrc
••4 Xftofc* «0» Wc«
H. C. PIATT,
AvrMurar uu Coc«aw-iu» at L*w.
IU. ruhaai «ad aail Real F:»tata, locate
U. narrMiaa taa BOH mat mum, iaw»
W
Tana,
Ialraaia4 to
Mb
N
TUTta. CABesaDDca.
THAYER fc CARSKADDEN.
Coi|n»eiior3
X*aAd Agents,
Jf«uo/M, Iowa.
OjJ&i mmr Burneti i Book-Store,
8reood Street. 1 U
I. LOHO,
JtrmCK
OF THE PEACE and Notary F*k-
lia. Tipton, Iowa. »1
JOSEPH L1XDIEY,
OTAEY Public, Rochaator, Iowa.
Office
to tha Poet OSeo. v2nl-ly
JOHN HVBEK,
ATTORNEY
LAW
AND COUNSELLOR AT
Whca at hia raaidence sear Tipton
Cedar Covaty, Iowa.
JAMES w7~B AO LBV.
A1TOMBT AT LAW,
Mrflutica of th« hua,
Tipton, Iowa.
Cy Office with the Caunty Judxe in tha
Cowrt Hoaae. t?3J
1m A A O If GIL BERT,
DEALER IN DRUGS 4r MEDICIXES.
OR Dye StaA, Painta, Oil*, Ulaaa, GtoceHaa,
-Ua^iea, I
ay
a, UBrdwaro aad *'aac Notiuna.—
Tiptoe, Iowa. a'
Wa. Rosa, BL D.
nastta l»r«Waa aixl Bansae,
U'l/ro*. Mufttn* Co., /MS.
Wtn practice, on the Elaetia lyataai, Wil
oaasdHeiiiity. n-10 y
JAIIBIC. TtBSEE.
PHYSICIAN
A N U O E O N
WIIJ praedoe ia Tlploa and eiclnlty. Office, No
f, to ^aality row, Booth of tha Court Houee. Bl
J. SMITH,
PRTSinA* ANP BURr.EOJf.
i at tha Iowa House, Rochaator, Codar
Ourty, Iowa.
OK. If. eBBEX,
PCodar
irSIClAN AND 8UBGEOK, Rochaator
county, Iowa- »1
ELIAS IHAWRFIR.
MERCHANT—Daalar
W. ft. SCOTT,
TaBdora hia profaaaivna) aarvicea to the poo»
fUdfTiptoo and vicioity. Special attention
£toa to caaaa of lone standing. Office at the
SrWM Store of Or, A* Hall.
JurrBBOMCS.—Tha frealty of Jefferwn
Madkal oallofB Philadelphia Starling Medi
CBl colton unokei Ohio Pennsylvania Hos
ftol PhaUitelphiB Dr. Huff Wheoirn*.
W.'r. COWAN.
W8IC1AN ANP SURGEON.
IWIah
to to *"u~ this pUca my fnture borne
IthoraforatoBdar Btjraarticeato the rltiaena
of tha Towa aad etciolty, in all the branchea of
aha p-otraaioB. I will practice PU*'.e Surgtry,
Amm(
/Mrttaalie **d RenuduUg DtficU.
Office Boar Tamperan e Hotel.
Ttytoa.
Jbb.1,the
iia __ viy._
aWSMJMIWtWWJUJt
s
EDWARDS k CARROLL,
JMMlsdUsad Sffipffirlntffiiidaots
OFWOR. Mb. 10, Foorth atory, Pool Office
1 Bfaty at DaTaoport, Iowa. J* tf.
P. SMITH,
®**A«®ATOSB A»B Blake Boob Maui-tacttbib,
-dBeeaw, offtaUt Put 00ka, Maatatm,
OaMia thlH atory. PHaliac, Ruliag and Bind
t^ of aeoey 4«BarfptiOB oaat utad to order in toe
"fh, bb ah
an Mitloe, aad ob reasonable
•anu.
N. B. Be
ok biader'a atoekfor a»Je 2®»f
e e a n e o u s e
BirmEsaon FLEMMMO.
TIPTOV, IOWA.
A K O U S E
BY R. 8. TUCKER.
Cm® *f Bnbn., aid Je&noB Streets
Itnua City, hma.
S A N I E S
AVTOKNBT
ROMPT attention p»id to Collections. WiU
.i
to
,he
payment of taxes
and the sale of real eatate. Alse, Agent for
'Da
Washington Union In?i»anh Co
Cleveland, Ohio and the
Co. of Davenport Insurauce effected on I ha
•tock or mutual system.
orrica in the coear noes* orra tub
clebk's office.
CLOVER HOUSE.
P. L. DOWNING, Proprietor.
Ctfier tf alnat mil Seeuou Streets.
MescATiNt IOWA.
fct-OOae ef Um llpwu ll«rion, m4 Oaka
a*Mio wkto watfrntli BMtafN*
(Mip.
Good ^tailing.
p/2TS uSTrc"
wb# w
OGILVIE HOUSE.
Cor%tr of Wat'r Sirttt and Iowa jitenvr, anp
oppo'it* tht Railroad Deput, Mmtratint, Iowa.
OGOR6E LOW. Proprietor.
rj',HK
Pkoriiktuk, ha« rt-ifntly letwed the
J. aVo»« popular lintel, au.! refurnished it in
atxl ooaaritla) maruer an i« pr«tp*r«o to
a to *h U #ut)rc lalUfacUt.s lu »*#ry pAri.icoiM
TH« a*lj o^cm oi th«
Western Com pany,
ts ihla i* it xY
RUhlo
oun Th» Pmpneior j«*t%d4a4 a
larf* e tn'd lo lb- *f lb#
84ftl. a«H) e n««qa*ntljr prr^ar*i u» faroUh Hi iw
t« a 3 wko S4 4««ir« U. at inwtw tvrmi
Bl 11 ELEY HOUSE.
TIPTOIT, IOWA.
Tht Retu HOr«* Whir* mm 1*4 for
Ik* *M(,
In«(l*aItmw
nam ilw lit Hw, Ida I Iiw|ia4
a maMdloa*. aa4 i n»!4«l »"h .t nr. m« r*iala.« N.
ha. w«. w t**H li add le tu. eearoaT ar
a«TMIWCI 3ft i nb i
John H. Hi re ley, Prop'r
a. T. VTUJAM. a. L. SKHBLBHOHU
SXKbl&LK
WILLIAMS A ELFHEI.BERGFH, PR^PRIETOJI.
Waterloo, Iowa.
I S I U A E
JSE1
T~ A
I N S U A N E O K A N
•ARTVOVD, CO**.
ftttorpof xt A. D. 1819—Cath Capital
$600,000.
'"PHE Undersigned ba» been appointed
A)T«nt f»r tliis old aad n liabla Company, la
A(r„Bt
Laa4 Warranta, attaad to tac P»yu:ent of pr^rad to iaaae policies on favomble terms
»,I»¥Bat»|atio»®ftitJaa,eon*eyancifig,fcc. WELLS SPIDER, Arent.
HMtar BMaatioo glvw tocoUeciiotw. AM office in tha Cuurt House, Tipton, lovra.
eara, will be atteodM
to *Hb ProaptoMi aa4 Fidelity.
Office ia the Court House wttWUe 1U
eoraar. Tipton, Iowa.
f„ ,,, old and ratable Company, li
O O N O S O E
TBOHN D) STBIN,
Merchant*, Toronto Iowt.
Tha abort firm keep conrantlj- on ha^d a fall
aupoly of
Ury Goods. GrotxrUt, Hard wart, CiotkiMf,
Halt and Cap*, Boot* and Sluxw,
And all kiud of
eoodi needed by the Community
Houso Finishing.
THE
subsoiber havinp located himself in
the town ft Tip'on is prepared to do plae
Uring of all kit.fis and colors and outside work,
Rouen cast imiiaied into brick, stone or mar
hie, fancy and ornamental woik, piaster of
paris. mouluine*. cornish, cen'.f *. paper
han^inrs, &c. I am ietermmfJ to give satis
faction to all who m*V favor me with their
patronage. Foi fuitLer icformaiion a,ply o,
or addreaa LEABHAK1
nptoB, Feb. 15,'56. "7
BlankBlanks
ftia
Exchange Ofioe!!
tJIGHT DRAFTS on New York can bo had
|J of the Subscriber ir sums to smt purchaaars
Certificttea of
Di*j»iait,
and Drafts on the
Eastern Ci'ies cashed.
Americ&n Gold ftjrnuh«!d at a small pramium.
OJfiet over S*e*tia*d and Snyda^i tor*
i/jju* over WM.lT TUTHILL.
Tipton, January 1, 'Ml.
~J.1l
OOWM.
BaOTHER CO,
BANKERS4
e a e s i n e a n e
isn
LAND AGENTS.
amMr of Clinton and Waahinirton Streo
b8»3 ly Il~"ra ^ou,a
Book!,
&
in Dry Good a. Gro­
ceries, Crockery, Ac. Cedar Bluffs, Ce
Abt
e«BBty, low*. nl
of all kind* kept constant­
ly on hand. Counties supplied with all
kinds of Kecorda and other books for
County offices, at short notice. _______
C. HOBTHAM-
a. runras,
DUBFEE JfcwIVOBTHAM,
DBALSB8 IB
Clocks, Watfkes, ss4 Jewelry,
SILVER W.1RE, SPECTACLES,
Cattery Fancy 'Goods and Toys.
orroatTt Veiw ai-o. «. r»o .,««,«• W' a"" *"r
•Tfloa B»i"a, m»i Attn. iu«a.
Or Particular aucutioa fireu to all Unas
of ttopBlring. '•'y*
HOUSES FOB SALE.
THE
undersigned offers for «le wo comfort
able .lw-Ming housea situated in lipton
One is a house of g'od si»e, and the other
comfortable house fjr a «niall family.
with good lots. IMtfl INO.H.Sfi
I o u & i s a n n
*«H af the Peejila.
•T
MPIRLAND
Sliiee
C0t*SELL0B A*
Pj
Law.
WItXIB.
9WM*
Pierce is laid aside,
KE
lenger seed he dream
oa't,
we ore all resolved to hare
Free preea, free speech aad FranaH.
DongUaa, Atchison k
CE.,
With Bully Brooki to lead them.
Must
RIGHT
.of
IIawkcte Injcbancb
shout"and march
The
Jaat next Fremeut aad
Da/to a.
For freedom, Fremont's In the raa,
There ie no room to doubt oa't,
Then cheer and still our watchword ha.
Free preea,
free apeech, aad
Against the fraud -f man.
Ho pause, ner rest, nave where the
That feed the Kaa«as rum,
Save where tht Pilgrim gonfalon
Bhaii Sou*, the aett:ng sun!
We'll aweep the prairie as of old
Oar father's swept the sea,
ABit make the West, as they the Eaal
THe homestead of the free.
ta'
WILLIAM LEE,
BOOV BltNTOBlle
Towa f'ity
One door east of the Post Office.
Washington ia his Hone.
A foroigner who viatted this country
toward the close of the iast century,wrote
at the time, the following description of
the person and home of Washington,
which will be read with universal inter
est
I crossed the river from Maryland to
Virginia, near to the renowned General
Washington's, where I had the honor to
spend some time, and was kindly enter
tauiod Ly that worthy family. A* to the
Generel, we may judge by the counte
nance, he is what the world aaya of him
—a shrewd, good natured, plain, humane
man, about fifty-five years of age, and
steind to wear will, being active and
healthful, straight, well made, and about
six feet high. He does not use many
Frenchified congtfs or flattering useless
words, without meaning, which savors
more cf deceit than an honest heart, but
on the contrary, his words seem to point
at truth and reason, and to spring from
the fountain of a heart which being good
of itself, canuot L*e suspicious of others
till facts, unriddles designs, whioh evi
dently appeared to me, by a long tale
that he told about Arnold's manoeuvres,
far fetched schemes, and deep laid de
signs to give home and his army up above
prospect
ia from Maryland.'^
Both
AR.
S. t. BIDEB. 0. SAITOBD.
RIDER & SAN FORI),
aurjtaaOBS to tuttlb a mvu..
WILTOX, IOWA.
Wholoeale and retail dealers ia
DKf (iOODS, GROfElES, Etc.
SKoa, Clothing, Hardware.
m4 all kladu of agricultural Impietneata. Alao
General Forwanilng aod Oommiarfon Kerchaota.
the higheet market paioe paid 1b oa*i for all
ktoda of Faman' Produce. li »y
ID BV ii Y
ir.g, Talleai, lerjeaa Dsatlst
ANNOUNCIi
STJ!
Old
notice and
to the of Cedar and
adiolBlag coontiee, that he ie tlhighly
niMad tatoaJBto inprovemeota of the profaa-
Ib
the moot laaprmad ^e. Office
•1 l)r U GIU'* «f" Sprlngdale 0
TIPTON, CEDAR Co. IOWA-SATURDAY, AUG.
AMY
WEFT
resolved for Freeden.
Oar Fremont's banner gaily
WARE^
With ne'er a blot or speck oa.
THEN
keep the ball a rolling free
For Fit moat true and Dayton.
Old Buck and Breck may wiaee aad jerk,
Aad victory fix their hopes on.
Bet eecond beat they'll end at laat
Freaoot.
Tfce
Kansas lsnl|netB
ST t. o. whittikb.
Adapt* t* the 7W of F,fly Ytmt Af."
We croee the prairie«
U
of old
The Pilgrims crossed the sea,
'O
make the
WE«t,as
they the
EAA^
The homestead of the free.
We ffo to rear a wall of mea
On Freedom's Southern Uaa,
Aad plant
L«»,Je
the cotton
tree,
The ragged Northern pine!
We cross the prairie as of old
Tne Pilgrims crossed the eea,
To make the West, as they the East,
The homestead of the free.
We're flowing from oar satire hitla,
Aa our free rivers flow—
The blessings
of
oar mother-land
Is on us as we go.
We
gu
o plant
her common schoolo
On distant prairie swells,
And give the
SABBATH
of
the wild.
The music of her bells.
We roaa the prairie,as of eld
The Pilgrims crossed tha aoa.
To make the West,as they tha Eaat,
THT
homestead of the free.
Upbearing, like the Ark of aid.
The Bible in our taa.
We go to test the truth of Ood
Frsaka af Iaadaattsa.
Tulpioa mentions a painter, wha verily
believed that all the bene* of his body
Were so soft and flexible that be might
•ssily be crushed together, or folded one
within another, like pieces of pliable
Wax.
A Lositanian physician had a patient
who insisted that he was perpetually fro
ten, and would fit before a great fire
tren in dog daya. The Portugese doc
tor made him a drees of rough sheep,
akins, saturated with aqua Tit®, and set
him on (Ire. He then «aid be was quite
warm, rather toe siik'i bo, aad bo was
tured.
Galen and Ariccn makes .mention of
feople who bare fancied themselves ear
th?n pots, and therefore have carefully
avoided being touched for fev they aho'd
be broken.
Then there i" the case of the insane
Watchmaker, mentioned by Piuel, who
insisted that ho bad been guillotined,and
that another head had afterwards,by mis
take, been put on his shoulders, instead
of his own. 'Look at these Ueth,' he
Would say 'mine was extremely hand,
tome—these are decayed. My mouth
was souod and healthy this is foul. How
different ia the hair from that of my own
head!'
Mr. Haslam, in his work on insanity,
mentions a case ot one, who insisted that
he had no mouth, and when compelled
-by force to swallow, declared that a
wound had been made in his ^^1,1^0*
which the food had been introduced.
Benvenuto Cellini, the celebrated Flo.
ffeutioe artist, in his Life says, that 'the
governor of the castle in which he was
confioed, bad a periodical disorder of this
tort, every year he had some different
whim. One time he conceived himself
thanged into a pitcher of oil another
Ume he conceived himself a frog, and be-
fe
an to leap as such another time, again,
imagined he was dead, and it was
found necessary to humor his conceit by
amking a show of burying hiui. At
length he thought himself a bat and when
he went to take a walk, he sometimes
inade just such a noise as bats do he
likewise used gestures with his hands
tnd body as if he were goiug to fly.'
A young man had a strong imagina
tion that be was dead and earnestly beg
ged his friends to bury him. They cou
tented by the advice of the physician.—
He was laid upon a bier, aud carried ap»
on the shoulders of men to church, when
tome pleasant fellow.up to the bus iness,
met the procession and inquired who it
was, they answered 'And a very good
job of it,' said one of them, 'for the
world is well rid of a very bad character
which the gallows must have had in due
course.' The young man now lying
dead, hearing this, popped his head up,
and said they ought to be ashamed of
themselves in thus traducing his fair
fame and if he was alive he would thrash
them for their insolence. Bat they con
tinued to utter the most disgraceful lan
guage. Flesh and blood could no longer
bear it up he juvps, they run, he after
them, until he fell down quite exhausted,
lie was put to bed the violent exertion
he had gone through promoted perspira*
tion, and he got well.
The Fir at Newspaper Persia.—
Some mouths after our arrival in Tehran,
the Prime Minister established a news
paper and, to ensure its diffusion in the
capital and provinces, he made it obliga
tory on all empleyees of a certain rank
to become subscribers. He placed the
paper under the management of an Eng
lish gentleman, whose duty it was to
traasla'e extracts from European news*
papers suitable to Persian ideas. The
'leaders' were often the composition of
the Prime Minister himself, aud were
chiefly in praise of tho Shah's govern
ment but this practice is said not to be
confiued to Persia. Ceasuru on any sub
ject was rigidly excluded, exactly as it
the Pet-rsburg Gazette bad been adopt
ed ss a model. This Englishman en-
month before the affair happened and .joyed no sinecure besides the above Ga
though he said he wondered at many
things that he observed in Arnold's con
duct yet he had nnt the least suspicion of
any treachery going on till the thing hap
pened, and then he could trace back and
see through his intentions from the be
ginning which from the General's behav
ior to him—of which 1 am well apprized
—seems to me to be the highest s.n of
ingratitude that a man could be gnilty of.
The General's house is rather warin.snug,
convenient, and useful than ornamental.
The size is what ought to suit a man of
about two or three thousand a year in
Ireland. The out cflices are good, and
seem to be not long built/ and he was
making more offices at each wing te the
front of the house, -which added more to
the ornament than the real use. The sit
uation is high and commands a beautiful "YJ the Daily Courier, and enquired
prospect of The river which parts Virgin-
zdte for the public, he had the superin
tendence of another newspaper, design
ed only for the eye ot the Shah and his
minister. The tatter journal contained
all the European political intelligence
deemed unsuitable fof the Persian public,
besides details of gossip and soaadul like
ly to give arousemeot to the Shab. Such
is the beginning of the free press te be
established in Persia five hundred years
hence for within any less period it is
hopeless.—Lady Shieti Lift and Man
ner* in Persia.
One Who Vants His Helta Inshured.-—
A thin, cadaverous-looking German,
about fifty years of age, entered the of
fice of a Health Insurance Company in
Indiana, on the fiist day of May, 1S52,
I»lJle
mai1 ,n
A coi respondent of the Now York
Herald, says
•I was informed at Leavenworth City,
by authority above suspicion, that within
ten days, upwards of fifty wagons, con
taining Eastern emigrants, had crossed
from Nebraska into Kansas, having
:ome by th»* way of Iowa. A great deal
of the emigration which might have gone
to fill up Kansas has been attracted to
the equally fertile and promising, but
more beautiful fields of Nebraska. At
a consequence, towns are springing up
in the latter Territory all along the Mis
souri river, and industrious settlers are
converting her beautiful prairies into well
tilled farms, where they may 'sit under inauro persons who are in good health'
their own vine and their own
and no man dare make them afraid,'—
Peace hat brooded like a blessing over
Nebraska, and plenty promwf tola
ward Jtr citirens.'
shares People s
helts?
The agent politely answered, 'I attend
to that business, sir.'
'Veil, I vantt nnne helts inshured vot
you charge!'
'Different prices,' answered the agent
'from three to ten dollars a year pay ten
dollars a year, and you get ten dollars a
week n case of sickness.'
'Veil,' said Mynheer, 'I vantt ten dol
lar vort.*
The agent inquired hit ttate of health.
'Veil, I ish sick all the time. Ise shust
out te bed two, tree hours a toy, und te
doctor says he cant do noting more gool
for me.'
'If that it the ttate of your health.' taid
the agent, 'we can't insure it. We only
At thw Mynheer bristled up in great
anger.
•You mut tink Ite a pig fool rot! you
link I come pay you ten dollar for jpshure
my belt, iwt vas
vtitr
9, 1856.
Border loading
Ktlu (taa.-€oal
for Hot Weather.
(Froes toe Atchison (Kansas) .Squatter ft eve
reign.
More Abolitionists Turned Back.—The
steamer Sultan, having on board contra,
band articles, was recently stopped at
Leaveoworth City, and lightened of for
ty-four rifles, and a large quantity of pis
tols and bowie knives, taken from a
Slave* in Kansas.—During the past
six months the slave population in this
portion of the Territory has greatly in
creased. Many settlers from 2outh Car
olina, Virginia and other Southern
States, have wisely brought their slaves
with them, as being the most effectual
way of settling the question of alavery in
tha Territory. These are the kind of
settlers we need here now.
The Palmetto RJUs-98th of June
The memorable 28th having been deci
ded upon as the anniversary of the Pal
metto Rifles of Atchison, the dav was
duly celebrated hy a parade and ban
quet.
At the head of the table hung the
'blood-red flag,' with the lone star, and
the motto of 'Southern Rights' on the
one side, and South Carolina on the oth
er. The same flag that first floated on
the rifle pits of the abolitionists at Law
rence, and on the hotel of the same place
—in triumph, now hung over the heads
of the noble soldiers who bore it so bra re
ly in that exciting war.
The following are among the toasts
drank:
Kansas: Our chosen home s'.and by
her. Yes! sons of the South, make her
a Slave Jjtatc or die in the attempt.—
[This toast was received with loud and
continued applause.]
Disunion By secession or otherwise
—a beacon of hope to an oppressed peo
ple and the sure&t remedy for Southern
wrongs. [Enthusiastic cheers.
The city of Atchison: May she before
the close of the year '57, be the capital
of a Southern Republic. [Cheers.]
Kansas: We will make her a slave
Stale,-r form a chain of locked arms aud
hearts together and die in the attempt.
The Distribution of the Public Lands:
One hundred ami sixty acres to every
Pro-Sl&v^y settler, and to every abuU
tionist six feet by two.
Ke Knew He. was in Washington.—
Judge KeMogg, a venerable citizen of
Michigan, arrived in this city on Satur
day evening. It was his first visit to the
Federal Capital, and when the care stop
pw».l »«as a little uncertain where he
was but as he noticed that all the pas
sengers were leaving the ears, he follow
ed suit. As he entered the main hall of
the depot he s%w a man caning another
ferociously, all over the room. 'Whan
I saw that,' says th« Judge, knew
was in Washington.'—National Intelli
gencer.
Presentations are getting common.—
The Captaio of a canal boat out west has
just been presented with a service of five
years in the penitentiary, in considera
tion of the distinguished ability with
which be plundered a passenger and
kicked him overboard.
Salt in XinnaMta*
salt region between the Sheyen-
ne and the Red Rivei" of the North,
which hat furnished the Red River set
tlement and the |Hudson Bay Territory
with that indispensable article, for a sc
ries cf years, has been long known to
our citizens, and excited much interest
the last year or tvo. but the existence
of extensive aalt beds much nearer our
valley is not yet generally known.
It has been our privilege to see, the
past Spring, a specimen of rock salt, ta
ken from the bed of a lake, equal of any
article of the kind we ever beheld.
The bottom of the lake ia question is
ene solid mass of rock salt, from which
pieces may be broken, but cot without
difficulty. The Indians use rat speers
or other iron that will answer as wedge,
and force off peices, in some instances
large and heavy. With proper toots, it
could, we think, be easily obtained and
in any quantity.
Tne lake in question is not more than
fiveor six miles from a navigable stream,
and in the vicinity of timber. As we
propose visiting the deposit again tnis
fail, however, we will refrain from des
cribing its location more closely at this
time.
The salt when taken from the lake,
crashes without much difficulty, snd re
tains the appearaoe of the best rock salt,
and we believe the supply it almoat in
exhaustible.
We believe this deposit is destiued to
prove highly beneficial lo the prosperity
of Minnesota, that is the influent* vvi:!
be more or lest felt throughout the West.
—Hudson Democrat.
A man's virtue should not be nsentered by his
octasionil rsertinti h-jt bj bit ordinary doing*
Tha PrUttr.
The Belfast Mercury gives tht follow
ing ia relation to orintera:
From high to low, they are the same
careless, light hearted, clever, well in
formed, reckless fellows, knowing how
to aa better than they do—nothing at
times—yet everything if occasion re
quires or the fit takes them. No soon-
crowd of cowardly Yankees, shipped out er are they comfortable in oae town,than
here by Massachusetts. The boat was
permitted to go up as far as Weston,where
a guard was placed over the prisoners,
and none of em permitted to land.—
They were shipped back from Weston on
the same boat, without even being insur
ed by the shippers. We do not approve
folly of sending tbese criminals back to
the east to be re-shipped to Kansas—if
not through Missouri, through Iowa and
Nebiaska. We think they should meet
a traitor's death, and the world could not
censure us if we, in self protection, have
to resort to such ultra measures. We
arc of the opinion that if the citizens of
Leavenworth City or Weston would hang
one or two boat loads of Abolitionists, it
would do more towards establishing
peace in Kansas than all the speeches
that have been delivered in Congress
during the present ses«oa Let the ex
periment be tried.
A He'tvu Majority.— Some year ago,
a clebrated Methodist minister and revi
ve'ist well known for his eloquence aud
zeal converting souls, was preaching at
Louisville. The feeling had got pretty
well up, and one night, after a very 'pow
ful' sermon, he came down (rem the pul
pit for the purpose of receiving the mour
ners, while the good old hymn of
"Caaan, Oh Caaaa, I'm bound for the land of
Canao,"
was struck up and chimed in by hundreds
of voices. The hymn was concluded, but
there were no penitents at the altar.—
In vain he exhorted—his words and ap
peals fell upon the eara ef his listeners
without exciting any motion. At length
he concluded to make a bohld stroke, and
follow it up with a tut and resuming
the pulpit, after a few words of exhorta
tion, he solemnly ftnounced that he would
put u question, upon which he expected
all to vote in view the estimation they
placed upon their souls. With finger
raised most significantly, and in a most
solemn manner, he announced—* All
those infavor of Christ will please rise
to their feet.'
Only some eight or ten responded to
the announcement while the minister
was watching intensely for others to sig
nify their position by rising, a worth)
member who was on his feet interfered
aud suggested that 'the reason might be
that the true desciples were loo modest to
vote.'
At this juncture a loud voice was
heard in the gallery 'I say brother
—, it's no uae a talking or irying to
force this vote—/Ais congregation is for
the devil at least twelny-five hundred ma
jority.'
Sentimentalism.—Irlrs. Swisshelm, no
ticing the publication of a new love sto
ry, says:
'All that stuff,about womans's love has
been said over and over and over again
a bundled thousand times, to the great
detriment of the best interests of human
ity. There is no kind of necessity for
using *he press to persuade silly girls
that it is very romattic and womanly to
love a scoundrel, to leave her affections
unguarded by reasou or experience, and
driIt hopelessly into sin,shaine and des
pair, as an evidence of her unsuspecting
womanhood.
'It is not true that woman's affections
are any stronger or durable than man's.
We think the opposite is the case, and
that two-thirds of all the women who
pine away or die for love, do ao for the
want oi something better to do.
'Everything calculated to make love
sickuess a lem'riine acquirement is a
great injury but to strew the pith of
the suicide with the flowers of poetry
and romauoe is in a degee reprehensi
ble.
The best motto to guide young girls
through the mazes of love, is, 'Do right
and trust iu God.' A gin who has done
to mourn over the
n6^1
caU8e
fickieuess of a pretended lover. Betltr
that he should change his mind before
than after marriage.'
Popping the Question.— 'What a strange
thing is acquaintance!' said a beautiful
girl the other day to a friend of ours 'A
year ago we had not seen eaeh other—
many a season had rolled its course,
bringing hope, happiness,and perchance I
sorrow to each, without cognizance of the I
other and noiD ice are so intimate.'
Our friend says she looked so lovely, I
he could not help pressing her delicate
cheeks as he asked her 'if he had aught
lo do with the happiness of the future.'!
'You arc iu ah the dreams of my coming
days,' replied she. They are to be mar
ried next mon'.h. We consider this one
of the neatest 'poppings' especially as it
happened in leap year,—Portland Tran
script.
A merchant advertised for a clerk ac.
customed to confinement. He received
an answer from a person who had been
seven years in jail.
TERMS, $1 50 in ADVANCE.
they make tracks for auither, even tho' i "Aching for favorable opportunities, and
they have to travel on 'hair space means. seeking tf po'Sible. to turn their ft
And to what will they not turn their
hands? We have seen, says an Amer
can editor, one and tha same individual
of the craft, a minister California, a
lawyer Missouri, a sheriff in Ohio a
boatman on the Western Canal, sailing
a privateer, an auctioneer in New York,
and a Dressiuan in a great printing of
fice. Nor are these characteristics ol
the printers in any obo ountry—they
are everywhere the same. We have
met them as lecturers, actors, traveling
preachers, ventriloquists, iu fact as eve
rything. We have met on 'ramp iu this
country, members of this roving profes
sion from all quarters of the globe—
Frenchmen, Spaniards, Portugese, Ger
mans and Swedes—aud all apparently
as much at home as ia their owu coun
try. Ardent lovers of liberty, king
craft and priest-craft find but small favor
In their eyes. They are always with the
people. When the Charust excitemant
was raging in England, the most elo
quent leaders of the movement were prin
ters. When the barricades were raised
in Taris in 1848, the compositois cast
their types into bullets, aud fired tbezn at
the Boyalist troops. When the Ameri
cans were at war with Mexico, General
Taylor's regiment was composed almost
exclusively of volunteer printers, and
they were the bravest of his troops.
NO. 31
Overlook Hoihiif.
Some persons seem to go through tha
world with their eyes shut, others kee^p
them always open. The latter, at eveiW
step, are adding to the stock of knewfc
edge and correcting and improving
their judgement, by experience and ob
servations. They keep their in ads ever
awake at.d aciirc, end on alert. ijatU
ering instruction from every occurence.
ures and mischances to their auvttntag«»
Sucu persons will rarely hav* occasion to
say, '1 have lost a day,' or
"To weep o'tr hears that Saw
Mora idly Una to* eoasiaer'e wta4
They will make every event the occa
sion of improvement, and will find
Hooks
Ibthe
running brooks,
Kermoae ia stones, and good in everything."
To the attentive observer, even nature
itself will appear a vast scroll, written ad
over by the finger of God, with instruc
tive, though tome times mysterious,
characters, while to the careless it wiB
seem at best but a black or scene of
confusion, 'without form or comeliness,'
possessing little to excite cuiresity or ad
miration.
To the young especially, we wou Id re
commend the habits of close aad careful
observation. We would say to them,
'overtook nothing,' do not despise tho
day of small things. Endeav or to turffi
the leisure time you may have, tho mou*
ey you may have or iuherit, the privile.
ges you may enjoy, in short, everything,
to the best sccouut. Take care of the
minutes and penee, and the hours and
pounds will lake care of themselves. Hp
who learns to regard his leisure time a|r
valueless, and habitually squanders fof
trifles the small sums of money he may
have, because they arc small, will never
be learned or rich. The secret of suet
cess is tj be careful of little things.
•"Spend bo moaaeat bat tn purchase of its worth.
Aad what ita worth,aak death bods-they caa tell.'
Iotca Land Grants.—The bill wbiefc
has passed the Iowa legislature transfers
the rights vested by congress in tha
state, to the several compauiea, with cer*
tain conditions. 1st. The roads niu^
be complete and equipped for 75 mile§
within three years from the 1st day of
December next, and thirty milei earfc
year there after, in case of failure tho
state resumes rights in the land. 2. Per
sons who had nettled and improved lands
along^thc proposed lines at the time tha
grant was made, are to be secured tfc
their possessions, upon presenting propeB
evidence of tbe fact. Not more then
3*20 acrcs is alowed to a to tier, and he is
to pay $2 50 per acre. 4. The com
pany must signify there acceptance of
the provisions oi this act within 60 dsyt
after its passage. 4. The roads muat be
definitely fixed arid located before tbO
1st of April, and maps aud plats filep
with the governor.
The companies viewing the laud on
the lower route—that is, from the Bur
lington on the Missouri—to the Burliog
ton and Missouri River Railroad com
pany thate a'ong the rout from Iowa Cite
to the Misouri, to the Mississippi an|
Missouri Railroad company: that along
the route westward from Lyous,to the Ly
ons Iowa Central Railroad company and
that oa the upper route, between Diibu
uue and the mouth of the Bg Sioux, to
the Dubuque and Pacific company.
Singular Effect of Electricity on .V.
grots.—A gentleaisn residing a few
miies out oi town, recently carried home
a small electrical machine, for making
some experiments. As soon as he gS
home, the negroes, as usual, flot ke4
around him, eager to see what n as tg
had got. There was a boy among cm
darkies that had evinced a strong dispo
sition to move things when they wanted
no moving, or in other words to piller
occasionally.
'Now, Jack,' says his master, 'lock
here this machine is te make people te||
the truth, and ir you have stolen au/»
thing, or hod to rnc, it will knock yoW
down.'
'Why, master,' says tbe boy, 'I never
lied or stole anything in my life.'
'Well, take hold of this.'
No sooner had the la1 receive 'a slight
i
shock, than he fell on his ki»e»'« U'4
bawled out: 'Oh, master, I did steal yoUf
segaii aud a latle knife, aud have tie#
ever so many times: please to forgive
mi .'
The same experiment was tried, with
like success,upon half a dozen juveniles
At last an oid negro, who had been lok
ing t'n very attentively, stepped up.
•Master,' naid he, 'let dis n^ger try
Dat ui uiasiieen is well enough to scu:
the children wtd, but dis nigger know*
better
The machine w&i then fully cl,arg»-J,
and he received a stunning siioak. lie
boked first at nis hand, then at the nm.
chine, at at lost, rolling hia eyes, n?
said. •Maratcr, it ami best to know too
much. Dara many a .Joul git* lo b*
damned by knowing too much, an' its
I ««y 'P inion that the dt'bbil made dat riia
sheen jast to ketch yer soul a foul
how, an' I reckon you had best juit t.\k*
an' turn it up, and have it done gone..
Mohtgumery ^ldvzr iser.
gfc^Mis. Partington said, UtKlir
what ails that poor weakly io k"'C
i
young man?' 'Madam, h)»cu~e ae»
pet ate one, he haa tubercles it' hi*
'Dont wonder he looks so ill, I dai aa|F
one buckle in his lungs would kill nt.%
any out-, let aloue two. Well that's wi *i
comes of going to sleep with sticl. a.uij|^
in their mouth.' The J)r. str ti. ^*n
line for home.
A great m*uy hea&aa Ktoea dig their uyn
with their teeth.
Wht-B da* broit what b-jar of -he piece*'

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