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Des Arc weekly citizen. [volume] (Des Arc, Ark.) 1867-187?, October 05, 1867, Image 1

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POE fc MATHEWS, Proorietors. lest i bushed September, wm.] $2 50 PER ANNO A— In Advance.
VOLUME 2.DES ARC, ARKANSAS. CX/IOBTOR 5, 1867. _DUMBER <39.
PCSLIS1BD BYEaY 5UTYRDVY.
OFFICE —BiJV VIST Y STitERT.
Our Job Prlti1.inx Dep irtinen4.
We hate supplied ourselves with a good
assortment of Printii g 'Material and arc
ready to execute a’l kin is of Job Printing
oi reasonable terms.
We arc preparol to print Pamphlfts. Cata
log’tos. Posters, i i**ge or small, Carla Ral
Tickets. B 11 R h 1* Blanks of ■■»ve,*y I ‘scrip
tion, fo- C’.3"k« 'l nviffs. Justices of fh
Peace Coos^aht** ?•<»
PROFESSION YL FARM.
KOPT. S ANDEHSON, WM. J. THOMPSON.
Jack$onp'»rt, .4rfc i>u/u»laf Ark
Anderson A Thompson,
ATTORNEYS AT LAV,
Jack3onport an*-! Augustt. Ark
Will attend the Court* of Jackson. Woo l
ruff, and adjoining Counties and to «p*-eial
cases in any section of the Suu-. Address
cither office. um\ IB ly
A. C PICKKTT. L. M. RlMSAt B.
iuj t err t iv -muu.
ATTORNEYS A T LA W .
-4 UG CS TA. A UK A K8AS.
Will practice in th“ counties of Woodruff.
Jackson, White and Craighead. Special at
lention given to collections of all claim* on
trusted to their care aprO-ly
J. C. JONS»>N, Office—West Point, Arkansas.
JNO. M. MOORE, Office—Searcy, Arkansas.
JOYSflV & MOORE,
^ttaeuey* at Law,
SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY.
—AND—
General Laud and Colt cting Ag~nts,
HE.Ut V. ,VHI4.ANS.\H.
Will give prompt at tetilton to any business
in the counties of Independence, Jackson
Woodruff. M *nroc. Prairie, White. Con was
tmd Van Buron tnar9
J If. ft*. A kjtfjtifc to
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
n . Til A ..1___
UUll/UU aiiwuiuowwi
Will practice in the Circuit CourUoi
Waodcutf county, and lb" Circuit Courts »>t j
tbc aevcuth Judicia. District, and give prompt
attention to all business entrusted to bis
care. '
Geo. W. Maberry
ATrOE JEY AT LAW, .
AND
SOLICIT O U IX C1IAXCKRY
—ASP—
«G\£Atl. L15D *G»’\T,
corruv plant,
WGOMIBFF COtTNTY. ARKANSAS.
•trriLl, attend the Circuit and Probate;
,V Court a for the count ie* of Monroe St. j
Francis and Woodruff t,i.u24- _ •
j B. GATKWOOD, I I -1 a THOM AS,
lien Arc. Ark. I \ BrownsnUle, Ark.
GITEW3 0 & T 0«U\
lies Are ansi Brownsville,
PRiVRIE COI vtV. ARKtVStS.
_deeluf __ l
N. W. WILLIAM*. T. M. GIBSON, j
WlbUiMS &. GIBSOV.
ATTORNEYS AT LAT,
Das Arc and Duvall's Bluff. Ark. j
Will, practice in Prairie and adjoining
Counties All businesa confided to their care j
vill be promptly attended to. sept21 tf. ,
1. N. HBI»UKPETH. T. Bl-AKt KENT.
HEDGEPETH * K NT,
ATTOHYIYS AT IAW.
DBS ARC, ARKANSAS.
j
WII.L practice in alt of the courts of j
Prairie county, and ibe circuit court,
of the surrounding counties. niar24-<ini
JAMES H. PATTERSON, LIOIAN C. GAL’SE,
Augutla. Ark. Jiirkronporty .1 rk.
SIDNEY S. GAl'SE.
Patterson. tinu'O & Bra.,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Jarksanporf and tugusta. Arkansas.
Will practice iu the Counties of Woodruff, |
Jackson. Independence. White. Lawrence.
Randolph, Green. Craighead and Cross, and j
attend to special caaee in any purl of tIn
state. Address either office my 18 ly
\VM. B. COOltY. t>. MC BAB.
COODY & MjRAE,
AtffOlkW 8T3 AT 14W
M'.lHll'. WUITE COUNTY,
AUlt.VNSAK.
Will pr a it leu iu all tbe court? of Arkansas.
mariM
S'JL. F. CLAllK. 8AM W WILLIAMS
L JuC W. MARTIN.
(CLARK WILLIAMS & MARTIN,
Attorneys at Law,
LITTLE ROCK, kHK VVSiS.
V,J ILL practice iu all the Courts, prosecute
I Claims of all kinds, collect debts, and
act as Real Rotate and General -t
OrriCB—Markham Street nearState House
april28-tf
W. HICKS. Formerly of the firm of Cypert A |
Hi ok*.
H, R, FIELDING, Formerly of Athena, Ala.
HICKS i FIELDING.
ATTOaSSYS AT LAW,
Searcy, Wiilte !»., iritaniai.
WILL practice in this an'l tbo adjacent
oountie*. in tbo ftistrlct Courts, and Su
]iromu Court of the State.
__Wo hare in connection tijitli our Law
Oik j an Al'TI VE OCT-KOOU COLLECTING
AGENCY. Claims entrusted to us will be
promptly attended to. and it not immediately
collected will bo at cnee secured if possible.
Claim against the Government for property
: .ken by the V. 8 forces (whether receipted
tor or nut;—BuiSTtm Ptsttosi, Arrears of
p»v Art' i.r*-t«vn«C- :)Utinri*Ml f»’.
v, ■ ■ If fCKvT s n fT r.‘tNC.
PROFESSIONAL CAROS.
(ICO K NORTON. T. ▼ AGO* AN.
HORTON & VAUGHAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
AMD
SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY,
DE9 ARC. ARKANSAS.
WILL practice in the Courts of the counties
of Prairie. White, Jackson. Woodruff and
Monro*. Particular attention given to the
collection *f claims any where in th* State.
a*p7tf
DR. RPBT. B. TREZEVANT
Tender* his professional service* to
the citizens of Des Arc and vicinity.
Office—At Johnson ft Davis' Drug
Store. *cp21
SR. ALLSIT
Offers his services to the citizens of
Des Arc and vicinity in the practice of
medicine. Thankful for past tkvors,
and by attention to business he expects
to share a liberal prtronage.
Office—One door oast of Burney's
Drug Store. sep21
u. s. (mutt. w s. aaoNAcau.
OANTT ft BRON AVQH,
•ITTORHW AT LAW*
Will practice in the counties of Prairie,
White, Woodruff. Monroe, Arkansas and Pu
laski. Prompt atttention given to the collec
tion of claims. Taxes will be paid and titles
investigated for non-residents. aprl4-.ini
THOMAS J. MARSH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
A. t Law,
DES ARC, AREA N SA S.
giSr Partcular attention giveu to the
collection of all kinds of claims against
the Government.
Office—On Buena Vista street next
door to J. M. Burney's drug store.
ro»v26
WM• T> JONJES™
m tfomwsi? a$ &Awt
BROWNSVILLE, ARKANSAS.
Tfttr l_si.. si_.....i!.. . f Yv,, 1. . V !
W Prairie, Monroe. Woodruff, Jackson and
White Prompt attention given to the collec
tion of claims. aprl4-ly
E?». Z. TT. BTTF.XTEY,
RESIDENT PHYSICIAN,
Bt-ing permanently located at Des
Arc, will continue the practice of liis
profession in all its branches. Special
attention given to the treatment of
acute and chronic diseases. sep21
i. a. ursorr.Tu, ». a. jacmu.n. :
HEDGPETH & JACKSON,
EOIISSTSAD
LAND AGENTS,
D*jh Arc, Arliunsiny.
Will enter Lands under the provisions of
the Aot of Congress, May 21, 1802, entitled
“An act to secure Homesteads to actual set
tlers on the public domaiu.” ap27
p. LEPTIEN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
I AM NOW PREPARED TO DO ALL
kinds of werk in my line. Mend
ing, Cleaning. Ac.
-Thankful for poet favors, l solicit a
continuance of the patronage heretofore be
stowed on roe. feb28-tf
WATTENSAW
Nursery.
ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND
PItUIT TREES.
OXE AND TWO YEARS OLD,
FOR H 41.V. TN* IAA7-A
BY JOHN D. MORROW 1 SON,
PRAIIIXE Cot ATT, AUK AN?* AS.
H AVING been engaged in this business for
the last scveuteen years, in Mississippi
uud Arkansas; und Laving studied it closely,
we claim to bare acquired a kuowledge of the
Fruit* adapted to our climate. We refer the
public to specimens in our Orchards, and Or
chards sold by us, in this and adjoining
counties. Addreaa
John D. Morrow i Son,
juu22-<tm Dee Arc, Arkansas.
N. H. BARNETT,
lAiiMt lAKSft,
Aid General Repairer.
W'ill repair Old Ham?**, or make new ot^s.
Also, repair Saddle*. Shop—opposite “citi
jien oruett.’*
Dos Arc, Ark., May ‘Jo, 1867—If
ENTERTAINMENT!!
The undersigned h a vino m
opened e House of Enter- -™s
talnmeut, on Buena Vista Street, near
the Steamboat Landing, for tLe accommoda
tion of
TRAVELERS AND BOARDERS,
Bythe day. week, or month, ailiciu the pat
ronage of those viewing Dt.t Arc. The fare !
will be as good ns the market affords, and ■
tonne moderate.
Give me a trial, und 1 will endeavor to givo |
satisfaction.
BENJAMIN HAYLFY
r>, - \r! . ,T -d-"i t s.
EPCfATIOML.
DE8ARC
Wk]L& ||J FEIfALE
ACADEMY.
THE fourth session of this School will open
on Monday, the 5th of August, under the
charge and direction of B. D. PERRY,
assisted by a competent Female Teacher
Tams, p*r Seuicn of Fire Months.
Orthography, Reading and Writing, $14 O'
The same with Arithmetic, Geography
Oraramar, Philosophy. Algebra, Ge
ometry. Chemistry, Rhetoric, Book
Keening, Ac., $16 00
Latin and Greek, $20 Ot)
No incidental expenses.
N. B The tuition must be paid at the end
of each month, or you will be notified to keep
your children at home.
Des Arc. July 20, 1867.—ly
BHOVVNSVILLB
MALE Sr FEMALE
AG A DEMY.
TP HE Board of Trustees of the BROWN8
1 V1LLB MALE AND FEMALE ACADE
MY. are happy to announce that they have
completed arrangements for the permanent
continuance of the School, under the present
efficient corps of Teacher*.
The government will be mild, but firm,
conforming as nearly as possible, to that of a
well regulated family.
The Fall term will commence Holiday,
September 16th, 1M»7, and continue
twenty wcoks.
TERMS.
Primary Department — Orthography.
Reading and Writing, $12 50
Intermediate Department—Grammar,
Philosophy. Written Arithmetic,
Geography, Etc., $16 60
Higher Department—Higher Mathe
matics and the Languages, $20 00
Incidental Expenses, $1 00—for Fall term
only.
Bills payable one-half in advance, the bal
ance at close of the Term.
JOHN WRIGHT, President.
—, Secretary.
a_iom o_
HICKORY PLAIN
MALE and FEMALE
INSTITUTE,
HISSORY PLAIN.
PRAIRIE COUNTY, ARKANSAS.
THE lf.th semi-annual session of this
School, under
FRO7. W. I. GARNER AND L'DY,
Assisted by an able corps of Teachers, will
commence Monday, tbs' Mil of Au
gllNt. 1867.
Terme, the same as heretofore. For par
ticulars, address the Principal.
W. L. MOORE, Pree. Uoard Trustees,
A. J Thomas, Secretary
July 13. 1867—tf
EES ARC
FEMALE SCHOOL.
MISS EI.LEN PHINNEY will open
a School at her rcHidcnce, known as the
Black house, ou Monday, 5th August.
Terms of Tuition.
Elementary Eng. brandies, Rend
ing, Writing, Geography,
Grammar, etc., per session of
five months .S15 00
Higher Eng., Philosophy, Chem
istry, Rhetoric, Mental Science,
Physiology, Geology, Algebra,
etc " $18 00
French and Latin, (extra,) per
session. $15(1)
Music.$25 00
Use of Instrument . $5 00
Drawing and Painting, in water
or oils.$15 00
Incidental Expenses . $100
Charge made from time of admission,
and deduction made incase of protract
ed illness.
References.—Bishop II. C. Lay, C.
G. Scott, Esq., Little Rock ;• Henry,
Williams & Co., Van Buren. Arkansas;
J. J. Polk, New Castle, Tcun.: Gen. I
Albert Pike. jul20-tf
WALT & CO..
Dealers in
PUOneCE, rilKITINE,
DKV GOODS, BOOTS,
SHOES, HATS, C LOTIIIM.,
HARDWARE, MOTIONS,
IRO.\ TIES, HAOCilKO,
ROPE, Ac., Ac., Ac.
um m% $m«
V\.TE ARE NOW RECEIVING. And will
W keep constantly on baud, a large sup
ply of all snicles needed in tLi- market. We
sell
Ami just as low as we can live a!, governed
at ail limes by
ST. L0X7I0 AITS 3ASTSF.2T
MAKKBT6.
Wa feel under obligntions to our customers,
and solicit a continuation ofduir favor* We
will purchase or mako advancement* on Cot
ton shipped to our house in Memphis, or to
ouv correspondents in New Orleans.
ft 'jt t T 'T' r pn
NEWS ITEMS.
-The Secretary of the Treasury
has suspended the sales of Government
gold, and the probability is that they
will not be resumed until after the pay
ment of the interest on the live-twen
ties, which fall due in November.
-The London Times thinks Sew
ard is delighted to have a new Foreign
Secretary to wrestle with. It says lie
resembles a lawyer who desires to pro
long litigation rather titan obtain judg
ment. The Times is amused at the
calmness witli which he alludes to war
as a “local disturbance."
——President Janrez has issued an
order repealing the general edict of
confiscation against the property of the
Imperialists, lie lias, however, con
fiscated and sold at public auction the
finest printing establishment in Mexi
co, that of Scnors Andrade by Esca
lante, in the capita).
-The Mobile register, of the 23d,
ult., says : We understand, from a cot
ton factor who lias just returned from
an extensive tour through this State
and Mississippi, that the prospects for
a crop are much better than was antic
ipated some three or four weeks hack.
If the warm, dry weather continues, 1
the worms will entirely disappear.
-Maximilian’s body has not left
Queretaro. Ilis remains have been
most shamefully treated. The coffin
was placed in a filthy, dark bodega,
and all who desired had free access.
The glass cover was broken, his board
and hair cut of!' and sold, as well as
pieces of his blood-covered garments,
and no one would recognize in the
contents of the coffin the body of the
murdered Maximilian.
-John W. Murdaugh, of Ports
mouth, Virginia, and George A. Bcr
chert, of Savannah, Ga., ex-officers of
the Confederate Navy, commissioned j
by President Gutierrez to go to Car- j
thagenia and investigate some roll- j
hnrirfi PtiniiniltPi! tiiinn tho strainer
IUyo, were killed by the populace, i
Thou. L. Dornin, oi' Norfolk, Virginia. I
and Pliillip Smith, of Fairfax county,
Virginia, were wounded. All of them
were at the time in the Granadian ser
vice. Up to the 15th ult., no arrests
were made, and no one dared to speak
of the affair. The dead bodies were
stripped of everything valuable. The '
dispatches and letters of protection I
they bore were delivered next day to |
the President of the State all bespat-1
tcred witli their blood.
-Dr. Duke P. Blackburn derminis 1
himself safe under the recent amnesty j
proclamation, took the necessary oath j
before the United States Consul at
Toronto, forwarded it to Washington,
and reached houisville to the general
joy of his friends on the 25th ult. We
regret to say he was a little too quick
in his movements, as 011 that very day
the Secretary of the State officially de
nounced him to the President as a de
testable felon, and his oath was order
ed to be returned to him. All this per
secution of a hightoned gentleman
arises from a foolish and malicious
charge that lie had engaged with the
Confederacy to infest the ‘-ioil ’ states
with yellow fever during the war.
-Secretary McCulloch lias issued
an order forbidding clerks in the treas
ury department furnishing information 1
to persons connected with the public '
press, unless by permission of the sec-j
■ etary or his assistants. A violation 1
of the rules subjects the offender to I
dismissal.
-Mexican advices say Vice-Ad
miral Tegehoff is determined to return
;o Austria whether he receives the re
mains of Maximilian or not. Efforts
are being made by him to secure the
liberty of Father Fisher, Maxiinilinns's
confessor. The fattier was authorized
by Maximilian to publish all corres
pondence with Kapoieou. Hozine, it
it is said, recently refused 4IK),(XX)
U.HUO, \J 111 I VII Wf «• 1IIIIVII VIIIVVK IWI
the document*. It is considered more '
than probable that Marquez is still con
cealed in the city ol Mexico.
I’arflero Diaz has accepted the nom
ination for the presidency, and his ad
herents were organizing for the cam- I
paigu.
Princes* Salm Salm is still living at .
Queenstown, where her husband is
serving out hit seven years sentence.
Politeness—A Lovely Trait.—
It is a graceful habit for children to
say to euob other, “Will you have the
goodness?” and “ I thank you.” We
do not like to see prim, artificial eliil- j
drcn ; there are few things we dislike
so much as a ininealure beau or belie.
Hut the habit of good manners by no
means implies affectation or restraint''
It is quite as easy to say “Phase give
me a piece of pie.” as to say “ 1 want a >
piece of pic.” The idea that constant1
politeness would render social life too '
stiff and restrained springs from a fulso
estimate of politeness. True politeness
is perfect ease and freedom, it simply
consists in treating others just as yon
would like to he treated yourself. A
person who acts from this principle
will always be said to have "sweet,
pretty ways with her.” It is of some
consequence that your daughter should 1
Uuow how to enter and leave n room
gracefully; but it is of prodigiously
more consequence that she should be
in the habit of avoiding w hatever is
disgusting or offensive to others, and
of always preferinjr <! !r pleasure to
her pm n.
The Fearless Advocate.
Wo have rend with intense pleasure,
says the Memphis Appeal, the splendid
argument to the jury in the case of
John II. Surratt, of Mr. Merrick, one
of tho prisoner s counsel. Tho trial
had continued more than fifty days,
and is most memorable for many tilings;
for the contrast it presents with that
hideous mockery of justice, ending in
murder, tTie trial of Mrs. Surratt be
fore a Military Commission ; for the
frightful amout of perjury on the pnrt
of the witnesses for the Government;
for the complete exposure of that per
jury ; for tile eager anxiety to convict,
by any moans whatever; for the lean
ing of the court against the prisoner;
for the extraordinary propositions of
law of the prosecuting council; and
for the fidelity and courage of the
counsel for the defence. The great
length of Mr. Merrick's speech pre
cludes its publication by us; but we
cannot resist the temptation to make
the following extract, the words of
which must have scorched like molten
lead the consciences of some who heard
them; and others who will have read
them :
“During our civil war, when tiiis
land swarmed with petty emissaries of
political and private malice, every pet
ty scoundrel in every district had Ids
spy at every table. 1 have learned to
contemn them. If I had the power 1
would take every informer in the Uni
ted States, unite them as one man, and
swing them as high as Unman. Spies
and detectives! The habits of imperial
and kingly government have come to
be the common daily food of American
society. Seriously, gentlemen, not one
of you during the last three years of
the war could move without it being
reported to some official; and they yet
swarm in the laud ; ti.ey suck tho blood
of tlie government; they have depleted
its treasure. Even to-dnv. now in the
timo of peace, these political emissaries
are fed at the public board; while
honest Industry bleeds and grows thin
that thov may grow fat and rich. The
system is iufamous; the tools arc more
infamous than the system.
*******
Feeling themselves grow weak in
testimony they fall back—upon whom
gentlemen of the Jury? Upon Mr.
I '1 raver I inttal ennf^., I W.I* vi>„,r
much surprised when I saw Cleaver
come upon the stand ami recollected
the denunciations I heard thundered
asrainst him by the district attorney,
and recollected the fact, which came
out in evidence, that only a few weeks
Since, for a crime w ithout a name, a
verdict was brought in against that.
man anil lie was sentenced. A new
trial was granted on technical grounds
mid ho stands for trial in this court now .
I say a crime without a name. It is a
prime not w ithout a name in law; it is
a crime that cannot be named in this
presence. Murder; not only murder
hut murder most foul and unnatural.
And the spirit of the ungrown girl j
stands before the eternal throne as the
accusing spirit of that accursed man.
Why, gentlemen, has the United
States government bowed itself to the
low humiliation of using such an in
instrument as that ? Rut that is not all
of Mr. Cleaver. I do not talk of him
lo you to get you to disbelieve him, for
I believe your indignation arose as you
saw him ou the staud. - I talk of him
as part of that blessed chain. Not
Cleaver alone, but Cleaver manipulated
by Conover, and uot Conover alone,
but manipulated by Ashley, incarcera
ted in your jail with that most notori
ous felon Conover, whose name lias
passed into history, upon whose body
yesterday grated the doors of the Al
bany penitentiary, incarcerated with
this man Conover the schemer, the de
viser of all the perjury of the military
commission, passing through the sciue
of the office of the chief of the military
bureau, Conover, the tutor of the ruau
who sits there beside the counsel—
UioKoe.l . at..* m.i._a
Montgomery who helped to give part
of that infamous testimony that stains
with dishonor too records of my na
tive country. Conover, the vile, the
tool of Ashly, scarcely better. This
man, manipulated by Conover, brought
out by Ashly, dug up from the purlieus
of the jail’s infamous depths, is put oil
that stand to ask you to take his oath
against the life of that poor boy. Oh !
gentlemen, gentlemen, thank God, al
though counsel may forget sometimes
which is due to a jury, a jury such ns
this cannot forgot what is due to them
selves ns men. Kpurii it, gentlcineu,
indignantly; not only disbelieve, but
spurn it.
* » * *
Win* of you is there that was in the
city of Washington, who will ever for
get that fatal day when the tolling of
the hells reminded you of the sad fact
that tiie hour had come wlieu those
people were to be hung? Your honor
[referring to Justice Wylie who was at
the time sitting by the side of Jud>C'
Fisher on the bench] and in your praise
ite it said, raised your judicial hand to
prevent that murder, hut it was too
weak. The storm heat against your
arm, and it fell powerless in the
tempest. Yon remember that day,
gentlemen. Twenty-four hours for
preparation. The echoes of the nn
iinuucement of impending death scarce
ly dying away before the tramp of the
approaching guard was heard leading
to the gallows. Priest, friend, philan
thropist, and clergyman went to the
r )) ♦ * V * Y»' *» »' ? s* ! JJO'V C (p
I president, to implore for that poor wo
^ ninn three days' respite, to prepare her
soul to meet her God. hut got no nc
oess. The beart-hroken child—the
! poor daughter—went there crazed, and
stretched upon the steps that lead to
i the executive chamber ; she raised her
hands in agony and prayed to every one
that came. ‘‘Oh. God! let me have ao
| e.ess, that I may ask for hut one day for
my poor mother: just one day!” Did
she pet there ? No. And yet, says the
counsel, thpre was no one to prevent
stress being had. Why didn't you
prove it ? Oh. God ! If such a thing
could have been proved, how would I
not have rejoiced in the fact; for when
reflecting upon that sad, unfortunate,
wretched hour in the history of my
country—an hour when I feel she was
so much degraded. I could weep until
the paper he worn away with the con
tinual dropping of mv tears. Who
j stood between her and the seat of mer
cy? Has conscience .lashed the chief
i of the bureau of military justice?—
| Goes memory haunt the secretary of
I war? Or is it true that one who stood
'between her and executive clemency
now sleeps in the dark waters of the
Hudson, whilst another died by his
violent hands in Kansas.
The Cross of Love,
This is a reproduction of an cxquls
ite piece of poetry which circulated
widely a few years ago. hut the beauti
ful and true sentiment cannot he repea
ted in too many or varied forms
Oh. I was sad and weary: wearied
with the conflicts of life, with its heavy
toil, with its hitter strifes. I reasoned
with myself and thought they might lie
trial tests of my faitli and love. Then
I looked around upon my fellow-mor
tals, and thought not one of them had
as much to endure as I had. Some
friends were taken from me by death,
others by estrangement worse than
acntii. iinu 1 ivnr, otiugcu io ion ior my
daily bread. Oh, hoiv 1 would change
places with any of my friends, their
burdens could be easily borne, but mine
were too heavy, my cross 1 could not
bear.
As 1 mused, the angel of sleep passed
by, and the breeze wafted by bis wings
toll soothingly upon my spirit and I
slept.
Soon n jol’l ntul uilror llirKl Kniiinpri lo
surround me. The sweetest and most
beautiful music filled the uir. A form
of angelic beauty approached me. llis
brow sliotie with a clear, resplendent
light; his face was calm and so radiant,
so Godlike, that l tcit like one entran
ced. I could neither speak nor move.
As lie came near, lie gently waved his
hand and said, “follow me. I am the
way.” Involuntarily I arose and follow
ed. I seemed to float through the blur
ether, and most delicious fragrance till
ed the balmy air. After traversing
what seemed to be illimitable space, lie
stopped and addressed me thus: "Mor
tal, 1 have witnessed thy conflicts and
struggles. Thou think'st the cross giv
en thee loo heavy to bear: lay it aside,
and take one of thine own choosing, '
at the same time pointing to a place
where lay myriads of crosses of divers
size and lashion.
I felt inexpressibly happy ns I laid
aside my cross and looked about to se
lect one to supply its place. Soon my
eyes fell upon a small but brilliuut look
ing one composed of jewels and pre
cious stones, and 1 said, “ I will take
this, it must be easy to bear.' But
soon l began to totter; tlie weight was
loo nmcli, and 1 said, “Oh. I must take
it off, I cannot walk.' Gently he said,
“Try again." Then 1 selected one ol
gold, elaborate ware, thinking surely 1
could beam golden cross. But that too
pressed so heavily upon me that I was
obliged to lay it down. Then the au
gol smiled mournfully upon me, and
said "Don't weary, try again.” .This
time 1 selected one composed of most
beautiful flowers, this is for me the bur
den must be light. But it soon made
its liid-sorrows known to me; thorns
pierced my flesh, and 1 cried in anguish :
“This one I may not bear! ’ and 1 said
“Oh! why ueed I have any cross? 1 do
well enough without." Then the angel
gently answered, “Mo cross no crown."
Sadly I gazed, but tho ungel said.
“Fear not; there must he one here to
suit your need." Slowly pass ing along,
I espied a plain unpretending lookeng
cross with the word LOVE engraved
upon it in letters of gold, I exclaimed.
“Oh I know 1 can bear this one!" As
1 raised it. a smile of ineffable sweet
ness illumed the face of the angel, and
I found I had chosen “my own old cross
again." But Oh! how differently it
seemed from what it used to; it fitted
exactly, and I joyfully acknowledge it
the best for me to bear.
Then tlie angel said, “For He so lov
ed thee that he gave his only begotten
Son that thou, by bearing the cross giv- j
ett thee, might inherit eternal life."
Willi grateful heart and suffused with
tears, I looked to thank tlie angel, but
he had vanished, and I awoke.
But what a lesson I had learned.
Surely tho cross “my Father" gave me.
was the best. With grateful and con
tented heart I thanked the giver, never
again doubting that the way lie had pre
pared and appointed was the one for
me; ever preying that whatever he
thought necessary for the discipline of
ntv life, I bear with patience, and trust
in “111111 who doeth all things well.''
—Christian Register.
Isay* Twenty-eight births of twins
have occurred in Fanola county. Miss.,
PI,;! t,r,s
The Raid into Fuljton County.
Wp sr( informed that on Tuesday,
the 10th of Sept., nnd during the pro
gress of the Circuit Court in our neigh
boring county of Fulton, an armed
l body of men, some twenty iii number,
who claimed to be Missouri Militia,
i entered the little town of Salem,
charged upon the court house at full
i speed, with drawn pistols, and sur
I rounding the house, held the entire
; court. Judge, attorneys, and citizens in ■
attendance, under guard for some time,
j An explanation of their conduct being
asked, the lieutenant in command stated
j that tl#y were in search of horse
thieves, robbers and desperadoes gen
erally. After tho lapse of half an hour
or thereabouts. Judge Powell asked
and obtained leave to iro out o!’ the
lines they had formed, and take with
him the attorneys in attendance, vouch
ing for tlie good standing, &c„ of the
latter. The citizens in attendance were
retained under guard for sometime.
The party, after remaining in the
town for several hours, mounted their
horses and taking with them Judge E.
C. Hunter, an old" and respectable citi
zen of the vicinity, a prisoner, left the
town. On Tuesday night, the same
party, having with them several citi
zens under guard charged upon the res
idence of Mr. A. J. Smith, who lived
some four miles from Salem ; and on
approaching the house about midnight,
eith r intentionally or accidentally, it
is not known which, one or two pistol
shots were tired by the party—which,
with ttie noise, it is supposed, alarmed
Mr. Smith, who sprang from his bed
and attempted to make his escape from
the back door, when he was fired upon
by the whole party, some ten or twelve
shots taking effect. Smith ran a short
distance and fell dead. On ascertain
ing whom they had killed, these ruf
fians pretended to be quite sorry for
what had happened, saying they had j
no charge agaiust Smith, but were ex
pecting to find at his house another I
111 <11, mi nuiu mrv wurc MiTJtruiiiiig.
Judgo limiter and the other citizens
under arrest were released the next
morning, without one word of expla
nation as to the cause of their impri
sonment. And this band of murder
ing Militia took up toe line of march
eastward through Fulton countv, and !
n is rmnorea that two outer mf-n ten
victims to these blood hounds the next
day.
We ijre quite sure such conduct is \
wholly unauthorized, un warranted, and
is certainly outrageous in the extreme.
(s a baud of irresponsible cut-throats,
claiming to be militia of a neighboring
State, to be allowed to invade our State,
outrage our courts of justice, arrest and
imprison our good citizens, murder un
armed and helpless men, and run
roughshod over the country with im
punity? The affair certainly demands
an investigation, and that the guilty
parties be brought t.) justice.—Bates
ville Times.
riS
Horrors ok War.—Since the crea
tion of the world fourteen thousand
millions of human beings have fallen
in tiic battles which man has waged
against his fellow-creature—man. If
this amazing number of men were to
hold each oilier bv the hand at arms
length, they would extend over four
teen millions five hundred and eighty
lliree miles ground and would encircle
the globe on which wc dwell, one hun
dred and eight times! If we allow
the weight of a mau to be on an aver
age one cwt. (this is below the mark),
we shall come to the conclusion that
six millions two hundred and fifty
thousand tons of human fiesh have;
been mangled, disfigured, gashed, and :
trampled under foot. The calculation j
will appear more striking when we
Mnir, iiiui ii vmy tilt? lurtfuu^crs ui
every oiic of those fourteen thousand
million of human beings were to be
laid in a straight liue they would reach
more than six hundred thousaud miles
beyond the moon ; and that if n person
undertake to count the number, allow
ing nineteen hours a day, and seven
days in a week, at the rate of six thou
sand per hour, it would occupy that
person three hundred and thirty-six
years. And, awful is the considera
tion! three hundred and fifty thousand
pipes of human blood hare been spilt
in battles! Who would not cxclkim
with Itishop Hall: “Give me the
mail who can devise how to save
troops of men from killing, his name
shall have room in «ny calendar.—
There is more truo honor in a civil
garland for the preserving of one sub-!
Ject, than in the laurel for the victory ;
over many enemies.” Or, with Bishop
Taylor: “If men were only subjected
to Christ's law, theu could they never
go to war with each other.”—[Dr.
Thomas Dick.
The New Orleans Republican a
Radical negro sheet, edited and printed
by mulattocs. has the following: “Hen
Sheridan, after two years of authority, and j
five months of absolute control in this'
district leaves the city of New Orleans,
the chief point of interest in it in a deplo
rable condition—financial, political and
sanitary; its treasury robbed by rebel offi
cial* under his nose; the cause of Republi
canism no moto advanced among its white
cititens than it was two years ago, sud an
epidemic raging which the experience of
the last five years seems at least to teach us
might h ;ve been avoided by care and
' t
Oue,square (10 ..Tien of this site type) for
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to their legitimate business.
Personal communication'' charged double.
Logo! advertisements will be charged, for
one square or less, first insertion £l, and »A
cent* per square for each additional insertion.
Advertisements not ordered for a specified
me. will be inserted till foihidden, and
barged for accordingly.
\’ a Ivertisintr duo after second insertion.
SALMAGUNDI, " “
MS'Onpntimcx the most costly thing
we get ix that which is given us.
I?* “Sam, nro you one of the South
ern chivalry?’ “No. massa; I am one
ot the Southern shovelry.’ -now
shovelry ? ' “1 shoveled dirt at the
Dutch Gap Canal.”
ft#” Blessed arc they w ho do not ad
vertise ; lor they shall not be troubled
with customers.
The promised land—forty acres
apiece to the freedmeu.—[Louisville
Journal.
m~ If. as tlie London Atla6 says, tho
Queen lias given away her last garter,
how will she manage in future with
her stockings?
#0P“‘Tell the truth and shame the
devii. We know lots of people who
can shame the devil easy enough, but
t other thing bothers em.
*85"“ "I will never marry a woman
who can t carve, ’ said Jones, “Why
not?’ asked Smith. “Because she
would not be a help-meat tor me.
iSy'John G. Saxe says that it is a
common notion that, if a person is born
in Boston it Ms unnecessary for that
favored mortano be “born again.”
I6S* Six months ago a Boston house
sent out a cargo of 500 hoop skirts to
Japan, as a venture. The Japs put a
cover on them and used them for um
brellas.
J©“ A Yankee has invented a swing
by which the swinger can, with one
toot, not only do ins swinging easily
but may at the same time set in motion
a churn, a wood saty; a pump or a
washing apparatus, as lie pleases.
t&r t wo duelists, having exchanged*
shots without efl'ect, one of the seconds
interferred, and proposed that the par
ties should shake hands. To this the
other second objected as unnecessary,
‘Tor,’ said lie, “their hands have becu
shaking this half an hour.
Chatting with one of her neigh
bors one day, an olo lady related her
experience, when converted, as fol
lows : “I used to he very gay and fond
of the world and all its fashions, till
the Lord showed me my folly. I liked
silks and ribbons and laces and feath
ers, but I found they were dragging
iBVJv’I'Sirl hell—bo I travc them all
Soft Soap foe All.—For a lieuten
ant. call him a captain ; for a middle
aged lady kiss her, and say that you
mistook her for her daughter; for a
young gentleman fifteen, ask his opin
ion respecting the comparative merits
of a razor; for young ladies, if you
know their color to ho natural, accuse
them of paintiug.
Osff* Tlie following anecdote of the
war we have never seen belorc: Du
ring the war a lady was distributing
tracts to the occupants of a ward of a
hospital, and was excessively sliocked
to hear one poor fellow laugh at her.
She stopped to reprove him.
“Why, nia,tn,’ says he, “you have giv
en me a tract on the sin ot dancing, and
I've got both legs shot oft.”
Editorial Necessities—A well
known editor of New Jersey, about to
start for Long Branch, requested his
wife to put in his satchel what articles
were necessary for an absence of two
or three days. lie lodged at Freehold,
and in tlie morning he opened the satch
el to takeout some linen, when lie found
it to contain ouly a bottle of whiskey
and a bundle of old newspapers. That
editor's wife evidently understood
his “travelling necessities.’’
Goon for Mrs. P.—“Will you have
a Daily Sun ? ’ said a news boy to Mrs.
Partington.
“Will I have a daily son? Why you
little scapegrace! How dare you insin
uate against ajonc woman from home?
No indeed—1 guess I w’ou’t have a dai
ly soil. My poor dear man used to
complain awful when I presented him
with a yearly son. A daily son indeed.
Begone you little upstart imp!" and the
old lady called lor the old turkey fan to
keep from faiuting.
Dancing A Quadrille.
It is described thusly by a young man
who tried it:
•‘We bowed to both, thou t other,
then the liddle raked, and the thing
started, grabbed her female hand, she
squeezed tniue, we both siting each oth
er, but sho slung the must, because 1
think she loved me for a little while:
thou we changed clear across the room,
jumped up and down ever so many
times, then niy dear and uie dosed a
doe and hop-scotched home again,
(from a foreign shore.) then we two
forwarded four, I ladies change, we X
over, turned around twice, shassha.ved
sideways, I backed to place, she dittoed ;
side couples to the right, aide couples
to the left, side couples this way, side
couples t'other way, side couples turn
gentlemen, side couples ttirn ladios, la
dies turu side couples, gentlemen turn
side couples, head couples turn side
couples side couples turn head couples,
all hauds around, back again, first
‘feller’ take opposite ‘gal,’ sling her
around, take yourown ‘gal’ and t'other
‘fellers gal’ forward and hack, twist
both-gals two times, sling’em to op
posite ‘feller.’ let him do the same us
you did, and back again to places flight
gentleman balance to heavy lady,
heavy lady duplicate, promenade all,
‘gals’ get in the center, ‘feller# get hold
Of each others hands,bob up and down,
arms over ladies waterfalls, ladles (tcop,
jump up and down, each ‘feller’ take
his‘gal’back to places; right geutlc
man spiii right lady, left lady spiu left
gentleman, ell twist each oilier, do it
again, over, repeat once more, keep it
up ; all turn round, all turn the other,
backward, sideways, each couple swing
t’~*bc" couple, rror► ^—er, beck ugMo."

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