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The Tipton advertiser. [volume] (Tipton, Cedar Co., Iowa) 1856-1962, August 30, 1856, Image 1

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WILLS fPIOEtt, PROPRIETOR.
VOL. HI.
TIE TIPTON ADVERTISER,
PaMiahed ewy S
a
tar
day Morning, la
1igto»» ft4i €«., Iowa.
EDITOR'S OFFICE** GOl/ftTING ROOM
l» I" Th r«m Inm fm Tn CMKTT niu 41
S
TIEX8.
•MT I year, paid in advance, SI SO
lo. paid witkin six month*. 2 00
go. paid at and of the y car, 2
Liberal deduction* uda U clubs of ftra *r
H«N to address.
RJTES OF jtDVM*2iSIt?G.
1 column I year, f50 00
do. aoatiis, 30 no
do. 3 aonths, 20 00
Half eolusft 1 year. 30 00
do. A Booth*, SO 00
do. 3 month*, 15 00
Quarter column 1 year, 18 it©
do. 6 months, 14 00
do. 3 months, 8 00
LEGAL NOTICES.
1 square 1 insertion, $1 00
fcaeh additional iosert'a, per aqaaro, BO
isqnaro 3 months, 4 00
do. month*
Ij I N
:ilH"~£iWinf6!!
MWE
la a satisfactory manner and can furnish. at
«h»t( notice,
Deedi,
O I A'L* A K S,
•f every kind executed wi'.h neatness and des
patch.
mm
IRTLLO SPICKR,
Attorney at Law
And
Solicitor in Chancery*
i *». ?"itn Of sbt* *.
attvfclioa Co lire'n* eiatns,
ttm i )r«)iclug
TN'tsaf ©I Kr»u
jmo. i~ riiN,
(mmtwT cr nr.-rim. f*
1
low u.
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Upton, 1 »l«i
srra P.-•*'*.»IK ..: V"" B»NI.
Ifci*»«'*••• »rtl I .II'K rtmiA •«..
»irrick H..UM »'IH
On«t/
*_
M.C. PIATT,
AXl. Cci'tiil.T.OR AT TjAW.
WArrjRVIT
ILL Purchase and sell K»**l Estate, locate
Land Warrant#, attend to the Payment of
TMH. Investigation of title*,conveyancing. &e.
JWtiwilar attention sftv* n tocolbV:on«. All
haiSn'W InWurteJjo h*« e«re, will tw* atteude
to witb Promptn^ a»l FW«Htv.
grOther in the Court House wiltyUie Re
corder Tipton, low*.
g, •. TflATtl. J- A RS E A DDEl*
lHAYKR k CARSKADDEN,
Jflehk'|s qnd
tf
General Land
E E A N E
6
00
do. 1 year, 1U 00
1 do. 3 months, 5 00
S do, months, 00
S do. 1 year. .. 12 00
OBO squari is tkrvttr.Jf?}
TICTONADVCRTISER*
JOB ftf OFFICE
Having pnrehaied a good ami »uficient
teetioa of material, the Publisher i» n«W p?a»
pared to do n*rly every description of
i .roreri(c».
Notions.—
Wm. Ross, M. D.
Orftk FhjrrirliR mil Ruinron,
Wilton, Miisrntinr Co., I
ova.
Will practice, on the Electic System, at Wil
©a and vicinity. n-H y
JANEI C. TiRNER,
mrmciAS AND S U IU EO w,
W0I practice in Tipton and vicinity. Offlce, No
7, ISPqaality row, Bonth of the Court House, al
J. SWITH,
PHTSK'IAN AM) SCROEON.
#4kc at the Iowa House, Rochester, Cedar
Canty, Iowa.
DR. IV. UREEI,
fHYIICIAV
EACH A NT—Dealer in Dry Goods, Gro
ceries, Crockery, ae. Cedar Blums, Ce
county, Iowa. nl
MEAT HARSET.
fOppoaito the Aldrich House, Tipton. Iowa.)
BEEP, oaffbe had ragalarly every moraing
laadaya excepted. Termacaah.
i.
LAND* AGENTS.
•oraer
of Clinton and Washington Stree
B8vS-ly Iotca Cily, Joiwi.ta,
CHAH1X8 NAELLEV.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL PEALLa IN
BOOTS A. SHOES,
AU kinkt of Leather, Hides,
fhoe Findinrs, Saddlery, Hard
ware, Collars and Haxnes.
•Main Street, Muscatine, /owl.
IABM®. ASP fwoRHARia©. atuiitkiB kt rtspect
r»ci©4 u U Ur|« lad will Ra^oit^ii »u of ©vsty-
,h*Mr
tkolr ttao.
EDWARDS & CARROLL,
Architect© and Saperintendants.
^OFFICE, No. 10, Fonrth story. Post Offlce
••Biding*, Brady st Davenport, Iowa. tf tf.
PKTER ir swilTil,
eE Bmnaa AXD BLANK lioox ItAsrrACTrRER,
Avenue, opposite rest Offlce. Muscatine,
I?, ^Vllr'' "*ory. Printing. Killing and Kind
he*t ''""^^Ption execntfcdto order in the
0B
*hprt notice, and ou reasonable
fc^r"1SadB°0k4
con,t*nt!y
Bo°1'
0. hand. Old
binder's stockfor sale. SGtf.
cC
O U S E
•T PATTERSON FLEMMIWa.
TIPTO*. IOWA.
PA
K HOUSE
BY R. S. TUCKER.
C©rier tf Oaba«ju* and Jeffer«oa Streets.
l*nca City, fmta.
S. S. DANIELS,
ATTORKBT A COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
pROMPT attention paid to Collections. Will
*'so
B"Pn''
and the aale of real estate. Aljo, Agent for
the WASHINGTON UNION
IXSUSANCS
Co., of
Cleveland. Ohio, and the HAWKBTE INSUAAJTCT
Co of Davenport. Insurance effecled on the
stock or mutual system.
IU IHK COURT
HOUSE orta TKB
CLERK'S orric*.
CIOVER Horse,
P» L. DOWJVINf, Proprietor*
Coroer of Walnui and Sfrom Strct-ts.
JH'ftATINE IOWA.
of the Tipton M«rlun, Wnnh'^efwi tiwl Otk»
Iwwa Uut. Bmv* u»u loud troa tk« BMIIfret
or rasrgs,
Hood flailing.
Oniilko»»»« rot) to ud from tbU boa** to tb* hoot*
*ai nn
Pr*o or i b«r(o
OOILTIE HOI SF.
Corn/ of 7(fr Snrtl anil lou a .'/•entir. im
oppotllt the Riiil'vr! Dtyt'l Aluscalinf. Iowa.
UEOUtit: LOW. Proprietor.
|MiK I'KOi'uiETjK, ha* recently leased tlio
1. popular it«l, and refunoshed it in
*n att*1 ?ib»-.a:ilt*l rnituoar. and prfp*r«t) t'.
u i a h- a U a s i e y a i u a
Ttivonty ntBcsnf th«
Ur«t«rn f'ompuny,
tr -,t IntM* Uomm Tb-» ProprdiAr «»jn«t
«r#»-r lartt 4f» com'- x*b\t ©taMe i- t,- of the
HIm. Ktitl \f e pr-parM to
tlfttkH© lu «il w*o msv t««tn* ft. at tns we«t ftf
BIRELEY HOUSE.
TirTOlt, IOWA.
TIM® BOTtL Is s NltW flOi'Mf wb cfc w*s ©Mn©4 'tw
I fai«r(«and
tfc# M©ptt©« of
teUtMll u«. »t»4 it pi
COir?«*iici Of it***
of May
*.»n enttf
». w'. I aUU
P'»H IJ.
John H. Bireley, Prop'r
M. T. WlLUiSSL V. k EICNtLBEROIR.
WIM !A'.r- A- F:C HELP,F.r.-Kit, Pro- ':otors.
Waterloo, Iowa.
SU' I E
*3E3 OT
3NT A
INSURANCE COMPANY,
UARrrORD, CONK.
Incorporated A. D. 1819—Cask Capital
$500,000.
rf^UE
JLjjhj,
Agents,
Mu*cali»r. Icnca.
Q&cs ©txr Burnett'$ Book-5iore,
Second Street. 1 lj
M. LOKTI.
JUSTICERORT.
or THH PEACE ami Notary Pub­
lic. Tipton, Iowa. nl
JOSEPH I.ISDSEL.
Iff OTARY Public, Rochester. Iowa. Ofcce
J| in the Po*t Office. v2nl-ly
JOHKHl'ICH,
A.LAW
TTORNKV AND COUNSELLOR AT
Vfhce at his rasidence near Tiptoa
CMar County, Iowa.
Z a A A O N i I E
^fnr.Ai.r.R /.% nnc s 4- ur.nrr/xF.s
tflun'a. I'.untd. Othi. 1
Uaalie«, T«y», Hardware a»a F.wy
Tipton, low»- nl
Undersigned havini? been appointed
Agant for t^ns o.d a i'! reliable Company, is
prepared to issue po!i:ies on favorable terms.
WFLLS SPIOKR, Aeent.
Odice in the Court House, Tipton, Ioara.
TO ITOTTO~sio it »:.
O N s S I 1 V
Merchant», Toronto Ioica.
The above firm keep constantly on ha id a full
•npoly of
lAry Good*. Groceries, Ilardutut, Clothing,
Halt and Capt. Boots m*d Shots,
And all kind of
Goods needed by the Community
.lift li.I.l V
&
PU »IFKR,
Dentists, Ctdur M] 11', /ova.
Have the pleasnro of snnnaricinK to the citl
7.eit* of Tiptoo and vicinity, that they bare in-«le
arrang^rn -rit* that one if them will be in Tip
ton on the first Monday in earh month, and spend
o ie w^k in pnctic* of their profession.
A 1 operations entrusted to them shall be eie
cuted in ihe most workmanlike mttnner.
i!Ec« at the T'emj"'rauce Ho ise. 20 ly
Exchange Office!!
OIGHT DRAFTS on N»w York can be had
O of the Subscriber in s'uns io smt purchasers
Certificates of Deposit, and Drafts on the
Eastern Cities cashed.
American Gold furnished at a smail premium.
Oflirt ovtr Swetlaiui and Snyder' torr
WM. H. Tl THILL
Tipton, January 1, 'fifi.
JAMES W. RiULlS
ATTOftVEV AT LAW,
and Justice of the Peace,
s
HARRAS.
H. 00WES, BROTHERS ft 00-,
BANKERS,
E A E S I N E A N E
Tipton, Iowa.
(HT Office with the County Judge in the
Court House. [-3]
WILLIAM LKE,
BOOK BITWDIUI,
l,w tl L'tty.
One door ea«l of the Post Office.
Blank
AND SURGEor, Rochester
i^odar county, Iowa. nl
EUAS tHAWRER.
Rook^uf all kii1 i- kept constant,
ly hand. Counties suppHed with all
kinds of Flanks Records and olher books for
County offices, at short notice.
f. NORrHAM.
o. runrcR,
UURKEE fc
j_ IiSALERS IN
RfORTIIAM,
(locks Walrhes, and Jewelry,
SILVER W.1RE, SPECTACLES,
Cutlery Fancy Goods and Toys.
OPPOSIT* IINIO* »^'H, TWO IXH)R!* Wf*T ')f GRKKV
ST Nt i »A»*, MCK4TIH*. IOWA,
C3T 1'artioaiia attention given to all kinds
of Kepairing. I,ly.
MOlTSES FOR SALE.
THEa
undersigned otfers for sale Iwo comfort
able tltvellin" houses situated in Tipton
One is house of good size, and the other a
c«mfoitable hou^e a small family-. Both
with good lots. I3dt£] H. STAR.
j. j. aiDta. W. x. aairroan.
RIDER k SANFORD,
aUC
1
KSh'HH
TO TI'TTuK A Hu.i,,
WILTON, IOWA.
Wholesale and retail dealen i©
DRY (iOODS, (iROl EIES, Etc,
Shout, Clothing, Hardware.
and all kinds of afrricultural implements. AUo
General Fortrfrding aiid Commission Merchants,
the highest market paloe puid in cash for all
kiads of Farmers' Produce. 21 ly
OR. IV. H. TULLOH.
S U E O N E N I S
pm~ OFFICE—with DR. H. G. Gru.. near
8pringdale P. O. 28tf.
I
JUST
received a supply of Dr. FITCH'S MED
ICINES, *t the Broadway Drug Store.
A. GILBERT. Aj't for Cedar co.
INDBFIIJM JJBUT ZITAXJZJ
Ipottro & UliscellaitDp
P©or Old Buck
Tvxt—lWU Xed.
There is tn old donkey, a won Mt Jack,
Too old to lire rerjr loafc
Ha Lv no bene in the middle of hlnhoek,
Where the bones ought to grsir Tt iy *iroug.
CHORCS—Then
'he payment of taxes
let down the bare rery lotr.
And dri^c in the poor old joe,
Ho always pallg wrong with a very hard jark,
Whlrth gireato hi* driver tauth tronble,
lie's not at all fit for onr kind of work,
Far he's never yet learned to go double.
CCORCS—Then let down the bar*, &c.
What's the nse of a nag with so many bad ways
So stubborn, so old and so slow,
The best we can do is to turn him ont to grace,
In the fields where the short trasses grow.
Cn
1T'ien
d-..vr, (h" Urn.
Kansas Troubles Heal Origin and Spir
it of them.
The pretence of apologists for the
Border Ruffians that 'Kansas would have
been Iree i! it had not been tor the Emi
grant Aid Societies,' is effectually and
lorever exploded by a letter of Rev.
George W. Robbins, of Upper Alton,
who was appointed missionary in the
Shawnee courfty by the M. E. Church
in 1S-51. The movement io make Kan
sas slave territory is mort than ten years
old. For a long course of years pro
slavery Indian agents have been sent
into the Territory through the influence
ot Atchison. They took their slaves
with them, and set them to work. In
1845, when the M. E. Church divided
on the subject of slavery, as soon as it
was discovered that the Indians connect
ed with the Methodist missions would
not go wah the Southern organization,
immediately al! the church property was
secured to a pro-slavery minority, and
the India us told that they must go iuto
the church South, or have no Methodist
missionaries. A larpe portion, with a
majority of the na'ive prenchers retused-
These continued for three years to pe
tition to be served by missionaries from
the Methodist Church, or as some style
it, the Church N"rth. In May, ISIS,
their prayer was granted by the authori4
tie* of said chun.li and in the fall of thai
year, Rev. i»Ir. Gurley from Ohio, was
sent to serve the V^'yandotis, and Rev.
Dr. Still, of t*5ouri, aided by native
preachers, undertook to supply other
portions of the Territory with the word
of life and the ordinances oi religion oc
eesi nally, rial now a new crusaJe be
gan. Mr. Gurley had scarcely com
menced his labors amon£ tiie Wyandotts
till he A'as arrerted and placed under
guard, iike a thief, and sent out of the
country. Dr. Still was also ordered to
leave on pain of severe treatment should
he have the temerity 'o disobey.
Tiie agent who figured in this affair
was a certain Dr. Hewet. Our Indian
friends, not disheartened by all that had
occurred, in tht fall of 1S49, sent a del
egation to the Missouri Conference at
its session in St. Louis, consisting of
James M. Annstr ng and Esquire
Greyeyes, who bore petitions from por
tions of the Wyaiidotte, Shawnee, Dela
ware and Kickapoo tribes, asking to have
missionaries sent tiiein from that Confer
ence. Bishop James presided at the
Conference, and before he would take
any step in the premises, he, in compa
ny with the Indian delegation, waited on
Col. D. D. Mitchell, Superintendent of
Indian affairs and obtained a wriiten
permission for missionaries to enter and
labor the Territory among any of the
tribes ot Indians who might desire them
to do sa. For one year after this the
missionaries were not molested.
But Col. Benton's speeches along the
border stirred up the wrath of the Ateh
ison party, and in the winter of 1S30,
Rev. Mr Markhatn, Methodist mission
ary, was ordeied to leave the Shaw.ve
nntion. Rev Mr. Rohbms was stopped
in sight of a Shawnee appointment, Feb.
1S50, by Col. Luke Lea. He showed
Col. Mitchell's written permit, with the
petiti of the Shawnee people for mis
sionaries of the Church (Noih.) Col.
Lea replied, 'You are suspected of being
abolitionists, and you and your brethren
are disturbers here.' The case was luid
before the President (Fillmore) and the
missionaries reinstated by special order
to the Indian agents. Every effort Mas
made, however, to frightt n them away
Maj. Moseley, Indian agent at Wyan
dotte, said, 'We intend to have this coun
try for slavery, peacefully if we can, but
if not peacefully we will have it any
way,'—exhibiting a pistol! The Com
missioners treatiug with the Wyandot'e
Indians, said to them, 'You are to keep
still about slavery, but you may be sure
this will be a slave territory.' Mr. Rob
bins said as early as 1S53 to Rev. Mr.
Wheelock ef Shipman, 'If there is an at
tempt tJ make Kansas a Free State,
blood will be shed.' 'Kansas and Sla
very,' has been the Atchison pirty's
motto for ten years. And now they pre
tend that the blocdshed is caused by the
Emigrant Aid Society The spiri' of
the pro-slavery men of the border is
what it always hms been. Witness the
following:
FIENEISH—The
TIPTON, CEDAR.Co. IOWA—SATURDAY, AUG.
There sno raoro work for poor oldBaek, murdered yesterday or day before.
Let him go where the old nags (o.
His legs are long when he rans after vofsa,
But he has no eyes for to see—
And his teeth are wora out eating public eats
Ro he'll have to let the public oats be.
CaoRrs—Then let down the tar», fcc.
Dayton, Ohio, Ga­
zette, publishes a letter, signed by three
individuals at Blue Spring, K. T., giv
ing an account of the fiendish way iu
which the border ruffians disposed of a
Free State man:
'Yciterd^ morning we were going to
ygPTKAIi ZN
Tecumseh, but wTien alxtut eleven milea
from that place, we were appalled by the
ight of the body of a murdered man,
firmly tied to a tree by the roadside.—
He was tied with b» back to the tree,
and his hands and feet partially around
it. He had been shot just above the left
eye, as we auppose, with a rifie ball. A
large hunting-knife wits sticking in hi#
breast. It had been driven elear thro'
Lim, and the point was two or three
inches in the tree. He was evidently
There was a toadstool tied to the
knife-handle, on which th© following in
scription was written
'Let those who art going to vole against
Slavery in Kansas tak* warningV
The name of the man was Laban
Parker,
and
he
teacher Philadelphia, takes great
interest in his genius.
1829—Enters Junior Class, Charleston
College.
1829—Graduates and leaves College,
1830 —Is confirmed in Protestant Episco
pal Church at Charleston.
Teaches at Charleston.
1831—Labors as private surveyor.
1832—Surveys one of the first railrotds
in the United Stater—from Charles
ton to Hamburg.
1833—Fiist public service under the
Jackson Administration in sloop of
war Natchcs, sent to Charleston to
put down nullification.
1S36—Commissioned as
August. Stands on the highest
peak of the Rocky Mountains, 13,
f70 leet above the Gulf of Mexico,
and unfurls the Star-spangled Ban
ner.
October. Reports at Washington
for further duties.
1
$43—Starts on his second expedition.
Discovers Central plate or basin
of the North American continent,
and corrects the previous maps by
showing that no streams flow from
Salt Lake.
1845—Jan.
29. Made first Lieutenant
and Brevet-Cap'.aiti of Topographi
cal Engineers by President Tyler,
under the
recommendation of Gen.
Scolt.
Oct. 27. Appointed Lieut. Col.
of Rifles by President Polk.
November. Starts on a third ex
pedition to California.
1S45—Arrives in Caiiiarma.
XS4G—Gen. Castro, Mexican, in com
mand, has
orders
to
Peak,
drive
Martial.
was from Cleveland,
Ohio.— Tem. Organ..
Chronological Table of Fremont'© life.
CUT THIS OCT FOR RErRUFNCl.
1813—Jan. 21. Bora in Savannah, Geor
gia.
1818—His father dies and leaves
him
five years of age with
at
his
mother,
a
ther and a sister.
bro­
1$:I0—At school in Virginia.
18^3—At school in Charleston.
1826 -Taken in charge for better educa
tion by John W. Mitchell, Esq., a
South Carolina lawyer.
1827—Dr. Robertson, now
a
classical
Profesaor of
Mathematics in the Navy.
Made Master of Arts by Charleston
College, without his bulicitalion.
183(5 —Reigns his commission in the Na
vy, and selected hv Jackson tj serve
under Capt. Williams, Topographi
cal Engineer.
1837—Surveys
mountain range© of C©r
olini and Tennessee.
1S38-Surveys Cherokee country for
1
military Map.
July 7. Commissioned as Second
Lieuten»nt Topographical Engi
neers.
Administration of Mr. VanBuren
determines on an exploration of the
region north-west of Missouri, and
are usked by Mr. Nicolet, who is
head of it, for an assistant possess
ing science, energy, eou.age and en
terprise," and Lieut. Fremont selec
ted by Mr. Poimett, Secretary of
War.
1S38 '39 Engaged in the explorations.
1810—Makes maps of surveya, and sur
veys Des omes river, Iowa.
1841 Oct. 19, Marries Jessie, second
daughter of Semtor B.nton, who
was in her 17th year.
1842--First explorations of the Rocky
Mountains.
Makes his celebrated speech to
the Indian Council at Fort Laramie.
him out of
California.
Etitreiichti himself on Hawk's
to resist.
Not being attacked marches tow
ards Oregon. Lieut. Gilles le en-
of Great Britain.
Fremont retraces bis steps to Cal
ifornia. In pursuance of direction
ma.
1847—Gen. Kearney arrives to take Cal
ifornia and finds it already taken!
and is greatly vexed.
30, 1856.
phan and the la?t of his family.
1947—President Polk tenders him his
sword and rank which he refuses
because its acceptance would ac
knowledge the justice of the Court
1848—Prepares to emigrate to California,
to reside as a private citixen. Great
sympathizing meeting with him in
Charleston, S. C., by citizens, and a
sword presented to him by them,
with eulogy on his character and ex
ecutive services by the Charleston
Mercury.
Feb. 22. 20,000 copies of bis re
port of explorations ordered tu be
printed by tiie Senate.
July 17. James Buchannn, iu a
letter to the President indorses Fre
mont as entitled to the highest con
sideration from his well known abil
ity and superior means of informa
tion.1
Oct. 19. Goes out on fourth expe
dition at his own expense, aided by
citizens of St. Louis.
v
1846—Appointed by President Taylor
Commissioner for running boundary
between Mexico and California.
His influence with the members
of the Constitutional Convention
Bake Cilifornu a Free state.
Is selected a Senator in United
States.
IS50-Sept. 13. Takes his seat as U. S.
Senator, and the next day submits
seventeen post roufes and eighteen
bills for relief of California.
Sept. 12. Introduces bill (or a pa
cific wagon road Opposes taxation
of mining in California, and speaks
for free labor.
The Rayal Geographical Society,
London, award him the founder's
medal.
Receives from the King of Prus
sia, accompanied by a letter from
Barou Humboldt, a gold medal com
memorative of those who have made
progress science.
1861—Jan. 3. Col. Benton, at reguestof
Mr remont, introduces a bill to
settle land claims in California, and,
lest he should be accused of selfish
ends, excepts Col. Fremont's claim
from tiie bill.
Is detained in California under
illness of Panama fever.
Is supported lor new term by the
Free state Party, but, after 110 bal
lots, defeated every native Calif or
nuin in the Legislature voting for
him.
1852 '53—Travels in Europe, (at the
time he is said by Alderman Fulmer
to be at a Catholic cathedral in
Washington,)and is everywhere re
ceived with ilattering attention.
1753—Makes a filth expedition, at joint
expense with Col. Benton, lo test the
practicability of railroad route for
winter trial.
Sufiers incredible hardships from
hanger, and is supposed to be lost
for five months.
1854—His Maiiposa title confirmed by
the December term United States
Supreme Court, after Strenuous ar
guments by Attoruey-Genera! Caleb
Cushing against it—Chief Justice
Taney giving the opinion, and in
dorsing his conduct in every respect.
Reported 17 Howard, p. 540.
1855—De cember. Talked of for Presi
dent by Speaker Banks.
1856—May IS. Tut
PEOPLE NOMINATE
HIM.
June 18. Two Conventions
cord this nomination—this being the
anniversary of the Battle of Water
loo, when ALLIED aunes commenc
ed the discomfiture of Napoleon,the
forerunner of James Buchanan to
plundering a la Ostend.
Who Acquired California«-The Work!
of the Ras^ Yojng Man."
The Boston Post having entered upon
the work ol slandering Joi.n C. Fremont
of depreciating his public services, and
of stamping hiin as a 'rash young inan,'
the Atlas of that city begs leave to call
From the an&nal report ef UlA 8MMt©l? tf
War, IV.iember 5th, I8i4.
SECRETARY MARCT 4 OPINION* (IF OSFE, VEX*
JPT
EXTRACT.
WAR DEPARTMENT, Dee. 8, 1816.
In May, 1845, JohnC. Fremont, than
a brevet" captaiu in the corpa of Top
couuters hna with a message from graphical Engineers, and since appomt
James Buchanan, Secretary of State,'ed lieutenant colonel, left here under
to Captain Fremont, authorizing orders frcm this department to pursue
him to do what he could to prevent 1 his explorati HIS in the regions beyond
California from falling into the hand the Rocky Mountains. The objects of
this service were, as those of his previous
explorations had been, of a scientific
character, without any view whatever to
from Mr. Buchanan, takes Califor- military operations. Not an officer nor
nia with sixty men and proclaims it. soldier accompauie,! him and his whole
independent. fotce consisted of sixty-two men, em-
Appointed Military Governor of! ployed by himself as securitv against In
California by Commodore Stockton, dians, and for procuring subsistence
Commodore Stockton and Gen.
Kearney d'spute as to chief com
maud. Fremont supports Stockton,
who was in superior before Kearney
arrrived.
Nov. 2. Court-martialed for not
obeying the orders of two comman
ders. Makes a brilliant defence.
diss, a&d

is
Buys Mariposa for $3,000 and in- I the wilderness 'and desert country thro evening of the 4th of July "and on
tends to become a citizen ol Califor- which he was to pass.
One of the objects he had in view was
to discover a shorter route from th^ I things n the province, and recom
western base of the Rocky Mountain to 'mended an immediate declaration of iu-!
carry him through the unsettled, and af
terwards through a corner of tl e settled
parts of California. He approached
these settlements in the winter of 1845-6.
Aware of the critical state of affairs be
tween the United States and Mexico
and determined to give no cause of of-
snowing that if guilty, he is only I fence to the authorities ot the province, i versed to reach 1. n. On the 6th of July
technically so. with com nendablo prudence he halted! the pursuit was commenced by a body of
His mother
©a of-1 hi© compauy on the frontier, one hun-! riflemen, commanded by Col. Fre-
dred miles from Monterey, and proceed
ed alone to that city to explain the ob
ject of his coming to the commandant
general, Castro, and to obtain permission
to go the valley of the San Joaquin,
where there was game for his men and
grass for his horses, and no inhabitants
to be mole?ted by his presence Tiie
leave was yiauted but scareeiy had he
reached the desired spot for refreshmen'
and repose, before he received informa
tion frem the American settlement, and
expresses from our consul at Monterey,
that general Castro was preparing to at
tack him with a comparatively large torce
of artillery, cavalry and infantry, upon
the pretext that, under the cover of a
scientific mission, he was exciting the
American settlers to revolt. In view of
this danger, and to be in a condition to
repel an attack, he then took a position
on a mountain overlooking Monterey, at
a distance of about thirty miles, entrench
ed it, laised the flag of the United States,
and with his own men, sixty-two in
number, awaited the approach of the
commaudant general.
From the 7th lo the 10th of March,
Col. Fremont and his little band main
tained their position. Gen. Castro did
not approach within attacking distance,
ther progress in that direction abstracted French, English, and Spanish consuls
by impassible snowy mountains, and
hostile Indians, who had been excited
against him by General Castro, had
killed and wounded four of his men, and
left hitn no repose either in his camp or
on his march. At the same time infor
mation reached hiin that General Castro,
in addition to his Indi&ti allies, was ad
vancing in person against him, with ar
tillery and cavalry, at the head of four
or five hundred men and thai they were
passing aruutid the head of the Bay «if
San Francisco to a rendezvous on the
north side of it, and that the American
settlers in the valley of the Sacramento,
were comprehended in th'* scheme of de
struction contemplated agaiust his own
party.
Uuder thees circums'ance©, he deter
mined to tarn upon his Mexican pursu
ers and seek safety for his own party and
the American settlers, not merely in the
defeat of Castro, but of the total over
throw of the Mexican authority in Cali
fornia, and the establishment of an inde
pendent government in that extensive de
partment. It was on the 6th of June,
and before the commeneement of the wa|
between the United States and Mexico
could have been known, that this resolu
tion was taken and by the 5th ef July'
it was carried iuto effect by a series of
rapid attacks by a small body of adven
rous men, under the conduct of an in
trepid leader, quick to perceive and ablo
to direct the proper measures for accom
plishing such a daring enterprise.
On the 11th ol June a convoy of 200
borses for Castro's camp, with an officer
and 11 men were surpnsed and captured
by 12of Fremont's party. On the 15th,
at daybreak, the military po?t of Sonoma
was also surprised and taken, with nine
brass cannons, 258 stand of muskets, and
several officers, and some men and mu
nition of war.
Leaving a small gairison at Sonoma,
C'ol. I* remont went to Sacramento to
the attcntijn ot the Post to the following rouse tiie American settlers but scarce
extract. We presume that paper will
hardly question the authority of Wm. L.
Marcy.
y h,vJ he arrived there when au express
'"ached him from tf p-arris^n at Sono
ma, with information lhat Castro's whole
force was erofsing the bay to attack that!tlie
place. This intel'igence was received
in the afternoon of the 2.'ld of June,
while he was cn the Ameucan fork of
ihe Aaciamento, 80 miles fiom the little
garrison at Sonoma, and at 12 o'clock on
the morning of the 25th ho arrived at
tiiat place with 9U riflemen from the
Anerican settlers in that valley. The
enemy had not yet appeared. Scouts
were s-nt out to reconnoitn and a party
of26 full in with a squadron of 70 dra-
ons, (all of Castro's foroe which had
with the Josd of his transport boats and jl,e*
,'gether, explained to them the condition
the mouth of the Columbia River. This dependence. The declaration was made th"rou3hl' arousing tha border ot border
search for a part of the distance, would ®nd h? was selected to take the chief di-!ruffiau9
rection of ai'airs.
The attack ot Ca tro was the nextebjeet. I
50 in ADVANCE.
NO. 35.
inont in person, who, in three Jays, ar
rived at the Ameucan settlement ou the
R\o de los Americanos. Here he learned
tn At Castro had ubnndonelf Santa Clara,
and was le'reatuig south towaid CiutMI
de los Angeles, (the city of t^e Ang
els,) the seat of the Governor General
of the Californias, and distant 400miles.
It was instantly resolved on to pursue
him to that place. At the moment of
departure the gratifying intelligence was
received that war had commcnced ,* that
ontorey haJ been taken by uur naval
force, and the United States dig there
raised on the 17th o! July and th.it tlt«
fleet would co-operate in the pursurt of
Castn and his forces. The I
lit 4 ot In*
dependence was hauled do*vt, and tiiat
of Ihe Um©'! States hoisted, amidst tbe
hearty greeting? and 'o tiie great joy oi
the American settlers and the forces un
der the command ol Col. Fremott.
The combined pursuit was rapujiy
continued and OQ the 11th ol Au^itat
Coinmodoie Stockton and Col. Fremont,
with a detachment of marines from the
squadron and some riflemen entered the
city of the Angles without resistance ©f
objection the Governor General, PKM».
the CotnmanJer General, Castro, .-find
all the Mexican autnonties having fled
and Col. Fremont, adhering to his plan and dispersed. Commodore Stockton toolc
ot avoi jing all collisious, neither to com- possession of the whole country ns a con
promit his government not the American
settiers ready to j-in him at all hazards,
li he had been attacked, abondoned his
position, and commenced his march to
oregon, inteuding by that route to return
lo the United States. Deeming all dan
ger from the Mexicans to be passed, he
yielded to me wishes of some of bis men.
who desired to remain in the country,
discharged them from his service, and
refused *o receive others in their stead,
so cautious was he to avoid doing any
thing which woald compromit ihe Amer
ican scttlerj or give even a color of of
fence to the Mexican authorities. He
pursued his march slowly and steadily,
as the state of his men and horses re
quired, until the middle of May and had
reached the northern shores of the great
er Tlamath lake, within the limits of the
Oregon territory, wheii he found his fur
jtrest ot the United Mates, and appoint
ed Col. Fremont Governor, under tfee
law of nations to assume the functions
of that oflice when he should return to
the squadron.
Thus iu the short space of sixty da^fl
from the first decisive movement, tW©
conquest was achieved by a small body
of man, to an extent beyond thfir o#n
expectation: f..»r the Mexican authoritio»
proclaimed it a conquest, not merely «jf
the northern part, but of the whole prov
ince of the Californias.
The coininniidaut General, Castro, MI
the 9th of August, from hia camp at tlm
Mesa, and next day on the road to So
uora," announced this result to the peo
ple, together with the actual flight and
dispersion of the former authorities aiad
at the same tune, he officially communi
cated the fact of the cenqucst to th©
California and, to crown the whole, the
afiicial paper of the Mexican government,
on the 16th of October, in laying these
official communications before the public,
introduced them with the emphatic deco
ration, The loss of the Californias is
consummated." The whole province
was yielded up to the United Stales, stud
is now in our militaiy occupancy. A
small part of the troops sent out to iub
ject this province wiil constitute, it is pre
sumed, a sufficient for#e to retain our
possession, aud the remainder w II be dis
posable for ether objects of the war.
W. L. MARCY,
To the President of the U. States.
Latest News.
Tht Attack on Franklin—RtlialU Intd'
ligtrujt from a Private Messenger***
Missounani in Secret Forttjicatims
Routed by Free State Men.
A messenger has just arrived froia
Kansas with reliable information about
the reported attack upon the town of
Frank!
in.
It seems that the Border Ruffians hav©
been industriously improving the time
for several months past in preparation for
a general attack upou the Free Slate
settlers—to wipe thein out with tire ©ad
sword.
For this parpose they have erected a
block hoi se in which they have stored
away ammunition and provisions. They
felt so confident of success that they
made no secret of their intention ©a^
even fixed the time for the attack
Already had they commenced mar
dering the Free State men. A Free
State man by the name of Hoyt, from
Massachusetts, was tound shot Hear tb«
1
')'°l bouse on Washinfton Creek, and
another one whose name the mesSbnger
did not remember, was aleo shot neartha
same place.
The Free State men being perfectly
acquainted with this slate of fact*, and
knowing full well that there would ba no
interposition on the part of the govern
ment, were compelled to tnke the in
itiative and accordingly, on the night of
1-lil
in,L aUackpJ ll,e
blook hou3e at
ceede,{ iu
#om,
kilied
caP'ure(i
8PrinK
harm to themselves: the Mexican com- A dispa th from St Louis gives
mander, De la Torre, barely escaping rurP°rt8
nine pieces of brass artillery, spiked. jonty snoiher version oi the
Tiie country north of the bav of San i Pran'f
Francisco beiug cleared of the enemy,
Colonel Fremont retured to Sonoma on': kowledge of the state of affairs in Kan-
the morning of 5ih, called the people to-
border ruffian
where it was
known a quantity of arms &.c.. wero
stored. This block house «as defended
by some twenty i.ien —who of couse bad
a great a autagc in being defended by,
the fortification.
i The Free State men, however, suc-
tiie house after a fight oi
hour8.
One Free Siete man was
»«»d.tw® severelyjwuunded. They
*»me 40 stand of arms and a
canuon-
Thw urms
crossed the bay) attacked and defeated Lawrence at tne sack of that plaue in the
it killing and wounding five without
mosU'
tro',ie ,na'
and
inS
He w\s at Santa Clara, an entrenched 'wrngmy Jocmo:9 of the slavc-driviUg
post on the upper or south Aide of the democracy
bay of San Francisco, with 400 men and
two pieces o! field artillery. A circuit oi
more than a hundred miles must be tra-
s,ulen fronl
10 an
what
account of another b©t-
bul we thiuk a
probable
Frorn tbe above
1 8as we can ,rarce!
liiat it
affair at
information an! our
y
notH
(ioubt tii:U
vfr' #c*
*''*Pected. Atclnsoa
Siringiellaw came down the Mis
souri last week with the intention of hold
the border towns and
in the border towns
who ,mve
i
sas 10
heretofore been ever
ready to make a warlike foray into Kan-
car'y
,n
priacucally the squatu
ftST*-Since the last issae of thi© paper
the Junior Edi'or has suffered some
pleasure on account of a v ry agreeable
double domestic affliction! Their nata**
j're "Jesuit" and "Jennie." How d»
you like them f—Linn Register.

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