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Akron daily Democrat. [volume] (Akron, Ohio) 1892-1902, August 25, 1899, Image 1

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AKRON ; DAILY DEMOCRAT
Insist upon baring the
Atomizers Perfumes
-AT-
Witt the AKRON BAKERY TAG. It Is
THE BEST-
STEINBACHER'S, z3t Market Stmt.
VOLUME EIGHT. NUMBER 109
AKRON, OHIO, FRIDAY EVENING. AUGUST 25, 1899.
PRICE ONE CENT
HE'S NEXT.
Col. Sanford Knows
What It Is to go Against
the Machine.
He Has Been Dreaming
About the Ring.
Here Is Still Another Old Line
Republican
Who
Does Not Worship at Mark
Hanna's Shrine.
IB. L PI.
1 pi I
8 ImMmSm I
I " JL
Notice, Democrats:
The Democratic County Con
vention tomorrow will be held
at Mayor's Court Room, City
Hall. R. L ANDREW,
Chairman.
Our
New Fall Carpet:
At the last moment, orders went
forth to down Col. H. C. Sanford.
Everything and anything that the
Machine could do to bringabout this
result was done.
An edict was issued from the Han
na Eing headquarters, to lieuten
ants in the various precincts, to de
feat Sanford. He had refused to
bow down and worship at the shrine
of Marcus Allpowerful Hanna. This
indication of independence sealed
his political doom.
After the battle was over, when
the smoke had lifted just a trifle,
Col. Sanford could see the true con
ditions that had brought about his
defeat. He realizes something of the
handicap that he was up against.
He does not mince words in express
ing his opinion of the methods used
against him. He is another of the
"dreamers" who believe that there
is a Court House Eing in Summit '
Morris Chairs
We are just opening
the finest line of MORRIS
CHAIRS ever brought to
Akron. Some of them
are very cheap, while
some are finer and higher
priced; but the line is
very select and the buyer
of "the cheapest will get
extraordinary value.
BUM L DUE,
124 and 126
. Howard S-t.
I
county. He expressed himself freely
in conversation with a Dkjiocrat
reporter Friday. He said:
"It was a still hunt on the part of
the Ring. I was led to believe that
I had the support of its members,
that they were working for my
nomination and that here in Akron
I wonld carry the precincts by an
overwhelming majority. Instead of
that the Ring worked to-defeat me."
"Then you do believe there is a
ring?" was asked.
''Great governor! Well if there
isn't one in this county,! don'tknow
where you will find any. I know
practically every member of this an
cient organization."
Continuing, Col. Sanford said:
Democratic
Caucuses
Tonight. I
I
I
They Will be' Held at the
Following Places :
Tirst ward Barnett'h barn.
Second ward Central En
gine house.
Third ward City building.
Fourth ward Market House
hall.
Fit th ward Buss hall,ground
floor, lirst door east of Kolbst.,
Wooster av.
Sixth ward Engine house.
Are going at a lively rate, they
please everybody. . . .
TWO TREES
Taken From Wise.
Prices, Designs,
Colorings, Quality..
,
Openin;
Tomorrow
OF THE WORLD RENOWNED
YOUMANS
FALL STYLES HATS
. Koch
-g--frg-g--g'-g.g.'f.y.'.?...-.'.!..i.g,..gr.
(r
ii
iff
H)
Stitch in Time
Is what wo advise for sufferers from .
Catarrh or Hay 'Fever, we've got the
stitch, its
m
8 ALLEN'S CATARRH CURE ft
ifc
If it don't do all we claim we'll re
turn your money. Come in and talk
with us.
w
(0
9
I The Allen-Clark Drug Co. $
$ Corner Howard and Mill Streets. " jj
"The Eing opposed me because it
did not believe I was an enthusiastic
Hanna man. Well, I am not, I do
not approve of his political methods.
Recently I said that if half the stor
ies told of Senator Hanna were true
he was not the man for Senator.
This reached the ears of the Machine
and it was afraid to trust me, in ref
erence to doing as Senator Hanna
dictated. For that reason I was de
feated. The Eing did not fight me
in the open. It's work was all under
cover. Since the primaries I have
heard of the methods used against
nie."
Col. Sanford claims that in Greens
burg, the Ring agents, headed by
Wash Johnston and Squire C. C
Foster, carried matters with a high
hand. Referring to the primaries in
that precinct he said : "My friends
in Green tell me that both 'Wash'
Johnston and Squire Foster worked
against me. A week before the pri
maries I had assurances from both
that they would support me. John
ston had told me repeatedly that he
would carry the precinct for me by a
large majority. Two days previous
to the primaries he was in Akron.
On that visit he told me that there
was to be a large picnic of Green
township farmers the day of the pri
maries. I asked him if that would
not interfere with getting out the
vote. He told me that it would not.
He said they would be through with
the picnic exercises by five o'clock,
and that he and Squire Foster would
line all of them up for me when they
came home to do their chores. One
of my friends was at 'the polls that
evening. I was getting a large vote.
Johnston and Foster had received
their order from the Ring and they
were working against me. This
friend of mine was near enough to
hear Johnston say: "Sanford is get
ting a large vote. We must hustle
for Seese or he will be downed here."
The primary officials at Greens
burg were evidently red hot Hanna
ites. Col. Sanford has been in
formed that they were so zealous in
their work for Seese that they mark
ed ballots before turning them over
to voters. As they handed out the
slips they stated that the ballots
were already marked. And it was in
this way that Col. Sanford was de
feated. A few days after the primaries he
met "Wash" Johnston here in Ak
ron. The Greensburg statesman was
cordial in greeting Col. Sanford. He
regreted the fact that Green had
not given him a larger vote.
"I was one of the first to vote for
you," said Wash.
"I felt like telling him he was a
liar," said Col. Sanfor, "but I did
not believe that would be exactly
gentlemanly. Instead I reached
into my pocket and -pulled out a $10
bill and offered to bet him that
amount that he had not. 'I will bet
$5 that I did,' was the answer, but
he did not produce the money. I do
not know why Greensburg's returns
were so late, in being forwarded to
Akron."
They were a day and a half late in
reaching Akron.
"The funniest feature of the whole
thing was up in Stow," said Col. San
ford. "A week before the primaries
r drove to Monroe Falls. I learned
that Rev. Frank Green had been
there ahead of me. Von know I de
feated him once for Representative.
He had been working against me. I
found that lie had fixed things there
pretty well, so I decided to pay a
visit to AVill Lodge at Silver lake.
He was not at home at the time. Two
days later I again went up to the
lake and found Lodge. He was for
mo, and with the assistance of a young
man employed on thS grounds they
had soon prepared a Hat of 18 names,
each and every one of -"which was to
vote for me. I then agreed, believ
ing it would bo perfectly legitimate,
to furnish a conveyance to take the
entire party to the polls. For this
All Are Right
The Upham-Brouse Co,
purpose T left $2. Well the Eing
heard of this and they went to the
lake. On the day of the primary, 15
of the 18 were hauled to the polls at
my expense and voted for Seese."
Col. Sanford has received reports
from all sections of the country, tell
ing of the work of the Machine
against him. In every precinct tke
methods pursued were similar. So
effort was made to get out votes, un
less it was certain that the men were
true worshippers of "Your Uncle
Mark."
FATAL WRECK
Valley Engine Thrown
From a Trestle.
Fireman Was Killed Engineer Dan
gerously Injured Ran Into Cattle.
Engine No. 430 on the C. T. & V. H.
R. ran into a drove of cattle on the
north Eide of the trestle near Valley
Junction Thursday evening about 9
o'clock. No cars were attached to
the engine. Some of the cattlcwere
killed, the engine was thrown off the
trestle, and the fireman, Mae. Crist,
killed, Engineer Sauder, of Cleve-
landbadly injured, and two brake
men, named Miller and Jones, also
sustained serious wounds.
The injured jnen were removed to
a hospital at Canton. Sauder was
badly burned and scalded. His wife
is at his bedside. It is thought that
he will not recover. The two brake
men will recover.
Further information relative to the
accident could not be obtained.
Met the Rate.
The B. & O. now announces a re
duction in its rate for the round trip
to New York, to be in force during
the week of the G. A.R. national en
campment at Philadelphia. The
rate will be $14, with stopover privi
leges at Philadelphia and Washing
ton. The Pennsylvania today make-;
the same rate.
Chris Seever Alleged to
Have Stolen Them..
Three Wills Filed In
Probate Court.
Motion For New Trial
Childs Case.
In
QQQQ$&$Q&b&&Q&$$Q&$W&S
v
Porter
Pleaded Guilty
House. News
Court
n
0
lUi
$600 Conover
Piano, used eight
months
$10 per month.
$300
BIG KNIFE
Used by Vicious Tramp
on Employe.
$500 Conover
.Siano, rented six.
months
$10 per month.
$275
$300 Kings
bury Piano, has
been rented
$7 per month.
$215
$300 Kings
bury Piano, used
8 months
$6 per month.
$175
Bad Cut on Baughmans Arm Assail
ant Escaped Arrest.
Oscar W. Baughman, 201 Second
st., North Hill, an employe at the
power house of the Northern Ohio
Traction & Electric company, was
quite badly cut on his right arm.
Between 2 and 3 o'clock this morn
ing Baughman was working at the
power house, when a man came up
to him and asked if he could sleep in
there. He was told that it was
against the rules. The tramp whip
ped a knife out of his pocket and cut
Baughman on the right arm. It re
quired over a dozen stitches to sew
up the wound.
Officer Kemple arrested a man this
morning, who is alleged to have
committeed the crime. He proved
his innocence and was released.
BROKEN OFF.
Freight Train Pushed Out Into
Mill Street.
About 7:30 Friday morning, a local
freight train was pushed in on the
siding between the Erie freight
depot and the Cereal mill with such
force that the stop block was broken
off and a car run down onto Mill st.
Considerable time was spent in
getting the car back on the tracks.
EMPLOYES
Will Be Furnished Free Transporta
tionImmense Picnic.
The employes of the Diamond
Match and the National Sewer Pipe
companies of Barberton will pionic
at Randolph park Saturday. Sept. 2.
O. C. Barber has announced that he
will furnish the transpor'atlon for-the
1,700 employes. i
A man diving from a towor 100
feet high, an act never before per
formed in this country will bo one of
the Freo attractions Street Fair
week.
$265 Used
Wellington
j Piano
& $5 per month.
$169
$265 Used
Wellington
$ Piano
v
$168
$5 per month.
I $375 Cable for.
$ Used eight
f months.
$ $7 per month.
$250
1 $125 Square
Piano
X Goodd condition.
$ $4 per month.
$75
I $100 Square
9 Piano
$70
X $4 per month.
$100 G octave
Kimball organ,
nice glass
$3 per month.
.$551
$75 A. B. Chase
Organ
$3 per month.
$50
$75 G octave'
Estey
$3 per month.
$45
10 Melopeans and I
Melodeons $1, $2, $3,
$4, $5, $6, $7, $8, $9,
$10 for choice.
Sni lis
220 South Main st.
$$$&$&$$j$4
Chris Seever is on trial in Probate
court for the alleged theft of two
cherry trees.
The prosecuting witness, George
A. Wise, charges that Seever dug up
the trees, hauled them away and
transplanted them on his own prop
erty. The case is being tried to a
jury. The defendant lives in Spring
field township.
Fined.
Samuel E. Porter appeared in Pro
bate court Thursday and pleaded
guilty to a charge of assault and bat
tery on Helen Patterson. He was
lined flO and costs.
Three Wills.
The will of Elias Fraunfelter gives
his wife, Laura C. Fraunfelter, a life
interest in all his property. At her
death it is to be divided between
their children, Charles D. Fraun
felter and Clara May Whitner. In
case of Mrs. Fraunfelter's remarriage
she is to take the share allowed her
by law, tho balance to be divided be
tween the children. Mrs. Fraun
felter is named as executrix.
oBy the will of A. G. Shields of
Hudson, his wife is given a life in
terest in the homestead and $200 in
money. A son James H. Shields is
given a farm, provided he pay $1,000
to Harry A. Shields, another son.
Marolla Shields, a daughter, is given
$1,200. On the death of Mrs. Shields
the homestead is to be sold. Out of
the proceeds Mabel Andrews, a
daughter, is to receive $1,200. The
remaining property is to be divided
equally among the children.
The will of Mary E. Smith Mc
Kesson gives all her property to her
daughter Alice a. Mcivesson.
Verdict of Guilty.
After being out Ave hours tho jury
in the slander case of the State vs.
Lavina Childs returned a verdict of
guilty with a recommendation of
mercy. A motion for a new trial
has been filed.
New Pleadings.
The permanent Savings & Loan
company has filed a petition against
Charles R. Boder, asking judgment
for $5-17.70. It is alleged this amount
is due because of a mistake made in
conceiling a mortgage. Boder, it is
claimed, paid $1,938.75 when the
amount due was $2,486.45.
The plaintiff in the case of W. H.
Carter, assignee vs. Perry D. Hardy
has filed a motion to dismiss the ap
peal because of irregularities.
Marriage Licenses.
James W . Barnett, Akron . . . ." 33
Cora Coyne,-Akron 23
LATE LOCAL.
WANTED A German young man
of good character between 18 and 21
years of age to learn trade. Enquire
at Burkhardt's Brewery-
CONTRIBUTION At the last
meeting of the Bookbinders' union
$25 was contributed to the striking
street car men at Cleveland.
PERMISSION The Akron Belt
ing company was given permission
to uso part of Canal st for two
mouths for building purposes.
MATERIAL ORDERED The
Northern OhioTraction company has
already ordered tho material for the
laving of the new track on East
Market st.
PATENT ISSUED Wilmer Dun
bar of 113 Oakdale avo.. with the Al-
den Rubber works of Barberton, has
been granted a patent on a rubber-
sole shoe.
EJECTMENT PROCEEDINGS
In Justice Hard's court Ronuis
Metzler enters suit for ejectment
against E. Hallowell. The case was
continued until Saturday, when it
will be tried by jury.
AWARDED ' JUDGMENT In
Justice Thomas' court Thursday
Mrs. Nora O'iNeil was awarded
judgment for $12-"i against her
brother-in-law, John O'Neil, for
board and money loaned.
REMAINS BROl'GHT HOME
The remains of John W. Holaday,
late of (5n West Market St., who died
at Chautauqua, reached Akron at
8:3(5 Thuihday night over the Erie.
Funeral Saturday at 3:30 clock, pri
vate at the houi'.
PLEASANT REUNION The ro
union of the Yerrick and Vandersoll
families, held at Long Lake park
Thursday, was a very pleasant and
well atteuded affair. An uxcellmt
program was enacted, and tho social
features of thwocunsion.werp many.
Everybody had a good time.
THE WKATHKK:
Generally fair tonight and Satu-day.
(1
I ftY
jIulII
M
0
'b
S
Q
1U
At prices that will do the selling:. To he
continued as long as they last, at . . .
J. J. BIH'S 51 hJ IOC 1
(P. R. Smith's old stand)
"The Big Store of Little Prices."
A quick clearance, that's what we want, to
make room for new goods which is arriving daily.
Judging from former sales goods will go
quick. It's the
Greatest
Sale
We Eyer Held
And that means the greatest ever held by anyone.
Sal Began
Tlxixxasa.a?3r
August SfcH
You'll find special prices in all departments
these being only indications of the general price-lowness.
Wood rim sieves
Glass tumblers
Good box paper
1 quart Mason fruit jars, per doen
Enameline stove polish . . -
Six cups and six saucers -
Decorated Jap. bowls
7-inch dinner plates ,.- - F
5-foot stepladders . . ..."..
(i-foot stepladders .,.-.'.
Brooms . . . . i .
12 bars P. R. soap
Hunter's Hour sifter '. . . .-.
Tin pie plates, each ....
Tin cups, each r- - .-r -.
Funnels, each
Tin fruir cans, per dozen
Crepe papers, all colors
1 pound box lye . . .
Glycerine toilet soap
Different kinds toilet soap . '.
7-inch carlsbad china plates . . .
Roekingham tea pots, only ":
Tin tea spoons, per dozen
Tin table spoons, six for
0 knives and 0 forks
0 knives and 6 forks
0 knives and 5 forks
Tin patent slaw cutters
Silver top puff box
Silver top salve box . . . '.
5-gallonoil can with faucets
4 pound flat irons ...
Wood tubs ...
Galvanized tubs
2-quart granite tea pots
Tin bread raisers
Coffee mills
Gold dust ... ....
Large wash bowl and pitcher
1, 2, 3, 5C
worm
10c
3c
10c
oc
40c
10c
oc
20c
10c
HOW
03LY
10c
OC
3c
10c
50c
31.00
51 20
10c
23c
10c
50c
15c
oOc
20c
25c
20c
20c
70c
5c
iScdoz
5c
3fC
3C
2!"C
Sc
3C
29C
37C
10c
25c
7c
1,2,3C
1C
33C
6c
5C
3c
3C
5c
10c
5c
Sc
33c
69C
$1 00
5c
10c
5c
37c
10c
35C
35C
10C
20c
10c
10C
37c
gr GOODS DELIVERED TO ALL PARTS OF THE CITY.
J, J. BRASAEMLE
5c and 10s Store
Smith's
Telephone 138
Old Stand
118 SOUTH H0WAF1D STREET
EXCURSION The C.T.&V. will Falls Friday, Sept. 1. Tickets will
run an excursion train to Niagara be good for five days.
Pi ill ill mi
Gas
Notice to fha Citizens of Akron:
In order to introduce into all homes in the city of
Akron in the shortest possible time the use of Natural
Gas, The East Ohio Gas company will give
A Discount, From the Present Fixed Rates, of
5c For Each l,G00 Cubic Feet.
Of gas used for domestic purposes during the year com
mencing July 1st, 1899, and ending July 1st, 1900.
As the company is making all house connections at
actual cost of materials and labor, it believes that this
saving in the price of gas will go largely towards the
expense of piping the houses and will give the company
the advantage of having every citizen (even the poorest)
as a consumer, thus affording to all the best and cheap
est fuel. ' To encourage the use of gas by manufacturers,
special rates will be given on application at the office.
EAST OHIO GAS 06,
IE. STRONG, President

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