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Des Arc weekly citizen. [volume] (Des Arc, Ark.) 1867-187?, September 28, 1867, Image 2

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W* ™ *2?_it "
y H. O.VIH, Editor._
D E 8 ARC, AtIAy8A8:
MtldEf MfBlH, »«yt. 38. I8g^
the convention question.
We have heard repeated allusions to
the alienee of the “Citizen” concerning
a convention when almost every paper
in the 8tate has committed itself either
for or against the measure. In order
to satisfy those who wish to know
our position touching this question,
w e have to say, that with the lights of
the present before us, we can sec no
possible good resulting from action in
thiB matter. To oppose a convention
will bring ns no reward cither individ
ually or nationally, it will not change
the determination of the radical party,
nor will it effect in the least degree
their policy—convention or no con
vention—the radical party so long as
it retains power, will contend for it*
own advancement, making the restor
ation of the Union a secondary consid
eration. Jt is their, policy to ride
roughly over every thing that stands
in opposition to tbcoi and establish
their own supremacy, even though it
bo at the expense of half the nation.
Hence, to oppose them at this trials Is
as if we tried to check the current of
a mighty stream with a straw. On the
ether hand, nothing can be gained by
advocating a convention no guarantee
can bo given that the deliberations of
any body of men will be respected, or
their determinations enforced. How
Arkansas or any wther State can in
this way be brought into the Union we
ceunot see. By what authority is the
government of Arkauens blotted out of
existence, when three years ago it was
recognized as loyal by Mr. Lincoln.
During the whole war there was in
Virginia a Government recognized a*
legitimate by the United States and
zupported by the Supreme court, what
possible strength can convention add
to these governments? The govern
ment of Louisiana was legal in the eyes
of the congress of *64, is a convintion
needed to make it respectable in’67?
The truth it the radical party operate
for power, they, in ’64 contended, that
to save the Union was their chief end
they have had their own way and the
Union is not preserved but worse
lirntnn tftpr tvn vpnrs and a half of
peace than when the cry of war was
hashed throughout the whole nation.
From these facts, we say, the better
policy for Arkansas is to let this thing
alone and wait. The political sky is
no where clear—significant changes
have been made—others arc brewing.
A new party may soon take the reigns
of government whether for the bettor
wo cannot tell, but let us hold our
selves in check, neither aiding, for this
we can not do ou principle, nor op
sions, if any slumber, and make their
rule nioro oppressive to the people and
grievous to the nation.
AMNESTY PBOCLAMATION.
We have lately seen much complaint
of the President and his course of ac
tion. Until recently the opinion had
obtained that the Executive had yield
ed to the foroo of Radicalism and con
cluded to oppose its schemes no moro.
But recently things have put on a dif
ferent dress, and the old iron-hearted
Chief Magistrate is on the offensive,
llis last act, the putting forth of the
amnesty proclamation, has created
much stir amongst the truly loyal. It
was a blow administered with force,
and the line of action which the Radi
cals will pursue to consequence of it is
difficult to conjecture. They have
staked too much and are far too violent
to weigh this step carefully, and are
very likely to make a big toss when
they reassemble at Washington. Some
of Yheir major minds have already de
nied the effect of the President s au
thority in the premises; andasanvop
position to the darling schemes of the
ftvorite party is high treason in their
eyes, we may expect to hear much talk
about impeachment when Congress
meets next winter. We do net think
Mr. Johnson’s constitutional right at
all doubtful, but that he has done just
what Lincoln would have done long
ago had he lived. The President has
before pardoned a number of persons,
with the sanction of some of the Radi
cal oracles, and the same right that jus
tifies the pardon of one man justifies
... . . • iwl _ n_if_1 - — . ..
UUB [iruudiuduuii. *
fret and fume over thia “stunning ’
document, but the Constitution and
the people of the Northern States will
sustain the President In his course. Jt
Is certainly to be regretted that there
was so much tardiness displayed in this
matter; that because of delay the gulf
of separation between the two sections
haf%ideued, and the Radicals, with
the President's silence as an influence,
have diafranchised iu a large degree
the whites, that through the ascendan
cy of the negro the balance of power
might be thrown into their hands.
This proclamation laaprovision against
many dangers which threatened us,
and may, perhaps, shield the nation
from that disgrace which must have
been the inevitable result of an ex
treme Radical course.
beidgS
Our people have loug Wen halting
between two opinions-—whether they
should stand still and wait for natural
advantages and position to build up
our towu, or set themselves to work
for the accoraplUbinout of this end.
But now they have become wiser and
determined to bring euergy and labur
to the help of nature, and make Du
Arc what every good citizcu thinks it
will be, a city. A few weeks ago our
merchants subscribed liberally to open
up and bridge the road between this
point and Cotton Plant, and the work
is now progressing so that this fall we
wilt have a good road leading into Des
Aro from this rich and well spttled
country. More recently asubs-rlpMon
h»9 been takeu up for Iho purpose of j
bridging Bayou Des Arc. Tbcccw-j
niissioners appointed by the stock- j
holders have selected a point near
Brushy Ford, ah at abt milca from
Des Are, as tba moat desirable location
for this bridge, and will to-day let the
contract for its building to the lowest
bidder. Thle bridge will be very little
off a direct line between Searcy and
Des Arc. and will give us easy connec
tion with one of the richest sections of
country in this portion of the State. It
is truly gratifying to see our merchants
and business men awakening to their
interest, and lending encouragement
to inch enterprises as will certainly
conduce so much to the growth of our
town.
AN AGRICULTURAL FAIR.
The citizens of Prairie county have
determined to have an agricultural Fair
in October, and all honor to them for
it. Nothing advances the interests of
hociety or so conduces to the growth
of a country a« the encouragement of
agriculture. The time is now when
this science should become to all a
study, aud So this cud societies should
be organized in every county and all
possible encouragement given them.
The Prairie county society have select
ed Bet Arc as the point at which the
Fair shall be held this Fail, this place
having subscribed most liberally to
the enterprise ae will be seen from the
proceedings of the last meeting. It is
true a magnificent display cannot be
expected as the time is two short for
much preparation. But still a good
and profitable entertainment can be
had if the people will enter into it with
the proper spirit. It is to be hoped the
citizens of Prairie county will take
hold of this enterprise with a good will
and this year lay the foundation for the
permanent establishment of au iastitn
tioh that will so greatly benefit the
people and improve the country.
- ■ « -
Human Nature.
The following characters which were
portrayed by a correspondent of the
Metropolitan Record, from Mississippi,
we clip from the Memphis Appeal of
the 21st instant, and it "fills the bill"
so exceedingly well, and is equally ap
! plica’ols tc thU State, that we give it
a place in our columns. If wo arc not
very much mistaken, we recoguizc
these peculiar characteristics in some
of the Arkansas “so called,” who were
as fierce as a “bull terrier" in their pro
testations against anything like sympa
thy for Sambo, ere now remarkably
affectionate toward their “unbleached”
friends. The writer says:
“Still another radical speech maker
i irufi nf wlml \imk Lnnn n nw »
I guerilla company. This gentleman,
j we are informed, takes great pleasure
; in assuring the freedmen “that lie did
not serve in the army to perpetuate
their bondage, aud that he uid the
union cause no harm whatever.” This
we can readily believe, so far as the
spilling of blood was concerned; but
wciMtfe a distinct recollection that the
gentleman and his band were very sue
the fe'nnessee border from union citi
zens, aud that they sold the same very
cheap to the rebels in this vicinity.
Another—and the last picture which
wo shall at present portray—is of a
man who urgees “that no race of peo
ple on earth is so much deserving of
our friendship, kindness, confidence
and esteem as the negroes.” Now this
last gentleman is universally popular
with the colored friends, and we have
no doubt that when engaged with them
in private social conversation, he ex
pressed much more than in public, thus
pleasantly paving the way not only to
political, but to social equality also.
The wonder is that this gentleman, be
ing a large slave-owuer before the war,
and racreover addicted to the habit of
iriving them “the dovil” pretty fre
quently, did not sooner ascertain that
they deserved his “kindness aud sym
pathy.” VV'i'ten his slightest comma'nds
were to his slaves law, strictly enforced
by the inexorable lash, and from which
there was no appeal, where was his
friendship, his esteem, his sympathy ?
But, presto! change. By the hocus
pocus tricks of the war, his slaves have
become freedmen, and if he does strike
one, the insulted darkey has the right
to return blow for blow; thus he sud
denly perceives the necessity of sym
pathy, of esteeqn, and tenders his hand,
and with it his confidence and friend
ship."
What They Fought For and What
They Have Got.
No braver soldier than General W.
W. U. Davis went forth as a volunteer
from Pennsylvania. He was one of
the very first to take up arms, and the
many wounds he received abundantly
attest bis bravery. In the following
article from bis paper, the Doyleatown
(Pennsylvania) Democrat he tells his
surviving comrade what they fought
for, and shows them what they got.—
Let every soldier read it;
Never in the world were a people
i_J_»_j .a __i . as t .i I
»*»vi v iivvvi i vm Mil<| oniiiuisu innii V/UI ?
in the result of the late unfortunate
civil war. We fought for one thing
a*u have got something else. When
the war was begun the Government
made such solemn assurances that it
was only to be waged to restore the
Constitution and preserve the Union
of their hither*, which had conferred
so many blessings on them and their
childreu, made them willing to risk
everything for its preservation. When
the cry was raised that the South had
unjustly taken up arms to break up the
Union and destroy the Constitution,
our people, almost to a man, rose up to
resist. The occasion struck deep into
the great patriotic heart of the North,
and the whole country gave up her
men and means. The Union and the
Constitntion were the great battle cry,
which resounded from the lakes to the
Potomac, and from the St. John's to
the Pacific. No one thought or talked
Of anything else—end the soldier* had
no intention of fighting for anything
eUe. For the Union, fathers and moth
ers gave up their sons, sisters their
brother*, and sweethearts their lovers.
They blessed them when they went to
tlie field, aud offered them a willing
sacrifice on the altar of their country.
What else could they have done l'or'a
cause so sacred ? Por the Union men
of all degrees submitted to the mo»t
onerous taxes and willingly gave of
their abundant or scanty store, because
they deemed it would advance the
great cause anil 1msteu the return ot
peace, prosperity aud a united country.
It is useless for us to call the attention
of our readers to the sacrifices made by
the North. We need only to point to
the half million of our sons and broth
ers slain in battle or maimed for life,
and the three thousand millions of dol
lar? spoilt of the wealth of tl>» rseopTe,
to e»y nothing of the agouv and mourn
ing all over ihe laud. Here is the
price we paid for a restored Union.—
Have we got what wo fought, and bled
and safltowd for? If wo bare, where
la the Union that woe to bo made whole,
and tha Constilntion that waa to be re
stored? Have we got them? Alas,
no I The one is hopelessly shattered,
and the other honly known by the fbw
fragments that '‘•licit in the kindness of
some Senator*.” Per all the blood and
treasure we expended we have only the
negro to show. Wc have got him at
an enormous price, to be fed out of the
public treasury and voted by the Bu
reau. lie is to be made the ruler of
the country, and the war has resulted
in establishing eleven negro States in
the South. In these States there is not
a vestige of republican government
left. Military despotism prevails eve
ry where, and neither Constitution nor
laws protects the people from the ty
ranny of tlie despots thnt rule over
them. The country could not have
been in a worse condition if the Con
federacy had been established. While
we fought to make the foundations of
constitutional liberty more enduring,
we sec the edifice polled down and the
corner stones digged up. The negro
with the ballot ill his bands is the only
remedy offered to the American peo
ple to cure the serious ills that afflict
the body politic. Talk of taxes, and wc
reeeive the answer of “universal suf
frage.” Complain of despotism and
we are told “equality before the law,”
will set all things right. Ask for a
restoration of the Union and the Con
stitution, and we we told to wait until
the negro is secured in his rights.
Oh. oppressed, and outraged, and
tax-ridden people, how long will yon
submit to this state of things? Will
you always be willing to receive a
stone for’ the bread that belongs to
you ? When will you demand a fulfill
ment of the terms of the war bond?
If not paid soon let us sue it out in the
great tribunal where such claims are
adjudicated.
tQr We find the following article in
the Little Rock Gacctte of the 18tli
inst., which we publish for the benefit
of those who desire choice fruit trees.
Mr. Morrow A Son Are enterprising
gentlemen, live among us and ought,
therefore, to be patronized, in prefer
ence to going abroad.
Tixe FiwjrT.—Messrs. John I). Mor
row A Son, proprietors of the Watten
saw Nursery, near T)es Arc, Prairie
county, have’ sent ns some of the finest
fruit in the way of apples thnt we have
ever seen in aiiy country. The Penn
sylvania Cider is a variety that grows
very large—indeed, wc have one of the
species thnt weighs near a pound and
a quarter. The Morrow Seedling also
grows to large size; those we have are
larger than an ordinary tin cup. _ The
Smoke House variety is likewise of
good size, mellow and of delicious fla
vor. The Thin Skin is a small apple
’' ■ *'' - -.o — - ■ — - - - — 1 -
cate flavor.
There is no locality that can produce
finer fruit t\jan this from the Watten
saw nursery. and since we have such
practical demonstrations as to the
adaptability of our soil and climate for
producing line fruits we hope to see
their cultivation become more general.
Messrs. Morrow & Son have 100,000
fruit trees of every variety, one and
two years old, for sale in 1887-8, at the
following rates: apples, 20 coots;
peaches, 30; pears, 40; and plums, 40.
Send for circulars, make selections of
variety and set out orchards at once.
By the time they come to bear well,
-c ; —-*-- — «i*- x.
market.
byteleoraphT
NEW YORK.
September 23. — A city of Mexico
dispatch, dated the 7th, says the remains
of Maximilian have arrived here front
Queratero, and, notwithstanding the
difficulties placed iu the way of Admi
ral Tegethoff, there is every probability
that the body will be delivered to the
envoy of the Austrian imperial house.
WASHINGTON.
September 23.—It is nndprstood that
Gen. Mower will postpone the elections
in Lotisiana until the first Monday in
November, owing to the yellow fever.
It is also understood thut Gen. Grant
agrees witu the president that all the
southern electloussliould take place ou
the same day, though both are of opin
ion that they havo no control over the
matter, it being left entirely to district
commanders.
IT. LOUIS.
September 23.—Rates of freight to
Vicksburg, Natches and New Orleans
were advanced to day. Flour, potatoes,
etc- SI 20, pork SI 75, whiskey S3 per
barrel, corn and oats 60c per sack, hay
and heavyweight freights60cand light
weight $1 per hundred. Barge rates
are 10c on flour, 15c on pork, 5c per
sack and SI per barrel lower than rates
per steamer
NEW O R EE A N S. ’
September 23.—According to the Re
publican's figures, the whole number of
deaths from yellow fever up to Satur
day morning’. 21st iust- were 1214. For
twenty-four hours up to Sunday mor
ning. 69; this morning. 70; being the
largest number on any two days since
the commencement of the epidemic.
From the president of the Howard
association we learn they have rccieved
money sufficient! for their expenses
thus tar. They acknowledge in the dai
lies very liberal receipts fTomJNorthcrn
cities. Their present expenses are 82,
500 per dav. 1 he applicants for relief
to day registered up to 8 p.m. number
sixty families, iu some of whom every
member is sick. Cases and deaths are
daily on the increase, and the necessity
continues for liberal aid from the
friends of humanity everywhere. The
Howard association in this city is ex
tending rolief to iufected districts in
the interior.
M4RKETtli
Memphis, Sept. 24.—The enquiry for
cotton to-day was light and almost ex
clusively for low' grades. Sales re
ported were 12 bales ordinary at 18**0,
2 do. at 15'*o, 8 good ordinary at ltfc,
13 do. at lsc. 23 do. at 18*4c, 2 do. at
17**c, 8 low middling (new) at Sle, 2
middling at 21e, 3 do. ui 21)* e, 5 do. at
22c, 4 strict at 2.) Vic. The New York'
market is reported dull at 24c, aud the
Liverpool market active at 6* for up
lands. Holders here exhibit less firm
ness than at any time for some weeks.
New Oki.kans, September 23.—Cot
ton dull: sales, 50 bales; low middling
21*c.- Molasses, mulling doing for
wain, of stock. Flour, quiet ami un
changed. Corn, advanced 5c owing to
scareitr ; mixed, $1 30. Fork, very
dull, mcou, quiet; shoulders. 15*c;
clear sides, Ul'-c; sugar cured hams,
25c. Lard, 14*15*.
St. Fouis, September 23.—Flour firm I
but inactive and unchanged. Wheat,!
82 30*2 45 for prime to choice. Fro- !
vicious, dull; pork, $25 ; bacon shoul
ders, 14** 15c ; clear sides, 18**l0c;
Lard 14**14* for choice tierce
MT Noany every house in Oalves
tou, Texas, is a home of either mourn
ing or sicknes
——R————■————w»*n
Stewart, Gwynne & Co.
NEW GOO >S!1
We desire to call tke attention ef Farmer* and Rwctaali to
ear Large aad General Mack, coasistlng la pait as fallows:
@R©©1EY DEPARTMENT,
MESS PORK, CLEAR SIDE BACON, ««AR CTRSR OASIS,
LARR, FLOOR, SUGAR. COFFEE, TEA, RICE. MOLASSES,
SALT, CANDLER, OYSTERS, SARDINES, CAN FRUITS,
CARDIES, DAISIES, PICKLES, MUSTARD, TOBAC
CO, SNUFF, CIGARS, CHEESE, CRACKERS,
Seda, Spies, Pepper, Ginger, Indigo, Mad
der, Cotton Tara, Copperas, Blae Stone, Cotton
aad Wool Card*, Lime. Brooms, Sifter*. Wash Beards,
Keatackjr aad India Bagging. Baling Rope, Iron Ties, Twine, j
Etc., Etc.. Etc.,
—o—
mi mm$> Am bottom..
tfanahutga, Qtatan and pleached 2/omeatica, GJ tilting,
3tti/iea, 3heeiinga, JDicking*, JfLanketa, & tunnels,
JKctaega, SEinseua, Jeuna, 3meet Is, 3a/inetta, Jaaat
me ea, 4$toad Jlath, Jlaak Jlath, fV'cltiets, Jahco, QLe
lainea, Sfafitina, jtLetinaa, jlftoca*. Johutgs, SPtaida,
f/jinqhojns, Jambtica, Jucanrtt, 3mis* and jtiidt
jtLnatina, Jv.tia.in and 3able Gl-amoak, 3hands, JhiL
dtena Jtfoada and Jacket*, Jfuktua, JLadie.a JLaaka1
and Jfraaguea, JJaLmatal 3kit in, JEaaft 3k.itt*y Jot set*,
JKu.it Jfetta, jfdotzea, Jfaaietg. Jamb* and 4^-tushes,
fjfiittaiis and 3htead, Jaffa and JaLlata, ftfannvt, JfeLt
3affata and flTelojet Ittibbans, SEadiea JfBata and Jan
neta, 3kiit Ifmbtaulettj, 3tat jftftaida, (Ztte&a 3timnUng*,
fylaak 3tuntnings, lageihet with jVatian* faa numetaiu
ta nicotian.
CARPETS AND RUGS,
A NICE ASSORTMENT.
CLO TH I 3XT C3r.
Men’s Reaver. Cassimerc and Blanket Overcoats, Men’s Satinett Sacks and
Frocks, Men's Ca»simer* Sacks and Frocks, Men's Cloth Frocks, Pants and
Vests of every St vie and Quality. Bov's Suits all ifracfos .and sizes; also Men’s
Cravats, Collars, Ildkt’s.. Gloves, Wool Under- and Overshirts, Knit Drawers,
Gent’s Shawls and Umbrellas, Etc.
BOOT# SB018,
Meu's Boots nil qualities, Bov's and Children’s Boots nil qualities. Ladies
and Children's Call'. Kip and Buff Shoes, Ladles’ and Children’s Fine Kid aud
Goat Shoes, Congress Gaiters, Etc.
HATS,
MEN’S AND BOY’S. A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
lruub& Waiters, Carpet j^adirs’
(Eawpauious aud ahhrte, j
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
■ j g»i p» i.'ii erwA-anray
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
COAL OIL. LAMPS,
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
itmtiMIOTF*
Note, Cap, Legal Cap, Bill Head and Letter Paper, Envelopes, Ink. Steel and
Gold Pens, Pencils. Banker's Cases, School Books, Children's Toy Books, Blank
Books, Memorandum Books, Scrap Books Note Books, Hymn Books. Photograph
Albums, also a niee assortment ot' new Library Works.
* U Li N 1 T V i t Lj.
Wardrobes, Bureaus, Safes, Bed Steads, Wash Stands, One- and Two-Drawer
Stands, Candle Stands. Lounges, Cribs, Trundle Beds. Baby Wagoqp, Split and
Cane Seat Chairs and Rockers, Baby and Children’s Table Chairs, Etc,
SHJ ***r
Guns and Ammunition, Wrought and Ca't Butts and Hinges, Serews, Nails
Locks, Latchos, Carpenter’s Tools, Axes. Spades and Shovels, Foot Adecs. Hatchets,
Steelyards. Cotton Balances, Meat Cutters. G.indstones and Fixtures, Wagon Boxes.
Stocks snd Dies, Rasps and Files, Fish Uooks and Lines, Table and Pocket Cutlery,
Spoons, White Wash, Shoe and Counter Brushes, Ete.
SADDLERY.
Ladies’ Side Saddles, a splendid variety; Gent's and Boy's Saddles, all sorts,
Buggy, Wagon and Stage Harness, Blind and Riding Bridles, Girths, Surcin
gles, Martingales, Saddle Bugs, Ox and Wagon Whips, Collars, Hames, Traces.
STOVES AND~TRIMMINGS.
Heating Stoves, Small, Medium and Large; Cooking Stoves, Latest Pat
terns, all Sizes; Cooking Stoves, Old Styles. Extra Pipe, Pans aud Cooking
Vessels, constantly on band.
-O
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
Castings and Hollow-Ware,
A LAROB ASSORTMENT.
WELL BUCKETS, WATER BUCKETS, TUBS, CHURNS, KEOS, AND RUNLETS of »U
sites, SUGAR BUCKETS, SPICE BONKS. BREAD TRAYS, AXE HANDLES.
PLOWS, COTTON SCKAPERS. COTTON SWEEPS, CORN SIIELLERS,
CORN MILLS, OX AND HORSE WAGONS, Ac , Ac.
THREE AND FOUR PLY, FOUR TO TEN INCH.
amiiA m»4U»
FROM ONE-FOURTH TO TWO INCHES IN DIAMETER.
PAtNTH AND OILS, 1
WHITE LEAD, VARNISH, LINSEED OIL, TRAIN OIL, COAL OIL, LARD OIL, TUR
PENTINE AND PUTTY, SASH AND GLASS el! sites.
DOMESTIC AND FRENCH BRANDY; WHISKY. RECTIFIED AND BOURBON i PORT
WINE: SHERRY WINE; CEDllON BITTERS: DRAKES' BITTERS: BOXER'S ]
BITTERS; ORANGE VALLEY BITTERS; SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS. Ac.
Our stock was purchased from Manufacturers and first class Dealers, thus giving
os the advantage of the best market* in this country ; and we hope by low prices and
strict attention to business, to merit the patronage so liberally extended to us in the
past. AH are invited to examine our atocK and prices.
STEWART, GWLNNE & CO. :
N. B. We pay the highest rates in cash, for Cotton and Country Produce, and! i
make liberal advauoea to persons who wish to ship to Memphis, New Orleans, or New
York. M. O. Jk Co. 1
TVs Arc, Arkansas Per le nder ?* 1**7. I.‘
DIED
In this city on the 17th iast.. Hxvrt B.
nfani son of A. F. and C © Jlc*«T*o*.
iged 11 month*. *
V»«i TennrSsoe Whig please ropy._ |

«k »f Land by roMttHouer In
fbflnierj.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN.—
Dint under and by virtue of a decree
of the P^irc Chancery court rendered
U the mtgust lerni thereof, 1SC7, I
■hall proceed on Friday, tho JSth day
af October, 1867, to offer for sale. In
frout of the court house door iu Bro wns
rille, lor cash, the following tract of
Land, to wit t The oast half of section
fifteen, (16) in township (2) two north,
In range (5) five west, containing three
hundred and twenty acres. This land
is sold fur the purpose of foreclosing
the vendora lein in favor of Robert 8.
Greer, vs. J. R. Gray, as administrator
jffiF. B. Spinks, dec’d. and tho minor
heirs of said Spinks, doc’d. Sept. 25th,
1867. MT. T. JONES.
Commissioner iu Chancery.
icp2S-lt.
SALE OF LAND BY COMMIS
SIONER IN CHANCERY.
Notice is hereby give*—That under
tnd by virtue of a decree of the Praire
Chancery court rendered at the August
:erm thereof, 1867, I shall peocoed On
Friday the 18th, day of October, 1867.
:o offer for sale in front of ihe Court
house door in Brownsville, for cash,
;Ue followtnf tract of land to w*t: The
lorth half of the south west quarter of
lection (23) twenty three in Township
2] two north ill range [71 seven west
containing eighty acres. This land is
■old for the purpose of foreclosing the
vendors lein thereon, in favor of Ilenry
\. Gragg, vs. Israel Cunningham. Sep
ember 2oth, 1867. W. T. JONES,
Commissioner in Chancery.
icp 28-lt.
SALE OF LAND BY COHMfS
SI ONER IN CHANCERY.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That under
and by virtue of a decree of the Prai
rie Chancery Court, rendered* at the August
erm thereof, 1867, I »hall proceed on Friday
he 18th day of October. 1867, to offer for
■ale in front of the court-house door in
Brovnavilln for cash the tallowing tract of
Land to wit. Tbs west halfr|f the south-west
quarter of section (5) five in Township (4)
four north ia range (8) nine west, containing
eighty acre*. This land will be sold fur the
purpose of foreclosing a mortgage executed
l.. a ■ n v % : _ r _r n... n n n^ti
September 26th, 1367. W- T. JOSES.
Commissioner ia Chaacery.
sep28-lt.
Bale of Lane by Comnrsaioaer in
Chanoery.
Notice is hereby given. That under
and by virtue of a decree of the Prairie
Chancery court rendered at the August
terra thereof. 1867, 1 shall proceed on
Friday the 18th day of October 1867,
to oiler for sale in front of the court
house door in Brownsville, for cash,
the following tracts of land to wit:
The south-west quarter and the west
half of the north-west quarter of sec
tion (12) twelve utnl the east haif of
the south-east quarter of section (11)
eleven and the east half of the south
west quarter of r etina (14) fourteen
and the south-east fourth of the south
east quarter of seettoi: (14) fourteen in
Township cue south in range (9) nine
west, containing all together four hun
dred and si sty-sis (4W) acres. There
lands are sold for the purpose of fore
closing the veudors loin thereon in
favor of Henry LinderaiSn vs. James
M. Rainev. Scii^tm^eij^i|f._lfiil7.
Commissioner In Chancery.
sep2S-?t.
Notice
LEFT my premises three miles west
of Dos Arc', on the 16th in*!., a certain
boy, (colored) named TLYXIF.L. Said
boy is about 16 or 17 rears of age.
This is to notify the public that they
arc warned against employing or har
boring said boy, and any information
concerning him will be thankfully re
ceived by the undersigned at this place.
B. B. ALI.EN.
De* Arc, Ark., Sept. 28, 1867.—-2t.
.BRIDGE TO LET.
Ou Saturday the 28th day of Septem
ber, the bridge across Bayou Dcs Arc.
near Brushy Ford will be let to the
lowest bidder. For particulars see the
building committee. The Plan and
Specifications will be made kuowu on
the day ofletting contract.
B. Blakenky,
Geo. McLaren.
A. O. Edwards, Corns.
N. W. Taylor.
D. C. Bradshaw,
W. F. Bell,
sep28-l 6______
JAMES J. GALLAGHBB.
Atto> ney at Lhw,
corroH pr.Axr, woodrcffco.ark.
Will practice where called.
sop28-if.
CHEAP DRY GOOD*
Cash House 2
We have now in store full lines of
XEVTUOXY JEAII.
LINSEYS AND DOMESTICS.
JlARlXOE'S, CLOAKS AND WHITE
GOODS, BLANKETS AND FLANNELS,
Clothing of all Kinds.
We will sell you good goods at honest
prices.
MENKES B10TIER8,
MS Mata St. Cor. f Murt St.
MEMPHU TEJCNKU8KE.
N. B. Examine our stock before you
»ny.
R reach 0M<*41 Murray 8t. Now Turk.
_ __
~R. G. MATTHEWS, Late of Lewis,
Matthews ft Co.
Capt. J. C. ALEXANDER, Late of
Mar's Point, Miss.
Matthews & Alexander,
Manufacturer', Ag'is for Sale of
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,
MACHINERY, SEEDS,
AMD GENERAL
CaaiatUsioit ittrcliaRts,
io. 272 Second St., Ayres’ Builtliug,
Opposite Court Square,
warms,.tlxsesseb
FOR S kLE.—Wagons, Plow*, Cotton
‘rou.es. Cotton Gins, Horse Power*. Peed
luiters. I'ureslitng Machines, Heapcr, and
doweva, Corn Spellers, and Plantation la>
demenis generally. And a large stock of
dachinery of all kinds—Stationery and
‘ortable Steam Unglues, Saw Mills, Grist
dills, Wood and lr-u Working Machinery of j
very J - 'rip': r. , .n“ 1 *'m
a ♦
L ROCCO & CO.,
WHOLESALE OBOOEES
And MaBBfacturara of
OHfwtt«Mrie»
STICK AND FANCY
CA«»2«S*
i* all ram taiiett,
Furaiahad Fraah Daily
and guaranteed pure.
oaoorr strbst
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Send (hr a Oatalogu*. *ep21-0m
9. VT. JL. JCITSB h OOm
COTTON FACTORS
General ComIssIm Merchants
cm rAtnt an Aonns,
Ns. MS froat direst, Dp Slain,
MEMPHIS, ------ TBNXKSSEE.
AH CO alignment* Wilt native our personel
sad prompt aeration. Will furnisk Bogging
and Baps ta thee* whs Assign lending ur
Uxeir Cottha. »ep2l-3m
A. 12. Franklnnd,
GENERAL DRY GOODS
CommtaMtK 4H«rc ant
No. 231 Second Street, Jefferson Block,
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Consignments of the following Goode
Always in Store and fore Sale at
EASTMAN PRICES.
CLOTIIING, DRYGOODS, BOOTS.
SHOES, HATS. HOSIERY.
WHITE GOODS, NOTIONS. SHIRTS,
DRAWERS, GLASSWARE, CUTLERY,
WINES. LIQUORS, CIGARS.
TOBACCO. »eji21-3tn
Ed. J. Tatlob, Wm. Gat,
Of DiBots Co., MU*. Memphis.
Wn. 0. Rctlaib, of DeSoto Co., Miss.
TAYLOR. GAY A RUTLAND
Wholesale and Retail
Cotton Factors
—ABO—
Communion pmnaira.
No. 301 Front Street, Moiby & Hunt’**
Block,
MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.
Liberal advances on Colton in store. In
auranee unto** otherwise instructed. Sup
pliea of all kinds on hand. sep2l 3m
WORSHAM HOUSE.
MEMPHIS, TEHI.
OWING To the decline in provisions from
war pries*, raising my ewn vegetables,
the general economical arrangement of the
house, and dost personal attention to bust
-T - w. oetoMaA t»* aanAmMlAllltf ’TVWt*
alCMl at SS Per Day, and
Day Boarder* at *33 Per Moatli.
Peeling desirous that my friends and ilie
traveling public should have the advantage
of any deduction that can be made in their
favor" I will eimply eay that my table and
general hotel accommodation*? shall always
be first-class, and attention to guests ooua!
to any hotel in the death vest.
C* B. OALLOWAT,
eepZl-Cm Proprietor.
MRS. A. A. NEWMAN
*o«nt roa
Mrs. 8. J. BROWN,
Is now receiving her Stock of
|«U rtillinm* | oobs
At her New Store,
K*. 1M Mill Street,
OPPOSITE THE OVERTON HOTEL.
MEMPHIS, TENN.
HANING The advaotpge of a long experi
eace in the tusinexa, and a Stock ot
Goode entirely now, bought at the very
unreal ratca, she is confident that she
can offer unusual inducements as lo style,
quality and price, to her old customers, and
such new ones as may favor her with a call.
BOpSltf
It, 'f.R0SSSli~
WHOIsKSAIsK
Cotton Factor
-ANUr
Commission glmtomt,
Mo. 316 Front Street,
BETWEEN KOKBOE AND {7KIOK,
MEMPHIS, TENN.
' S. C. COUMHinON,
Formerly of Do8oto cowuty, Miss, is !
permanently with me.
scy2l-3m. * i
*»r dirick §ousr.
It* C. HAH*Wick, Proprietor.
SITUATED ON
M*m street Nos. 6i, 63 & 6->
Between Second and Third.
MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.
■ — *
THIS Popular House, having been
newly remodeled and arranged, is non- !
iu most successful operation, its Iota
tiou being Central aud convenient to i
business and to Railroads and other i
points of travel, makes it a desirable
stopping place for all visiting the citv.
The • ■
COUNTRY MERCHANTS
j
Aud Farmers will find it to their ad*:
vantage to atop at this House. Trau- j
eicul tare reduced irom S3 to £2 50 per i
day. Monthly day board $30.
w. L. HARDWICK,
sep3f-tf Proprietor,
ROBERT A. MOON,
COTTON FACTOR
—AM* —
Commission JRrrchaat,
No. 376 Front Street,
NElirHIl, TEA'X ESHER
LIBERAL ADVANCES—Supplies
«t Wholesale Price*. Coni minion for
selling Cotton, One Dollar per Bale.
To the C otton Planter* or West
Tennessee, ilubuma. Missis*
alppl and Arkansas:
Th« undersigned respectfs;I, tenders bis
services ns Agent for tbs ssle of your cotton
■a this ail;, wad A>r the purchase of your sup
plies The uufortunste termination of the
late war, which so materially affected the bast
interests of the South, has also bad its effect
upon the Commission Business of this city,
as transacted between planter and merchant.
You doubtless well remember with what per
tinacity (previous to tbs war), amounting in
some instance* to aunoyance, you were soli
cited for your lmsine** at the rate of fifty
cents per bale ceutniission. free of draysge,
and stored for twelve months without charge
Then (as will be again) the producer was the
ruling clement, and high rents, rich landlords
and merchants were llic result of planters'
patronage. No people or occupation have
been mon seriously prostrated than planters
and planting, and none so much deserve t»
he fostered and aided in their unfortunate
changed condition. How that aid so much
needed has been meted out you I opine loo
well know. Onerous government taxes in
general, and a special tax upon your leading
production, Cotton, large profits you have hail
to pay upoa supplies furnished, commissions
on sales ranging from 50 to $•"> per balo,
monthly storage at exorbitant prices and
other expenses, os per reference to your ac
count sales, as a sum tstal will leave yon but
little if auything upon which to rebuild your
shattered fsrtnnvs, or to compete with the •
new order of affairs—free labor. When I
withdrew from the Cotton and Commission
Business in 18(10, private reasons then led me
to helievc that I would never engage in it
again. The solicitation* of many friends that
were forme* patron*, and a desire to promote
the interest of the planting community. *o
far as my feeble efforts - can do so. and the
apparent want of gratitude exhibited to a
community that in times past tended so ma
terially to tboprosperit^ of Memphis and 1:3
mercnniile community, has determined me
again to offer my services in the capacity as
siaieu. lue reuuum »«««.* «*«*.
United Stales and short sudplics in the hands
of New England manufacturers has caused
some advauoe itt prices from tlio late depres
sion, hence curly sales may be prudent and
remunerative; such was the case the paet two
seasons, and many planters have had cause to
regret the acting upon the too common prac
tice of holding ami drawing upon llicir cot
tons. ! would advise no planter to send for
ward his cottoH unless ho wished it sold upon
the first acliva market. It can b" held at
home much cheaper than in Memphis. My
charges for eelling*otton will be One Polls
per .bale. Insnvances effected in all cases if
not instructed to the contrary. Shall bny
i your supplies front wholesale houses giving
yon the benefit of same. In short, by strict
attention to all the departments of our busi
ness, I hope to merit a large share of ; air.n
age. Very resneclfullr.
■spill 1. ‘ R. A. MOON
GOSS HOTEL'
DEVALL’S BLUFF, AM.,
.T. O. GOSS, Proptr.
Would respect fully Announce that lie has
! opened » rirsf Clua* llo?4»l. at IKVhII «
mutt. ArK.. «u<! 14 now prepare*! to tutori.iin
I \rue9t9. His table, at all nines, will be fur
nished with the best that the market afford l.
There is also a (Noofl Nlablf Attached.
Give him a call. 9cpt21-tf.
i?i 1
65 9
3. 3
1 s j
2 <Q.
3 3
f I
s £
S 2
= J
2 *
1 §
£ S !
\ ?
« *.
S 2.
B 3
a ^
•< 65
r s.
1 1
5' 5'
~ TS
g“ o
«3 I
8.!
2 3
= M
■a S
f
p 2
3 :
S' fr
i S'
SL er
or s
1 §
s; ®
! I
I =
!| 5
I li “O |
w. j. Tapp, e. w. kexvkpy,
Titos. J. TAM*, EP. P. WALSH,
J. TATLOIi ISKRUY.
Tapp, Kennedy k Walsh,
Importers and Jobbers of
eiOOJJS,
NOTIONS. &c.
288 T7SST i:AI2T STREET.
Between Seventh and Eighth Sts.,
Sooth Sido,
LOUISVILLE, KT.
%

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