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Hungry Horse news. [volume] (Columbia Falls, Mont.) 1948-current, September 23, 1955, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027524/1955-09-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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Park Theatre Shows
'Hansel and Gretel'
"Hansel and Gretel," a technicolor
production featuring electronically
controlled puppets will be shown on
the Park theatre screen Friday and
Saturday.
Music of the well known "Hansel
and Gretel" opera is used, and the
story is from the old German fable.
The show received a Parents mag
azine "outstanding movie of the
month" award and is recommended
for the whole family.
It is a story of long ago when
there lived on the edge of the great,
mysterious forest, a poor broom
maker with his wife and two child
ren, Hansel and Gretel. So poor were
they that the children had to work
endlessly at chores while their par
ents were selling brooms in the mar
ket or gathering sticks in the for
One day, Hansel and Gretel tire
of their work and begin to dance
with their pets, Suzy the goose and
Gingy the bear. Unexpectedly their
mother returns and seeing that the
children have neglected their work
she chases them with a stick. In
the confusion a pitcher of milk, their
only food, is spilled, and the child
ren are sent into the forest to gather
wild strawberries.
Unaware of their danger, the chil
est.
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PRINTING
For the first time
since Repeal -
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Hermitage
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OLD
HERMITAGE
BRAND
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***• Pint
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT
BOURBON WHISKEY
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Code 29C
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Code 29D
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86 PROOF • THE OLD HERMITAGE COMPANY, FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY
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Anything less is an
old-fashioned truck!
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New Chevrolet
Chevrolet Truck Work Styling is well illustrated
in these four models ranging from the Low Cab
Forward and Cameo Carrier at left to the
pickup and tractor-trailer unit at right.
Trucks
duty models,' another for heavy
duty. Your Chevrolet truck will do
your job better—and look better!
Most modem features throughout
Advanced suspensions! More rigid,
ladder-type frames! Tubeless tires
standard on Vi -ton models! Come in
and see all the ways you're way
ahead with new Chevrolet trucks!
•V* standard in L.C.F . models, an extra-cost
option in oil others except Forward Control
models.
tion and wear per mile. And all
Chevrolet truck engines have a mod
ern 12-volt electrical system for
quicker starting, better ignition and a
greater electrical reserve.
The truck driver's "dream cab
With wide panoramic windshield,
concealed Safety Step and High
Level ventilation system.
Work Styling—a Chevrolet exclusive
Two fresh, functional styling treat
ments—one for light- and medium
Year after year, America's best selling truck!
Most modern trucks on the road!
If you don't get all the advan
tages they offer, you stand to
lose money on the job today .. .
and again at trade-in-time!
»i
Most modem power—V8 or 6
In most new Chevrolet truck models,
you have your choice of V8* or 6.
Chevrolet's new truck V8's have the
shortest stroke of any V8 in any
leading truck! That means less fric
ÏK
HARLOW CHEVROLET COMPANY
Whitefish
dren go deeper and deeper into the I
woods. Their parents set out to find
them, but tricked by Rosina Rosy
lips, the witch, they lose their way.
The children come on to a won
drous cottage made of cookies and
cakes and fancy frostings. In front
of the house is a hedge of ginger
bread children. The story continues
with the well known fairy tale.
The technicolor production of
"Hansel and Gretel" features a
modern type of puppet. In effect
they are electronically controUed
dolls -
A cowboy picture, "Down Laredo
Way" starring Rex Allen, is the com
panion show. The whole program will
be shown twice. Shows start at 7
and 9:15 p. m.
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Home Colors
by Leonard Yager, Horticulturist,
Montana Extension service
BOZEMAN — The use of dried
plant materials lend themselves to
the construction of attractive ar
rangements that will bring color into
the home throughout the winter
months.
Some garden plants, especially
in the everlasting flower group, hold
color well when dried. Gomphrena
and Helichrysum are two of the
more popular flowers of this group.
The plants can be gathered from the
garden when the flowers are fully
formed, tied in bundles and allowed
to hang upside down in a dry cellar
or shed. No other treatment is nec
essary in handling them.
Other garden flowers can be dried
but care must be taken in handling
these so the flowers retain their
original color, form and shape,
Many garden flowers are
fully dried in clean, moisture free
sand. Care must be taken when
placing the flowers in sand so that
they do not become distorted and
put out of shape,
Many interesting seed pods and
gra ss spikes of native plants make
interesting plant materials for dried
arrangements. Ripe wheat barley
and oat heads make interesting sub
jects, as well as the spikes of native
grasses. Seedpods of yucca bur
dock, poppies, milkweed are only
a few of the interesting native plants
that can be used effectively in ar
rangements. Dock seed heads
found in rich green, brown and red
success
are
shades and provide plenty of color.
Dried sagebrush plants add interest
ing greys, blues and greens to the
dried arrangement. The late sum
mer blooming purple liatris or blaz
ing star, if properly dried, is an
other good native wild flower to add
color. Colorful autumn foliage from
trees and shrubs is another import
ant source of color for the fall ar
rangement.
Containers which match or com
plement the colors of the dried plant
materials are most suitable. They
should also be of a texture related
to the plant materials used. Since
no water is used with these arrange
ments, flat containers are very suit
able. In fact slabs of wood of ir
regular form, or irregular pieces of
flat stone, highly lacquered serve as
fitting bases or containers for fall
arrangements. Copper and brass
containers fit in beautifully with the
color scheme of many fall arrange
ments, so are very useful.
Pin point holders are useful for
holding the plant material, but even
more useful is a small amount of
floral clay, or plasticene, fastened
down to the container. Use enough
clay so that the plant material holds
up well without falling over because
of its weight.
The same principles of design
used for fresh flower arrangements
can be employed with dried arrange
ments. Dock, grasses, sagebrush are
useful in developing the fine or form
in the arrangements. Seedpods, dried
berries, rounded forms of dried flow
M know
ONTANA ..
GREAT TEST FOR EXPLORERS
The greatest test of endurance for the Lewis and. Clark expedi
tion crossing Montana in 1805 on its way to the Pacific Ocean, came
in the month of September.
This test was the two-week trek across the Bitterroot mountains
by way of Lolo Pass into the Idaho country. The Idaho country
south and west of Lolo Pass is a jumble df mountains, ridges and
spurs, slashed with deep rugged gulches and canyons.
Game was scarce and food supplies ran dangerously low. The
men ate bear grease, horse meat and even coyote before they
emerged from the heavily forested country to reach the Clearwater
River in Idaho.
As the result of their fasting, privations and partial diet of
roots, most of the men were sick and exhausted. Nevertheless they
started at once to build canoes and on October 7 of 1805 took to the
water once more and were on their way to the Columbia River and
the Pacific.
THE ANACONDA COMPANY
"Work for a Greater and More Prosperoua Montana"
This Is a project that should include all Montanans.
FORESTRY-U.S.S.
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mcuAsmemims
OF AMERICANS ARE
Efuovma outings in
FOREST AND WOODLAND
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MANY LEAVE TNC MARK
OF A GOOOWbODSMAM
A CAMPGROUND
SAFE AND CLEAN
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OTHERS'EITHER 'Tfe
CARELESS OR THOUGHTLESS^
LEAVE A MESS—J
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JLCAYT YOUR CAMP OR PfCN/C SPOT TUB WAY YOU'D LIKE to FIND It
ed in flower shows in order to en
courage the use of naturally colored
dried materials.
ers can be used as focal points. The;
types of arrangements that can be
made are endless.
While many plant materials used
in fall arrangements are gilded or
painted, it is more desirable to use
the materials in their natural colors.
One needs to work with these mat
erials only a little to realize that
there is much natural and beautiful
color in our plant materials with
out the need of coloring them artifi
cially. Judges disqualify artificially
painted dried arrangements exhibit
Annual School
Census Underway
Underway in Flathead county and
all over Montana is the annual
school census.
Purpose is to obtain the names
and ages of all persons between the
ages of 1 day (as of Oct. 1) and 21
years.
The apportionment of state funds
to help support schools is based on
the school district census figures
from the ages of 6 through 20.
Making the census of the more than
2,000 in this 1 day to 21 years age
group in District 6 is F. P. Fleming,
school district clerk, assisted by
Mrs. Fleming.
Pine Grove School
Has 15 Students
PINE GROVE—Pine Grove school
opened this fall with 15 pupils pres
ent. Mrs. Lois Magar of Kalispell is
teacher. Tommie Parker is a new
student and his parents are living
in the former Ed Martin home. Bon
nie Holmquist and Jimmie Schroed
er are the first graders. The school
house has a new look about it, with
its new door.
Last Sunday the Pine Grove Bea
vers 4-H club met at Lake Blaine
for a picnic. Members were treated
to roller skating, while others went
swimming or boat riding.
Mrs. Charles Warkins was honored
by her closest neighbors at a birth
day party at her home last Satur
day evening. The evening was spent
playing canasta. Guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Carl Patterson, Mr. and
Mrs. George Trankle, Mr. and Mrs.
A1 Tronstad, Mr. and Mrs. M. Street
and Mr. and Mrs. L. A Bruyer,
Mrs. Frank Logan and Mr. and
Mrs. Darrell Logan of Creston, Mrs.
Ben Bruyer, Mrs. Linda Bauer and
Mrs. Lawrence Bruyer visited at the
home of Mrs. M. Street, Friday af
ternoon. They presented her with
a birthday cake and a remembrance
in her favorite glassware. Darrell
Logan is handicapped with a sprain
ed ankle that he received at the
fair, while looking at some machin
ery, so he was able to do some vis
iting in the neighborhood, also.
An announcement from Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Carlson, of Arvada, Colo,
tells of the birth of a daughter, Su
san, Sept. 1. Mrs. Roy Carlson was
the former Marvel Hoagland and
taught at Pine Grove several years
ago.
Jim Davises Buy
Hungry Horse Home
HUNGRY HORSE—Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Davis have purchased the Cliff
Westerfield residence in Hungry
Horse. It is a two bedroom home.
Davis plans to continue his photo
graphy and scenic postcard and col
ored slide business, and feels that
the Hungry Horse location will be
an aid.
In June, 1949 Davis opened Pio
neer Photos in Martin City, and then
moved the photography store to Ap
gar in 1950. From January, 1951 un
til March, 1953 he was in the United
States Navy as an aviation photo
grapher. He had been in the coast
guard during World War II.
He met Mrs. Davis, the former
, Doris Lewis, Pine Town, N. C., at
1 Pensacola, Fla. She was a WAVE.
They were married in Alabama and
both served in the Navy in Hawaii.
The couple returned to the Flat
head in March, 1953, and he became
Inter Lake photographer in Kalis
pell in April, 1954, remaining in that
position until June, 1955. Recently
Davis has been employed on the
McLaughlin road contract in the
park. The couple have three child
ren, Mike 3, Alan 2, and Alleen 1.
Great Northern
Passenger Train
Schedule
Changes
Beginning Sunday, September 25,
1955, Great Northern's Western
Star (Nos. 3 and 4) and the Fast
Mail (Nos. 27 and 28) will be con
solidated between Williston, N. D.
and Seattle, Wash.
The consolidated train will re
tain the name Western Star (Nos.
3 and 4) and will be operated both
westbound and eastbound between
Williston and Seattle via Havre,
Great Falls, Shelby and Spokane.
Stations in Montana between
Havre and Shelby via Chester will
be served by a diesel-electric motor
car and passenger coach on a daily
schedule in both directions, begin
ning Sunday, September 25. These
trains will be Nos. 27 and 28.
Your local Great Northern Rail
way agent will provide detailed
information on the new schedules
of trains covered in this announce
ment.
Water in Sub-Soil
Aids Spring Growth
BOZEMAN—It pays to apply wat
er in the fall in most irrigated areas
of Montana, says H. L. Dusenberry,
extension irrigation specialist.
His recommendation follows a sur
vey he made with county agents in
most of the irrigated areas.
The big reason for fall irrigation
is that it puts moisture into the sub
soil. Rains rarely put moisture any
deeper than a foot. And moisture in
the top foot of soil evaporates
quickly. Plant use of moisture in
the top foot also Is heavy during
the growing season but is light dur
ing the winter.
Moisture in the second and third
foot of soil does not evaporate. It
remains there for early spring use
of plants. This is an advantage.
The longer irrigation can be de^
layed in the Spring, the better, be
cause early spring irrigation with
cold water may retard plant growth.
Good fall irrigation means spring ir
rigation can be delayed from two
weeks to a month.
Other reasons Dusenberry cites for
fall irrigation are: It puts the hay
crop in good condition for the win
ter. It may save stands of legumes
and grasses and give them a quicker
start in the spring. It ! keeps crops
growing long after the spring rains
stop. Where fall plowing is necess
ary, fall irrigation puts the soil in
better condition for plowing. It
strings out the labor load.
Dusenberry's
about fall irrigation apply particu
larly to soils with fair to good mois
ture holding capacity. Gravelly or
sandy subsoils benefit the least from
fall irrigation.
recommendations
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with Carter EXTRA Gasolin e
There's nothing like « tankful of Carter EXTRA
gasoline to put extra pep into slow, sluggish
engines! This high-octane gasoline starts you
fast and keeps you going with all the power
your engine can develop. You enjoy extra J
power for eager acceleration in traffic... I
for easy, knock-free bill climbing... i
and for quick, responsive, economical
performance on the open highway.
If you aren't already enjoying all the extra
benefits of Carter EXTRA, treat yourself to
a tankful today. Swing in where you see
the red-white-and-blue Carter sign of
Happy Motoring.
y wHk
Itetp ••
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friend.
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Motortofl
Aeote**
go«
HopPT
your
Corte*
ICartar EXTRA
Y Mit WA
UP*/
Use Your Carter Credit Card
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Get First Thing s First at the j (Carter) Sign!
EXTRA
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CRIAT FAILS IRIWIKIES INC., CKAT FALLS, MONTANA
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The lunch of cold cuts and potato chips that you serve with Great
Falls Select can be tremendously good. And there's no trouble at oil
in preparing this type of lunch—whether at noontime for your
husband, or in the evening when guests drop in. Yes, Mam, it's
fashionable and easy to serve Great Falls Select. Remember to pick
up a pack next time you go shopping.
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fog-BEER...<*•% ÛC COMA*
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"MOOSE AND THE LAKE" prints available!
Simply send 25c and your noma nnd address to Groat Foils Breweries,
Inc., Box 1604, Groat Falls, Mont., for a full-color print of "Moooa
and the Lake" by Ltslie H. Peters. This print is 9x12 inches i* »!*•<
cantered on a plain 16x1 8-inch mot, suitable for framing.
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State Xmas Tree
Stands Being Sold
MISSOULA—Preparations for Mon
tana's Christmas tree harvest are
getting underway with more than
100 permit applications on file tof
State Forest lands, according to
Stpte Forester Gareth C. Moon.
Permits for state lands will be is
£ued Oct. l with application dead
line set for Noy. 1. On lands where
more than one application is involv
ed bid invitations will be advertised
Advertisement
From where I sit... iy Joe Marsh
V
Makes a Man Healthy
Wealthy-and Tired!
• • •
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Sandy Peterson's nephew Pete From where I sit, we most have
has gone back to college. He heard a million stories like
worked on Sandy's farm a couple Bat they show how some people
of months last summer to get assume their customs are the
hardened up for football.
He seemed to enjoy farm life getting up at 4:15 seems odd, be-1
all right—but like most city kids cause they don't do it. Just like!
some people don't think enjoying;
a glass of beer is "right" ... be-i
cause they happen to prefer an» <
other beverage and haven't waked
up to the fact that everyone has
a right to his own choice.
proper ones. To most dty folks
it took him some time to get used
to a farmer's schedule.
Sandy claims that when he
went in to wake Pete—»-on the
first morning—the boy looked up
startled and asked what time it
was. Sandy replied it was four
fifteen. "Gee," Pete murmured,
,"if we're going to do a day's work
rtomorrow you'd bettor get to bed ! "
i
Copyright, 1955, United States Brewers Foundation
for ten days and will then be open
ed to public bidding.
1954 Christmas tree harvest ftk
the Flathead-Lake-Lincoln county
areas totalled nearly 26.000 baton
with stumpage receipts $12,698.28.
In the Missoula area slightly lean
than 13,000 bales were harvested
with a valuation of $4,940.49.
Parties interested in submitting
bids for State Christmas tree stump*
age may either call at the Kalispell
office or write the State Forester in
Missoula for bid forms. •
11
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