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The Tipton advertiser. [volume] (Tipton, Cedar Co., Iowa) 1856-1962, February 15, 1872, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027398/1872-02-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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Jh« Sip
tot
18
NklliM tv«rjr TksrsAaj,
MULFORD* LONCLEY,
Office over H. L. Dean's Bool f- Rhoa
Store, North of the Court House.
TKRMMi
OSIOBPT, O*K YRAR 11.60
HI
MONTHS
MANlTOl'l°il.ln.v
ATTOBXF.Vtho
75
TIIIII MONTHS
I/O HUE No.*, I- O. O. F. mwt
••vers nvcnln* their Hall
t.vrr'Javui flr i I nr.*'. I 'lotli
I nff St or#*.
MIIMIE
No.SSOl.
i
O.
of
i.T., Tipton. Iowa. Nwli every TOM
«i:i evening in (ioo.l Templars' Hall, over
A. Kagley's Store.
visiting Brothers and Bister* eordlally
greet •!. «. M. Mt'RRAT, W. C.T.
A. APLKR. W.Mee y.
f"»KP \K I.OIHJK No. 11. A. V. A A. M„ Ttp
»n Inwa. holds regiiluroommunlratlona
Oil A'edno»itay evening*, on or before foil
moon. \'iit i in lirethren welcomed,
4. n.SHKAKER, See. J. W. K YNKTT, W. M.
OILOAM t'HAlTKU No. 1«, mefU every
C5 Wednesday night aXer foil moon.
liKAKTS ON M'.W YoHK ANI
for ill) required •mount can
IIICA
fce proenre
procured of the KiiiMcrilwr. AIHO, Bills
of Exchange M'tU«h HterllDg, on Kng
land or Ireland.
tVrtlfleates of Deposit and Dank Draft* on
Hew York, Philadelphia. Roaton or Chicago
0hed, and Government Securities pur
chased.
Piivsage Tickets from Liverpool, Iiondon
•Jerry or Glasgow to New York,or Clarence,
flirnishedon moderate terms.
WM. H.TUTHIIX.
Tipton, Iowa, Kept. 1st. 1KT0.
Attorneys.
JT U.I.I AM
P. WOI.K,
SANFORD V. I.A*DT.
WOLF A I.ASDT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, TIPTON,
IOWA.
Oftlre over the City IrtigStore.
JOKkPIl W. BI Lir
AT T.AW. TIITON,
Office lu lianlc Building, tipitairs.
W. ROLU\l~
ATTORNEYbiiKcmcnt
AT I.AW.
OflUv in of Court House. |B
JuHN M.I.I'.AY. s. I..SMITH.
(JRAl OVITH,
Attomeys nt
TIJITV,
Tipton,
IOWA.
wi:h County Trcusurer, Tlptoa,
Cedar c.niaty, Iowa. Will pay t«(«i
for non-rcsl.ienls. examine laud lHles, for
llish illstfacts. *c.
I:i'fc:s t., J.W. H'lll. ASt'y Ti»n«««,
Co. Recorder: T. •Mel 'lelland. Co. Treasurer
Hammond A- Pound, It inkers. 1 "it
Physicians.
Dr. II. II. AYXARD.
1JHYSICIAN ANI1 SCRGEON. I'. S. Kx-
I
atninerof Pensioners.
tion
TLPTOII.
IOWA.
tuficc urn! l!.'»ii|. ni i .posite tne Miller
llollHS.
GEO. M. Ol llT, 1. O.,
1
irYSfcr.\N
and Surgeon. Examln** of
Pensioners, Tipton, Iowa.
Uff Residence on the second l#l«»ck MMt
ot yie Miller House, office over City Ofiig
More.
i:. H. I\4«RAIIAN, H. D.,
H(iK'iN.
oNKEoPATIIlc Pin SKI AN A SITR
i|li'-e .A. Piatt Cnrr s !*W
tidiiv. TIITON. Iow.4.
*«-|iiKeases of Women and Children
eeive sp-cial attention. 1H 47
Dentist.
E. T. RIGB1,
IH\TIHT
IOWA.
Office over Ciillertson'a
Residence south of Court House
uare.
Jtsft renrrM,—C. I.. Chainl* rs, Al. P., II. H.
Sluvnard. M. I'.. Tipton I'. T. Smith. I. IK
s., i.iu it Cil Tie iii.oiit'oate» and E l» Vnl*,
To* i'
store
Clarence. ni.Hf
Photographer.
t.
%RTI.E,
ru.ooRAPHER.
TON. IOWA.
Pictures taken in any
st vie, copied and enlarged. Rx»ns over
'««eA-
L^ewis',
west side Court Square,
All work prorn]»t!v to
ni»d wftr-
:Uitf«l. Hhop ill r. M. sterling **.'* lfc*k
»iorf. J7nV»y
Painter.
ED. B. I\GMA\,
o|*SE SKiN
A N"
I ORNAMENTAL
Painter, Tipton. Iowa. Hf
Auctioneer.
HM. II. HXOTT,
l'CT NI-.ER
Will attend promptly
toseilliiK all kinds of |roperty at
BRTKKH
A
nifli*, where ttioSf desiring Ills
ices fin f1* thedav for their sale with
si-elllg no.
Hotels.
PALMER HOl *S,
MliS
MAUV I'AI.MKU. ProprlHreai.
ItoAnlem Arid Vi« TravelliiK Public
^ill find everything to' th»»ir comfort At tnu
If m%c. »ood roinfortHl'le rHni« and
V'eiHr wtrci'f, Tipton, Iowa.
Nood Ktuhlinu Httuched. 9it
Meat Markets
NEW MEAT MARKET?
Hpul/liu
A VINO opened a, M. at Maiket in Wiy
liuiiditig, north of the vurt H(iiare,
the is Informed that no pains will he
«p«r..d to keep constantly on hand the
FUl^ll .UK AT,
ofnll kinds. Mv aito will lie
NKATNKS8
HI ACCOMMMKATION.
titf
B. LA NO.
Tailor.
N E W
TAILOESHOP!
tl. (!. KIRBV, Tailor.
lI.flTHINO made to or.ler. Cutting done
lu ttie latest «lylc, and warranted to lit.
Bhon South Court House Square,
Tipton, Iowa -'*4tf
FEESH HEATS
ARE A I WAYS U KIT AT
OW.
PORTER'S MEAT MARKET. Just
went ot cuihertsoi. & Jwk'i store. He
kcfiJ* the very be»t i|iiallt!e» of
Beef, I'oric, Mutton, Veal, A®.,
Having had nmiiv years'experience In bBjr
«nu stis-k. he knowsjiiNt what Is needed to
supply the want* of ills customer* and will
iiave.t mi Ihe block.
Ills prices area* low as the lowest,and will
fgiiarmiU* satisiW-tioii in every partlcnlar.
i he highest maiket price paid for good fat
bailie, losi- .iiol sheef. .U Mltf
mm. %v I
i
ia&
xfiaggoa
VOL. 19:
40
INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
Lodgw.
Bank.
«A. Knmna,
WM- T. HKfSKR, N. G.
It. \V. •TAKH. seo.
TIPTON
KNVAMPMKNT N«. I. O. O. R.
Meetings :Mnnl Monday evenings
«.f month.
N.
W.M.
J- HAWI.F.Y.C. P.
KI.MOTT.
Soribe.
HIVSTAI.
Kol'NT
•Kll'KD.
HAMMOND & POUND,
BANKERS,
»V*' Tlplmt. lo4Hlt
IrtW Ao a Beneral Banking
Exchange Business.
Special attention given to'eollcctlAn*. 46tf
Hotels.
POST HOrSE.
BYE.
W. H. AMIES, H. I».
s. 1,. Hm|TH, *ec.
E. POST, CLARENCE, IOWA. A
new Hotel throughout, convenient to
thedepot.and kept with the utmost regard
tothecomfort, convenience and satisfaction
of customers. vlTnlli
1IM CR HOl?HE, 7
2.
Exchange OfRc*
Bitiiir
Ntaira-ood, lOTv n.
111E PROPRIETOR of this lions,- will
spare no pains to i.lake his quests com
rtalile and in doing SO hopes lo merit the
custnm of the politic tnneially. lLirks
leave this house daily .Sundnys excepted),
for Tipton,and return. AIso, in connection
will le found a good Livery, llome custom
and farmers will lie furnished meals at re
duced rates.
t-'tf H. H. MILLER. Proprietor.
'FLEMING TT6TtSE\
North ot the Co'.'.r! S'j'.uiro,
TIPTON. IOWA.
ipHIS POPULAR HOTEL,
enlunccl and tlioKm^hly refitted and
re-furnialied, offers lie best of Accommoda
tions to foanlt»rs and the traveling putrilc.
Money or pnins %vill not he pared to
MRS. c.
IOWA.
Office over
Hal! & Maynurd's Irug stor*». 18-35
n. nrL.ll'GHLIN,
TTORNK\ AT
I.A
FLEMINO,
A. P.
Tnished
W|and .eneml
VTTORNFY
OIIM-
iV li" Aiti'nt. Will give prompt atten
tion to nil linsitii'ox cTiirn.stol to him.
('Iarenre.il*. H.'i
MAHMOK,
.* l'NSEM,i Ht AT LAW,
Mecli:inlr«i'i||c, Iowa. 41
II. II. KIIMC. I!. W. STARR.
liIRK AT4BH,
4 TTnnNEY ATI.AW. The asslsfnti. e of
/V Fairsii. Bosl4 laekton. of lows (1ty. se
cureil lor he trial of onuses in Courts of Rec
onl. Collections iiromptiy made. •*-ifflce
in i ourt ll'iin'i It.isctnent, Tipton, luwa.
41y
A. R. STAR RETT
ASfltted np an office in the Pity T»rug
store iiaiiding «'here he will continue
to huv Neuotiahlo Notes occasionally.
Justices.
IOHX K. Tl'THILil^
TT MTH'E OF THE PEACE. NOTARY TUB-'
»l Mr Insurance Agent, Mini Conveyancer.
with the County Clerk inthe court
house. Tipton,Iown, Jan. 1st,1W. nlvlS,
O. W. PORTER
II'STICK (»F TIIE PEACE. Collections.
vP and oilier prorti|t)y Alt^nd^d
in v s cad tilt**rtKon'ii corner
fuUlin$Cs
Conveyancer.
ARE IDLER,
OFFICE
Proprietress.
FLEMINI
t3
Clerk. 2!lni6
need House.
0PP08ITKTHE
RAILROAD
DEPOT,
WILTOX. IOW %.
HIS HOU»iC has heel! redtled and refur
toy Jomrii
OPES,
In flrst-clasfs
style,and Is kept second to none lu the
Htatc. The travelling public are resiK-ctfUl
ly invited. All who stop once will come
again.
Ktaltliiis itnd Fir-rt
I.Ivor) \tu»rlifi.
JOSEPH OURS, ProDrietor.
Musical.
OHN HOYT,
\0 Wholesale an.! !!eHil le.-t!ei ill
NI NIi AL !NEK€IIA\»I*E
Kriawu), Mterk
IIIHI
Pianos.
Oeneral Agent for f:-.rge Wood and other
Organs. Shwet
MUSH-
lWAi*!ia
and siogiiig liisiks
constantly on hand, order* promptly at
tended to. twjtiady .si.,
and vicinity.
S.
DAVENPORT.
A. lirown.a^ent for Mai|U-iketa
E. KEAKHoRN, Agent i«r 'edar county,
IoWK.
J.ZIMMERMAI
PIWO
MANUFACTURING GO.
Also, (ieneral Agents for
r. r.UKkto, Knahr, ^rove«
4Trtn and pnrirrrprwn
llIM Piitlios.
JU*«,
Tajlor and
Kas lcj Organs.
PIANOS fOR 03OO.
Warranted for five years.j
So. lOMain St. DlYKSPOitT, IOWA.
Livery.
LIVERY SALE AND FEElf
STAIII.K.
On XorUi 'j !",i' nt Stpmrt.
PRITCHARD & BBO.
Proprietors.
Horsrs. Carriages and Ih.Ktties to let on
reasonable term*. Drivers furnished if de
Horses Ixnight ami sold, and hoarded by
the day or week. Satlsf:i.-!i..n guaranteed.
A SEW LIVERY, FEEII W
NAI.E STABLE
TIP­
l*-iW
Jeweler.
A. II. Ciill'EETTE,
I JRACTICAI. V.- ATC V K K
I ANIJ JEWELER, Tipton. Io.v»
IN TIPTON,
GEO. S. IXEMTPTG.
At the I.arn in the i. :.r ot tne Fh-iuiltf
House, miiv found a stoi i .1 line horses,
boggles ,11,d e.,i :.,t'cs i,. let e iii, or without
a driver, on lie must re:,s.^luiilc terms, nhitf
Miscellaneous.
HKHKYK
H«*r rutting
HAI-O »N.
fjr.
CONWAY wisl-s
tolnfojrm
Ot
opened a sliop next door to the Heuung
House where l" will he
AOE-
itl anv lart of Cedar county.
list of
:i!es will »lwa\sl.e iinlat the
round
always
ft?%
i wt
i jn tr.n
li-
,i -i e
-4
IIMK TABLE

Railroada.
€kle«g« tmA Xgrth Western
RAILWAY,
and
IOWA DIVISIONS.
On and after May CTh -187*, pusiniltr
trails wUJ run as follow*:
WWT.
stations,
Chlcsgo,
Cliuton,
Clarence,
Stanwood,
Cedar Rapids,
Boone,
Potmell BInflS",
make
the entertainmcjit at his hoii-c- tiiM el
»F*».
Good Stabling on the Premise*.
All persons desiring conveyance to Da
venport, Wilton or Stanwood, can prooore
aeats in the Hacks h.v leaving their natntk
at the Fleming House.
Pacific Express,
a. in.
4£«r. m, ft*
8:2:1 p. in.
&S7 p. ni.
NttSp.m.
l^o a.
WW a. ni.
Stations,
Chicago,
Clinton,
Clarence,
stanwood.
Cedar Rapids,
Boone,
Council Ulntfc,
OOIlfO F.AHTf.
Mall.
ti£0 A. ni.
1 .ri0 p. m.
p. in.
8&i|». ni.
00 p. ni.
I:1U r.m.
«kKla. ai.
DEALER IN
BOOKS A STATIONERY,
JHirtI.lv aid TINCTtM.
Keeps Constantly on Hand all
Goods Usually Found in a
FIRST CLASS
Book Stores
ALSO MAKES
PAPER HANGINd§f*
WINDOW SHADES
A (WPKLLALLTV.
Particular Attention ia Called to
Our
ftTOCK OF Oil. NHADRft,
I n alt colors.
F. M.STERLING.
on
hand, anu will try to please
TIPTON
all
who will
give hiin a call. Ladles UuU' rutor aUftui
uooe«l at
shop «r
residence.—I^)iig hair pur­
chased and made up to order Into switches,
(•iris or waterfall*.
ESTAURANT
AND
AKERY,
391'J
BY
THEODORE MA GEE,
when* will in- Iniuid nt all times
FRESH OYSTERS,
in fi'.y style also,
Prrajh Hrrad, |1i'«.'uhr. onr«'C
Ilonerj, Ar.,
and where customers are sure of pi omptjund
careful attention. Call opposlt# the Post
tifhee, Tipton, Iowa.
ROOTS All) SllOfiS
ARE KTILI. SI A IE AT
fUD HERBCHFIKIiOC'
Old and Well Known Shog,
OF AM, KTYI.Esi. FI!OM THE
BEMJ' »»Ti n K A .N i
AT I'll 14
Lowest Frloe.
A -I (Too-l rtient of
MtES'MEISMEIIMII
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Bvf*t Eastern
Manufacture*
ffaaaasaadfltilet
HI TCH I'FTKP'W
IT ITIHE.
mm
Jc
M. BEACH,
OK A I.I' or
CTJRinTUILIi,
Has ou hand at all times a
Large and A Veil Helectsd Hiwck tl
WIliMTlKK,
INt I.L'IHM.
Parlor,
He*l Ilooui,
nun
Mall-
ViCi p. in.
I- 4:'J0a. m.
#:J7 a. in.
4:.72 a. in.
"«(:K a. m.
iu p. m.
p. m.
rscifte Eprcsa.
1:15 p. m.
Jh.Via. ni.
not
Stop.
.W a- in.
1210 a. in.
.•:*ip, m.
The Pacific Express train will stop at the
following stations: Clinton. MITW, Uu
don, Clarence, Stanwood, Meehan tear tile,
Mt. Vernon, Oertar Rapids, Hlalrstown, Bella
Plulne, Tama, Marshall, Boone, Mongolna,
Urand Junction, Carroll. Denbon, Dwlas,
Mo, Valley Jwnctlon arid tusmrtl BMfc.
Freight trains
will not atop l« tsitnrlestl
passengers, and ticket nflfteca will not be
open to sell tickets for freight trains. No
passenger will be taken on n freight train
wlthont atlckettotheBtatlon at which the:
train slope.
J. B. WATKINH, ftnpl.
II. P. RTANWOOl), (Jen. I' iss'r Agent,
Clinton, May. 251
h, s~0
F. KSTEEinra,
i.^^®
Wkit* and a*i(t.
Green «nd (iold—Iiiflfereni
Stone
tjavemler -",
Excelsior TI
oil and—SomefV,li|f UW.
Judd's Flxturea.only SMS.
Patent Perfected Fixtures,
Spring Rollers—No Vwd, no
Cords, Tape, etc etc.
I'IIICI'MIII
«0*ETHIKO FOR THE
A I E S
MppBaa*aa4 torLmt,
Hualln, and lamask
Cnrtalna.
Osll He
fore I'uriliusiiiK Eiswbsrc
Chamber, and
Kitchen Setn
COFFINS.
Partlrnlar Affcntlon paid lo
OFFI\K ||E %KME Fnrnlohed
If Wanted.
Alt ()tin* will Bcceive Prompt At•
tent
ion.
^t^re Hon th side of Court
Tipton. Iowa.
tlic.'itl/.ens
Tipton
and vlcimly iiiat
l.e
lias
BOOTS! 8HOES!
»M)TH!
SHOEH!
v-w,!I ANI NEW CI'STOMERS and the
Ur public generally are Informed that
SAM. WIRICK
Isstlll doing
all kinds o(
Custom "W
orli.,
anil also keeping a carefully selected stock
of East
I IN
Made
I
O«H|S
»t his
Boot & Shoe Shop,
VUtin Wook.
kieptni tho b*mt of *4ovk. Miutoyiu
th« tn*#•! MkiTlful w«»rkinrn,*nl charging tn
lowest I'TM'i'K, ht* not only
a rontliiiiuiiiv but tin likrreaMe of tho »tr
PATROIUIKI' IUT» TOFON- B«5KTOW^«L.
Good Boots and Shoes
MAT BR BrtVOHT
E A I«A
AT
SAM. WIRICK'8.
'Hpton City Mills.
The Subset lhers keep always on 1)11)4 k
Kirst'Rate Article of
Fa milu Flour,
Graham Flour,
Mil I in
(j
h. Bran,
fv
perfect tlU, latest styles, anil liest wear,
fihulh Side Cfturt Jfimxr S'/uarr, Tipton,
fuvn. Sept. I, ''W,
Ovists ground or exchanged at all Umes,
l«i rlnnr lirllrpmil to My part of the town.
!Wf r* W MlfFARKf!,
TIPTON, fOTKAfeJKKBW
4' 5
B8HAIS S tlilii
IMITUIIK
JPIRPPLf
Hovni^irs ntHAi
aiMlt.lTV, JACNDICK, KiaKAsK OFTMR
KIDNKVU. F.ltt PTIOVS OF TOS
»KIN, aixl all tllMeaw#* arMnK
from a dlaonlcrcd
M'irnifi
•1
H&IDFACTD1ES 111 Mil
IJTW,
sttimaHi, or IM
PARITY
1
TIfK
fUad the following Rymptomn
roiwtlpatlon. Flatulence, Inward Pile*, FaltiMH
Blood to th# Head. ArMlty of the fHomacb, NaoM
Heart burn, IMw^iiKt for Fulnewi ttr weight
the M(omwh. Sour Kn»rtuti»in««, sinking or Klutterh
llurrutl .i lutliotlt HrenthinK
hokttii «»r
I., inn I'MHinr... V
th^^igia.Uuii 1
'wu iBthftlfttwi.
ration. YHlowneaaof
4-r.
Hu
ti..
In-!-.
WH
mm
lit!«n niWit ikabal «r 4 Mf Hri.
diflVreni from stl«JJieJ»^*fc
''imIs'«ed
In
nl lb»
itr 11I«TS. Ilr.un
wqaed, f«usi
or portlcim pftne not I
pure of vrT*'
Ba
Imrt portions yrme
wor*hlM«i
in^ ttjwtl.
IK
(.IMTUINNL H-i HIIIOLI
BUOHAWS »ERXI1 TO^ilC
PtyBtrfUM o'
"ftrtjr rnmafvii* on* ui
.•flhc lie
i iik' at
wli.n
1 iteiora
Kl
l«!^-it. «.i ih
with Impure
The
HM#
M«tWMSF?il"hea of ff»-j»l
lluar iillifcT- »»f
i' 11 alt
d4KH«tivp organ" combinwd
HUMHI
the Hitters or TiM)i* will «oow«aiM
alH\e ivp]i|ioiu«
iiUu i.H
t-
Dr. Hoofland's Greek Oil,
lighting 'ure for oil Kind* of Point
ami A
AFPUJEI It \wU«ir+ allkin
Palnn Art*, auch TtlirtimatHuvhcuraitfU
htiolfttro*. Hnrnlnm, fkutaen. JfrMt liii
:.e*«, IVii»s
HI HF
iWk
AND L' LII", FALN.T MI
I«»int*or i InMctN, ]{htKW«rni*«. etc
TUkV AI.J.\. t' will CH1-M h'WIney («.
pluiMt*. 11'iotaclie. Colto. Uyaenter]
"uri'.i'i i tK.Iera IurautlkM, O)io1#ra Mortnu
I'miK in tli» WNlWMif li. jhVi*iiUd .A:'
A 1
1
TOHt
it '-rw
nl7 ly
oim/.iv
DR.
BOOTS SHOES
HOOFLAND'S
I'ODOPHTLLIK.
HuUUUiUil for Murcury
TWO FILLS A DOSE.
Themoat Powrrftil,
1 rt IHMWRI,
Vcfrlablr C'nthartlr known.
It f* not oeeeMtary to take a handful »tf th^ae PiH« to
prodtuw the dwtliad eftert tw»of them art qairhljr
and f*owerfuliy, cleanatng the IJver, Htomaoh ai«
Th
Uofdll fiu|iiit'itle*. The prlm^l|lOl
FfMlophyHin, or the AWvUolir JCxtrart«
bin by riiMiiy tlua* more rowerttii,
hltig, than the Mamlrake Itfiflf
Hon t* n|Hm the f,iv
obitnic'kum, with all
iromthe lujiirioux rofuilta'attaefeed to the imoof that
n»taeral.
lor all t!i*e»Ke
.in w hirh t!ir
I Ingradlent Is
of Itajidrakr
l, Actios, and
ut««l, thet.c piiiH will gtvo entire aatlHlhctlon In
nerof fhli.
•li f,
Jh?
'flier 1
of" i.ivert
aa.Pf
ffllOUitl Mt IIMHi
effects of th'* Hitter* or l'-»hic hujl^in
I lie liltter*i or 'J'liiiic iurWI-atU« llio
Kery ysnr Howotaartlv* »ilk tbe Mid leWnp
tliesysteai wltfc Wttemar 1 unte. aM iiu rfiseas* can
nrnggisw and tMal
insdlilnss wwiwlwi-.
tkat it is ba. UoyrkAMt» Ouius Asm
saimlvenalfjr used aiMliltfifx
lie Mt
~rw*
S*»ml
ao ill-torn-
ptnd nil, but th*n *ii not diji
wkn m^aiai
wnufvtth hta
wbeoevar tb«j mot«iKl bin w«n
sure toba vlaiiad apoa hit wlfo.
to go
HIM, ptwr w«oaMt, VMtutrd
and iMMiD^llDtag. Her banbiafl
frotfUlneu grl#v*«i b»r, and
brougbt on a fit of weeping, but nffpf
induced MtaMaim. wAtbat iheiAtt
gre«y|lN •oUI
b«co|ng, what Ua would have been
¥ery mooh wrprtMl to be charged
with, a MMiroe o( 4Mtefp|aeaa to |M*
wife, and hta pr«#fbAjf no. kM^r
iwoiimmlni^iha witb
i#"0M
be known tbi, he would doubtlea*
blvl'Mt &iKti «|ri«v«4 but bla fje«
yfwmat eyen to hu owo pnvalling
Imik
Let an HloatnOan bla
utacblerooa propensity.
One day be came home iTretted and
Impatient. He bad just received
tidings of a reoent loan, which, though
not large or Important, waa yer *exa
HOW aa all teases are. This waa per*
hapa more ao than uaual, because be
oould eaally trace it to hia own care
Whea he entered his yard he fmmd
that the gat* had been left open. Un
der the Influence of different fselinga
he would have t|uietly closed it aud
not aufiertNl it to remain iu his
thoughu. But when one ia already
vexed, a majwHWe K» itft to the
vexation.
h**
UUe of thix .*hf»
m«flrin»l
VIRTUE
Ibun*! in »M»rrr*l jmllun* of ordinary nlsMifMb Tlw
Kcou. Av., IWHI in thH aw rrmniia (Mnr
tliHr h«l s ttrart4U in Ifeat oooar
iw'M'nlilt liroti*4 met I'orwHrtlwl It* the
iit wiifiviiii'\ i*r« ttnuHounde*! and
ronuimujt uu -IHTHUIHI
fr«v itmi it»o urRKl acmti*t att oinws ao
f«r Miimiiauf* tiidocMl from their w*
r.nu .ii tonke tUunkHrd*. and mmwtmmA+r —j
IWHJ
bottled.
*,t£
Accordingly lie slammed it to with
vehemence, and entered tlio bouse de
termined to call somebody to account
IK
A a
A *H
rt fla\ in Murb a
th»« »l!t»nt »v«r
tutri'f'ahlc
ili»- ai«dk*i»al
Wlinfr WiMA fXmmrPIHrri!'"*' «'I lit*' imv«
oo«»e, ftmntaaa pwparanon highly
plMMiauf %o the |MuUit«, au1 ctiutainins iJUe
Ttrtti**of th»- Bitu*ro. Tne prk* eftna Tt
prfc* eftbt TonlrtoiiJO
per hottlp. whtrh many |wnwnpthhiil too
muht tak« Info tbat lb*
IB attarantwKl to i«*
eouii be ftirnbihfld at
ter to |MV liltl« inure
ai itr
of s pure duality. A poarartk
a ciM»Mf pdi«, NM ftt Mt Im
ore and kav«a|uo4 article?
laJs no
madkinai i«r«*paratk»N ibonid
OORIMI
none but tl
beat iugredieitL«, ami tbey wbo expect to otitalB
rheAfi M»miMiiin«l will n»t»*t certaintvw ehontad
TJmy the ^fiatast Imown
n?,j itm,Remsdiw* .ss^_
*»LtV*«in»lflviNTI.\M'hTftIA,iaEl»'Ol
e
ao^arodhla wifc.J'l
4m.
y f0?1?
house," saM-tier husband, daMrmined
to vMtUwbl|i«ia upon his Wife.
I don't think any one has lieeu out
Mtae*pe*FtWF*»renwn—thnti«, nut
ain^ wdi^iu
the mornipg."
Mr. CMUkg was mam compelled to
attribute the act to the ys in tho
street, or else charge bimself with it,
which of course he had no mind to do.
His ingenious mind devised another
tack upon which he might assail his
Wife.
Well," said lie, if it was tha boya
in the street, they wouldn't ba allowed
to meddle with the front gate if I was
at home—I hope I should baveenargy
•tiough to see %o tltat mueb,"
i'erhaps, John," said hia wife,
mildly*, if you had dinner to get and
the house to take care of, you wouldn't
find time to lie looking out of the win
dow.''
My buainess is aa uoiuplicatad as
yours, I should Imagine," said Mr.
Uolding, with some contempt, but 1
find no trouble in attending to all the
details."
Just at that moment there came to
hia remembrance the fact that if he
had been attentive as he boasted, he
would not have experienced the IIMH
which bad vliat morning befallen him.
Accordingly he thought it beat to
change the subject.
THE
In cttMippeur. «»»d tliv patn^ot will
!1 itinl hen li I
Why isn't dinner ready be iu
quired. Beenu to ine it is always
behind baud."
"It's all ready to bring up, John,"
said his wife.
Well, let me have it aa soon as
possible. My time is of too great val
ue to be wanted in waiting for din»
ner."
Mra. Golding weut out, and busied
herself in assiatiug the servant to lay
tba dinner on the table.
"What, roast beef again to-d^y?"
demanded John raiding, surveying
the principal dish with an otnlnotu.
frown. 1 should think you supposed
there was no other kind of meat but
beef. Beef two days in sucoeselon is a
little too rnuoh for me."
But, you know John, we had roast
muttou yesterday," said Mrs. Goidiug,
mildly.
Well, then, it wus the day before
that we had beef. It makaa little
diflerence. It U altogether too soon to
btviHagaia. I wish you wonld be a
little more considerate, Mary.''
This was said with an Injured air, as
If Mrs. Goldlng bad really beau acting
In a very reprehensible manner, and
stood in need of a rebuke. But with
out a word of reproach, although she
was grieved at the fault finding spirit
of her husband, she aaid, by way of
explanation:
The fact ia, John, the butcher bad
no other kind of meat except aauaagas,
and those you never eat. Ho I was
forged to do tba beat I could."
Thla remark gave Mr. Golding au
opportunity of indulgiug in an in vo
tive against the butcher for condnc
ting hia busineae with ao auipabU a
lack of attention to variety.
Whirls tb«MruO *i«hab *u the
«teMMuMh.
Vott
market,^
ftminVp Itsrtf pernlfar oi^
cleaning ft »needfly ^oxn all
the power of M^rmrr. yet free
UJH»of
arathartlr la l2"
to aend ao^
will thi
iv«r iWi-laiijl, Pyap«pftia.|MMl eitrei
»r lloonanu (lertuan Hitter* or r»
I in «oii(ie tloii With the |*lila. 'i'Ui'to
nlr
'tik*
ihe Hywteiu
then#
'I tie liittep* or Tonic ourtltcn th*? lUot^l. Mtreugthei
rh# aervos,regulates too Llvtrtao«l gtvgoMMMth.e
errv, slid vt«or.
HIM*tbefirtMl«st
to
1
(ptalMMgrtblage
MraaM lie mfltss
dies will he see i.» MMMiM sir looaiftir. ag
«*ii4RI^F m. BVANa,
formed#,"
Htkk**
Corn Meal
and Chop Stuff.
Iackpos A
u w
j| «a
ni
r»w
TMNBI
Tea ar« lb lift iy
Drugci
ggiats, Storek**o««a, ttd
Medicine Dealer*everyWne.
that I
should
mo#ning, I
aald Ifr. Ooldlag
the sanaab this n
«f it,
reproachfiltiy.
His wife might have aitawered that
there was no reason lor supposing be
would fotget tbat pnrtianlnr nrttele,
n|or« aapeoially as aba• ka«w that he
W "hir* thau ordiaariiy Md of it.
Many wlvn would have been indneed
loaagf thns mnab In extannation, but
aa bn already bean nU, MakOalillng
MaNqnuiid, andtt
aa aoi
Vi #M*t
k
li 1 i iJ'-—~
ARY 15, 1872*
8ba aooordlngly waa dtaoraet enough
to aay nothing. But not thua eaally
waa liar huaband to ba sileooed.
I see, ha grumbled, that the po
tatoes an boiled, aa uaual, whan you
kfiow how particular I am to have
them baked. It really saenu as If I
had only to wiah a thing to make sure
that It would not ba Ibrthoomlng."
To
this clan htloagid Min Uoldlng,
Not tbat b«
How «M you aay ao, John aald
poor Mra. Oolding, the team starting
to her eyea.
Well,ian't it an?" repeated her
huaband, hardening bitnaalf, ia apite
of hia half oooviaUon that ha was get
ting vary unreasonable. Havn't
time and time again told you tbat I
eonaider baked poUtoaa infinitely
preferabla la buitod Can you deny
thai? Aaitia, what with the beef
tbat I've got aiok of, and tba a|uasb
that U uaiasing, and the potatoes that
are oooked just the way I don't like
tbem, I am not likely to make a very
food dinner."
Pathaps," aatd MM. folding,
Mr. Goldlng lifted the oover, but hia
ingenuity at fault finding was by no
meaneexhaaatad.
1 dare say," he grumbled, tbat
they are cold. If there's anything
that requlree to ba warm, it la a baked
potato."
Ho saying, be took one of the pota
toes in his hand, which ao far frAn
being cold, proved a little too hot for
him to bold ootnfortably.
Rut it is needless to pursue the con
versation farther. It ia but a aiugle
illustration of what happened far too
often.
One day, when her huaband had
been unusually unreasonable and fault
fludiug, Mrs. Gotding, uuable to resist
forthe deeeJioiioti. THe Aft |impulae, bunt into tears, which
hemetwu his wlfc.mnlte her h* at farther exasperated her husband, who
once bfokamit: left the house in a pet.
How aoea ft Happen* tbm the front ...
.... ilefore lu vile bid fully recovered
from her tears, a friendly neighbor
e n e e w o a o n e n o i e a
I
something was the matter. Mrs
aay it
may have been u.y ... 'h«
Oo|)lj fa #t Rnt re,ucUut
fhmlly inducwl to reve
a
.i to her sym-
i —. ratblzing visitor the cause of her grief.
?i Had the latter bean a mischief-maker,
this might have proved uufortuuate.
but such was not the oase. 8he was a
woman of wisdom and experience,
and possessed uo small knowledge of
humau nature.
I think," she said, after a pause,
that if you will implicitly follow my
directions, I ean put you in a way of
curing ur husband of his disposition
to find fault.''
'Do you really think you can?"
asked Mrs. Goldlng, eagerly. How
ahatl I go to work
In the first place,1' aaid Mrs. Ber
tram, I'm quite confident that the
habit has grown upon him graduatly
and almost imperceptibly.*'
'It has indeed. When we first
married be scarcely ever found fault
with me."
"He is not probably aware of the
extent to which it governs him, and
would be very much surprised to be
told that he was behaving unkindly to
you. Rut this does not alter the fact.
What he needs is a mirror, in which
he can see himself just as he Is."
Aud how shall he be proviiied
with such
a
mirror
You must do it. For a day
ia bar
dlaposttlon to oarry thi Oat lalia tba
enamy's codntry ."
or two
you mnst assume his own habit
o
fault-finding. He will be surprised
aud disturbed, and when lie a*ki
When Mr. Golding came home it
so happened that his wife was in the
front entry.
Upon my woni, Mr. Golding," *he
aaid, with as much sharpness as her
voice was capable of oonveying, it
seems
to me yon think nothing of
tracking mud into the house. I should
like to kuow how you expect me to
keep tba bouse clean wbeu you
are
doing all in your power to dirty it.''
John fioldiug was completely taken
aback by such ail outburst from his
usually mild aud submissive wife—so
much so that lie hardly knew what to
say.
I didu't thiuk, Mary," ba said,
with uuwouted mildness.
Well, 1 hope you'll try to uext
tluie. What mudc you so late this
this evening! Kupper'a barn ou the
table for tho last fifteen minutes. I
do wish you would make an eflort to
be here iu time."
Mrs. Golding fouud her role an eas
ier one than she had anticipated.
AUIiough she bad not boon iu the
habit of employing the language of
fault finding, she had been so accus
touted to hearing it from her husband's
lipe tbat It was not so hard to catch as
she had anticipated.
I did not know I waa so much in
the habit of being late," said Mr.
Golding, wondering what had come
#ver bla wKe.
I dare say not," aaid sba. "People
are not apt to bo aware of their own
shortcomings. Did you stop at the
store and get that sewing silk I asked
forf
I declare, Mary, I forgot ait about
it."
"Just as I expected. I really wish
you bad a bettor memory. All 1«. you
can't have your vest mended till it
cornea."
Wall, I will get It to-morrow. But
it seema to me, itary, you might apeak
in a little pleaanntor tone. Of course
I didn't forget it on purpose."
You'd bettor aoma to tea if you
don't want it cold," said his wife, pre
serving aa sober a Atoe as she could,
though she oould scarcely help laugh
lug to herself at the little plot in
which she was playing so unaccus
tomed a part.
Tbey sat down to tba tea-table,
when Mrs- Goldlng eaid to her tldest
daughter i
Ellen, don't you know better than
to coma to the table without an
apron Uo up immediately and put
one on."
Kllen, who was net in the
started in surprise at thla unwonted
Wi iintrt
rt
from her mother. From her
tone
Ibtber she Would not hare been sston»
lshed to receive such a peremptory
command.
Mr. Golding looked at his wife In
wonder. He had never seen her dls
ptaylng such a mood.
Throughout the meal she exhibited
the same fault-finding propensity. A
small hole iu the table doth led her
to censure her husband for not buying
a supply of new ones, as she had casu
ally recommended some time sinee.
The children, too, came In for a large
ahare of blame. Everything seetned
to go wrong, aud Mrs Goldlng seemed
to have fallen heir to her husband's
ingenuity In fault-finding.
What can have come over you,
Mary t" asked her husband in blank
astonishment. You seem to find
fault with everything and every
body."
Oould you think of anybody else
who does the eame thing inquired
bis wife significantly.
WMB
a apiee of apirit, it weuld bavajeto
dbattar to males sars tbat there were no
hnksd potaUw before finding fanlt
with aaa. If you will lift tbat oover,
you will And them."
A new light flsshed upon Jolin
Golding'* mind.
Do you mean that you are giving
an imitation of nte?" he asked.
I have tried to," said Mrs. Gold
ing, smiling, but it's hard work."
Do I ever appear like that?" l.e
asked, mortified.
I'm sure, John, you dou't intend
to, but I'm afraid you make tu all very
uncomfortable sometimes."
Then I'll turn over a new leaf,
Mary, and what's more, I thank you
for the lesson."
From that time forth, John Golding
strove tn get his peevishness and feult
Qntt lender command, and found
his own happiness as well as his wife's
greatly increased thereby.
Our Case Before the Geneva Arbi
tratora.
Attest«• have au explanation of
the outcry iu Great Britain which has
followed the publication of the printed
Case" of our government, as present
ed to the Geneva Commission on the
Alabama claims. The great outrage
on justice which we have committed,
in view of the London journals, Is
tbat our government has given an
implied promise not to claim compen
sation for indirect damages, such as
the prolongation of the war and the
like and tbat, in spite of its promise,
the case in question does urge the in
direct injury done
IIR
in sggr:ivatlon of
of damages.
This complaint is most plausibly set
forth by the London fifpeHator, which
gives It substantially as follows: At
the Washington conference ou March
8,1871, the American Commissioners
said tbat claims already presented
for damages done by British cruisers
atnoun'ed to $14,000,000 that there
might yet be large sums added to this
and that the cost to the government
of pursuing these ships could easily be
determined. They added that, in
the hope of an amicable settlement,
no estimate was made of the Indirect
losses, without prejudice, however, to
the right of indemnification on their
account, in the event of
IIQ
such set­
tlement being made." The American
commissioners then asked two things:
An expression of regret on the part of
(treat Britain for the depredations
committed by the British vessels, and
an agreement by the Commission at
once upon a certain grog.^ suit) to lie
paid li£ Great lirituin, in satisfaction
of all claims, with interest.
The British Commissioner* agreed
to put on record the expression of re
gret asked for, but declined to at ree
upon any gross
for
an explanation you must tell hiin
yoor object."
This proposition was rather a
Mart-
ling one to mild Mrs. Goldlng, but
altera time she came to tae that it
might be productive of good, and after
some further advice aud instruction
from Mra. Bertram, she felt in a meas
ure prepared to carry it out.
MIH.to ie
ptiid, believ­
ing that there was still a defence
which, in case of arbitration, might
protect them from the necessity of
payiug anything. The American
Commissioners accepted the express
Ion of regret as very satisfactory to
them and as a token of kindness."
Xow the Spectator insists, and other
British journals assume, that the
treaty which followed was an "amica
ble settlementthat it was doutly
so In view of the cordial acceptance by
our Commissioners of the expression
of regret made in it and that having
reached this settlement, the United
States were bound to avoid making
any elaim whatever for indirect dam
ages thereafter. In presenting the
frightful looseness of conscience which
permits oit government thus to break
its implied ptomisc, the SjiwtntQr bo
conies strangely bewildered, aud finds
Itself wholly unable to explain the
matter consistently with its respect
for our country.
Tue lioiiaoii press ia childish.
There is no other word which fairly
describes its state of miud in peevishly
and obstinately adhering to the appar
ent sense ot one incidental word, and
blinding itself to the meaning of a
whole series of negotiations. Tho facts
are these The United Htates made a
definite offer to settle the whole case
at once iu the Joint High Commission,
by accepting an expression of regret
and the payment of a gross sum to be
fixed by them. This was the precise
amicable settlement" they asked,
aud they offered, iu direct connection
with this proposition, to fix the gross
sum to be paid with reference solely to
direct damages, leaving out of sight
the indirect. While they made this
offer, if such a settlement should be
made at ouce, they expressly reserved
the right to urge all claims, for indi
rect as well as direct damages, if it
were not made.
The Spectator quibbles on the word
"amicable," and oan see no other
word In the whole history. It asks:
Was uot the treaty an amicable set
tlement?" We answer what evary
schoolboy knows, tbat the treaty waa
amicable," Just as much so as the
Spectator insists, but in no sense a
settlement." Our proposition was,
if the High Commission would "set
tle" the oase, to abandon certain
claims. The Commission refused to
settle it, and adopted a treaty which
merely provides means for the future
settlement of it. 11 is evident, there*
fore, that the refusal to aettle it, re
mauded us to all our rights and olaims
in that future settlement.
Precisely similar caaes occur in
courts of justlco every day. Bef ire a
cause is tried the counsel for plaintiff
offers to acoept a round atitu as a *«t
tlement of the case, without preju
dljathat ia to aay, reserving tba full
right, if the off^r is rejected, to
r.
Mrwt
jk^jUki
NO.
hts whole claim. If the defendant's
oounsel should then nfim a settle
ment, and go on to insist that the
plaintiff's offer of settlement fixes the
very maximum for which he ean ask
to have a verdict, he would act in a
dishonorable manner, and would de
serve to be thrown over the bar. Yet
this Is precisely what the leading
London journals, almost with one ac
cord, now urge their government to
do.—JY. F. Port.
A. Remarkable HiatoJf:'
In 1868, Mr. Thomas Hheehan of
Daaklrtt, N, Y., foreman In the black
smith department of the Erie Railroad
shops at that place, patented a sapma
rine grapple, whleh, though an Ingen
ious invention, proved to be oue for
which there was little demand. This
was his first invention, and the oost of
Ita completion, together with one year'a
struggle to manufacture and introduce I
it, completely exhanated Mr. Shoe
ban's means and reduced him to the
eatrenaeat poverty. He was in fart tn
pretty nearly tbe aame condition as
Palissy the Potter, at the moment of
his greatest distress. A wife and eight
children, Bheehan's family were re
duced to the verge of destitution, and
Mrs. Bheehan tiecame unconsciously
bitter.
Just at this crisis, Mr. 8. D. Cowell,
general freight agent of the Erie Rail
road at Dunkirk, chanced to meet Mr.
Hheehan in the streets of that town,
and accosted him with:
Well Thomas, how are tbe grap
pies? I hear they have used you up."
Yes," was the answer, "tbe grap
ples have done my business I wish I
bad never seen them."
"Throw 'em away," advised Mr
Cowell. Have you any now fin-
To this merchaut he hietj, and some
what reluctant to preler his request,
begau beating about the bu?h, and
fiually strayiug into politics,hot words
passed between them, and our friend
feeling his manliness would suffer ton
keenly by askiug credit for his steel,
cauie away without it. With no
definite purpose he went home, pon
deriug how he should surmount thla
now no trifling obstacle of the broken
tap. He found his wife making lye for
soft soap, but her acidity in uo way
neutralized by the alkaline reaction.
Despondent and discouraged, he sat
down in no very enviable mood, when
he chanced to spy a piece of iron lying
near the tub at which his spouse was
working. Meditating how he could
make that piece of iron bard enough
for a tap, he was led to a rather rude
experiment, the results of which have
in Ihe end made him a richer man
than he ever dreamed of being.
It so happened that from a distant
relative, a Roman Catholic priest in
Ireland, our friend had inherited quite
a library of works on chemistry, some
of them rare and valuable. He had
read some of these books to very good
purpose. There is surely carbon in
that lye, "thought he. "If I only
could get tbat into this iron in the
proper proportion I should have steel,
and from that my tap, and so finish
my grapple."
With little faith or hope that he
should succeed, he look some of the
lye and adding, without any particular
reason for so doing, some saltpetre
and common salt, made a paste with
this solutiou and a hard-grudged sau.
cer.'ul of the little remaining flour
there was in the house. He then
forged tbe tap, and, enveloping it in
the paste, put the whole into a luted
iron box and exposed it to beat for
two hours in a blacksmith's fire. To
bis Joy and surprise, when he took it
out, it was hard enough to cut cast
steel. The grapple was finished, and
$40 flowed into the family treasury of
Thomas Hheeuan. He went back to
his old work, disgusted with patents,
and resolved never to have anythiug
to do with one again. But tbe remem
brance of the tap, hardened in so
unique a manner, stimulated him.
Having a great deal of case-hardening
to do, be thought one day be would
repeat tbe experiment upou a large
scale, which he did with perfect
IUC)M.
For twelve months he went on to
experiment, purchasing the material
with his own money, and working in
secret by night, and odd hours. At
tbe end of twelve months he reconsid
ered bis sentence of condemnation on
patents, and applied for one on his
process, which was granted Septem
ber 4,1800, the olalm being for a com
bination of damaged flour, potash !ye,
or lye from hard wood ashes, niter,
common salt, and sutphrate of sine, for
oase-hardening iron. In 18C7 he pat
ented an improvement on the above
named process. In 1868 he took out
another patent for an entirely new
process, wnich consists in thn use of
raw limestone, charcoal, black oxide
of manganese, sal soda, oomnon salt,
and pulverised iwln, combined for
WO iMK man r*f«ty-tbree of tbe
ailag railways Mf km*\m now Me
thla prooeea,
1
lshed?"
I have one almost done," .said
Thomas.
Finish that I will pay you forty
dollars for it, and have It used for pick
ing up ooal at the dock. The money
will help you in your present emergen*
cy, and ycu can go back to your old
place iu tbe shop, and earn a good liv
ing for your family."
I will," said Thomas.
Bade to bis bumble home went the
iuveutor, with new hope in bis breast,
and set himself to finish the grapple
with all due speed. But upon what
slender threads do the fortunes of men
bacg! A tap, tbe only one our invent
or had of tbe size required, suddenly
snapped asuuder, and as It was essen
tial to the progress of the work, he
must have a new one or be oould not
go ou.
I n tbis strait he appled to hia wife
to lend him twenty-five cents to buy
the necessary steel to forge the tap.
But she, having no faith in tt?e grap
ple, refused for two very good reasons
—first, that she believed the money
would be thrown away if she gave it
to her husband and second, that she
had not tbe money to give blm even If
so disposed. The refusal was seasoned
with some very hot word-spice, that
made it very uupalatable to Thomas.
But he bethought him of a merchant
who, in brighter days, had seen the
color of his money, and who, perhaps,
would now give him the credit for the
small motlicum of steel he required
for the tap.
fr0l°
patenteaftWHOMlVMMks, guides,
ptnaand autaufiaainirfNse, afliming,
we an hdd, no laaaaanvta® than from
five to six han*aal at iHaatJ—u»'»y
on each locomotive, in obviating the
loot motion ertOtqlltat
for the Advertiser.
Vhm Moderate
we»r
of links, guldaaaai WiA tielnven
toAhas already leemeT Wjtoences
unaer bis patent flf WlO, WW, »*d
has just sold the rrtlaltl^w j!* pat
ent in America forWi.xKD-.lWcnfi/-'
American.
7i
BVt. U. INa&AliAM M. Ih
Whenever a widespread evil Invades
society, multiplying victim* and mak
ing itself felt in every ctTCte, public
opinion rises up In indlgnathm to In*
quire what Is the caune and irho Is to
be blamed for it. The spread of In
temperance in our country Is a public
calamity, and the advocates of the
temperance refbim have often sought
to frame' a hypothesis that wotrid
throw light on the perplexing ques
tion, and thus single out and expose
to putilic censure the merclleas and
brutal hearts who have brought a gi
ant evil upon human society.mfftltlng
many a joyous heart and happjf tiome,
and rendering many of the MblMt of
our kind more vlleandloatfiaWSfi* than
the beast* of the field.
Temperance men have had nfuch to
say about" strlkiaf at tie taproot"
aud "drying up tbe fountain," mean
in the draqpshop. Neither the distil
ler nor the vender of ardent spirits is
ever mentioned by us except In term*
of contempt and abhorrence. We are
too far enlightened to-day to persecute
and despise the drunkard himself.
Him we have learned to take by the
band, to give bim encouragement and
support. Tbis is a great advancement
from our old way of thinking and ac
ting. A few years more and we may
learn somewhat of Christiau furl ejr*
ance and charity toward tbe runaseller.
But this can never be until we hive
sought out and convicted the true in
stigator of intemperauoe. I mean the
moderjtedriuker." With abundant
intelligence, reapectability, and au
easy control of pasaion aud appetite,
unmindful of the force of his example
upon a weaker brother, be persists lu
patronising tbe saloon keeper, aod by
his presence there render* drinking
fashionable.
I would not detract 9ne lota fjroii)
the guilt of the rutuseller. Qver bis
wandering steps an affectionate—a
sainted mother even in Heaven might
weep. But we know uot the lyog
story of his temptations. Low born,
low lived, low bred bis may have
been only tbe one talent. And if,
while hidiug the gift of God in a nap
kin and stifling his better nature, he
must iucur our censure, what #ord$ of
rebuke or condemnation are sharp
enough for the high born, well dressed,
educated aud vcholarly gentleman,
who throws tne full weight of his
example in the face of n)oraHty knd
civilisation?
Much has been done of late yeattt to
effect the enaotmont tf pfotfbtfton
laws, and God speed tbeday thkt shall
aee them ou our statute books.
But let us remember that an etlct of
tbe Legislature is ouly a name, a help
less thing which has no life except
what it draws tcom popular opinion.
Therefore, in our labor of reform,
while we raise up those wl*o hM1* a"'1
speak kind words of warning tq the
young, we must also appeal brtvely to
the man who pretends to driuk in
inodaration." He may tell you that
be was never drunk that he can use
and not abuse ardent spirits that
cider, even fermented, is harmless,"
and wine "goot for the stomach,"
and you may iiud it hard to make
headway against, bis sophistry. But
if he be honest and philauthropio at
heart, lie will easily understaud that a
weaker brother canuot advance of as
cend to sobriety unless stronger,l)ear ts
shall lead the way.
MA AID THAT.
The pteasahtost Ying in one s
that of the dinner bell.
How uiauy peas are thefe if| aV
Only one p, surely.
An ungramatioal judgeie-npt to Ma
an incorrect sentence.
Mock turtle—Kissing before Cotn
pany, and fighting afterwards.
Woman flrst" tempted man to eat.
He tojk to drinking on his own ac
couut.
Garrison says that the woman ques
tion was aINembracing" one. Who
Slid it wasn't
They say female coaipositoia get
through their copy very rapidly* being
anxious to get the last word.
If a man tells you tbat water leached
through ashee ia fit for beverage,
dou't believe him. It is a lye.
The laat remark made fcjr a mau
while separating under the Influence
of nitro glycerine was, Let me col
lect myself."
The reason why so few marriages
are happy, Is because young ladies
speud their time In making uets, not
in making cages.
Naomi, the daughter of Enoch, was
580 years old when she married.
There's hope for some of you other
ladies, after all.
A New Orleans paper »as that a
young widow In that city, who writes
well, is training herself fur an ali
tor." Who is the editor she Is train
ing herself for
No one has died in Holmes county,
Ohio, for ten years p*at,and the citi
sens naturally begin to regard their
present habitations as UM4C eternal
Holmes.
Ma tbis milk ia batter than ye.
terday's milk was."
DOQH U»at,
child, say there's more milk in this
water than there W«s In tbe water we
got yesterday."
Hungry boarder: Some note
bread, If you please I always eat a
good deal of bread with my meat."
Sarcastic landlady:
"So
I see, sir
likewise a good deal of meat with your
bread!"
Grace Greenwood calls Brlgham
Young a mysterious, masterly,
mauy*sided and many-wived mau.'1
If bis wives originated like Eve, be
would need to be "many-sided" to
meet the demand for ribs.
Bays the New York Mail: "The
definition of wedding,'in the fash
ionable vocabulary, meaus a grand
crisis of clothes, bride,' a peg on
which finery of all kinds is hung
bridegroom,' a sober, black object
following the bride, of no account in
in particular, aud yet without whom
there would be no tba bin
could not uo on."

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