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The Ocala evening star. [volume] (Ocala, Fla.) 1895-1943, November 03, 1920, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027621/1920-11-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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Red Cross Has Placed Seventy-Four Nurses In 'Southern Communitie
And Hopes, to Increase Number Through
Fourth Roll Call. '
OCA LA EVENING STAR. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER- 3, 1320
TO SICM
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1 11" B3F
La . S i
A Ti
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sr1' II 'I I i 1 1 " J
nr'f ' : iff
f i . A. J. Noble & Company of Cordele, Georgia, are shipping us s
: r v iviuies, iu norses ana mares 10 oe soia ai aucqon to tne mgnest Dia- s
r 1 der regardless of price These animals are not plugs, but good f
i smooth work stock, four to eight years old, , from , the devastated
: j cotton fields of Georgia. Animals may be inspected in bur bam be- s
11 fore sale at cornor of Ft. King and Main Street.
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USING THE SUN AS A STOVE
Device Invented by American Scien
tist U Acknowledged Valuable t
, : Fuel Saver. i
Baklnj bead 'and jroatloiftncat on
the summit of a mouot'ain without fuel
Is possible, by' he tni& of a device;
ponian institution, Waflifiigton; D.'C.
The intensity of 'the sun's avs is har
nessed, the unusual energy is, capital
ized, and food can fe Vooked beyond
the line of perpetual snows.
' An i.astranacatetTnirrorv atj: -the
receiving and meas'urinj? the energy
; wi nit; buii iu.vo. jiiwuia iiLi; r uiai in
snnmer the solar -luminary transmits
;qpOn each acre of land energy equir-
alent tf 7,500 horse-power.
Tlie1" so-tef med "solar cooker" con
sists of a half-cylinder of Iron lined
' with mirror glass,' tyhlcli catches the
rays of the sun and. concentrates them
tipon a metal tube, that 13 the half
cylinder's axis. The tube contains oil.
which expands and becomes lighter, by
the beat as it passes through the tuba.
The. latter Is continued to form a loop
a sort of endless chain.
Passing , through tie loop. Use oil
ceois. uowever, tne sxm s neat icrcmg
the oil through the portion of the tube
Inside the half-cylinder, compels the
cooled oil to follow It, otherwise there
would be a vaccua. So while the etui
" chines there is a continuous circcla
.tlca cf oO. The "loop" passes throcgSx
a box which contains an oven. Umt
Srom tho oil warms tho oren and dbea
the ,es!red cooMnj. :- ' . ::. '
POSITION CALLS FOB .-ABILITY
Cncllshmm Chown to Admlnfcter Af-
fains In'. Jerusalem Ha ; Been";
:-: Given a Hard Taelc .
The See of coveroo? of Jerusalem,
once occupied by Pontius Pilate, ts
now held by OoL Ronald Storrs, a
graduate of Cambridge xmlversity and
eon of the dean of Rochester college,
England. . :
His task Is one to test the adminis
trative ability of any man.' ' Jerusalem
la a city of disunions, where what
lever may come of the future, for
the moment Zionists and Arabs are
passionately divided, and to steer a
just path between them and Induce
them to Join him on that path la thank
less work. v
It is to that task, however, that he
cnlefly devotes himself. Twice a week
he has meetings of his favorite pro
Jerusalem society, where French, Ital
ians, British. Americans, rshbia.' ZUs-
Of
WW NlV
iis, ieaaers commercial meti'of staiia-'
Ing and others who' are In any way
prominent In the life of the city are
brought together and In ; the course
of idebate- iledito7 see that they have
in common a. single citizenship.' Ills
motto as . governor is unify - and be
friends." , V " " "
Colonel Storrs was pne of the prime
movers m tne esiaruisnmenT or an ; in
dependent , Arab kingdom. ; He Is thirty-eighth
years' old.; - 1 i ?
Searching for the ' Point. ;
John George, executive secretary
of the!pHlgh 'street ; M. :B.-'.church of
Muncie, who is a- Scot was listening
attentively to. a story about ; two fish
ermen who had ?bee" having good
luck fishing from? a boat In a lake.
They wished to remember the spot
where they had caught the fish, but
looking shoreward they saw. no land
mark that would assist them La find
ing the spot on another day.
, Flna11y.w r said the story teller,
"one of them had ' a happy thought
and cut a notch in hi3 boa.t at this
epot." i
v The crowd laughedV except George,
who appeared ' puzzled. Finally, he,
too, : burst out laughing.
"I was Just thlnkIng,,, he explained,
what a good Joke It would have been
on those fishermen If the next day
they were unable to get the same
boat P Indianapolis News.
Incendiary - Buneta, :; .'T'
The Incendiary bullets used during
the war, mostly ' fired from ' machine
guns carried - by airplanes, were la
effect miniature high explosive sheila.
Those supplied to our armies (mil
lions of them were made at the Frank
ford arsenal-were of brass, hollowed
out to hold a composition of which
the principal Ingredient was t barium
nitrate. To set this off, each bullet
had a priming charge of magnesium
end red lead.'-, W5"- -ys
An ordinary rifle bullet, of course
la solid. The Incendiary bullet is of
wholly different construction, though
of the same caliber, being meant to
carry .flame. Its discharge sets fire
to the explosive stuff contained In It.
Kansas City Star. !
, Hew Grade of Rubber. .
... Chrysll, a new high grade rubber. Is
vulcanized without difficulty. It Is pro
duced by the (rysothamnus, or, rab
bit ' bush,, a genus of shrubs yielding
In different species from 1,93 to 233
per cent, and in one Individual plant
as high as 6w57. Of Chrysothamnus
nauseosus, the chief species, ' 22 varf
eties are known, 12 of them contain
ing chrysil. The plants are large
shrubs, maturinff In six or elctit years.
MA
" A
AT
flD ill 1
d
1 i 1
with an , average weignr ' or rour
to six pounds, and abound In many
parts of North. America. The rubber
occurring ; In the, cells and not as a
latex concentrates near the soli line.
' ': A Strike. ; '' '-.
Til show 'em." said the ben as she
; kicked 'the porcelain egg out of tlie
.nest. . - ; ' ; v-:-;f:;
: They can't mate a brick layer out
of me. Carnegie' Puppet. . V -l !
- t j , -' " ' ' 1 -: .
LONDON MOURNS FOR fTS KIWI
Only Apiteryx In England' It N o More
-Wingless Bird Is Believed r r
' . Nearly Extinct. rf 5 i
The total extinction in England of
the kiwi (or apteryx) has become a
reality. The Lqndon Daily Mall . an
nounces' th death of . the Regent's
park zoo's only specimen. The ispeciea Is
nearly extinct in New Zealamd how,
but the British Zoological society has
written to the New ; Zealand govern
ment asking if Just one more kiwi can
be spared from the Island sanctuary.
Zoologists will mourn the loss of the
dwarf i wingless ostrich more , than, the
zoo visitors,' for not one in ten thou
sand ever saw tt while It lived there
more than cine years. Th keeper
would turn out this xueerest of birds
every now and - then, but the Jong
billed bundle cf apathy and sleepiness
scrambled back Into Its box as soon
as released. ' ; , v-v
A curious point about h kiwi la
the fact that Its nostrils are fit the tip
of Its long worm-hunting beak, and In
the ardour of the chase It emits aa
unpleasant snuffling noise. Its mating
can is a pig-like squeal.
' England Is responsible for the vir
tual extinction of this rare bird. Brit
ish ships brought rats & New ; Zea
land, so weasels were sent to extermi
nate the rats. When they had nearly
wiped out the kiwi, the New Zealand
government found a rail ess Island and
consecrated It to the poor bird. But
the problem of saving, an Idiot bird
that puts all Its eggs into one shell,
so to speak, was a difficult one. The
kiwi laid one egg a season, nearly as
big as Itself. . Exceptional "mothers
would lay two eggs and then find It
almost Impossible to hatch both, as
the ends would project' out "beyond
their feathers as they sat on them.
Strassbarga Famous Cathedral.
Strassburg, capital of Alsace, called,
the bulwark of the Holy Roman Em
pire by .Emperor Maximilian L Is
famed for its cathedral and pate de
fole gras and prized for its commercial
and military importance. Its cathe
dral, .sipse buildinst extended over
Ik
v 1
As the time approaches for the
Fourth Roll Call of the American Red
Cross, which takes place from Novem
ber 11 to 25, many people all over
the country are asking how their last
year's membership fees have been
spent and what are the organization's
plans for the fuurel Full statements
have been made from time to time,
and the financial records of the Red
Cross both in the chapters and for na
tional work are , always open to the
public, but many people have neither
time nor inclination to study them,
and the simple statement hat public
health nursing is one of the most im
portant phases of the Red Cross pro
? gram means little to a person who has
not made a special study of the work.
It is necessary to understand just
what a Red Cross public health nurse
means to some specific community to
realize the Importance of what the or?
ganization is doing. Take the little
mountain town of Highlands, N. C
for instance, a summer resort with a
i winter, pdpulation of about three hun
dred people, situated on a table-land
. on the side of a mountain, - eighteen
miles from a railroad over roads that
, are practically impassable tor" about!
eight months" in the year. Highlands
has no hospital, no dentist, no trained
nurses and only one physician, bpt
' it has a Red Cross chapter. . And la6t
".year, the Red Cross- Chapter applied
, for a public health nurse, that is.; a
graduate trained nurse who has taken
special , post-graduate training in pub
lic health work. The Nursing Depart
ment of the Southern ' Division ' sent
"Miss Margaret Harry, a nurse who
had been trained under a Red Cross
scholarship and who thoroughly un-
derstood mountain' conditions, to fill
' the ptace. .1 ' -;; ". '-
One of Miss Harry's first moves af
ter she became , acquainted with the
people and won their confidence was
to open a Health Center. Health Cen
ter is another term that means little
to the person who has not-seen one
in 'operation. 1 The Red Cross Health
''Center' at 'Highlands is the "lower floor
of the" Masonic Temple, donated, rent
tree, by the Masons for that purpose.
' It Is separated into three rooms and
a. hall by partitions which Miss Harry
buijt herself because of the scarcity
of labor. ' One of the rooms is a rest
room and general clinic Here are
the scales for weighing and the appa
f :MUPSRf:
rour; centuries, says a Tsationai uee
graphlc society bulletin, typifies the
diverse Influences to which the city
has. been subjected. The facade, es
pecially presents a singularly happy
union of the northern France and
German style of cathedral architecture.
No Law Schools In England.
England today has no law school in
existence. Harvard's Law school Is
not only the oldest existing law school
In the United States, but It la the
oldest existing academic law school in
the . English-speaking world. ; They
have a professor of law at Cambridge,
and a professor of law at Oxford, la
England, but they do not teach Jaw la
the manner of a professional school.
They simply lecture upon law, or en
deavor to give a scientific preparation
for the profession of law,' but do not
give a scientific, professional training.
East Indian Farmers Exploited. .
Although 0 per cent of the East
Indians are agriculturists, only 2 per
cent of these farmers are tree from
debt. Every season they borrow for
tilling, harvesting and for marketing,
so that they always work cn borrowed
money. The farmer does not sell in
the market, but the produce Is sold
by .money lenders. The establishment
of many Industrial Institutions by
missionary societies Is proving a
practical solution to the problem,
FISHING IN BOYHOOD DAYS
Glorious Time When Mother Kept
Supper and Praised : the Flvs
Little Sunflsh.
The dry man who was the country
boy of yesterday closes his eyes a few
minutes and lives, over again a sum
mer afternoon of long ago, notes the
Milwaukee Journal. A day when his
little crowd, equipped with . enough
worms to feed a school cf fish, betook
Itself to the pool .where it waa jwsnn
ratus for measuring under-nourished
children; here talks are made to moth
ers about the proper care of their ba
bies. The hall Is fitted up as. a wait
ing room with health posters cn the
walls and health literature for distri
bution to all who are interested. The
room on the right is an emergency
hospital fitted up with five beds and
A crio lor . me vpry smau. pauenu.-
And at the back is the nurse's private
office, which is also the operating
room, fitted with a real operating ta
ble and a dentist's chair.
Weighing and measuring children
of school and pre-school age was" one
of the first things undertaken at the
center. Children wbp were under
sized 'and underweight were advised
as to their diet, and so eager were
they to gain the pounds and Inches
that ' would make them normal that
they readily consented to substitute
milk for the coffee and tea they were
accustomed to drink. '
- Miss Harry next turned her atten
tion to the care of the teethe At her
request, a dentist came over the moun
tains from Franklin and stayed for
tea days and was busy tor every min
ute of that time, finding several seri
ous cases of pyorrhoea among fifteen
and sixteen year old children. , Miss
Harry's dental clinic will be respon
sible for saving these teeth, Later,
an eye, ear, nose and throat specialist
followed the dentist and a number
of operations for tonsils-and adenoids
were performed at the Health Center,
the patients and their mothers being
kept overnight in the 'emergency' hos
pital. Both clinics will be a more or
less regular matter from now on.
In addition to her work at the health
center. Miss Harry has done .visiting
nursing all over the mountains, some
times walking four or five miles to
see one patient One woman, the
mother of ten children, who has not
been out of bed for several years, has
already been taken to Charlotte for a
serious, operation. Miss Harry accom
panying her on the journey as she
had never been on the train before.
But the value of a Red Cross pub
lic health nurse is not , limited to re
mote rural communities, as the fol
lowing extracts, from a report made
by a woman of Athens, Ga., who in
terested herself" in the work of the
Red Cross nurse employed by the
Clarke County 'Chapter will show. The
report, which was published In the
ESSEX' t STIUPEB
tmty reparteTf ana fervently benevea
the, big bass -were hiding.
They didn't eet big bass. -Bites came
slowly, and those they landed were lit
tle sunfish.- Is there anywhere in any
lake a muskie big enough to give him
as great a thrill as those little sun
fish? He was late to supper, but there
was supper kept for him. And mother
didn't scold. , She was pleased as
punch, and told him to hurry and clean
the fish, and she would cook them.
And she did. J
No other grown person praised his
catch. In all the world. he and mother
alone recognized how worth while
those five little sunfish, were. And yet
It didn't seem wonderful that she
didn't ask him where the 'bass were.
That was what other people did.
- It was a wonderful day. but as be
looks back oa it, he sees that -the won
derful thing was not the little string
of "boy's fish," but the mother who
. was so pleased that she stood over a
hot stove cooking them. . How glad
she was to 'do It. . ' How happy she
would be if she could do It again, to
day. But she lives too far away now.
We wonder If he remembers to write
and tell her of his discovery his dis
covery that mother's heart was big
enough to make his littte fish a splen
did catch. -
FOREST ON DRIFT! FIG SHI! OS 1
Frenchman's Ingenuity Has Made cf
Waste Place a Region ef FertU
. Ity and Usefulness,
In the southwest corner of France,
between the rivers Adour and Gar
onne, are long stretches cf pine woods,
green and cooL Where these pines
now stand was a barren waste in fhe
middle of the.eighteenth century. Eun
and wind vied with each, other in mak
ing the land drier and dustier. Over
the stormy bay pti Biscay came winds
that eet up great sand etorms and
sometimes buried wbcle vClagesL But
at lsrt there came alssg a tzzn wta
acknowledged Jfeta Ctr as aametnst
Athens Banner, says, la part:
' . -- j
T n?orif In tn ctsV Mlaa Cm srf A3
the Clarke County Red Cross nurse,
about .her , work -recently, and I was .
not only . interested in what si's had
to tell me, but aroused as to my own
responsibilities in the matter cf health.
I had an Idea that Misa Crawford's
duties as county nurse consisted in
going about nursing charity cases. But
no, indeed. That just shows how ig
norant I was of the ort cf an invest
ment I had made with my Red .Cress
uuuttr. ' .....
Miss Crawford works on the theory
that an ounce cf 'prevention la worth
a pound of icure.'--She says' its has .,
not time for what seems to be tech
nically known as , "bed-side nuE!s.,
When anyone In the county, is taken
sick. Miss Crawford will go into the
home and show " the members cf the
family how to nurse the patient. She
will stay perhaps two hours at a time,
and for .such a visit you may pay iter
a quarter or fifty cents, or even "fif
teen cents; if. you prefer not to accent
charity, and she will: explain to yen
what is needed in the case cf tie
particular illness you are nursing and
help you with the finit steps. "
In Tuckston and Oconee .Heights she
has organized regular classes in bene
nursing.. These. clastes meet once a
week in Oconee Heights; once every
two wesks in Tuckston, and Miss Craw
ford shows her pupils, at their leisure
and under .more favorable circum
stances than when there is actual ill
ness, the same things that 'she shows
the, housekeeper when she is called
into a home where there ia sickness.
In East Athens - lbs has a Little
Mothers Club, where she is teaching
these same things to the girls.
. And last Saturday she started a
Health Center, in Winterrille. Che
told me they were, going to start a
Health Center next week in East Ath
ens. ; - .. . .: ;
; And in giving a dollar last Decem
ber to help finance this undertakiiig,
I feel that you made a good invest
ment. Don't you? ,
The Southern Divisiion cf the , Red
Cross has placed seventy-four public
health nurses in the five states cf
North and South Carolina, Tennessee,
Georgia and Florida. A . successful
Fourth Roll Call will make it possible
to continue the work, of these nurses
and to add to them many others for
similar service throughout the dlri.
sica." ' : ' -
io oe overcome. hi nam wsrTJre
montier and he '-was viy'Jnnztor cf
roads. - He began fenclig in the des
ert. He built a fence and behind IS
planted a handful of broca seeds. Bo
hind the broom seeds be put. eeeds cf
the pine. The fence protected the,
broom "seeds', and the broom grew.
Then the broom In fis turn afforded
shelter to the delicate pine shocta
Soon the-pines spread and their tough
roots bound this sandy soil together.
Tbe first step was accomplished. Thea
canals were madl to drain the wet
parts and carry water to the dry.
. Ammonia -From the Air.
A syndicate hns been formed to es
tablish a nitrogen factory for the ci&a
cfacrare cf ammonia synthetically
from the nitrogen of the air, says the
American Chamber of Commerce ia
London. , - '- .:r
; The syndlcafs Siaa prctared the es
xenslve rito te County Darharcs wfcicH
..the British goremsseat acquired mora
than two years ago for the purpose cf
building a factory.- The capital re
quired will be $S23,O0D,G0a
'.; -: The process to be adopted, says the
American chamber, win be on the prin
ciple of the German tfcemlst, Haber.
'Kltrogea and hydrogen will be com
bined Into ammonia under pressure at
a high temperature, tint ammonia then
' being converted Into nitric acid or
other nitrates as may be required
either for tb manufacture ef explo
sives cr for use as fertilizers.
. Early Rubber Goods Imperfect, l
Many were the troubles that earl
manufacturers of rubber goods ex
perienced on account of. the propensity,
of rubber to expand or contract with
the beat 'Daniel Webster, who was
Mr. Goodyears counsel in his patent
litigation, humorously referred to a
fine cloak cf India rubber he erica
owned,' stating that In cold weather it
stood well by itself, scd that he often
set it out on the porch surmounted
by his hat, many persons passing by,
rzistaklEg it for the 15sge cf M&TLh-
ficld Mraselt. ' -
: ' 1
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