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Northern Ohio journal. [volume] (Painesville, Ohio) 1872-1896, October 12, 1872, Image 4

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CHUDREN'S COLUMN, j
The Children in the
Wood.
by mk. I.. I.. iioonwi.v.
' y iVy'-T wan three miles to uvUool, ratb
JsJL er a long tiiuuc for two cliit
" 14 dreii of seven and nine vrarii,
like Pet-sr and Mercy Lane.
Being through tlie I'oreit, tall, dense,
monarrhial, scan encroached on by
the new settlement, the way wa a lone
as long. But the girl and hoy bad stl
dom travelled it afoot, never without a
companion. Their father owned a ver
itable . pioneer team ; a horse fearlej.
fleet and strong; a sleigh that ponied
to enjoy rough linage and could triumph
over all oroinary-necidMJta; besides a
plentiful supply of wolf-skin robes,
which Mr. Lnuvi hud firat seen with
hungry, nowliug bodies inside them.
With these agreeable facilities, Peter
and Mercy were every morning con
veyed to the little log school-house, and
every evening back to the bright heartb-
toue and warm, eneery Htaiies 01 notne. i
One day the father ahd mother went
to town, as it was called; the town con- !
gistiug of a log tavern and store, and
surrounding this nucleus of civilization,
half a score or ho of dwellings, not
widely distinguished by their architec
ture from a beaver village. On this
oiasiou of the parents going to town,
Peter and Mercy were taken along to
school and there sat down with the in
junction it was a sad pity they did not
better heed namely, to get dismissed
in good time and go home and stay with
Hugb, th hired man ; because, as their
father distinctly told them, it was not
certain that he and their mother would
return until quite into the evening.
Notwithstanding, early in the after
noon, with their eyes on their books
but their thoughts out of doors, tins
children of 31r. Lane began to listen
and every now and then to fancy they
could hear the creaking of sleigh run
ners on the snow ; when they would in
stinctively glance up at the pegs from
which hang their cloaks and comforters,
in the momentary anticipation of hur
rying the garments on and beginning
the ride home, snuggled at their parent's
knees. ...
And: though so often mistaken, they
continued to expect the welcome sound
of "whoa. Bill." at the schoolhonse
door, and to encourage each other's
hopes, by exchanging the least bits of
smiles across tne nine room.
' It was not that they would mind walk
liisr for once, and fear of danger by day
light there was none; but, the thought
of their mother's company, so mucn
enjoyed bv them in the morning, gave
unusual zest to the prospect of riding;
besides, their dear mother would be
wfln to buv something in town espec
ially for them, which to were eager
to obtain possession of : at the earliest
moment. Ho the children lingered and
longed until at length the school was
dismissed.
From four o'clock until dark is not
lone in winter. The first half the dis
tance Mercv and Peter traversed quick
ly, on the : horse-sled of a neighbor,
who had come to take home nis own
children and the schoolmistress; at the
turn of the road they were lelt to pro
ceed by themselves on loot..
Then, late as it was, they began to loi
ter, walkinar backward or looking expect-
uiiriv over their shoulders, and saying
the. while that their father and mother
could not be far behind.
It was about the beginningof March
The weather had been mild and pleas
ant for man v da vs; the deep snow had
xettled away from the trunks of the trees
and become brittle . and porous. The
road was- smoothly trodden, as it had
been all winter.
Coming before long to a hut used by
wood-cutters earlier in the season, the
children- halted under the low eaves
fringed with icicles, though some had
fallen and nierced the snow, or nasnea
themselves in pieces on the strip of black
and frozen soil where the children's feet
were Dlaced. They agreed that this was
a most comfortable position in which to
wait the sueedv arrival of their parents
But their parents came not; and the
first thins that Mercv and Peter knew
the sun had dropped 'behind the hill and
disappeared, leaving only a gray and
deepening twilight with the distant sky
above, wnere me nrsi star vi eveuiug
was trying to light its little beacon, aud
below and far around, the evenly-spread
snow and naked forest trees.
The children turned toward each
other, the sister's blue eyes and the
brother's; black ones meeting in a star
tled gaze. They all at oncce felt the
lonely situation and wondered what they
were to do. Little Peter straightened
himself bravely, proposing to start for
home and hurry -as fast as they could;
and lie strode- into the road, pulling up
his red and white tippet about his ears.
But Mercy, looking along the road and
observing how quickly--it was lost In
..loom, felt -secretly' afraid and would
much have preferred going in the direc
tion from which their parents were to
come. She kissed her brother's cheek
which was cold almost as snow ; tears
trembled on her eyelashes; she told him
they could not go on, it was too late, and
thev would not be Kept-waiting' long
and so led him back to their standing-
til ace outside the hut.
Duskier - fell the curtain of night.
Still, and strange, and awful appeared
everything about them. Mercy was half
in doubt where they were, dreamily
ouestioninsr wit herself how it could
have happened that she and her brother
should be in the woods atone at mat
time of the evening. And when her
thoughts - came back to her like a flash
and she -recollected just the : truth, the
hour or two since scnooi was out seemeu
a. whole long day.
A sound in -the distance caught Peter1
ear. lie listened, then turning his eyes.
saw that his sister was listening too. It
was bv no- means tin sound for which
thev had strained their hearing in vain
Th hpftt; that Mercv honed and a eood
hope indeed, only dispelled in a moment
was that the hired man was coming
to meet them, halloing to the forest
echoes for company's sake. Theyjjhad
heard the howling of wolves, though
not man v times; the sounds, even when
they were safe at home, had caused their
hair to stand on end. The indescribable
resonance now swelling on the air they
knew to be nothing less. ' Need ' I say
the children were terribly irigntenea r
For a few minutes they clung fast to
each other, doing . nothing but cry,
Then like the pioneer children they
wre. tnev toot courage, and very sen-
si bl v set about trying ; to escape the
dreadful fate which threatened. They
went- into the hot, and could they have
shut the door, might have been compar
atively seeure. as there were no win
dows: but the door having stood open
was banked with - snow,- which bad
thawed and irozeu at the base into
layer of solid ice. The poor children
tugged at it with all their little strength
nnt the door was immovable.
findings there was no safety within
rhev next bethought them to get upon
the roof; which,, by the aid of a pole
they -found in the hut, was shortly et
tected. The roof sloped all one way,
toward the 'south, -and was not steep!
they pushed off the end of the pole and
cut down on their feet in the midst of
the shallow, crunching snow.
All was again silent, all save the fear
ful howling, nowlieard more distinctly,
in token that the wolf-pack was drawing
nearer.--' Mercy and her brother spoke
not a word, only crept, siiuutieriug, still
closer to each other. The height that
thev had been at such pains to gain
appeared quite insufficient; they doubted
whether the dreadful beasts would not
make the leap at the first trial. L'nless
their parents sliolild conic directly, there
was little hopes for tnera.
They had occupied their 'position not
many mtuutes, wnen a plunging iresia
in the Know drew their attention to the
rear of the hut. A moment s stillness
followed; Mercy nogan to think it
might have been only a dead bough
that had fallen to the ground.
Presently, while their eyes were fixed
I11 the new direction, out of the dark
ness into the dusk,' came with slouching
but stealthy gait, a creature resembling
i hir are brown dog. The children-who
hud never seen a living wolf, and could
not see this plainly, hopod it was a dog.
tiioutrii knowing ot none sucn anion
their few neighbors. It approached
snuffed at the pole which had served
them in climbing, sn titled at their tracks
an toe snow, settled on its haunches an
raised a pair of gleaming red eyes to the
-ittle boy and girl, off whom it could
liave supped comfortably and quickly.
vCOJICl-UPKD IN OCR NEXT,)
AGRICTJXTUILaX.
j There is no orii:tni-nl inil. or outside
! of our houses o cheap as plants or flow
! ers. Few paiir- to regard the archi-
lecture of your rooms or your bou-;, but
the beauty of flowering shrubs, or the
living arabesoe of a thriftr creeper over
j your door, are lessons of taste and beau-
ly. Indeed, subuebaii residences are
I sadly deficient without these simple, yet
beautuul accessories, always within the
reach of taste and refinement, no matter
how empty the purse. As the real nec
essities of "life require the least expendi
ture of time aud money, so the objects
which tend truly to satisfy the love of
me nesiitiiiui m nature are wiuiin me
reach of our humblest children.
How to Start ax AqriBax. Oneot
he most attractive of sitting-room or
naments is an aquarium. They need
not necessarily tie expensive, as common
window glass set in a wooden frame will
snfhec, though .one with an iron frame
will be !etter. Of course it must be
made water, tight. - When Hi in is done
put in rain or river water probably any
soft water will answer i then get a piece
of rock large enough to come nearly to
the top and. the more holes, aud cavities
and projections it has the better it will
suit the fish. Put this in the middle, and
then cover the bottom with clean sand
or gravel two inches deep or more. You
arc ready then for aquatic plants, such
as American Starwort, Mermaid-weed,
alia, Eelgrass, etc. When these have
been planted three or four days it will be
ready for the fish. Minnows, water
newts, perch, mussels, tadpoles, snails,
and a few gold fish, are commonly used.
Miails are said to keep Doth the water and
the grass clean. Some other kinds will
do equally well, but pike and trout are
objectionable on account of a weakness
for eating up the other member! of the
family. Care must be used so as not to
overstock the vessel, or all will die.
With a proper proportion of plants aud
fish the water will remain pure for a
number of weeks. When it has stood
for some time it can be improved by dip
ping out, and pouring back from a little
eiglit. xne nsn may ne ted Dread
rumbs and minute bits of meat, but
hat is not eaten by them must be re
moved, or it will taint the water. Coun
try Gentleman.
Fctckitt axp Phosphorus. We will
assure sensitive-minded people in speak-
g of futurity aud phosphorus, we have
no idea of suggesting a disquisition con
cerning futurity and brimstone. Sul
phur and phosphorus are very different
n their nature and adaptation tnougn
they are sometimes made to act as sub
stitutes for each other; and the futurity
of which we shall speak does not extend
beyond earthlv limitations.
Much has been said and written or late
years concerning the exhaustion of the
world's supply ot coal. Men nave al
ready used up, practically, their fuel
supply furnished : by nature above
ground, but. as if forseeiug what fools
men would make ot tnemseives in con
suming their forests without providing
tor new growths, nature quietly secre
ted another source of supply under
ground, and men call it coal. Tiiis
source or supply it is impossible lor man
to recreate. He has nevertheless
mined it and burned it, and wasted it in
smoke, by the tens of millions of tons,
just as though those subterranean forests
could never be exhausted, fccience comes
along, and with an outcry of alarm an
nounces that this thing must stop, or our
posterity will have nothing left for fuel
wherewith to Don tne tea-ketue.
Xow, it so happens that while Science
is a croaker and an alarmist, Philosophy
a soother and a comforter, bo, at this
outcry of alarm. Philosophy very con
soiingiy assures us tnat tne supply win
outlast our time, and thereby enable us
to bear the burdens of posterity very
cahnlv. Moreover, Philosophy coolly
demands of Science that it is her busi
ness to be looking about to provide a
substitute for coal, as she has done for
wood, m order to meet the demands of
this new exigency. Philosophy some
What superciliously says to science
The coming generations must have
heat; heat is merely a 'mode of motion ;'
and it is your business to find out some
new method of producing the requisite
motion tor evolving the requisite heat.
And there, as between the two, thesub-
iect drops, and the question rests.
uut, besides using up tne eartn's sup
plies of fuel, men are with equal reck
lessness using up the earth's supply of
phosphorus. Like coal and wood, the
quantity ot phosphorus allotted to this
distinguished member of the solar sys
tem is limited, uur planet lias received
its full rations of both fuel and phospho
rus, if men will persist in the wasteful
use of those rations till thev are ex
hausted, they can draw no more. The
laws of Nature's commissariat allow of
no commutation in that regard. Once
exhausted, phosphorus, like coal, can not
be recreated; nor can any other sud
stance supply its place.
Well, then, can't we do without it?
Kot very well. We might dispense with
lucifer matches, but how abont our
bones? Ji very well grown man requires
at least lour pounds ot pnospnates,
merely to built up Ins bony frame-work
and give him suitable solidity of spine
to enable him to become even a politi
cian. Without the phosphates, therefore
we could have neither men nor animals
above the grade of the cartilaginous.
Moreover, the earth, if deprived of her
favorite phosphates, refuses to yield
plants, or the seed of plants, useful to
man. It is from the phosphates thus
deiived that : the bony structure of the
whole animal creation is manufactured.
Now, think of the millions of tons, by
millions of millions multiplied, that have
been drawn from the original : stock of
the earth's phosphorous tor building up
the animal universe, and then consider
how many of those infinite millions of
tons have been wasted and lost in the
uses of men, and we can no longer won
der at the waste places ot the Uid orld
Then we will understand whv the vast
regions of Asia Minor, once fruitful and
populous, are now barren ; why portions
of Sicily. Palestine, Arabia, and. the
plains of Babylon, once so fertile, are
become deserts. Those lands have been
robbed of their precious phosphates ;
their phosphorus is exhausted.
Certainly, vast amounts ot the phos
phorus thus taken has been returned
through various media to the . earth
whence it came, uut how infinite are
the quantities we have deposited iu the
grave. This may be called returning
the phospbotes to the earth ; but not
in any practical or beneficial sense. The
bones, lying undisturbed, retain all the
phosphates. It is only the organic mat
ters that are decomposed in the grave
the phosphates remain and are not redis
tributed through the soil to become
again elements of fertility. That dis
tinguished chemist, Jjleoig, tells us that
" the only loss ot elements we are un
able to prevent, is of the phostatcs, is so
tar as those, in accordance with the cus
toms of modern nations, are deposited
in the grave."
It is not probable that men will aban
don the custom: of deep-earth burial
certainly not for the purpose of making
mineral manure of the bones of their
ancestors. Kor does anybody wish that
they would, : But it is manifest ttiat the
growing necessities of men will compel
them to adopt some measure of rational
economy in the use of sewerage; so that,
instead of draining our lands of their
precious- phosphates, and wasting them
in our rivers and the sea, they may be
returned to the soil to supply" the phos
phorus lor coming generations through
all the cycles of time.
History assures us that races of men
m their ruuu condition were ever stal
wart and brave. As civilization came
there also came luxury and effeminacy,
x ue same races ceased to oe either stal
wart or brave, feo the barbarian has
ever prevailed over the refined and lux
urious. But let us question Philosophy
to know if History is correct iu her de-
duetiou that refinement necessarily en
feebles nieu. Was it not a diflcieue-y of
phosphorus, rather than an excess of re
finement, that caused the deterioration
in manhood V Could the barbarian con
qner because he was ignorant? No, but
because they were strong, and they were
strong because they were the sous of a
sou not yet rooued ot its phosphates
The gigantic Gaul made the civilized
Komaii tremble; now the descendant of
that gigantic Gaul boasts of being an
aueragc giant ot only tour feet six! so
every where, man's stature and strength
uinuuisn as piiospuorus disappears. Un
less we learn to preserve this our futur
is dark and desperate. A judicious sys
tem of agriculture must soon be de
manded that will return to the soil the
waste of cities, or our posterity will do-
generate to a puny, rickety, brmeless
PRACTICAL HINTS.
H' " reripe which m'l kertafter he rjtHE largest stork in the world, at greatlv re
glm P ar rta-ler. i thi ')xTtTMmt. or 1 duced rate. Circulars free. Also, a full
.- - -'jrT rr-r-j mum. wrm M'nif-f. 0f
prvur-x rriiavi. like Mjormati thry
vail, lAv-v. alwiym e tmxa 1 hr xlMtlAr
full vlt MMfr'Ji y uf pi gJH-t rvtion.
Bluein-j for Clothes. Take 1 ounce of
soft Pru-iau bine, powder it aud put in
a bottle with 1 quart of clear rain water,
and add 1 quarter ounce of oxalc acid.
A ttaispoonlul is sufficient for a larse
washing.
... VHnsTjiaitable Slackiaij. Put one gal
lon ot vinegar into a i4one jug, and one
pound of ivorv-bl'ick well pulverized, a
1 half pound of loaf sugar, a half ounce of
)oU of vitriol, and seven ounces of sweet
o!1 . incorporate the whole bv stirring.
MhickiHii for Morocco Shot? Pound
some black sealing wax, aud put it a bot
tle with half a pint of alcohol ; ehake it
frequently, and when it is dissoryed.yon
may rub it on tnororvo shoes when tiicy
are scaled or defaced, ahd they will look
idtuost like uew; -dry It on in the euu.
Vermilion raint.The tendency cf
paint made from vermilion (cinnabar or
sulphide of mercury,) when mixed with
white lead, to turn black or brown iu a
short time may be obviated by mixing
wita the dry pujut, before adding tfio
oil. one eighth of its weight of flowers
of sulphur.
White Cement for Crockery, Glass, Ac.
Take 4 pouuds of white glue, 1 1-2
pounds of dry white lead, half a ound
of isinglass, 1 gallon of soft water, 1 qt.
of alcohol, and a half a pint of white
vramsh. Dissolve the glue and isin
glass iu the water by gentle heat if pre
ferred, stir in the lead, put tne olcohol
in the varnish, and mix the whole to
gether. Carriage Harness Blacking. T a k e
three sticks of black sealing wax. dis
solve them in half a pint of alcohol and
then apply with a sponge. . Shellac dis
solved in alcohol, and colored with
lamb-black, will answer the same pur
pose. This 13 a quick drying, hard var
nish, liable to crack the leather, and
sliould, therefore, beputon as seldom as
possible.
Cote-ifeeZ Jelly. Boil two cow heels
in one gallon of water, until the- bones
come quite out. Take the juice of three
lemons, strain them through a sieve into
the jelly; add loaf sugar and cinnamon
to your taste; boil them, together, then
add three eggs. Let the jelly boil five
times. After the jetly Is first boiled it
must stand till cold,- and the fat then lie
taken off.
Mu$h Biscuit. Make about a quart of
Indian meal mush, or stirabout; while
hot, add a piece of butter' about the size
of an esrg; thin it with milk, adding a
little salt; then add some flour as will
make itthe consistence of dough; kneed
it well, set it to rise, and bake with a hot
fire. The meal makes the bread light,
and thus removes she objection t the
nnhcaltbrulness ot hot bread. ,
Abernethn Biscuit. Dissolve a quarter
of a pound of butter in half a pint of
warm milk,- add -with four" pounds of
flue flour a tew caraways, a halt a pound
of sugar, make a stiff but smooth paste,
and to render the biscuit short a-nd
light, add a drachm of carbonate of soda,
in powder. Roll out very thin ; stamp
the biscuits, pricking them with a fork";
bake in tins, in a quick oven. , , .
Liquid Blue. Take half a pound of
best double oil ot vitriol, mix one ounce
of Spanish iudigo, pounded very fine,
and scrape m a little chalk; ttave an iron
pot half full of sand, set this on the fire :
when the sand is not. put the bottle in,
aud let the vitriol, &c., boil gently for a
quarter of an hour; take the whole off
the tire, and let it stand for twenty-tour
hours, and then bottle it for use. .
liaisinCake. -Two cups of sugar ,1 cup
of butter, and half butter or half fresh
lard, three eggs, one eup of molasses.
one coo of miik.. two and a half tea
spoonfuLjof cream of tartar, one of soda,
one pound of raisins, live cups of flour,
spice to taste. By putting in plenty of
spice and fruit raisius, currants, and
citron this make a very nice . fruit
cake, which will keep some time.
To. Fry Fish.-Aftar it has been"
cleansed, cut it into pieces of the proper
size, and lay tttetn in a clout in order to
dry them. Fry four or five slices of salt
pork, or ir you have not this, lard or
nice beef drippings will do; but pork is
preferable. When th3 slices are fried
brown, take them out, dip the pieces of
fish in a plate of line Indian meal, and
lay, them "into . a spider.. Yry them
brown. When the fish is done, lay it
with the pork into a hot dish. Pour a
little water into the spider, boil it up.
dredge in browned flour, and pour the
whole over the nsn.
To boil Corned Beef. Wash it thor
oughly, and put into a pot that will hold
plenty ot water. Ihe water should be
hot; the same care is necessary in skim
ming it as for fresh meat. - It is not too
much to allow halt an hour tor every
pound of meat after it has begun to boil.
The' goodness of corned beef depends
much on its being boiled gently and
long. If it is to be eaten cold, lay it,
wnen ooiiea, into a coarse earthen dish,
or pan, and over it a piece of board the
size of the meat. Upon this put a clean
stone, or a couple of flat-irons, or some
other heavy weight. : Salt meat is very
much improved Dy being pressed.
To Bleach Linseed Oil. Put iu a glass
jar some bona fide new linseed oil (from
the oil pressing works not the shoos)
pressed from fine Eastern seed, iu the
sunlight on the top of the house with a
piece of sheet lead (scraped bright) in
serted part in the oil and part in the at
mosphere 01 the jar. Cover over with
glass the mouthy so as to admit air and
light freely to circulate, but not the rain
to enter. In a few weeks the oil bleaches
and to the lead between wind and water,
a mass of mucus attaches itself, which is
witncirawu py genuy .taking out the
lead, rerscraping, and 'again inserting
until the oil becomes of the lightest tint.
Hot Pudding Sauce. To four larsre
spoomms oi roiiea, ciean Drown sugar,
put two of butter, and stir it together in
an earthen dish until white; then put it
into a sauce-pan with a teacup of hot
water, and set it nnan the coals. ' Stir it
steadily1 till it TmhIs, and then add a
gpooutuil or two ot wtne; lemon jniee.or
rose-water, ana let it Don uo acain
Pour it into a sauce tureen, and - grate
nutmeg over me top. xne advantage of
stirring the butter and sugar; together
before melting it, is, that it produces a
thick white foam upon . the top. The
reason for stirring it steadily while on
the coals, is, that it would otherwise" be
come oilv. -
Peeling peacftes.-Somebody give.the
following method for pealing peaches
ani tomatoes; "io remove the skin
from peaches. Every one knows there
is a great loss ot pulp in pearing
peacnes witn a kinte, to ohvlate
which the following has been suggested
for- treating them: Make lye as strong
as possioie witu wooa asnes and soft
water. . Fill a kettle with the lye, and
when boiling rapidly drop in twelve or
niteen peacnes, and take out immedi
ately and immerse them in a pail of cold
water, rake one m yonr hand and the
rind will slip off entirely.' leavine a
round, beautiful yellow ball; throw it
immediately into another pall of water,
aud so proceed until all are done. This
process will not injure the flavor of the
finest peach, and, once tried, the old-
fashioned way of peeling with a knife
win not oe agai-i adopted. , it the lye is
not strong enough, put into the kcttltt
two dippers full of clean wood ashes.
This is a good way of ridding small on
ions ot their jackets preparatory to pick
ling them ; also for peeling tomatoes."
Jiecaratiee Painting on Tin. Tinfoil is
spread out upon a smooth surface, such
as glass, the latter having been first
moistoued to aid the laying out of the
foil and to maintain it in its position.
The painting is then executed upon it in
oil. This painting on tin, when dried
ana varmsned, can be rolled up like or
dinary paper hangings, from, which it
essentially differs U PAseasing all the
variety Of tone and coloring that oil
panning auiuits oi. xne tin ground
work constitutes a water-proof protec
tion, and, 011 account of its irreat flexi
bility, will follow the various moldings,
and contours of the object to be orna
mented. To the lattor should be ap
plied a hydrolago mixture, when it will
be ready for the decorator. This meth
od can replace ordinary gilding, as the
"gold can be applied iu the workshop and
the tin gilt fixed afterwards. Tho ad
vantage of gilt tin over gliding on other
metals is that it is inimical tooxidation;
whereas it is known that gilding upon
other metals, and notably upon zinc,
deteriorates rapidly.
Sweet Chestnut Trees'.
line ef superior Nurserv -Stork. Nineteenth
year; ai-xe; 11 preen bouses. Address,
.STORKS. HAKK1SON CO.
61-35 Painesville. Lake eounty, oiiio.
3D. IjVE.
DDY
No. 90
MAIN STKKET, PAINLSVILLK, O
OXE of tne oldest Shoe houses iu Xorthern
Ohio.- The cheapest plare in the Stnte to
ltrrcoae all k i mis of
BOOTS AND SHOES!
My slock is very extensive, consisting of
all the variefi of Men, Women?' and
. hiitirtrti's- Bool-, feboes, Gaiters aiid Slijj
per. and, Tearber Findings, all f which
will he sold at exceed injrly &mall profits
for ready pay Call ana 6c itemember
the pliitc .No. '.to Main street, tro doors
west of A. Wilcox's liant- Avail your
seiTej of the rare cha?c of iriTestin
your fuuney We elmrre nothing lor
ahowins our gorwis. No. 10 Main street.
Eddy Cheap Hearty Pay Shoe Store.
Buy Twenty Cents worth and receive a
PRESENT
Of an JVlpliabel for the Children, worth 15 Cents
40fi4
MAUD WARE!
The under-signed offer to Dealers and Custun
ers at lowest rate.
BUILDERS HARDWARE,
MACHAKICS TOOLS,
':' TINNERS STOCK,
AI.SO,
Carriage and Harness
Maimers Goods.
GeoW. Wortkingtoa & Co.
JSTos. 90 92
WATER STREET,
43fb3 '
A song for the sons who honor deserve,
A song for the sons of the Western Reserve.
Western Reserve
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
Located at
PAIXESVILLE, OHIO,
i i Corner of Main and St. Clair Streets,
' . FBAtT BROS., Proprietor.
Instruction (riven in nil branches of a C'omraer
- eial Education which includes the
SCIENCE OF ACCOUNTS, COMMER
CIAL LAW,'" - BOOK-KEEP--
1NG, PENMANSHIP and
telegeaphixg: ,
Fifty good Bookkeepers, Penman,and Telegraph
ujicniwr wttiiieii iimiieuiuceiy to prepare
themselves for Business situations
sureto be fonnd, goodenter
. prising Business men are . ,
always wanted.
BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE a specialty.
Book-keeping 30 00
Penmanship, plain and ornamental 8(1 W
Telegraphing 25 00
jiisLriTCLiun per inomn, uu
run course in all departments, time on-
uutittsu.... B75 uu
A Thorough Course will be
given in Mathematics.
We intend to establish in this heant.ifnl ritv.
which is unsurpassed for its educational advan
tages, a Commercial College that shall be a com-
ycw auwna iu au ik .isepartinems.
Colleare Hours From 9 till 19 A. M from i
till 3, P. 31. ,
lg?-Ftill information sent to
those desiring to
attend.
O. G. PRATT,
PRINCIPAL.'
1,th?. BKST ai"1 CHE PEST Independent
Family Newspaper published. It contains
kokty-kiout columns of reading matter, is
IJi-iuted in the neatest style, on fine, white pa
per, aud published at the low price of Si a
year, aud
EVERY SUBSCRIBER
Receives a Beunttf nl Chromo, worth the
money invested, thus receiving a FIS8T-LA8S
Weekly Newspaper -
P O R N O T HIN Crt
JSSend Cue Dollar for a year's Sb
icri.jtion, and Ten Cents for postage on tha
Cltramo to the Star Publishing Cam
puny, Cincinnati, O.
iii r luuirwing iimc DooKsarerecoiu
f 1 4- mended as being the best of their ui
Li class.
,0
M The Song Echo." for Schools. . .
40.75 0
M;
KinkeUrNer Method for Reed
J ? Oifpins, will be ready Ane.25.i
HI PetersT Klectie Piano School, -
. J naw aim nnn ... i ..
50 Id
25 M
3.
fl Peters' Burro wes' Primer
ff. Worrell's Guitar School.
UJ Festival chimes, tor Ringing classes,
Ne Plus Ultra GU9 Book. With(
Piano orOrgan Accomplanments,)
i i . Ludden's School lor the Voice
m Peters' Art of Singing
50 U
i.6o m
1.30
1.50 rO
a .no rl
3.U0 f )
3.00 V
C A itchtl'ft Violin School;? Peters' edt'nl3.00
uj lvummer-s Flute School
IfJlWimmerstedt's Violin School
LrWimmcrstedt's Flute School. . . .
3.00 It,
T5 n
15 '
10
ii i-eters v uuin bciiooi..
l i refers' Flute School
Ij Peters' Parlor C'ompauion. For;
00 W
00 Q
r lute, violin ana 1111110;. t
reters-ranor companion, r or
Q Flute ami Piano, )
0
Any Music will be sent, post-paid.
xeipt of the marked price. Adclrei.
J.T.Peters,
599 Broad-war New lark.
3-55, 3-3.
n Teceipt ot the marked price,
(5
0
w
BONDS.
IZ-VESTIMIJISIISrT
Secur ities .
XTT"E continue to sell at par, adding accrued
MM interest, the First Mortgage Gold Bonds
of the Xorthern Pacific Railroad Company. On
the completion of this season's continct, there
will be FIVE HUNDRED AXD (SEVENTEEN
MILES, oi the niuiti line of the road in opera
tion, uniting Lake Superior with the Missouri
River, and seeuring the large traffic of the
Northwest. This amount ot road also eutittles
the Company to Ten Milliou Four Hundred
Thousand Acres or Land, located in Ceutral
Minnesota, Eastern Dakota, and in the Columbia
V alley on the Pacilic Coast. Tho Bonds are se
cured by a llrst mortgage on tho Road, its Traf
fic, and Franchises, and on tlie out ire Laud Grant
received. from the Government. The rate of in
terest is Seven and Three-tenths, GnliLoquiva
eont to about Eight and m Quarter pur cent, in
Currency. Believing the security to ho nmnlc,
aud the rate of interest satUI'uctorv, we recom
mend these Bomb us a desirable investment.
Holders of too United States 5-ais and high
priced corporate securities mav inalei-iallv in
crease both their princ-iial aud their iutcres't in
come by exchanging for Northern Parities.
Jay Cooke &; Co.,
New Tokk, Phh.apki.phia and Washington
J. "V- PAINTER, Banker,
Cleveland,
General Agents for f (bio. For sale bv
BANKS and BANKERS generally.
0
FOR SALE IX PAINE3XILLE BY
First National Ilank
Wilcox, Bankeb-.
n. nieeie,
613,-6.
Notice This!
Warner & Mastick.
Tlie Narrow Gauge Store
ASI THK
Side Track Auction Store,
Nos. 166 & 141 !
STATE STREET, PAIXESVILLE, O.,
Are now supplied with .
:b a-.a. i iisr s
IS
All Kinds of Merchandise.
Dry Goods,
Notions,
Crockery,
Teas !
Withal a general stock of Goads, all
Bought at Low Figures
And to be sold acordincly !
We use no common, cheap flattery such as of-
lertng xo our customers a spool oi tnreaa,
or .something ol that kiud. a little
cheaper man our neighbors,
but we sell anything
in our stock
Cheap.
Special Bargains In
WHITE GOODS,
EMBROIDERY,
SHEETINGS,
COTTOXADES,
LINEN DRILLS
TEA.
& TAR.
LINEX GOODS,
PEIXTS,
LIXEU -CHECKS,
CROCKERY,
SOAP, ROPE,
In connection with the "NARROW GAUGE "
ye oct-apy
Store No. 141,
Next to James H. Taylor's Grocery, where, aside
from our regular stock, we have the
Finest Lot of Chromos !
Ever offered in town.
ALL NEW SUBJECTS
AND WELL FRAMED.
To those desirous of ornamenting their par
lors and ninkiug home attractive, we win say
that these enromos are ox
IF1 1 IN" IE CTJIjIT-Z-
AND WILL BE SOLD CHEAP.
Our aim is to help customers to Goods at LOW
FIGURES. Our buyer, 1). WARNER, Jr.. has
had practical experience in lookius up bar
gains, and knows how to secure th.
" GOODS WELL BOUGHT
ARE HALF SOLD.
WARNER & MASTICK,
166 STATE STREET.
45arl3
Carpets ! Carpets !
AS IMMENSE STOCK FOR THK
TALL TRADE.
AVe have just imported a choice line of
FINE CARPETINGS!
Which we offer at Oreatly Reduced Pri
ces. '1 hose who have bouses to furnish anew
will find the most uniquestyles of the season at
our store, and we are confident will save their
expenses to Cleveland.
A EULL ASSOBTMfiXT OP
CURTJIXS AND- UPHOLSTERY GOODS
Cartiets at Wholesale at Manufacturer' Prices.
. .. t
Beckwith, Sterling & Co
187 &1S9 Superior at. Cleveland, O
oi
HA RT & MALO NE,
Manufacturers
OF
Pine
FIT UNI T II R E.
103, 105 & 107 Water St.,
30, 32 & 34 St. Clair St,,
Cleveland, O.
38art)
CH. Wheeler,
BOOTS end SHOES.
AN ENTIRE NEW STOCK OF EVERY
VAltlUTY of:oods in this line, just re.
ceivod for tlsj Spring and Summer Trade of 1OT!.
Mo. 03 Ma in st. Cai'l and examine the stock
before purottasingetsc whore.
Every kin dot' work made to order and in all
cases satisf action giub-antead, both as to ma
terial aud i xii 't. R Iriug ilone at theshortesl
notice SiuuiM the Rod. RowU Marl
Jb Printing.
E"VEi"X" STYLE
Plain and Fancy Work
EXECUTED
Neatly and Promptly,
REASONABLE RATES,
-AT THE
Journal Printing House,
No, 114 Main St.,
I'-A.IDSTESVIIjIjE, O.
THE PROPRIETORS of this establishment
naving latelv made extensive additions to
their stock of TvDe and material, ore ureuared
to do such work as may be entrusted to their
hands in a satisfactory manner.
New Type and Machinery
As the True and Machinery are all new and
of the latest and most anDroved stvles. their la
cilities are not surpassed by any onlce in the city
lor aoing ail Kinas oi
Mercantile, Commercial
jF'jDsrcx' Work
SUCH
BILL HEADS, BILLS OF LADIXG
CHECKS, CARDS, CIRCULARS,
LETTER & JTOTE HEADINGS,
PROGRAMMES, STORE BILLS,
AUCTION BILLS, LABELS,
ENVELOPES. BALL TICK
ETS, INVITATIONS, &C.
The personal supervision of
Competent Workmen
Is exexcised on all work, and satisfaction will be
guarant eed in every respect to any reasonable
mind. The following are recognized as theessen
tial qualities of a-good Printing Establishment:
FIRST:
GOOD WORK: Correct and as ordered.
second :
PROMPTNESS ;delivery when promised
REASONABLE RATES.
Particular attention is paid to Mercantile
Work. None butthe best stock will be used and
none but the best of workmen will be employed.
Every Kind of
BOOK OB BLANK
REQUIRED BY
Merchants. Banks Hotels, Professional Men,
County Olticers, or by the public gener
ally, executed on short notice, in
the best style, and at the
lowest prices.
OjEIDER.S
bhonld be left at the Counting Room of the
Northern Ohio Journal,
No. 114 Main St., Stockvrell Block,
I'AINESVII.I.E, OHIO.
ORDERS BV MAIL
Will receive prompt attention.
Estimates on work ehecrf illy frnil'd on
lisattea by 1Mb ox UwrWiMt.
1873.
M.t & PAVXK,
M ANVr ACTUKKItS ASH nKil.KKS IN
CABI1TET WIREJJ
SOS. 51 AXn 53 Mjli.n Strekt
PAIXESVILLE, OHIO,
ire constantly on band a well-selected
sortment ol"
RLOR AXT :HAMT5E11 SETS. TETE-A-
TETEii, DOi'AS, SOFA CHAlliS, EASY
CHAIKS, IXirXGES. MARBLE. MA
HOGANY AX1) WALNUT TOl'
CENTER Tjl-IBX-iIES
EXTENSION AND DINING ROOM TABLES,
Kl-SW, C ANE WOOD SEAT CHAIRS, WO
VEN. WIRE MATTIt ESSES, luxurious
and durable, BOOK-CASES, MIE
ROR9, SPKING BEDS, WHAT
NOTS, FOLDING CHAIRS,
&.C., &C, &C
We have added to our former Ware Rooms the
rooms No 51 Main street, which gives us in
creased facilities for doing business. Uive us a
call. No trouble to show goods.
D. W. MEAD.
GEO. W. PATXE.
Itf5
Furniture for tlie Million.
THE UNDERSIGNED WISHES TO CALL
special attention to his assortment of
FURNITUKE
of all kinds, consisting of
CHAMBER SETS, BOOKCASES, CAXE
AXD WOOD SEATED CHAIKS, TA
BLES, LOUNGES, &C, &C.
A large quantity of Elegant MATTKASSES just
reueiveu. jtivl u-u- r i&xiu E.3 mrnisnea ox
any pattern.
B?" Custom work of all kinds will receive
prompt attention.
Cor. Main & State Sts., Over French's Grocery,
PAIXESVILLE, OHIO.
llarS JOHN SCHWENINGER.
JOSEPH JOHNSON'S
STANDARD
HEKBAL REMEDIES!
FOR SALE AT
DIET So CO'S.
40tf3
Union Meat Market.
A LL
KINDS OF FRESH
AXD SALTED
x- MEATS for sale at the lowest prices,
All
meats delivered free of charge
C. G.
DAVIS.
37UUI
Painesville, March 23,1878.
Invertlble Xrotufh.
We, the undersigned, are convinced, either by-
using or examining the InvertibleTroiign,latly
patented by F. J, Goldsmith, that it is
desirable acquisition to .my farm where a
trough is used; and take pleasure in recom
mending it to all who wish to be merciful to
their beasts or saving of their time aud money.
GEORGE BUSH, M. B BATEUAM,
E. E. JOHXSO-f, B. F. FULLER,
CHAS. C. JENNINGS, L. X. NYE,
U. E. HODGE, K. MURRAY, 2(1.
The only additional cost of this over any other
trough, is about an hours extra labor in making.
Any farmer can do it, and all ought to.
Agents wanted. State, County, Town and
Farm Rights for Sale.
Farm Rights for sale at $2.00 Address
F" J. GOLDSMITH,
Painesvi lc, Lake County, O., P. O. Box 645.
TO BRASS BAUDS A XI) OUCJir.STRAS
MR. GEORGE BURT, BASD-MASTER OF
the Painesville Comet Band, respectfully
anuonnces that he is prepared to give
Thorough and Efficient. Instruction
to any Organization, Brass or Stringed, that re
quire the services ot a teacher.
music Arranged to Order
for any unmber or kind of instruments. In the
best possible style and always to suit the abili
ties of the respective performers, of which infor
mation must be given in ordering.
Having a very extensive. Repertoire, he can
from the Sensational to the Classical.
Ousdrille Bands can- tret all the newest and
best Music of the day for their business Fancy
uances, witn f igures, so- sc.
After a long and active experience in his pro-
tession, ne does not Hesitate to warrant
PEEJECT SATISFACTION.
or monev refunded. Thebestofreferencerglven
if reouired. Private Lessons given on lnd
and Stringed Instruments. Address
GEORGE BURT,
P. O. Box 887, Painesville, Ohio.
larS
DANTZER BEOS.
Flour, Feed and Produce
Merchants. .
Are connected with one of the LARGEST.
FLOUB 3IILLS
OF THE WEST,
therefore, can furnish the WHOLESALE and
RETAIL TRADE with the
BEST FLOUR IN THE MARKET.
Also Manufacturers of the
Sea Foam Baking Powder,
Dantzer Bros.
Painesville, O. 45ar3
-jQOiriS IRE-TAG,
Ja'anufacturer and Dealer iu all kinds of
TOBACCO, SNUFF, &C.
CIGARS, THE BEST IS TOWN.
PIPES of all grades, from the finest Meerchaum
to tue cheapest ctay, aim a iuii assort
ment of all goods found in a
FIRST-CLASS TOBACCO STORE.
All articles sold at prices which
Defy Competition.
larS
JAMES
MORLEY,
D
KAI.ER IN and manufacturer of every va
riety ol
BOOTS
& SHOES
For I.ntlies' Gentlemen's and Children's wear
No. 09
MAIN STREET, PA I N ES VI LLE, O.
A large stock kept constantly ou hand, which
-clll bo sold at prices as low as those ol any ot lie
eatablishtncuu npociai attention paut to
CUSTOM WOBK
And satisfaction guaranteed In all cases.
staie- ltcmeuiber the place. W Main St. 43av
Caution.
Ti the Citif'ti of Late and Ijeaitoa
Counties :
There is a man canvassing this and the adicin-
ing counties for Photograph copying, exhibiting '
samples of good Photographs and India ink work
and deliver-- nothing but tin types. I
liozcii of farmer have been at my rooms in-
quiring about the matter, as he ha represented j
that he was connected with niv rooms. '
In East Claridou he represented himself as j
Horace Tibbals; be has never had any connec-
s
Mocfcweli, tlr. Hums, r Arnold, and Mrs
Bracket. Thomnsou; .1. Brockway, Val. Brock,
way, Lclloy. W . A. FAZE.
Plain and Fancy Stitching
DOXE AT THE
WEED
Sewing Machine Rooms.
-14 MAIX STREET. 42dkl
DENTISTRY.
M. L: WRIGHT,
Operative and Mechanical
CHARD ON, OHIO.
ALL operations performed in the most skil
ful manner, and in accordance with the
latest scientific principles of the art. Art ificial
teeth inserted on the Rubber Base. Childrau's
feeth extracted withoutcharge. Usmirnothinir
but the verv best aualitv of material in the man
ufacture of Plates and Teeth, ahd having but one
price, I feel confident in giving satisfaction to my
patrons in every particular.
. ALL WORK WARRANTED.
Call and examine specimens. ' S9ar8
New Boarding Stable.
IT1BE UNDERSIGNED would respectfully call
JL attention to the fact that he has opened a
uvvr Stable at the place formerly occupied by R.
Briggs, where he will be ready at all times to
RECEIVE AND ' BOARD ' HORSES
By the Day or Week, at the most reasonable
terms. Having-Lhad nearly a life times' expe
rience in the care- and management of horses, it
is needless tosav -that thev will-receive the best
attention. Fai men and others will here find a
good place to bring their horses lor a singleaeed.
Oood accommodations and easy-of access.
Sz& Remember the place. Stable No. St St.
-iui street.
41ch2 ... z B. CURTISS.
American Button-Hole
-AK1
O VEB-SEAMING
SEWING MACHINE1
1. T. WADE, A re tit for Lake county,
As this is one ol the best if not the best ma
chine in the market, I would simply say to all
intending to purchase machines, to examine its
merits before closing a bargain anywhere else.
If yon do not like it you need not buy, and by ex
amining it yon may find it to your advantage
topurehase of us.
S3ch3
J. S. MOREELL & SON,
CONTRACTORS FOR
Brick, & Stone Laying,
ANN PLAIX AND ORNAMENTAL
PIST5JE?.XjT G--
TUCCO CENTERS and ENRICHMENTS to
CORNICES manufactured from Original
Designs and kept on hand for sale or put up to
order. Also, Hair and Mortar. Old Plastering
whitened or tinted, inquire ot
C. W. Morreix. Nebraska street, or
J. S. Morrell, cor. Jackson & Grant sta,
38ch3
JT. S. .Worrell c Son.
"TUX! BIRDS SAXG SWEETLY."
That Convention.
-o-
rpHE balance of this Thrilling Romance will
JL. be found in "lllil uu.WL.MlUi; or
hve u ays A folitician." .lust out, contain
tug 1UU Illustrations Dy the Greatest iitnon
Artist in Ameriea. with contributions from
G. V.." PEfROLEUM V. SASBY. MARK
TWAIX.H. G.." KOLLO RAMBLER, and
score ni nrnpr ununiar writers. .u ueauiiiiii
tint paper, elegantlv bound. Cloth, 1.25; Paper,
o cents. h,iLr. r.v.m ivniir., or t-rai
post.paitt- on receipt ol price, t . G. vv r. ii. m
CO., Publishers. New York and Chicag.
AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY. New York
General Agents for supplying the trade.
Neiv Clothing House
S. SCHWAB,
MERCHANT TAILOR
. AND
CI OTHIEE
13 4:
S1TPII-IOR ST.
UXDER AMERICAN HOUSE,
Clval3.il, O'jlIj.' ;
T HAVE Just opened with a new, large and
JL complete siock oi
FRENCH. ENGLISH. GERMAN AND
AMERICAN. CLOTHS. CASSI
MEBES & VESTINGS,
And having in my employ a
Competent Cutter,
I am now prepared to make up for customers
garinents which are
WARRANTED IN EVERY
RESPECT, AND AT THE
VERY LOWEST RATES.
READ 7-UADE .
I have on hand a large and select stock of nil
grades which, when examined, cannot fail to
please. Goods in all cases warrautod as repre
sented. 47dktU-S
CAIX AND SEX THE
New lYlieeler& Wilson
Sewing Machine.
Ogle it. CO H LES' DRT GOODS STORE,
NEEDLES, OIL, &C,
Can bo had at the abovo Oftlco.
chSM
Boarding and Sale Stable.
At the Old Stand, in rear ofStoektrell Jfouse
W. O. WATER3IAX
TXAV1XO recently leasod and nawly fitted tip
rl lhHlnv Stsble. would rtMlCCt fllllv lll-
!oriii the public that ha is now preparwl to re
ceive ami
BOARD HORSES
bv the meal, day or week. Having had many
vents' ept-rience, satisfaction will lie guaran
teed in both care ami keeping. Terms reasona
ble tittists Bl the StockweV. llouso will find
everv couveninmat. litesv Stables. ill U
EUREKA.
VINEGAR BITTERS.
,
FUSEL? VESETAB-E,. USE FM ALCCSOL
BR. WALKER'S
CALIFOEMA VINEGAR JJITTEES.
Vinegar Bitters are not a vile Fancv Drtnk,
,ado ol Poor linm. Whisky, Proof Sniflts and
Kefnsa Liquors, doctored, spiced, i-.nd sneetened
I please tne taste, c-.uteu "'ionics." "Appetizers,1
r.estorers," Ac-, that Jcrad the tippler on to drunk
enness and ruin, but aro a true .Medicine, nuule
from the native roots aud herbs of Caiuonila, free
from all Alcoholic Stimulants. Tlixv i-re the Ciw.-.
P.lood Pnrilierand a Life-mviuf. Princinle. a Perfect
Renovator and lnvigonitor of the Sysu m. carryicg
otT all poisonous matter :r.d restoring the blood
o a neaitny conniuon, cnnciitr.g it, rert-esiang ana
nvigoratin both mind aud beniv. Thev are easv
of administration, prompt in their action, certain
m tiieir resaiis, sale and reiin.e in au lorms oi
disease.
AO JPrrson can take these mttcm accord
ing to directions, aud rciufjn lous uuwcli, provided
tucir Dones are not ucs.rovcHi uy mineral poison
or other means, and the vital organs wasted beyond
the point of repair.
Dyspepsia or I n5ig Uon. Heartache, Pain
in tlie Shoulders, Courtis, .iluucss of the Chest.
Dizziness. our l-.ructatiuus or tlie s-tomach. llad
Taste in the Month. Bilious Attacks. Palpitation of
Uc Heart. Inflammation of the 1. lines. Pain In the
region of the Kklncys, and a hundred other painful
symptoms, are the offsprings cf Dyspepsia. In these
complaints it has no cquui, and one bottle will
prove a better guarantee of its merits than a
lengthy advertiseinent.
.ur -emniiu uoiiipminis, in young or old,
married or single, at the dawn of womanhood, or
the turn of life, these Tunic liittcrs display so de-
ciucu an influence tnat a marked improvement is
soon perceptible.
for inua minatory aiul Clll-onle It lie u
matistn and (.our. Dvnen.sia or iiiiiiirestion. Hit- '
ious. Remittent aa-.l liii'eriuiticnt Fevers. ULseascs
of the Blood, Liver, Kidneys and lilnddcr, these
Bitters have been most successml. bucli Diseases
are caused by Vitiated iliood. which is generally
produced by derangement, of the l.igesiive Organ-.
xncjrare a urniio x-.ii-gaiivo as well us
'I'ouic. possessing also the peculiar merit of act
ing as a powerful :e;eiH in icllevlng (Tomrt-stiou or
latlammation of the Liver ami Visceral Orgalis uid
In l.ilious Diseases.
For Slcin Clseascs, Fruplions, Tetter, Salt- :
r.liei'm, Iilotchc, Spo.s, l iuiples. Pustules, Roils,
carbuncles, Kag-wi.r.i.s. ,e:iiu-itcau. bore i-jycs.
Hrysipelas, Itch, Scni Ts, I'isculoralions of the bkia,
ll-mors and Diseases of the fc-Um, of whatever .
name cr nature, arc literally dug up and enrried
out of the system iu a short lime by the use of these
i:ittc.s. One bottle in such ccses will convince the
most incredulous of tiielr curative effects.
Clertiise the vitinted BIochI whenever yon
find its impurities bursting through the skin In
Fimplcs, Eruptions, or Sores ; clcause it when vou
Cad it obstructed and slugirish in the veins; cleanse
it when it is foul ; your feelings will tell you when.
Keep the blood pure, and the health of the system
will tonow.
Grateful Thousands nioclaim Vinegar Brr-
te'.-.s the most wondcnul luvijoniut that ever sua-
tsiaea me sinung systcn!.
Pin. Tape, aul oilier Worm., lurking la
the system of so many thousands, are effectually
destroyed and removed, bays a distinguished
physiologist : There is Rcarccly an individual outliTV
face of Hie conh whose body is exempt Irom the
presence of worms. It is not upon the healthy
elements of the body that worms exist, bnt upon
the diseased humors and slimy deposits that breed
these living monsters of disease. No system of
meoicme. no vermuues, no anineiuitmucs, will
iree the system from worms like these Viticrs.
Sleeliaiiical Diseases. Persons engaged In
PrJnu and Minerals, such, as Plumbers. True-
setters, Gold-beaters, and ilincrs, as they advance
in life, are subject to paralysis of the Bowels. To
guard against this, take a dose of Walker's Vin-
UAtt i:iri tus i lt.e u
Bilious, Iti-nilttcut, and Intermittent
Fevers, which are so prevalent in the valleys oi '
our great rivers throus;r.nut the Imted States,
especially those of the Mississippi, O.uo, Missont i,
Illinois, lennessee, t.'.iinueriaiiu, Arkansas, neu.
Colorado. Urazos, Bio Grande, Pearl, Alabama,
Mobile, Savaunali, Hoanokc James, and many
others, with their 'am tributaries, throughout our
entire country during the Bummer and Autumn.
and remarkaniy so uuriug geascus oi unusual neat
and dryness, are invariably accompanied by exten
sive derangements of the stomach and liver, and
oilier abdominal viscera. In tltcir treatment, a
purgative, exerting a powerful luiluencc- upon these
various organs, is essentially necessary. There is
no cathartic for the purpose equal to Int. J. Wai.k
EKra Vineuab itirri.iss, as they will speedily
remove the dark-colored viscid mailer with whicli
tlie bowels are iaaai.uiiii: Kaineiimesiimuiatmg
the secretions ol tne .liver, ana generally restoring
the healthv functions ot the li?t-stive oorans.
tu-rnftiin. or Kiu-'-Uril, U tiitc Swellimrs.
Ulcers, Ervsijwlas, Swelled Neck, Goitre, Scrofulous
Inflammations, lmlolent Inflammatioiui. Mercurial
AI.ect.oos, Old Sores, Erupuons of the Skin, Sore
Eyes, etc, etc In theso as in all other constitu
tional Diseases. AValkku's Vinegar IIittfks have
shown their great curative powers in the most -obstinate
and intractable cases.
Dr. Wulker's California Vinegar- Hit
ters act on all these cases In a similar mauner.
By purifving the mood iin-y remove tne cause, ana
by resolving away the ctl'ects of the inflammation
(the tubercular deposits) ilio affected parts receive
ucaitn, anu a pi-rnmm-m, j.in.-1- ucn-n.
Tlie wropertloa of 1UL Wai.kb's Tixkoar
Bittkks are Aperient, Diaphoretic, Carmiuative,
Kutritious, Laxative. Diuretic, Sedative. Counter
irritant, Sudoriflc, Alterative, and Anti-Bilious.
Tho Aperient and mild laxative, properties
of Diu Wai.kerts Vinegau BiTTEKS arc the best
safe-guard in cases or eruptions anu matignum
fevers. Their balsamic, liniling, and sootning pro
perties protect the humors of the fauces. Their
Sedative properties allay pain in the nervous sys
tem, eiomacn. anu nunom, uoui muuiu uuuu,
wind, colic cramps, etc
THctr Conntcr-Irritnnt Inflacnce ex
tends throughout the system. Their Ai-U-lUiieas
Croperties stimulate me liver, in tan secretion oi
ile, and its discharges lliroueh the biliary duets,
and ate superior to all remedial agents, lor the cur
of Bilious i'ever. Fever and Ague, etc
Fortify tlie lMKly n$ralnst disease by
purifying all its fluids with Vinegar Bitters. Xo
epidemic can take hold of a system thus fore-armed.
Directions Take of tho Bitters on going to
bed at night from a half to one and one-half wine
glassful. Eat good nourishing food, ench ns beef
steak, mutton chop, venison, roast bcei; and vege
tables, and take out-door exercise. They are
oomposed of purely vegetable Ingredients, and
contain no spirit.
It. H. McnOXAI-D fc CO.,
Druggists and Gen. Agts.. San Francisco. CaL, It
cor. of Washington and Charlton Sts., X.Y
SOLO BY ALL DBUIKJISTS A DEALERS. -
Millinery & Dress Making.
MRS. L S. FLEMING having secured new
rooms ill tho Parmly Block, State street,
would lie pleased to receive all friends who may
desire work in this line. The
LATEST STYLES OF GOODS
Kept constantly on hand and received direct.
I'he attention of ladies is especially called to tho
Dress Making Department. 42bhl
Prospectus for 1872.
FIFTH YEAR.
A Representative and Champion of American
Art.
THE ALDINE:
An Illustrated Monthly Journal claimed to be
the handsomest I'apcr in tha World.
"Give my love to the artist workmen of THE
ALDINE wbo are striving to make their pro
fession worthy of admiration for beauty, as it
has always been for usefulness.1 JJtttry M'arri
THE AlDIXE. while issued with all the reg
ularity, has none of the temporary or timely iu-tere-t
characteristic of ordinary periodicals. It
is an elegant miscellany. of pure, light, and
graceful literature, and a collection of pictures,
the rarest specimens of artistic skill, in black
and white. While other publications may claim
superior cheapness ns compared with rivals of a
similarclaKs.1 HE ALLUXKis a unique and orig
inal conception alone and uuapproached ab
solutely without competition in price or charac
ter. New Features for 1872.
Art Department.
The enthusiastic support soreadilv accorded
to their enterprise, wherever it h.is ficen intro
dueeil. has couvinced tho publishers of THK
ALUlNKoftbesoiiudiiessof their theorv that
the American public would recognise and heart
ily support any sincere effort to elevate the tone
and standard of illutratod publicalious. As a
guarantee of the oxcellcnceol'this tlopartmrat.
the publishers would lieg to a nnouuee during
the coming vear, spcdim-us lrom tlie following
eminent Anicricau artists:
W. T. Richards, Wm. H. Wilcox,
Wj, Hakt, .1 auks H. Beard,
W. Keahp, Jamks milkv,
(iKORUE SMILET, It. 1- I'lOl'KT,
Ai u. M ill, Frank Heard,
l-iK ANV1LLE l'KRKIXS, 1AV L IUXON,
F. O. t H AKLKY, ' J. Ho ts.
VlCTOK NKI1LIG,
Thee pictures are being reproduced without
regard to expense by the very best engravers in
the country, mid will bear the severvt critical
comparison with the best foreign wurk, it licing
the detei .liinatiou of tlie publishers that THK
Al.L'lNK shall lie a successful vindication of
American taste iu competition with any cxit
iug publication in tho world.
literary Department.
Where so much attention is paid to illustra
tion and get up of l ho work, too much depend
ence on appearances may very natnrally ln
feared. To anticipate such iinj-givings t i
only nccesarv to state that, the editorial man
agement of Til K AI.IH.N V. ha been intrnt-cd to
SIR. Klt'H AK1 llKXKY STOllAKl), who has
received assurances of assititanco from a host of
the most popular writers aud poets of the coun
try. , The Volume for 1872
will contain nearlv atv imkcs. nud aiKMit M tine
engravings, t oniiiicncing with the number lor
.lanuarv. i-vcvv third nmiilK-r will contain a
beautiful tintwlph-turc on plate aHr, inserted
as a fmiiiispircv. .,,
The thritiims mimber for will be a
splendid volume In itself, containing Hl-jr en
gravings, .four m tint) and, although i-etaileit at
one riollar, will lie scut without extra cliargo to
all vcavlv sitbncribtii-ik
A t'krmis 1 Kverr ttnfcsrrlbrr
was a very popular feature last year, and will
1h rcHattti with llo jirescnt volume.
The publishers have purcliaMxl and reproduced,
at great oxiH-nsc, the lHsiutiful oil painting bv
Skis, eutilli-d 'lA-K X An re's School" The
chromo is 11x18 inches, aud is an exact fao-ft Un
ite, in site and appearance, of the original pic
tu iv. No American chromo, which will at all
compare with it, has vet Ik-cii ottered at retail
for less than Ihc price nked for THK ALD1NK
and it together. It will btMlclivered free, with
the January number, t every subscriber who
pays for one v car lb advance.
Terms tor 1872.
One Copy, one year, with Oil Chromo, Five
Dollars.
Fivo Copies " " TwentT
Dollars. 7
JIASIES ttlTTTOIf CO,,
HTBI.1SH-BB.

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