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The Medina sentinel. [volume] (Medina, Ohio) 1888-1961, August 21, 1914, Image 2

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THE BIEDINA SENTINEL, FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 1914
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Agricultural
Co. Statistics
The following totals taken from the
official abstract of agricultural sta
tistics of the various townships of
Medina county, from returns made by
the several assessors in May, 1914,
will doubtless be of interest to many
of our readers. The Information is of
kind not easily available to the av
erage reader, and yet may be made
the basis of some valuable calculation:
Acres of wheat sown for harvest,
1913, 21,262; b ushels of wheat pro
duced, 393,638; acres sown for harvest
1914, 23,454.
Acres of rye sown for harvest 1913,
1329;bushels of rye produced, 21,120;
acres sown for harvest 1914, 916.
Acres of buckwheat sown for har
vest 1913, 63; bushels of buckwheat
produced, 702.
Acres of oats sown for harvest
1913, 24,789 jbushels of oats produced,
,829,283; acres (estimated) sown for
1914, 23,775.
Acres of spring barley sown 1913,.
55; bushels spring barley produced,
1,291; acres of spring barley sown for
1914, 69.
Acres of corn planted 1913, 23,038;
bushels of corn (shelled) 1913, 760,
602; acres planted (estimated) 1914,
22,305; acres unhusked corn in field
Feb. 1, 1914, 145.
Acres ensilage corn planted 1913,
2,055; acres planted (estimated) 1914,
1,846.
Acres broom corn planted 1913, 7;
pounds brown brush produced 1913,
&
Acres sugar corn planted 1913, 22;
tons of sugar corn produced, 1913, 33.
Acres tomatoes planted 1913, 1;
bushels tomatoes produced, 1913 405.
Acres Irish potatoes planted 1913,
3,364; bushels Irish potatoes produced
1913, 289,444; acres (estimated) for
crop of 1914, 3,142.
Acres of onions planted 1913, 412;
bushels of onions produced, 1913, 49,
240. Acres in grass (other than clover)
1913, 31,094; tons of hay produced
1913, 36,920. '
Acres clover grown 1913, 10,386; j
tons of hay produced 1913, 13,063;
acres plowed under for manure, 107.
v Acres of alfalta grown In 1913, 83;
tons of hay produced, 165. i v
Tons of hay (all kinds) stacked in
1913, 708.
Acres of . tobacco planted in .1913,
65; pounds of tobacco produced, 85,
670. Number of creameries 191S, S.
Number of cheese factories 1913, 3.
Number of milk condenseries 1913,
Number of silos 1913, 228.
Acres occupied by peach orchards
1913, 32; bushels produced by peach
orchards, 340.
Acres occupied by pear orchards
1913, 18; bushels produced by pear
orchards 955.
Acres occupied by cherries 1913,
16; bushels produced, 255;
Acres occupied by plums 1913, 10;
bushels produced, 450.
Acres occupied by other fruits' 1913,
39; bushels produced, 1,523. -
Number acres cultivated, 1913,
129,520; number of acres arable,60,
889 number acres in timber, 25,325;
number of acres orchard, 3,207; num
ber acres lying yaste, 2,430; total
number of acres owned, 221,389.
Number horses owned in February
8,285; beef cattle owned in February
1914, 193; milch cows owned in Feb
ruary 1914, 10,483; all other cattle
owned in February 1914, 4,944; total
number cattle owned in February
1914, 15,620.
Number sheep owned February
1914, 12,758; number killed by dogs
1913, 324; value 1913, 11,207; injured
by dogs 1913, 111; estimated damage
by injury 1913, 257.
Number of cidar mills 1913, 6.
Number of dairies (4 or more cows)
1913, 1,289.
Number of gallons milk sold 1913,
1,350,443.
Pounds of butter made in home
dairies 1913, 449,493.
Pounds butter made in factories
1913, 566,165.
Pounds cheese made in home
dairies 1913, 1,320.
Pounds cheese made in factories
1913, 352,744.
Number of maple trees from which
sugar or syrup was. made 1914, 183,
160; number of pounds of sugar,10,
120; number of gallons of syrup, 27,
743. Number of bee hives 1913, 513;
pounds of. honey, 19,140.
Pounds of fertilizer used 1913, 11,-
064; estimated pounds . used, 1914,
9,796,600, : f
i Acres occupied by orchards (apples)
1913, 8,081; bushels produced (apples)
63,049; No. acres planted in apples
1913, 10. , . ,
i Number of pounds wool shorn 1913,
99,253.
Total number hogs owned February
1914, 11479; number hogs for sum
mer markets 1914, 4,617. v
LITCHFIELD
w tti i yt i-i.; - ci ;a.v
i miss neien nu xatitue ouuui vis
ited over Sunday at the home of Miss
Maud Lawrence at Mansfield.
Rev. Williams of Texas will occupy
the. Congregational pulpit Sunday
morning, Aug. 23. Mr. Williams is a
i son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. T. ' B.
Starr.
Several of the Litchfieldites are
attending the fair at Wellington and
North Randall this week. x..
Esther and Ellsworth Swanker are
spending some time visiting friends
in Cleveland.
The second division of the Congre
gational Ladies' Aid society, will give
a "Jubilee" supper in the park on
Saturday evening, August 22, if the
weather is favorable, otherwise it
will be held in the town hall. Supper
10 cents.
The new furniture store is being
treated to a new coat of paint, which
improves the looks of the town.
. Mrs. George Chapin is visiting in
Lagrange.
E. B. Rice and family, A. B. Can
field and wife, spent the week-end in
Akron.
Dell Eaken and wife ' entertained
company from Sharon Sunday.
tion is to make better citizenship, and
even if the trained woman does get
married or goes into other work, she
is better fitted lor managing her own
household, or doing that which she is
called. In other words she is a better
citizen for her education."
Ohio schools also benefit by her
special, training during .the ..time . the
trained teacher is employed by them,
he declares. - '3 V. "
CONVENTIONS TO BE HELD
NEXT WEEK
FORTY PER CENT MARRY
bushels of seed produced 1913, 2,868; 367,542; cost of fertilizer used, $123,
The fact that 40 per cent, of the
women teachers who drop out of the
Ohio schools each year do so to marry
is no argument against the special
training of teachers by the state in
the opinion of President H. B. Will
iams of the Bowling Green state nor
mal school.
"Every five years the teaching
force of the women in northwestern
Ohio changes," he declares. "And 40
per cent of the dropping out of the
teaching service Is due to marriage.
But admitting the teaching life of the
woman is only five years, I contend
that the state has not lost anything
The acknowledged aim of all educa-
The coming state conventions of
the Democratic, Republican and Bull
Moose parties next week hold the at
tention of state politicians. These
conventions will adopt the platforms
on which the state candidates will
make their fights for office this fall.
There will be between 300 and 400
delegates to each convention as fol
lows: All state candidates except ju
dicial; candidates for the state legis
lature; members of state excutiva
and central committees; and chair
men of central and executive com
mittees. Prolonged debates are . eliminated
by law. The statute says that plat
forms must be made public by Thurs
day night or two days after the con
vention convenes.
There is much speculation as to
what stands the different parties will
take on the state-wide prohibition and !
woman suffrage fights now on in the i
Ohio.
Democrats are expected to "stand
on their record." and dare the op
position to take off any of the laws
written on the statute books by the
present administration.
H. 'WAITE
Funerals Director
and
i s" TV fUfj
Embalmer
North Side Public Square Office Phone 4080
Mr. Lawrence W. Jeffrey of West
Salem, who was married on the 15th
to Miss Bernice E. Wiley, was re
cently elected first principal of the
Homerville centralized schools for the
coming year.
APPLICATION FOR PAROLE
NOTICE is hereby given that W.
Schemp a prisoner now confined in
the Ohio Penetentiary, has been re
commended to the Ohio Board of Ad
ministration by the Warden and
Chaplain as legally eligible to a hear,
ing for parole. Said application will
be set for hearing on and after Oc
tober 6th, 1914. 51-3
THE
Of -
A car of Hocking Valley Nut.
The price will be the same as last year, $4.10 per ton.
61
liedina 6oal
Phone 1171
SAMUEL ADAMS
Candidate for Sheriff on the Repub
; lican ticket,
was born in Medina and educated in
the public schools. Has lived in Me
dina county all his life except about
four years in Akron in the employ of
the C. A. Collins Carriage Co., and
the Whitman Barns Manufacturing
Company.
A carriage blacksmith by trade.
The schooling of practical things that
MUST BE to live and keep straight
with the world together with a de
termination for success in life and he
ft man among men, to be respected
and trusted in any way that business !
or duty might call, are the qualifica
tions I offer as a subject for your con
sideration and ask for your support '
at the November election. i -
i And should I be elected I will prom
ise you the services of a man ; and
officer to the best of my ability for
the people. ,
' Respectfully yours, ,
' Wtf. Samuel Adams.
VhWhWhWWhWhWWhWhVhVwV
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First Installment of the Thrilling Serial Story
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Present
Euro?
pean
War, by the I
WarO
lalme
From 1900 to 1905 Mr. Palmer saw service in the Central and SoutK American and the .Macedonian
insurrections. With the breaking out of r;teen Japan and tEussia lie joined the : firat :JJjapilee
army in the fielC
only correspondent who saw active service wi
the Turkish revolution of 1909, and was witt ' the Bulgarian army throughout the Balkan war of 1912-13.
In addition to this active career as war corresdondent Mr. Pamer has circled the globe with Admiral
Dewey, and again with the American battleship fleet in 1907-8. He is familiar with every capital of
Europe, and has a personal acquaintance with a very large number of prominent European government
officials and military and naval commanders.
Mr. Palmer is now at the front reporting the present war for the papers he represents, and is wit
nessing the fulfillment of the prophecy contained in his notable story, uThe Last Shot.
BE SURE TO READ THE OPENNING CHAPTERS
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