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Akron daily Democrat. [volume] (Akron, Ohio) 1892-1902, June 16, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028140/1899-06-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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C. A. GODDARD
PHOTOGRAPHER .
Arcade Building: Tel. 1982
EMOCRAT
-HEADQUARTERS FOR-
Paris Green IrSR
And Other INSECTICIDES.
SIEINBACHER'S ::: NO. IN EDSl Ml SI.
VOLUME EIGHT. NUMBER 49
AKRON, OHIO, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 16, 1899.
PRICE ONE CENT
AKRON
DAILY
REFUSED
To Appoint Guardian
For Aged Resident of
NorthamptonTownship:
Martin Found Guilty in
Twenty Minutes.
lyiilli
Damage Claims Filed by East
Market Street Citizens.
Motion
Heard In
Court
Garber
News.-
Case-
The application for the appoint-,
ment of a guardian for Simeon Prior
was refused Friday morning by
Judge Anderson.
The matter has been in court for
some time. Prior is an aged widow
er residing in Northampton. Some
time ago his wife died leaving him a
considerable estate. Her heirs filed
the application for the guardian. If
Prior should die without making a
will, the heirs of his wife would in
herit a portion of the property. If he
makes a will they are liable to be
cut otf without, any share.. Tho ap:
pointment of a guardian would pre
clude any chance to make a will.
Martin Guilty.
The jury in the case of the State vs.
Samuel A. Martin, brought in a ver
dict of guilty after 20 minutes' de
liberation. He was charged witli
embezzling $123 of the Akron State
Building & Loan company. At the
request of the attorneys for the de
fendant the jury was polled. Notice
was given of a motion for a new
trial.
MarKe "Street Damage Claims. - ' "
The property owners on East Mar
ket street have filed damage claims
against the city amounting to $33,
300. The city has filed an applica
tion in Probate court for the pur
pose of adjusting the same. The
claims are as follows:
Fanny C. Bloomfield, executrix of
the will of Bosaline Tallman, $1,000;
James M. Poulson, $600; Frank M.
Atterholt, $5,000; Mary E. Fay, $600;
Carrie M. Sadler, $3,000; America
Morris, $500; Amelia W. Snyder,
$1,000; Laura C. Thompson, $1,000;
George G. Allen. $3,0J0; Eunice R.
Carter, $900; Cynthia A. J. Hall, $800;
E. Steinbacher, $3,600; Fannie A.
Kohler, $600; Ida'M. Paige, $2,500;
Catherine Good, $3,000; Annie Bock,
Great reductions on
Tailored Suits
JaCKCLS and
Dress Skirts
A complete new
assortment of
Shirt Waists
AT
Tempting Prices
??
Piaifii
Successors to
TAYLORS
155-157 S. Howard street.
(f)
ff
.?&$a&$3.
a
and
ORGANS right out &
of the boxes, at. my
store.
OPENING
16
PIANOS
injunction proceedings against Wni.
T. Taylor and George Heintz. The
parties reside in Coventry township
and are in a dispute in reference to a
line fence.
Court Briefs.
The heirs of Dorothy Mathews, on
the application of Ella A. Simmons
et al. have been granted permission
to-partition the estate.
The damage case of Nora A. Jen
nings vs. The Akron & Cuyahoga
Falls Rapid Transit company has
been assigned to Judge Nye.
Will Filed.
The will of Frederick L. Harring
ton of Northampton has been filed.
He gives his wife, Mahala M., a life
use provided she does not remarry.
He provides that his son Charles
shall have the use of $1,200 after the
death of his wife. The balance of
the estate is given to three sons.
The case of Henry Donnelly vs.
George A. Cooke has been settled.
The defendant in the divorce case
of Lizzie J. Miller vs. D. A. Miller
has filed an answer denying all
charges. -
Projate Court.
James Kirk, has been appointed
guardian of Eva Carmichael et al.
George W. Ciouse, George T. Per
kins and O. L. Sadler have been ap
pointed appraisers of the estate of
Lewis Miller.
. Marriage Licenses.
William O'Neill, Akron. . .
Mary "Witt, Akron
-&&fee&&eeeeeeec&&e&&&
$DREHER'S PIANOLA RECITAL TONrGHT.
m
(0
WA CORDIAL INVITATION TO AI,L.-& i
I The B. Dreher's Sons Co. I
"tin, IVIgr.
GROWTH
viz
&
&
Xo.
So.
Xo.
Xo.
Xo.
Xo.
Xo
Xo
Xo.
1. "Klyinp Dutchman"..... .
2. Coquette Mazurka...
3. '-La Cnmpnnelln (transcription by Liszt)..
4. "Recollections of Home" .... ..............
.". "Sonata Patlietlonie" ......
6. "The Korest Fnlry (Valse dl Bravura)
7. "Sonata. Op. 2T (Moonlight)
5. "Stars and Stripes Forever" (March)
ft. "Ricoletto" (Paraphrase lu Concert)
Xo. 10. Military March
ni
... Overture. Wwjiner
.... l.arregla
I. PaKBMni
S. H. Mills
j Beethoven
..... Venzauo
Beothoven
.... .. ...Sousa
Liszt
..... Schubert -Tansig
Of St. Mary's Church.
Many Improvements That
Have Been Made
THE NEWEST
opened to-day.
Attractive designs,
Perfect fitting,
Fine assortment,
.of new
Ml 1
.. 24
..21
INTENSE
TODAY
jg TOMORROW
1 SATURD
n n ass tii U
ft d. m.i ft
w
ii
220 S. Main St.
Excitement Created
By the Wonderful Cures
of Boy Phenomenon.
Immense Audience at
Grand Opera House
Collars,
linen '
best quality, 2100
ur
. Linen and pique
skirts are models of perfec
tion, workmanship, style and
price exactly right.
THE! NEW
Carpets opened
this week are trademakers for
us.
The Upham-Brouse
$2orj4-jiudie
$6,000; HarrietE. Buel,
B. BoblnsolirW -
Garber Case.
The motion of Harvey C. Garber,
asking that the minutes of the grand
jury which returned the last indict
ment against him be brought into
court for his inspection and that each
juror be examined under oath, was
heard in Common Pleas court Fri
day. The state asked that tho mo
tion be heard, as it was anxious to.
take up the trial of the caso this
term.
State vs. Gorehan.
The rape case- of the State vs.
Gerehan, was taken up in Common
Pleas court Friday afternoon.
Injunction.
Harrison M. Spicer has brought
Are here and a man don't feel very
standing around in the sun unless he
much like
is dressed
awfully cool. Why not get dressed in our
Coo Summer Clothing
And feel perfectly cool wherever you go?
Crash and Linen Suits
Garments that are the dressiest for hot
weather, and the" cost of them is very
small.
Serge, Mohair and Alpaca Coats
As well as vests we have the coats in
. regular lengths, extra length and
stouts.
Shirts
$3.00
$4.00
$5.00
$1.00
$1.50
$2.00
$2.50
50c
75c
$1.00
$1.50
For this weather should be just as cool
as you get them. We have the Silk
Madras Cheviot, Zephyrs and Oxfords
with and without collars.
Straw Hats. For Everybody
T Vanh fc Pa I
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
:2&s-
Witnessed Remarkable Exhibi
tion of Power.s
Afflicted
Received
His Hands.
Relief at
The audience attracted Thursday
night to the Grand Opera House to
witness the second series of magnetic
power exhibitions by the Boy Phe
nomenon was perhaps the -largest
ever assembled there.
In the house were closely crowded
together at least 1,400 persons, while
outside the building a crowd of about
2,000 congregated and clamored for
admittance. Only when the last
hopes of gaining admittance had
died away did the crowd reluctantly
disperse.
As early as 2 o'clock in the after
noon those afflicted with rheumatism,
paralysis, deafness and various
other ills began to assemble that
they might secure front Keats in the
house, and thus have better chances
of reaching the stage for treatment.
When the time arrived for the ex
hibitions to begin an instinctive hush
prevailed throughout .the entire au
dience. The feeling yas intense,
the scene was dramatic. In the as
semblage were old men and women,
helped to their seats by crutches and
companions, or carried bodily and
feeble little children were then to
take part in the drama, so real and
without a shadow of simulation. The
suffering ones wore on their counte
nances expressions of care and for
lorn hope that could be the result of
no makeup, but only of "hard exper
ience. As was the case Wednesday night
all the cures effected were simply
the results of the laying on -of hands
by the Boy Phonomenon. The skep
tics were dazed by the seemingly in
credible cures performed before their
eyes in but a few moments.
The names of the persons treated
and their diseases follow:
' George Poole, 404 Locust st., mus
cular rheumatism and lumbago eight
yetrs; Mrs. Margaret Manderbach
139Bartges st., rheumatism lOyears;
George Zimmerman, 106 Common
st, deafness 15 years ; James Groark,
40 Forge st., paralysis 12 years; Mrs.
JBJancne Winkler, 103 Main st., neu
ralgia of the face many years; John
Manderbach, 139Bartges st., rheum
atism 35 years; "Aunty" Brown, 206
Carroll st., palsy for soveral years;
D. J. "Waltz, 109 Rhodes av., rheum-1
atisui, 15 years; little John Coney, i
219 Valley 'St., paralysis of left side
several mouths.; Aaron Slabaugh,
404 South High st., rjieumatjsm and
paralysis six years; Mrs. Theresa
Bowers, Summit Hill, rheumatism
five years.
Each caso was successfully treated
and the patients expressed them
selves as having experienced instant
relief. Some of tlio.se treated for
rheumatism or paralysis shouldered
their crutches and marclied proudly
down the aisle to the door. When
each patient would return from the
"stdge" npplauSftvigh-foU6' "uriU"prfc
longed would be accorded the Boy
Phenomenon by the auience.
Everybody is talking about the
wonderful power exhibited by the
young man, and expressing satis
faction over the results of his demon
strations.
PLASTERED
During the Time of Rev.'
Moran's Pastorate,
wwwwmwww.
lonster June
.j
I M
i 2-IM
Special Sale
Interesting Account of
Foreign Travels.
His.
Met Leading
Rulers
World.
of the Old
TheResidence With Signs
. and Illustrations.
Tried
to
residence
The"
... T
JjWrutcon-Fouutain-,
Mrs. Stuart Miller of Elwood av.,
left today for an extended visit with
friends at Mansfield.
FUNERAL The funeral of Leroy
P. Summers will be held Saturday at
2 o'clock at 142 South Broadway.
'AUNT MILLY" FAILED.
So the Young School
a Hand.
Mom"' Took
"Hastily putting up a small lunch,
the young school teacher hurried
away for the day's duties; taught
her physiology class the evil effects
ofcoffee '(that being the lesson for
the day) then came home and made
coffee the principal thine: for dinner.
She had been growing more and
more nervous and irritable as the
weeks passed "by. Stomach trouble
had set in and more or less bowel
trouble, but she never had applied to
herself the teaching that coffee acts
as a poison on many systems.
A package of Postuin Food Coffee
found its-way into the house and was
sent down to Aunt Milly, the cook,
to make, in the morning when it
was served, it was so inferior that it
was pushed away in disgust and
regular coffee called for. But the
school teacher knew she must have
help some way to get rid of coffee
drinking, so she went down the next
morning to make some Postum her
self and to make it carefully, accord
ing to directions. The. result was
more satisfactory than she had ever
dreamed. With rich cream it was
better than the best coffee she had
ever drank, and it made herself hun
gry for breakfast just to smell it.
A week passed by and she became
known as an enthusiast on the sub
ject. One day at school a remark
was made on her improved looks,
and she related the story of the new
coffee. Miss Smith, one of the
teachers, remarked that she had al
ways wanted something in place of
coffee, and intended to try itl A few
mornings afterward Miss Smith re
marked, "We tried your old Postum
at home and nobody liked it." She
was-induced, however, to give it a
trial under the personal direction of
her own supervision, in order to know
that it was boiled 15 or 20 minutes.
That cleared up the case, and Miss
Smith is as enthusiastic over Postum
as the other teacher has been.
The little nephew in the house was
perfectly delighted with tho thought
of having a cup of coffee every
morning for breakfast. "The greatest
victory we have had is with sister,
who lias been a regular coffee devo
tee and held out against the Postum
for some time, but after she had used
Postum for about ten days, she said
one morning,."! must say I will take
this in preference to coffee ovory
time, so we will just have Postum
hereafter and none of the old-fashioned
coffee."
Now whon the teacher instructs a
class in physiology, she can demon
strate by her own physical health,
the advantage of leaving off coffee
with its poisonous effects." Janet
Cooper, Nashville, Tenn.
Force an EntranceThey
vMet With Resistance.
of Mr. and Mrs. S.
(.jluul-tlie
appearance of-a corner bill board af
ter a clyclono Friday morning.
Tt was plastered from top to bot
tom with various.placards calculated
to convey tiie idea that it was the
abode of a- recently married couple.
The various cards were profusely and
appropriately celebrated.
Mr. and Mrs. Warner were mar
ried Wednesday afternoon. Thursday
night 4Q friends visited their home.
The husband had anticipated the
event and lie had every door barred
and each window nailed down. Tho
crowa, after finishing its decorative
work, placed a ladder to an upstairs
window. Two young men mounted
it. One of them pushed his hand in
side, raised the window and ran - up
against a stiff left hook, delivered
by Mr. Warner. It landed on the
chin of the intruder. Both men on
the ladder fell to the ground. The
crowd then serenaded the bride and
groom with a snare drum and tin can
chorus.
While the improvements made
during the past two years on the
buildings and property of St. Mary's
church, on South Main st., have
been extreme, yet having been made
from time to time, the casual ob
server may not have considered such
improvements in the aggregate.
Glancing over the work done in the
past two years it is shown that at
least $10,000 has been expended in
improvements.
Jn conversation with a Dkmocbat
reporter Thursday evening, Rev.
Francis T. Moran said : "I have just
finished all that can be done at pres
ent and am now enjoying a short
season of rest. I am very grateful
that I may now look forward to ab-
cnlntn nmaf "
The series of improvements was
completed a few days ago with the
laying of sidewalks about tho par
ochial residence.
Among the improvements made
under the pastorate of Dr. Moran,
which has been two years and a half,
the parochial school has been re
modeled, the sisters' house enlarged,
the church frescoed, a sacristy added
and statues of St. Anthony, St.
Joseph and the sacred heart placed
in the building as have also been
stations- - of the cross. -?few hnlls
have also been arranged and the
present fine parochial residence
erected. By the above enumeration
Friday and Saturday, June 16 and 17, at the
"BSG STORE OF LITTLE FfflCES"
J. J. BRASAEMLE
So cartel lOc Store
P. F3. SMITH'S Old Stand
The gathering of superb values is not a matter of un
important detail. It represents to the vast arniv of house
wives and home-makers. AN AGGREGATION OF MONEY
SAVING ITEMS. All you have to do is to come and take
advantage of these hona-fide reductions, as the value giv
ing is without precedent.
First Floor iWQRTH NOW
Pot -cover, size 8 to KM
Rising sun stove- polish . .
Asbestos stove mats .
12 bars P.E.S. soap
Box paper, 24 sheets paper, 24 envelopes
Yegetable brushes ' ".
Bottle blueing .
All kinds spices . . -
Carpet, taicks, 12 papers
i galvanized glazed crocks
Enameline' stove polish
0 -yards valencinens lace for
Climax llusset stove polish only
Machine oil . .
Extract of lemon and vanilla
Mixed bird seed ' "...
"Writing ink .. . ..
All colored crape paper '
Washing powder
Blue decorated plate's
No. 1 plain lamp chimneys
ocorac3 Floor
Meat broiler .
"Wash bowl and pitcher . ..
Green and gold water sets .
"White and cold water sets.
"Glass punch bowls
b foot stepladder
. only
only, -only,
.only.
. only .
.only.
Resolutions of Condolence. .
Whereas, it has pleased God in His
Providence to remove from our midst
our late neighbor, Max J. Fink; and
whereas, the intimate relations
held by our deceased neighbor with
the members of this camp, render it
proper that we should place on record
our appreciation of his merits as a
man and neighbor; therefore be it
Resolved, by Akron Camp No,
4384, the Modern Woodmen of Amer
ica, that while we bow in humble
submission to the will of tho most
High, wo do, nevertheless, mourn for
our neighbor, who has been called
from liis labors to rest.
Resolved, That in the deatli of
Neighbor Max J. Fink, this camp
loses one who was always earnest in
his work as a Woodman, ever ready
to advance the interests of the order,
devoted to its welfare and prosperty,
ever ready to help the needy and tho
distressed of tho camp; an honest
and upright man and beloved by his
neighbors and fellow-men.
Resolved, .that this camp tender its
heartfelt sympathy to the family
and relatives of our deceased mem
ber, in this their sad allliction.
Resolved, that those resolutions be
entered upon the minutes of this
camp and n copy be sent to tho fam
ily of our deceased neighbor and
printed in tho daily newspapers of
this city.
Akron, O.. June 12, 1899.
F..E. Whittemokk,
. Harry S. Brandon-,
F. W. Baker Jr.
Committee.
of improvements it will be seen that
extensive changes have been made.
Everything about the prqperty is
now hi splendid order.
All improvements to be made at
St. Mary's for a number of years
have now been completed. No more
are contemplated until such time as
the contrresration shall have increased
in numbers and it feels able to erect
a new church.
The finances of the parish are in a
healthy condition. Many new mem
bers are alsolieing added to the con
gregation.
It is especially.appropriate that in
this connection a word should be
spoken of Dr. Moran. While unas
suming and modest in his manner
Dr. Moran is big-hearted and genial,
a faithful and able pastor, and he
has many friends throughout the
city Avho esteem and respect him.
Rev. Dr. Moran was born at Valpa
raiso, Ind., near Chicago, in 1865.
He is the son of Peter and Catharine
Moran. His early education was ob
tained at St. Paul's grammar school
in Valparaiso. Afterwards he at
tended college at Milwaukee and
Baltimore, completing a philosophi
cal and theological course at St.
Mary's college, Cleveland. The
course taken by -him was the longest
and most thorough arranged in the
college curriculum. Ordained into
the priesthood at the age of 23, lie
was at once assigned to open mission
work at Halgate, O., where he re
mained three feonths. From there
he went to Toledo, spending a year
there as pastor of one of tho churches. '
Going-from there to Clyde, he spent
six years in pastorial work at that
place and and in adjacent communi
ties. He came from Clyde to St.
Mary's church, Akron, and lias been
here about two and one-half years.
Dr. Moran has traveled extensive
ly and lias also lectured a great deal.
Some of his most prominent lectures
have been delivered on such subjects
as, "Man, a Christian," "Whither
Are We Drifting?" "America's Fu
ture" and "Success."
In 1895 Dr. Moran .took an exten
sive trip through Europe, visiting
t lie principal countries. He was in
all the capitol cities, with the excep
tion of St. Petersburgand Stockholm.
He recalls with pleasure his visit in
Spain where he was entertained at
San Sebastian by the Countess Del
Val. San Sebastian is the great
summer resort of Spain, and during
his stay there Dr. Moran saw fre
quently the Queen Maria Theresa
and the young king Alphonso XIII,
who were also spending the season
there.
While ill Rome, Dr. Moran met
King Humbert, King of Italy, and
also had personal audience with Pope
Leo XIII.
Dr. Moran spoke of havimr enjoyed
liis European tour very much, hut.
speaking ot America, said: "I pre
fer living in America; but his
torically, Europo is of great inter
est." .
BIRTHS.
o root steplauder only
Screen doors only
No. 8 all copper boiler . only
No. 0 all copper boiler . ... .... . . only
7 pieces gold band glass berry set only
Crystle berry sets
Crystle berry hets
Blue decorated cups, and 8 saucers, 0 cups
( saucers onlv
oc
oc
5c
10c
ac
ac
oc
ac
ac
- ac
10c
ac
ac
10c
10c
10c
for
50c
3c
4c
2c
25c
Tc
2c
3c
3c
Tc
3c
3c
10c
10c
3c
5c
3c
3c
8c
5c
tc
5c
25c
70c
$1.20
$1.20
$1.25
48c
33c
50c
$2.00
$2.25
$1.00
25c
35c
set
Remember we are headquarters for Fire-Works and
Flags, wholesale and retail.
GOODS DELIVERED TO ALL PARTS OF THE CITY. .
J. J. BRASAEMLE
5c and 10c Store
R. Smith's Old Stand"
"P.
hor-e 138
IIS
Howard St.
premature iSPECIALSALE
Celebration of the Fourth
of July.
-ON-
Arrests Will FollowCases
In Police Court.
Heard
Vierb To Mr. and Mrs. E. J.
Viers, 420 W. Centerst., Wednesday,
June.14, a daughter.
Stkobeij-To Mr. and Mrs. Frank
A. Strobel, 118 Furnace st., Wednes
day, June 14, a daughter.
Young "America usually com
mences to celebrate the- Fourth of
July about a month before hand, the
consequence ot wnicli is that a num
ber of complaints come to the ears of
the police department.
Chief of Police H. H. Harrison lias
instructed all officers to arrest any
ono caught exploding fire crackers.
This morning H. Fischnaller, 450
Perkins St., aged 15 years, was given
a severe lecture Dy Jiayor . J-J.
Young for having a premature cele
bration.
Frank E. Wilcox changed 'his plea
of not guilly to guilty to the charge of
indecent conduct. He was fined $3
and costs.
Frank Hoacland was fined $2 and
costs for assault and battery. He hit
a young man with a piece of stock at
at the Whitman fc Barnes works last
week.
Bergo 15. Slusser's case for assault
ing Couductpr John A. Falor was
continued until next Wednesday
morning. Falor is slowly improving
but is still confined to his bed.
The case against Adam Duncan,
manager of the Akron Soap works,
for conducting a business offensive
to the neighborhood, was continued
until noxt Wednesday.
Alexander Mahony, a drunk, got
$2 and costs.
Win. Shade, an Erie engineer,
pleaded guilty to tho charge of blow
ing a whistle inside tho city limits,
when there was no impending dang
er. He got $1 and costs. Ernest C.
Deible tiled tho information against
him. Warrants are out for two en
gineers on tho same chargo. Their
last names aro Paden and M vers.
our
SATURDAY. POSITIVELY ONE
DAY ONLY.
Famous Royal Seal, special sale
... . ... price $1.05 reg. $1.15
price S1.0S reg. $1.20
price $l.0S reg. $1.20
price S1.0S reg. $1.20
price $1.00 reg. $1.10
Patent A
Stone Mill
F.S.
Gilt Edae
Cannon & Swain,
" 11 S. Howard St.
SALARIES TNCREAS ED Sal
aries of posf masters in Mm vicinity
of Summit county Iiuve been in
creased as follows: Barberton, $1,400
to $1,500; Cuyahoga Falls, $1,500 to
$1,700; Crestline, $1,000 to $1,700;
Kent, $1,700 to $1,S00; Orrville, $1,600
to $1,600.
LIEE SAVED
By the
Prompt Action-of William
E. Shepard.
The prompt assistance rendered by
William E. Shepard saved the life or
Mrs. Hartshorn, who resides on
South Mnin st. near Falor's crossing.
Thursday evening lie was driving
pat tho house when lie noticed
flame-; issuing from the kitchen. In
a moment Mrs. Hartshorn ran from
the house. Her dress was on
fire. Mr. Shepard jumped from his
carriage and ran into th6 yard. He
grasped the woman about the waist
and threw her down, extinguishing
the fire by rolling her in the grass.
Tho damage to tho hbusu as trilling!
The fire was caused by the explosion
of a gasoline stove.
THE WEATHER:
Fair tonight and warmer Saturday.
jT

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