OCR Interpretation


Akron daily Democrat. [volume] (Akron, Ohio) 1892-1902, October 27, 1899, Image 5

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028140/1899-10-27/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

jlTFi77
- r- '-.sapS
"ff-f"-$v!j""'---''' 'srrfp'fcsSsS' iS?- - f ""-: 'n- - !k'"e- ' "A v ; --piflrtK,!
yc- - " v
THE DAILY DEMOCRAT
Ed. S. Ilarter
Fred W. Gayer
Editors and Managers.
i:u H. 1)e La Court. Mgr. Advertising Dept
PtNtM-IIEIl HT
TJ1K .VKKON DEMOCRAT COJIPANX
OKKIOK
II m-mra Block. Nos. I:S anil 1S7 Main t.
Lo.VtJ nfTWCE PHONE WO.
orpiOhKn and Dinr.CTORS.
I ! n' Jajles V. Welsh
viee-lnldent. jl. T.Paige
- ot irv ". Fred W..UATER
mji-urer William T. Bawtek
Knvr.S. II vi:tkh . Jso. McNaxaba
Ed. If. 1)K IjA Court.
Knli'ml at the 1'ostofflce at Akron, Ob.lo.ii-Sccond-Cins9
Mall Matter.
Delivered Everv Evening by Carrier Bov
5 CENTS A WEEK
H -Mull fi& - - - J1.25 for Six Months
Official Paper of tha City of
Akron.
TO TELEPHONE THE DEMOCRAT CALL
NO. 180.
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 27
Ohio Democratic Ticket.
Fur Governor,
JOHN It. MCLEAN.
r Hamilton.
I"ir Lieutenant Governor,
A. W. PATRICK, .
of Tuscarawas.
For Supreme Judge, -DkWITT
C. BADGER,
of Madison.
Kor Attorney General.
J. W. DO RE,
of beneua.
For Atidlloi,
GEORGE W. SIGAFOOS.
of Darke.
For Treasurer,
JAMES.I. GORMAN,
of Ijiwrcnce.
For Member of Board of Public AVorks,
FLETCHER D. MALIK. ?" .
of Lxke. ' '
? .
Democratic District Ticket.
For Stnto benntor from the SItli-Mth
District,
i:iVARD M. YOUNG.
Of Summit.
Democratic County Ticket.
For Representative,
CUAS W. ICEMPKL. .
For Probate Judge,
IMAO If. PHELPS.
For Clerk if Courts,
W"W. A. D17RANH
For Recorder,
MICHAEL RKILLY ,
For Commissioner,
.1 4COB I). BREITEN8TINE.
A
For Infirmary Director,
BCRTON I. SANFORD.
- -
DEMOCRATIC LAND APPRAISERS,
Akron.
First ward-J. K. SIMMONS.
Second ward WM. NELAN.
Third ward-GOE. G. 80IIAFFER.
Fourth wiird CHRIS. LAMBACUER.
Fifth ward V. A. CLARK.
Sixth ward JOHN D. CAMPBELL.
Townships. .
Boston J AS. SULLIVAN.
Copley S. 8. llOTHBOCK.
Coventry J. L. PORtER.
Cuyahoga Falls M. M. McLANE.
Frankliu-JOHN' DEUTSCH.
Green WM. KRUMROY.
Hudson A. I. SHIELDS.
Northampton WM. MOT77.
Northfleld GEO. W. FORBES.
Norton GEO. SNYDER.
Portage J. AV. FRANK.
Bprlngfleld B. M. BOYER
Stow H. B. GRAHAM.
Tallmadge-THOS. F. METLIN.
Twlnsburg A. J. BROWN.
GITRADES(?T.I COUNCIL)?
m ,TM n I
Above is cut ot the residenee containing , A waranty deed given the for-
slx rooms, cellar and good well situated at . tllliate nerSOn holding tllO lucliV
oorner stnnton nv. and Bellows st Stelner i i
allotment. Lot is 50 by 150 feet. , number.
Try to Get a Home. The Following Merchants Give
Tickets On House and Lot.
BOOTS AND SHOES
Chas. A. Holloway, 143 South
Howard st.
D. "W. Holloway, 626 South Main
st., Clarendon Hotel block.
BAKERS
South Main st. Bakery, 600 South
Main st fresh bread, buns, pies
and cakes constantly on hand.
CLOTHING
The Akron Clothing Co., 128 S.
. Howard st., one door south of
Dodge's Furniture Store.
niAi. np.AT.PR
-- -. .. ,
Sam Pry, 701 South Beoadway,
leiepnone irz. Rohrbacher & Allen, 170 South
A. D. .bllis.Cherry and Caual sts- Howard st
Coal.moving vans, teaming and I S. F. Gulliford & Co., cor. Bow-
TO,.t-l;ansfemn Phone &7. , ery and Bartges.
D D?. B. J. Hill, s.w. cor. Main and Ex-' GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS
change sts. ' "William Teplansky &, Co., 191 S.
DRUGGISTS - Howard st.
S. E. Allen & Co., 105 S. Howard i MUSIC
street. O. G. Brownell, 207 E. Mill St.,
Black, The Druggist, southwest Sheet Music, Musical Instru
corner Main and Exchange st. meats, GraphophoneH and
DINING HALL , Phonographs.
The South Main st. Dining Hall, I MILLINERY
500 South Main st. Helen Griffin, 121 E. Exchange.
FIVE CENT AND TEN CENT STORES i PHOTOGRAPHER h
M. Friedman, 151 North Howard . A. A. Besaw, 186 S. Howard st.
st. aud 147 South Howard st. . STOVES, TINWARE and FURNACES
Viering Bros.. 502 South Main st. . The .Tahant Co., 166 S. Howard.
FURNITURE and UPHOLSTERER - MEAT MARKETS
CW.Chamberlin, 170 N. Howard) "William P. "Walker, 1137 East
St., furniture, upholstering, re- Market si.
pairing and feathers renovated. Alfred P. "Walker, Corner Adams
DRY GOODS ' and TJnsoii st.
John Herhruck, 186 S. Howard.
A. ft Hall,
Walsh & Co.
Tb the place ti buy '
Climax Stoves, Ranges
and House Furnish
ing Goods.
SPECIAL PRICES
On Guns Ammunition and
Hunting Coats. Be sure to
examine the principles of
our
Hot Air Furnace
Toil will
have said :
sav,
like others
;it is the BEST
in the market."
No. 1050 South Main st.
Near Hankey Dumber Co.
Phone 1644.
THE ABSTRACT
I
Are owners of
plete Abstract
niit county.'
the "only
Plant in
coni-Suin-
Remember this when buying a home.
226 South-Main St.
Tel. 2.
AKRON,
0.
TAK
In consideration that the
Quality -of Our'Groceries
is the best in the market. Our
prices are very reasonable. We
have just received a
A New Line of Canned Goods
Try our
B
Vf
They are recognized by all as the
best for the price to be had in this
city.
GRIESMER & CRMRINE
GROCERS
No. 218 East Market Street
Tel. No. 58
Agents Wanted
Fast selling book
3sW - l
pr?1 Z lOWTpncer
Large commission.
Jackson, The Printer
Everett Building.
Phone 241.
DEMOCRATIC MEETINGS.
EAST LIBERTY.
Saturday evening; Oct. 28.
At Town Hall.
Hon. I. H. Phelps,
Hon. A. C. Bachtel.
All of the above meetings will be
gin promptly at 7:80.
For Sue plumbing call on C. M.
Oberlin for prices.
House & Lot
Given Away
By trading at the stores nien-
tinned below you will get a
chance to own a home for nothing.
i Ask -for Tickets
"With every cash purchase of
,50c you will be given a ticket
which may get yon a home.
HARNESS MANUFACTURERS
Fred Hauff, 531 S. Main st.
A. Rosenfeld, 123 S. Main st.
GROCERIES
"Wiener Bros., 224 B. Market Kt.
John Herbrack, 186 S. Howard.
A. "Whitman, 504 S. Main st.
D. L. Griffiths, 1201 S. Main st.
J. H. Etling, 831 Howe st.
Benner & Thornton, Corner
Bowery aud "Wooster av.
John Russell, 1136 East Market
C. G. "Welton, 112 "W. North st.
UL'Ut Atui:
HARDWARE
wco. iiaas, m a. Howard st., xcl. 47S.
C. F. Gill, 210 "W. Exchange st.
MANAGER
No. 188 SOUTH HOWARD ST
Hllu UUUUK
on
InSifence.alieroj
There was a shimmcr of crimson light
in the bky as he rode along. Silting
square anil deep in the saddle, with an
attitude that changed little as his horde's
gait varied from lope to trot, from trot
to walk Or from walk to lope, his eves
Used straight ahead, the scout rode. al
solutely alone.
Solitude" and tUeuce bad been his por
tion eo much that language was to him
a curio, a rarity, a luxury. He eldom
heard xthe sound of human voice, and
when he did he listened deeply and an
swered deliberately . for his supply of
peech was not great. As he rode there
came a scream from afar overhead a
bhuc-k. a screech. Hut he did not look
upward.
He knew the tuice was the voice of
n Springlield ball, high in the air. Man
ami lmr-e lay down and waited. Neither
moved, but liotli watched.
On the brow ot a little knoll, far away,
he saw a buMi wae too fa-t. It was far
n way. but he leveled his rille and fired.
1'hi'ii lioie and man arose as if by
mutual tiudrrbtandiirj. and turning from
the knoll he rode, the report of tin- guns
behind him merely iivsinsr him to liaMn.
He wa1- not aft aid He w:i- nut c-
i it'll.
Me did noi uspeir io ne. tie niu not
1-i.pect to live.
I.ate that 'night lie reached the poet,
delivered his unler and tinned to go.
The captain st-ippetl liim.
"Meet anybody o:i the' way over?" he
asked.
The scout looked haul. a if digesting
the tuery. Then lie thought. At latne
nnseiel:
"Only some Indian--."
How manyV"
"Was stci," said the cout. "Xon
SIS."
"On the warpaLliV" asi.ed the captain.
The scont looked tioubled. as though
borel by the question.
"Tliey lird" was all he said.
Now. then, tbe war was on in earnest.
But tbe scout ever after aioided the cap
tain as a man who talked t-jo much.
In the grounds noncommissioned offi
cers passed to and fio. bent on th" duties
of the day. New reciuits were being
drilled, singly and in squads. Now and
acain a stiff young lieutenant crossed to
the o!Gcer3 quaiters or. bent on inspec
tion, went through the form of examin
ing quarters to so" uh.-tlier tbe dust bad
been pioperly brushed away ana tne noor
duly swept. Presently a soldier entered,
walked to where the scout lay, aud said:
"Colonel wants yon!"
The -scout remained immovable for a
few second-. Then he turned to the mes
senger and looked him squarely in the
eje. Then he arose, deliberately dresed,
drew on his long hoots, buckled his belt
with the ammunition and revolvers in
place, and .-talked to quarters. The or
derly halted him at the door.
"Colonel nants me," he said.
He passed in. Tbe colonel ignored the
lack of a -alnte. for the keen eyed man
before hiui was uot a soldier.' but a civil
ian employee. Then he said:
"There is a woman here, the wife of
Lieutenant Jasper, wbo is wounded at
the ferry. She wants to join her hus
band. You must guide her over."
The scout looked half terrified.
"Woman?" be asked. The question
bad a world of meaning, for tbe colonel
knew ot the hostiles ou the road, the dan- J
gers of the trail itself. Its double dangers I
for-n woman. He nodded.
"Bad," said the ucout.
. "Can't be helped," said the colonel.
Tbe.ecout' stood (still a moment. Then
he'turned and walked ont."--As herreach-
aTJ8Jafsyergl-6un(rue8awa'womaa
before the officers' quarters. The sight
revived his memory.
In a few minutes he was back at the
colonel's quarters, his horse saddled, his
blankets rolled behind the cantle the
rille slung by the horse's side, the riata
coiled carefully over the saddle post.
"Tell him I'm ready," he said gruffly
to the orderly. The soldier turned in dis
gust. He was not used to unceremonious
oider. But the scout was impenetrable.
So the'orderly went.
AVhen tbe scout was ordered in, he saw
a little woman wealing a short riding
habit. He looked at her indifferently.
The colonel spoke, saying he was the
best scout at the post, and she might feel
safe with him. x
"I feel it," she said.
Tbe scout broke silence. "Better not
go," he said.
"Oh, I must!" was her answer.
They rode away together. All the
night long they rode, halting during the
day. On the third morning, as the wo
man was about to lie down for a few
hours' rest, the scout arose, aa one who
was about to deliver an oration.
"Only six miles," he said.
Fear of the hostiles bad forsaken her,
and they rode rapidly on, indifferent alike
to the whistle of the bullets, the yells of
the braves, and tbe efforts of small par- j
ties of bucks to head them off. Closer
and closer to tbe camp, and then, as the
sentry challenged, the scout turned and
let the woman ride ahead.
He faced the bo-tiles for a ruomeDt.
I Then he looked around and saw the
' guard rush forth and welcome the faint
ing wife. The dancing braves jarred on
his sight. He turned back to .vhere the
woman had entered the camp, and then
followed her.
The officer of the guard almost hugged
Iniu. Men gathered about him. Tbe
captain clasped his bund. Tbe wounded
lieutenant, now almost well, wept.
The talk annoyed him. Philadelphia
Times.
Docklns: Horse.
Docking horses took its rise in the dark
days when bull and bear baiting was
honored by a place in the category of
sport, rightly now relegated by law to
the catalogue of outrage. This custom
of docking was once generally applied to
English roadsters, hunters and harness
horses. The only useful purpose it ever
-served wps in the Peninsular war, when
British dragoons could be most easily
distinguished from French by their cock
tails. It fell into disuse with the decline
of road coaches, and we owe its unwel
come revival to their partial restoration.
It is senseless, baibarous and disfigur
ing; it inflicts needless suffering upon
brood mares and horste? turned out to
grass, depriving them of their natural
defense against flies, besides tbe severe
pain and shoek caused by the operation
Itself. It dhonld be discouraged in every
possible way by influential persons, by
those who lead the fashion in such things,
and agricultural societies should be mov
ed to refuse prizes to exhibits which have
undergone this mutilation. Blackwood.
' ' .. J
Co.tlr Ml.nndemtnndlng.
Irite Customer Look here. The bill
for those two boxes of cigars I bought
of you last month calls for $14. Didn't
you tell me they were three for a
nickel?
Tobacconist Not at all, sir. 1 told
you they were free from nicotine.
Chicago Tribune.
In Old Jtentnekr.
Stranger Have you lived long In this
section?
Native N6, sab.. I am a gentleman,
sah! And It is Impossible for gentle
men to live long In this section, sah.
Washington Star.
Call on us for..
Natural Gas
Stoves and
Heaters..
Natural gas appliances
a specialty. Come and
see stoves in operation.
J. Rutherford
Son
173 S. Main st.
Tef. 413.
e
o
a
eeaoaeeceecc
ail
Suit and Over
coat now. . .
0 JLM
THE FASHIONABLE TAILOB.
Guth Block. 134-136 S. Howard st
First Clas:
HALF-TONE
ENGRAVINGS
AT.
Akron Photo Eng. Co.
603 South Main st.
Poison Has Its Place.
In till systems f medicine, and
it is lrequently called for in pre
scriptions. It. is evident, there
fore, that no guesswork must be
permitted in compounding pre
scriptions nor as t. quality of
the drugri employed.
Our Prescription Department
is in competent hands, and our
long record of successful experi
ence warrants us in guaranteeing
absolute accuracy and puritv.
lluilPisislJUiin
Discreet Silence.
"I told Buuks a story, and it didn't re
mind him of another."
"Perhaps he was afraid that if he told
Ton one it would remind you of another."
Chicago Itecord.
Order yoisr F
I Is 8 i 3 H I I
I 1U1U
""DRINK
Bnrkhardfs
Bccr- -
ITS
THE
BEST
BREWED
I. .IIMILIWI. Jllllll
jiL p
A SHADOW.
Hns AHmu lived in a humble cottaye
in Jerusalem. One n.-miis he -tood long
before the open winj.iu shutter. IIow
dilhcult it wa- t get at clo-jng it! Tin
air was cool, ihe lit si.li. lMn in the
narrow, hilly street came a muleteer
astride, stooping furwuid over the back
ff the ass whii-i- little boor- . licked! and
slipped on the big. smooth stout-. He
sang a monotonous -ong hi the cu-tomary
plaintive brawling, nasal tones of the
easterner, and as he passed along the
sound -of his voice reminded one of the
bagpipe.
On the window sill lay a manuscript
dissertation, and so clear and brilliant
was the February moonlight that Hans
could read tbe fine writing without dif
ficulty. It was a defense of the establish
ed order of things, of standstill conserva
tism, admitting of no exception. Aud
a he stood there in the city where the
idea of human brotherhood as born and
had gone forth over the eaith, as he
glanced uter the pages of the document,
he -aid to himself: "No, no; we young
lo.le an- natural foe to conservatism.
We are the ones who now, in all ages,
Ii.im- broken ground for the truths which
Im-ii- pioceeded from thi- city." As he
. -poke he made an unconscious movement
I with his head. At the same time lii
) giai - fell upon hi- own slu.dow ou the
--.all. outlined by the moon.
ti i-jiilil uot le-trnin hi- laughter.
"t a- ii-.i that the shadow of an actor, the
head thiown back, the hand extended as
r he weic declaiming some stirrim-
p-.ig-7
A ffelmg of shame ,-nept over him as -he
considered for the fir-t time that, i
anioiig' the iden tranmittrd from tl-at
cilj to the western world as a cargo of i
i preci'-u- jewels, was a tiny pearl. 1m-
inanity.
lie closed his eyes and pre cd his '
I hands, over his face, and a thousand little
stars seemed to Hash before Ins sight.
To lie sure, it was meiely the pul-ations
of hi- owu blood, which produced this
' ' Keii-ation, and yet, litfle by little, those
tiny lights ceased to revolve and looked
j for alt the world like the pale stars w
he hnil itis.t been wntrhin:? in tbe fii
vhich
lirina
j raent. i At length, aroused by voices in j
the street, he looked out.
Between the houses opposite there ex- ing become loam and then stopping a
tended a. wall. On tbe uroind in frr-nt btinghoie iu a beer barrel, he had seem
was a -bright fire, and by that tire sood ' ed to reach the ultimate extravagance
Christ jsnrrounded by a few disciples and of imagination. Yet. near the Porta
fneudi. Ju-t behind htm his shadow , g fcM m unexpected ex-
was clearly dehued upon the wall. , , .. .,,
Johrf the disciple whom he loved, me- ' miragan.v wan revealed after the cx
chanirally picked up a blackened coal , -'avatious carried on there. In these
and with it outlined the shadow until he ' a elpptis. or sepulchral column, con-
i had dt-linented the entire figure of the
Muster uuon the wall. Then he ilrnnnert
the coal and entered into conversation
with tie reit. -
Next" morning, when Hans Alieuus
again stood at his open window aud saw
the people p.i-. thtie wen- many who
stopped aud looked with cuiio-ity at the
drawing on the nail.
"That represent a shoeu.aker; his
back i bowed." said the shoemaker.
''YotT talk nonsense." returned the
fruiterer: "that stooping posture proves
that hi is a fruit vender. They forgot to
draw the babket on his back, but that
half open mouth shows clearly that he
was crying: 'Pomegranate! Come and
buy! Come and buy!" "
A hirh official of the banbediin who
pasted, and who of course did not mix i
bis voice with the gabble of the trades- i
people bought to himself: "It U perfect-
lylan that that represents a learned!
man Jud a thinker. One might almost
FkAS
it is n: not bad, cither. Probably some ,
of theitrudespeople drew it. Of c-omse '
they gl know me more or Ics."
rtiewiwiiue one Ol llie SJivciaxorfe mtu
aileuify nppuuehed the c-arbon drawing.
He hud a simple demeanor and a kind,
patient fnce. Nothing great was known
of him, no chronicle has preserved his
name, for he led n retired life, away
from the noi3e of the world. With hands
crossed over the knob of his walking
stick he contemplated the drawing.
"What a nobb? forehead!" he thought.
"What lofty humanity that bent figure
suggests! Oh. if only one could he like
that! But why wish for the impossi
ble!" As he stood theie. -.ilent and humble,
the likeness to the diawiug was so strik
ing that everybody fell back, pointing to
him in whispers.
Startled and ashamed he slipped away,
unable to understand why they should
stare at him.
In his conscious humility he had re
sembled the Christ shadow.
Had he known this, and, pioud in that
consciousness, stood erect, the likeness
would have vanished. St. Lonfa Globe
Democrat. Franklin IVn Oratoj.
It was Poor Kichard whr remarked,
"Here comes the oratoi, with his flood of
words and his drop of renon." and dur
ing his whole life Franklin was uo
speechmaker. "I served." JeffDrson said,
"with Geneial Washington fn the legis
lature of Virginia before the (evolution
and during it with Dr. Franklin in con
gress. I never heard either of them
speak ten minutes al a time nor to any
but the main point which wi to dec-ide
the question. They laid their -boulders,
to the great point-, knowing that the lit
tle ones would follow thenisclv C-."
John Adams, in one of his periodic out
bursts against the man whom the public
deemed greater than himself, contrasted
his own services in congress, iu which he
claimed to have been "active aud aleit iu
every branch of business, both in the
house and on committees, constantly pro
posing measuies, supporting those I ap
pioved when moved by others, opposing
such as I disapproved, discussing and ar
guing on every question," with those of
Fiauklin, who was seen, he says, "from
day to day, sitting in silence, a great part
of his time fast asleep In his chair."
Yet Frankliu was appointed on eiery
important committee and Adams on few,
and the sage, could he have read his
brother congressman's comparison, might
fiiiily have retoitcd, with the wi-dom of
Poor Richard, "He that -peaks much is
much mistaken." or "The worst wheel of
the cait makes the most noise." Paul h.
Ford iu Century.
A HERO OF THE MINE.
He Risked His Life to Sno- Tliut of n
Fellow Wurlciiutn.
Heber Franklin, a young iniiu em
ployed at the Clear Creek mine. Is as
much a hero at. any man who ever
braved death on the battlefield. Frank
lin sought not glory, but to save a hu
man life. Theie was u fire In the mine.
The men were called out. Then they
rrere about to shut off the air iu order
to stop the flames, wheu It was learned
that a lone miner was working deep iu
the mine beyond the point where the
lire started and was then raging with
growing stleugth. Here Is the story
of the subsequent events:
boreman Tlmmus immediately canett
for volunteers to xo with him Into the
m)ue to rescue the man. Several nt
tempts were made by different ones,
but they were driven back by the
flames, and the cry of "Powder!"
caused a hasty retreat.
Finally Heber Franklin, a young man
whose work keeps him on the outsjde,
said, "I will go." And accompanying
Foremnn Tfcwis b.e pressed oa
through the fire and fonnd the man
working away tatuplug a hole, entire
ly uncousc-ious of the danger threaten
ing him. They .succeeded in getting
out of the mine safely, when the fan
was shut off ami the dip closed up.
The rescue was an act of great bravery
on the part of Franklin, as his work
kept him on the outside and he was
unacquainted with the exact lay of the
land Inside, and the danger of suffoca
tion from black damp was great. lie
was the only man of the many staud
Insr by whose nerve did not desert him.
It is stated upon good authority that
ten minutes more of lost time would
have resulted in the death of tins miner
who was at work and possibly a great
lo-s to the company, as the supply of
air could not be cut off while there was
auy hope of rescue, ami this would
have tended to feed the flames. Salt
Lake Herald.
IF I WERE YOU.
X wojldn't think about distress,
It I were jou;
1 wouldn't even once confcs
To ever fctiiitj blue.
But ivhen the Fun i well dipoed
To shii.e ujion our friends and foci
I'd be cuntcntwith oeu Irtssr
H I were oc
Just let it raia cr iuqw cr shins;
"Twill bi in no gain
To blane ntffouu-e or repine;
Tfie Iontr.--a: lane
Wilt cml Mmt(imt. and etcrr day
Ro&cs wi i l!oim aiou lite waj,
ftccau-c of rain.
Then iiiy our sonj; try if jou must,
D-it tx-ep in view
The liCdltlij wltf li.spirins trust
If .it's jfwjts due
To them ttii Uruc to lire above
All eaith!. i'. u.s. e.v.tptin;j lore;
Td let al etf-i-r tnafi-rcs ru--t.
If 1 were iu!
Katts and Fiction.
FATE OF A CAESAR'S ASHES.
ShakeHi'cnre'a Coneelt Find. a. Conn-tc-rpnrt
In Kenlity.
When Shakespeare put in the mouth
of Hamlet the curious conceit about
! ""-' " or the great Alexander nav-
taining a cinerary urn of rare oriental
alabaster was brought to light. The
inscription on the cippus revealed that
the ashes contained within the urn
were those of Calpunius Piso Liciul
anus, who, in February, A. D. 69, was
proclaimed Caesar by the Emperor
Galbra. Four days afterward Galbra
was killed, and Piso also suffered
death in his thirty-first year. His were
the ashes that the alabaster urn con
tained. The precious urn was given to a
workman employed on the premises to
take care of. Some days after, when
the proprietor of the place asked for
the urn. he found It empty. "Where,"
said fie. are the ashes that were
here?" The workman, surprised, said
that he gathered them together and,
uerer ft,.pamjUg that they were any
d , , , h and c, spQt
to his wire to make lye for her
, , , ., ,. ., . .
washing! And thus, said the late
Shakespeale Wood, describing tills in-
tmc-m. lum- iim aoin-a ui txu nullum
Caesar, adopted, by -Galbra nsTiherius
was adopted by Augustus and accept
ed by the senate, been used more than
13 centuries after his death by a Ro
man washerwoman to cleanse her dirty
linen, together with the ashes of other
members of the family In whose veins
flowed the noble blood of Crass! aud
of Pompey the Great! Baltimore Sun.
Curnecle and Ml-rurles.
Henry A. Chitteudeu, formerly of
New York and a nephew of Simeon B.
Chittenden, was the man who suc
ceeded In drawing from Andrew Car
negie an offer of $30,000 for building a
library in Oakland, Cal. In acknowl
edging a letter from Mr. Chittenden,
inclosing some clippings from the
Oakland Tribune, with which he is
connected. Mr. Carnegie baid: "If
Oakland would do as other cities have
doneI. e., provide a site and agree to
maintain the library at a cost of, say,
$1.00'J per j ear It would give mo pleas
ure to give the necessary $50,000 to
build It: but I must be sure that the
community Is obliged to maintain it as
aboe. Xo use building libraries un
less we are sui-p of their future."
A Soldierly Quality.
Examiner What Is the chief quali
fication for a soldier?
Frenchman A thorough knowledge
of penmanship. Indianapolis Journal.
-Tl-te STANDARD HARDNAARE GO. 1
faBlBKialiaaaaaW 4T" E5" 'J
ill vSSkJIbbbbI . -.?& ... til
R RlBaTSBK-jABBBBBBBBBBBB
B0T BLAST IbMMeQEhEXJBBbBbbQ S3
- fHBH9QH MZZsf Jg BdA 4bH U b
jn bHHKSIIbbIBS w h h !! 0 bW
1 -BBmKsoSBbhbHH89bBb9b9HS (6 &7 UF si vl Q (& Wjrj"; fa "QnB Sj
kj ?"alK''''BtBKjaW3a3p-rSiv g" j&
!ifl!WiPPiPHWiBBWiWPPl
EVERY CUSTOMER PLEASED
With the great values they received here last
week. WHY DONT YOU take advantage of our
BIG BARGAIN SALE
Of Fall and Winter Suits Overcoats and Top Coats
Look at our boys' top coats for $2.98
Look at our men's top coats for . $7.50
Look at our men's black, double breasted, silk faced
suits at . . .$7.50
Look at our men's line black suits for ..$5.00
Look at our boys' fine llack 3 p vestees for $2.25
Look at our boys' suits, in black and fancy colors at $2.48
Complete line of Hats and Gents' Furnishings.
You will find a complete stock of new stylish clothing
here. If not satisfactory money will be refunded.
Big 134 Clothing House
HOLDSTEIN & CO.
;ss
ARE YOU SATISFIED
iViTM ttrmovr
PLATC
AWKCUU.TV.
Ae Do Painless Evsc-fcrac-bin
And you keep your senses alert all the while; we don't put you to sleep.-
Fillings, Soc up. Plates, $6.00 Set.
Crowns, $5.00. All work guaranteed 20 years.
examination
w Yor
146 and MS South Main St.; Akron.
si the
We
Sv kI
I
(g?m -&gz&
f it-i n i ;
effort to carry only the best coal and coke, and while we have
different grades the price is consistent with the quality you wish
to purchase. Just a little trial will convince.
The Klagcs Coal & Ice Co.
- Office Gorner-MilKandProspect-stSr
PHONE 19
Are You Looking For Reliable
RANGES, COOK ant! HEATING STOVES?
You will find here a complete line of
GARLAND STOVES and RANGES
Prices very reasonable considering quality.
Do you Hunt? Don't fail to see our stock of latest im
proved Guns, Rifles, Revolvers and Ammunition of all kinds. Our
PRICES ARE EIGHT.
"Ao Ai-o Headquarters for
Sherwin-Williams Co.'s Paints, Roofing and Spouting, and
a general line of Hardware.
SEE: US FOR
ARTE
Oor.
Howard sirsd
The oldest hardware
nil Prqtesr.
Tommy Tuff Come on, Wi'lie. Le's,
play Injun.
Willie Hardrow Xaw, yer don't. See
this spot on my nose? Well, tha's whut's
left of that pinte yn put on me las' week.
Maw's scrubbed my face till I can't laff.
Ohio State Journal.
5-
With the condition of your
teeth? No! Then why not let
us- put them in a condition that
will enhance your beauty, health
aud comfort? You will be sur
prised at Uiq small cost and de
lighted with the result. If it is
necessary to draw your teeth
Bridge Work, $5.00. Best Gold.
.
a.-sy aifc?
Open, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays 9 to l
Ft-oo. -
If ilatl
Information on....
or
Should be sought for right now, and
incidentally make arrangements for
laying in of your winter fuel.
do, and alwaj's have, made an
AKRON, O
ESTHVIATES.y
Market Streets
stand in the city.
A I.oiik crvjee. " "i
In remote pait of Scotland the old
Covenanters love for long services on
tbe bare hillside still linscrs. At Diug
wall a recent communion service in the
open air l.i-t"J lYf.r.i lOn. in until A p
ni. without I'-jliati-ilng the staying pow
er of the rongix'satiuii
M
it
M
i
i
1
i
i
4
4
i
i
?
-a Wt--. T-f- - -

xml | txt