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The enterprise. [volume] (Wellington, Ohio) 188?-1899, February 13, 1889, Image 6

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THE KNYERPKTSR NVKDSMbAY. KttlWA RV 1, 18H9.
THE ENTERPRISE.
4, H.ttITU, Prostrletni. '
WELLINGTON. OHIO.
JIM O' ourN.
He's r si ' tlx month old, is Jim
Jam k Catu II C'lnv Won oo, Viol's h'm .
An t.mii . I oo hl raw, 11 s y
B i ooii, Hi-; liliolics' litt o 1 mi)
Ye'vu ft: u (or many a da?.
They n'.n't n iny of h s s 20,
Hon got 1 oi h known' sort o' eyes;
An" w'o-i ,vo talk o( Wet, I "!nw
His to .r 1: a tal;0 a r-o' ful i'so
Bp-iijoul'n twenty you kiuiikow.
Four's a IU-- lios tu-. tt Oo beat
Tho bu:;j, tho way tbot rv.nt U!n eitl
Tou'd Oo yo iroo I Wr see lilra ait
A pro' , tut 1 000 o' mud; n' moat
An' cuawn'.; ilow.i ev y lustcs- bit!
Yo don't hetrti lt n orslefl ni nkht
I'm -m! luVJes' so pwrt ' br gut
Wo--U or iu, ly 'M cj d tcr stay
Awaao an 1 acii U:m rou.id till light;
Ha won'. Lev things no other way.
An' i t t ! yo ou -liter hvcair h.m bawl
Wen ho dm't (t t b wi.y tliot'i ullt
An' k:ci, un' screen, an' hold b brent,
An' tur 1 r. lit Mick, an' p toil un' muul .
T.ll you Ji s b n plumb in. yorso'f.
I nln't no ? ft nt r onli'n' fa'r,
Ent hyciv's It 0 natter plu a 'n' squat
K rol In' i)H n lojr kfrt ft,'
'F ye u.m fr eo a u auv, thur
Is 0110 ilo B by ro ni ToU'ver's Lte't.
L:it Ui'ilir-McUlueox Putt
ALLEN GRAY;
-an.
Tie ESl2Kos Point
IT JOHN B. MU3ICK.
ATJTrmni V'.M.TEiin,'OWpir.t,n." "Hrus
LauujaV "Uankeh or niioronD."
A..U OlIIKJ BTOnlLi
Copyrig ttci, y (U A. X. Kc'Jojg Airu-
pip r loimcnt).
cn,i'T::n xv.-covrrsunD.
But Ai!cn l's:d hchooh d hxisolf to bear
his sufferings without a word of complaint,
and next morning w.is in his vulco as usuoL
During his ul!cnco another iisuo of the pa
per bud been published and circulated. Ilo
sat down at liis desk anil lxiccl over his
mull. Thcro were a fow unimportant lot
tors, one or Iwj from old acquaintance,
congratuUiMn:; him on the success of his
entcrprUo.
Asniilecui'li -Jthcllpof tho editor as he
tbonirht ho'.v fur from success this vonture
tn the nc .vspaiier ltUHinnss had come. To
all lnquiri.'a about his ubsenco ho answered
that ho lu 1 bejp suddenly culled away on
business. Nut a word of his strungo ad
venture did ho breaths to any 0110, and
tboso who saw laa young mun sitting so
calm and b.isinc i liho ut Ills dosk never
dreamed that ho l.uf come so near losing
his life only i'ic ni;?lit beforo ut tho hunds
of ths mti.'jr of tli)Htouo hoj30on tho hill.
"Backusuin, uro your" said Miss IIop
kinA, with u fuuilooti her shriveled fuco. "I
am so giud you have come, for I roally think
I havo a pern 1 f a v:;n this timo."
" What is tho tiller Alien united. ,
u Lavc'o ,vu 11," the old maid
answered.
"Very tou sling indeed," said tho o'ltor,
with becoiuin;; gravity, partially uncon
scious of what ho was saying.
" Oh, sir, I havo shed tears over It," staid
the anclont maiden, cnt husiast ically. "It
was Into in tha cvonwrf, and tirod of the
tolls of the day I had retired to rest, and
as I lay on my bed thinking what I could
do to advance tho interests of the nvrn
JirpubUl am t: ways thinking of you"
she parenthetically added, looking very
tenderly ut h'.ui "I was suddenly seized
with a desire lo wrlto. I bcliovo yos, sir, I
verily bclievo that a voice called on me to
write that poem. Tho voice of fume"
' Please road It, Miss Hopkins." No ed
itor In his sober senses ever asks un author
to read his or her productions, so tho reader
can ImuTine how duxperate was tho condi
tion of Allen Gray.
Now, Mr. Gray," said the old maid, with
feeble attempt at a blush which failed,
however, to appear on her powdered check,
"do not say it is splendid unless you really
think so. Yoj uro such a person to flatter,
especially younj girls."
Allen was too deeply, too painfully an
noyed by tho complications iu which he
found himself to observe tho coquettish
manner of the poetess, and with no other
"LOVE'S TOt'NO IiRfAM," SHE ANdWEHKU.
object than gratifying an ambitious writer,
be abstractly said:
"You wrlto oxcollont poetry, Miss Hop
kins." " There, I knew It"
" But lot me hear your poem."
Bhe unrolled her manuscript and pro--ceeded:
i)vns youno imriAM.
ur miss u-.rrnr norKi:;a
" Bo jtoud, s Rallant, bruro ar.d fair.
Dark jmy cyi-s and au orn ba r,
Hweetost ireasuro ovor kaown.
Oh, ray lor Ml oil?, wart tbou my own I
Would y )U aK ina bera to tall
When Uint 1 Jr -umcd of love s sweet spoilt
sHbould jju us : ma bow I know
Thut t'llk liourt wuh lora doth llowf
- I would nnswr, I Simula say
Oa JB t ha n y, got .on day, (
Wken tbo vS caarmad eyns Orst saw
That ona whoso w.ll shall ba my law.
"Co tbeu, te the song biros, ,
Cpasli to thrm of love.
Boar It wti svor:d in iba wlads
Or tha cooing 1 f ha dovo "
Allen, whose mind had really not been
on the poem more than half the time, here
asked bor to whom she alluded.
"Oh, I won't tell," she 1 answered, and
another blush made a desperate effort to
struenle through the rouge on tier cdook.
"Now I don't believe I will road any more
' to you."
' ; "Leave It with ma."
"Oh. not for the'world." '
"Itnn't vou Intend to have it published!"
be asked, beginning to wondor why the bad
taken up so much of his time. 1
'No, no," she answered, holding the preo
Vrua tnanusciipt dose to her heart For
' !
moment Vie gnsed M her In astonishment,
and then, boforo he wua awure of what bo
was doing, roinarltod!
"You are a very remarkable girl."
Evidently putting a wrong construction
upon his worda and manner, she gasped:
"on, aon t.: ' .
Although Alloa had road the history of
that unfort.unnto gentleman, Mr. Pickwick,'
yet so much was he nbtoi'bod In tho mys
tery or Turicys ronit that. 110 bad only
given u Boundary thought to tho poom, and
still lea to tuo conduct or 1.10 authoress,
and wuul'y fuilod to dlscoTcr tho matrimonii
altwuiic.o tu iior oyn. and was not caring to
pro ong tuo m.omow. uomiid:
Very wc.l. Urns Llopuinu. If you do not
wlah mo to unoyour boom I will not Insist."
"Oh, woil. then, you may havo It, but I
wouldu't givo it to another pornou on
earth," said llins Hopkins, handing him tho
dolicato liuio roll of auuusonpt.
Are you partial to publlshoi'sl"
Oh, hu h! ' tad thu time thoblushmnn-
tt'jcd to wah its way through. lt Is difll
ciilt to tell how fur i ho would havo gone,
for Miss Ilop'ains win arriving at an age
'hat mt'es it woman unxious to many,
desperates had thoy not boon Intorruptod
by a sunnier.
It was u uiau. boluiug up tho li-outoi ms
flapping broad brim bat with one hand,
"I WAST TEB, HEE THE EPITl'U."
while tho other held a horsc-wbipof tho
Uiickt'iakt kind.
" Vhar's tho cdilur!" ho roared, In a voice
of tbjm-cr.
"Oh. dear!'' screamed Miss Lecthy Hop
kins, in a paroxysm of fear, springing up
from tho chair whoro oho had been sitting
and golting ready to faint
"Whar's tho cditurl" the stranger again
yelled, bringing down ona foot with astump
thatmado tho building ring. "Show me
thut or cditur, 1 say whar's tho editurl"
"Oh, don't don't please don't,"
scrciuiiad Miss Hopkins, to whom a golden
opportunity now seemed to open, bhe
could immortuhzo herself and gain the love
of this publ.shcr at tho same timo. This
was tho InV'nciblo mn'.i with the horsowalp,
como to demand sali.uucti n of tho editor.
Everybody lias heard of "tho muu with tho
horsewhip;" many ctiitors have formed his
acquaintance und lt Is useless to suy that
this individual is thought by many to be an
indispcusubie chock to editors.
"Cit out 0' my way, gal whar s the ed-
iturt'' roared ho ot the horsewhip, dancing
lu bis fury.
'Oh, don't, don't, don tl" screamed Miss
Hopiuus, wringing her bands and falling
upon her knce3 bcioro tno enraged counlry
niali. " Oh. snaro him; sparo him this time;
for my salio sparo hira I"
"I won't do it, I won't. Whar's the ed
iturl I'm er goin' to hosswboophiui,l don't
kocr cf it's at a funeral."
Allen, who had boon standing cool and
apparently unconcerned over since the ar-.
rival of this stormy stranger, now spoko up
for tho first timo."
" Wo wiil excuso you, Miss Hopkins," be
said, as ca'mly as if some ordinary matter
was under discussion. " 1cuve mo with this
man; ho undoubtedly ba some business to
transact."
" Ye bet 1 hov. It's important, too, an'
I'm anxious to git at It"
"wo will excuse you, Miss Hopkins."
"Oil, I will faint!"
" Get out lu the open air and you will
fool bettor."
" But, oh. dear, I am so afraid"
" No one Intends harming you excuse
me. but I must bo alone for a short time."
Ue opoLcd tho door as ho spoke and Miss
Hopkins, sobbing and simpering, left the
office.
"Bo seated, sir," said Allen to the in
furiated furmor, who stood somowbat
amazod that the editor did not quake and
tremble before him.
" I want to see the cditur," he bawled.
" You shall see him, but thore is no need
for you to be In such an extraordinary
hurry Be seated."
With a growl something very much like
an oath, the man threw himself into m
chair, and Allen, with amazing coolness,
asked:
" Now, sir, what do you waut to see the
editor fori"
" I waut to wear out this hosswhoop on
him," roared tho enraged husbandman,
bringing tho whip with a savage whack
down upon the dosk. "I am mad; I tell ye
I am mad, and when I git riled I oat mount
ains." " You are mistaken, sir; you are not half
so mad as you think," Alien coolly re
marked. "Tell ne why you aro mad I"
"That piece -that piece in yer papor about
mo that I misrepresented, slandered and
lied on Sam llorrin 'bout tho corn knlfo."
For tho llrst timo Allen now recognized the
enraged mun as Oeurgo Lccpor, bis formor
correspondent from Billy's Creek.
" ell, Mr. I-eeper." said Allon, folding
hi arms vory quietly, "there was a mis
understanding between us on that matter,
you know you told mo it was all a harmless
Joke, wbilo Hum llorrin says it was a ma
licious slander."
"Haralird!"
"Well, he Is tho uiai you want to see
then. I published your representation of
the matter: und, at his request, published
bis, which was only just and right that the
public may draw their own conclusions.
Now, as to tho editor for whom you are
looking, you met him on your former visit,
and he ba not changed so much that you
need fail to rocognizo hlin. But 1 really
think tho proper thing for you and Ham
Horrln to do is to sottlo your dispute with
yourselves and not be dragging them into
the newspapors."
Having given this wholesome advice, the
editor cooly turned to his desk and began
writing. For several minutes Ooorga
Leo per sat glowering about the office like a
battled tiger; then rising, he said:
" I want my paper stopped." .
" 1 your subscription paid I " Allon asked,
taking up a large book and opening It
" I paid half a dollar on it, an' 1 ewa'r I
won't pay a uutber cent I don't want yer
paper any more, nulher.
" It's against all rules to stop a paper un
til the subscription Is paid lu full." .
Allen went ou writlnir as if the violent
dancing and cursing at his back did not dis
turb biiu. This subsided in a moment and
he beard lie ring of a sliver dollar on the
dosk at which he wus writing, the door
slammed spitefully, und the man wltbj the
horsewhip was gone. A torrlble noise with
out shortly af uorwurd attracted tho editor's
attention. Uo looked through the window '
and snw a man leaping, dancing and yelling
on a hill-top about a hundred paces nwny,
swearing lie. was the boat man on dirt. It
wua tho man -with the horsewhip from
Billy's Crook.
cnU'VEU XVt'
A DI'.3PK ATP. DETEUU1NATI0S.
Alien smilod. Tho man from Billy's
Crook had culti'f od his Ul-tempor until
howasonublodtoily into a passion on tho
llrrhtost notice. Somo men do thin, appar
ently, for no otbor roason than to make
themselves miserable.
Growing tirod of tho silly follow's antics,
the editor turned to his dosk and tried to
bury himsolf in his business. But notwith
standing tho many exciting and ludicrous
events, his ramd wns not wuo'.ly won away
from tho mystery whiclj soom j j to bo real
ly blightlug his lifo, aud kept hiu thoughts
from businoas. In hi busiest moments,
nm;d tho moat exoiting ovonto,tho cry: "In
Heaven's narao spare him I" rang on his
cpr. Tho swoot, sad faco of tho mystic
girl, whom ho could not but lvo. seemed
always beforo h'm, pleading with Lor large
blun eyes for roliof.
"Whoaroyouf Who are you 1" ho nskod
himself again and again as tho vision rose
be "ore hi i mnd. Ton thousand tormenting
ilonds scorned constantly aggravating him
with their doubts and fears.
"I will know tho worst" ho doclarod to
himself. " If I havo to board tho lion lu hia
den. I will know all."
Tho stranger from Billy' Crock was for
gotten, so wholly was Allen abnorbcd with
thoughts of tho stono houso on tho hill. The
rustic br.lly had grown weary with cursing
aud striking tho air, and, as no nuo seemed
to disputo his titlo to bo " tho best man on
dirt," ho loft tho village, to. carry to his
friends a wondorful story of how ho hod
mado tho editor quail.
Tho editor, meantime, sat in oblivion oi
his existence whoa ho was start od by
sob. Lcoltbg around, ho wan not a little
surprised to see Miss Lecthy Hopkins stond
iiig just within tho door.
" Why, Miss Hopkins, are you horol" the
wondering editor oskod.
" Ah, uro you hurU" she sobbod, hysteric
ally. " No' he answered, in astonishment
"Oh, I that is -sir -I was afraid that
violence had been done you," gasped Miss
Ilopkius, sinking Into a chair.
"I assurayou that I am uulnjurod."
" But ho looked so furious I"
" Tho Is littlo daugor in looks."
"And I hod such a dread of him."
" Ho Is gono now, and cas do you no in
jury," said tho cdiloi", misinterpreting tho
old maid.
" Oh, Mr. Gray, I -I would not have had
him Injuro you for tho world, and we wore
talking so pleasantly, too, when he came
in."
" 80 wo wore." returned Allen. " I be
lieve wo wore talking about tbe mystery of
Turloy's Point, wcro wo nott"
" Yo, no oh, you rogue, you know about
what we were talking," said Miss Lecthy,
wiping her eyes and blushing profusely bo
hind her handkerchief
If ho comprehended Miss Hopkins ho did
not pretend to, but in a cool, evon voico
aid:
" I was going to ask you something about
that old houso on tho hill."
" Don't you know It is a forbidden topic!"
" Yes, gonorally It is," ho answered, with
a sigh. " It is not every ono that I would
talk with on this subject but as wo have
occasionally exchanged conddenco on other
subjects, wo might on this."
"Oh. of course " Hbo managed to blush
quite profusely now, and coyli pinching at
tho folds of hor dress, gnthorod them down
into narrow plaits. - ' "
"I thought you would bo willing to toll me
all you know about tho matter."
"Oh, yos."
Bho sigbod and gavo him a glanre from
tho eornor of hor oyes.
" W hat Is tbo namo of tho man who live
in tho stone houso!" Allen asked, without
noticing hor look or making an effort tc
translate it
"Some say it's Colllns.but bo has a great
big French name, something liko Do Col
liour, which they say Is his real namo, and
that ho took the namo of Collins In place of
it because it is ca3ior to pronounce."
"How many bavo they in family at the
rock house!"
"That is very difficult to ascertain. Borne
say thore are several, others thut there are
not many. Thoy have a good many servunU,
but talk French, no one can find out
any thing from them."
"Did it never strike you that there Is 1
great deal of romance about this singularly
mysterious old bouse on tho hill?"
"Yes, sir, it has," she answered; "and I
believe that it would be an excellent theme
for a story."
"It might What do you know of lt!"
"Oh, not much."
"How long hav? you known that tall,
dark-whiskered man I"
"I don't know him at all"
"You mean you havo no formal acquaint
ance!" "No, sir."
" How long since you first saw hunt"
"Three or four years ago."
" Had he boon here before thut tlmol"
" I have heard that he had. He has been
living at tho old stone houso on tho hill at
short poriods, for sevoral yean."
"I bollove you said that a young lady
was once socu within those walls!"
"Yes, sir; that was only a fow months
ago. I bavo heard that she was seen again
within the last few day. Horn ono discov
ered bor sitting on a rustic seat beneath an
old oak, at a spring on tho hillside, between
tbe village and the rock bouse."
"Who Is shot"
" No one knows. B'.:o seems to be tn ad
ditional mystery. It is generally supposed
that sho Is tho daughter of tbe dark
whlskored master of tbo stono house."
"She has no resemblance to blra what
ever," Interposed Allen.
"You nave soon bor thou."
" From tho description I have had of bor,
he has no rosemolunce to him."
" No; yet parents and children are some
times very dissimilar."
" Do you think she has lived there long!"
"No, sir, she can not have been there
nioro than a few months at most" o
wered Miss Hopkins. "Bhe was never
een about tho place until recently."
"Have you over heard of any children
being seen or heard there!'
"No,lr." .
" Do you think there are any!"
" There are none. They would find lt im
possible to keep a child within those great
wall so quint and sllont that it would not
be seen or beard by somo one," answered
the school-teacher.
"Does that dark-whiskerod man make
frequent trips away!"
"I suppose bo does-it i seldom, bow
ever, that any ono evor sees him go away or
come back. For weeks at a time he 1 not
sen, and then we know he is away from
the old bous on (lie hi 1L Then all of a sud.
den he ia discovered walking about the
big house, or even coming to the village,
but making the acquaintance of no one.
Home peoplo think that he is the chief of
banditti and goes away to his rendexvous
occasionally. Then there Is an old mother
Tiffin wbo believeatn witchcraft. f?ho says
he Is a wizard, and that tho strange sight
soon and stran;;o voices heard there so
o''en nre tho result of his wild incanta
tions und invocation of tho evil spirit. I
havo beard pooplo say that they havo heard
screams, shrieks and wild, domoniao-laugh-tor
from within that old house, which al
most fro.te tho blood in their veins."
Allon, haviivr witnessed somo of those
strango sights and hoard somo of those
mystorious nohca, did not think that she
was cxaSToruting thom In tho loast. But
his strong common. uon:W told hira that there
was nothing suprnutural in all ho hod seen
Bn(jhoaia lt coulll uu bo very ca-.i'.y ao-
counted for if properly undoratood. Ho was
not so much intcroutcJ in tho houso und the
mysterious r.:ati and sounds omunatlng
from lt as in tho bountiful, mysterious
Bertha.
t'Do you lmow any thing of the young
lady!'' ho asked.
"No, sir," r.!:o nnswerod, curtly, while an
oxpres3ion flitted over hor faco which he
could not imdnratir.nl, unless It was a tlngo
of joalous fear
"Did yon ever hnr nny thing about her!"
"Onlv wlist I have told you," sho an
swered, "fiiao has nos-or been seen but
twico."
HocouU have to'.d mivh moro of tho great
stono houno on tho hill than nny oao know
had ho choso to do so, but he dolcrmincd to
keen his counsel tohimsoj.
Tho convcraalion bc-wn to drug, and as It
was gro-.vinj lata, and nho considered tho
young editor fi-ea from any further dnngcr
at present, Hiss Ijalhy Hopkins loft the
o31co. Allen's faco wai convulsed with
montal an jur.h, and, striking his desk with
his fist ho said :
" This has gono far enough. Bo lt lifo or
death, miacrv or happiness. Heaven or hell,
1 will probo that myntory I will know nil
boforo another sun rhoa. I will go to the
tall stranger und demand im explanation,
oven If ho shoots mo dead on hia door-step.
Death ia prai .'r.'. jlo to nnot'aor night of mis
erv uud do:;! it ' .
. With tbiad'v.iyjni'o resolve fresh on his
Hps and onraven in his heart ho seised
his hat, atid Icivin Toby to closo the ofllce.
left the viila.ro uad burr: 1 up theold disused
road to tho great stono houso cn tho nllL
rilAPTISB XVII.
HOW TCIII-EY'S POINT DKIfK.VTEU IIKHSEMF.
When Allen G:"a roac'.icd tho houso on
the hill, imteai of gom1? uro.ind It 03 ho bad
done on former occasions, ho walked direct
ly up to tho groat front gato and tried to
enter it; but it was locked.
His llr.it thought wai to scalo tho wall,
which ho could have dono by going to the
roar, but seeing a servant in tho front yard
ho culled to him.
" I want lo soo your master," ho said.
Tho servant, who understood somo En
dish, shook his head, saying:
"Zo laouniour gono zo monsieur gone.
Mousiour 110 como no como !u jaur mon
sieur 1" And 1 urnbg n'uo'Jt wont away.
AUcu waited a l:i wailo at tho gate,
hnpingha waalii m o:ao 0110 else to whom
ho could appeal. D.trltiiosa cutno over the
earth, and he was ut last forced to leave.
Blowly und sadly ho tnrcod uhjut and weul
down tho hill, his head bowed iu thought
"Afier all, 11:1 1 not a fool!" ho said." Why
need I caro! What can she bo tn mo;" But
it was Tolly for hi'.n to attempt to drivo hei
Imago from his nind; it had boon indoliblj
tumped upon his heart and could never b
effaced. Sho had boon no coqttotto soekiug
conquests; sho had mado no advance noi
ovuiccd nuy bolJnoas, even when visiting
him by night to havo him Like the litteboy
to Froncbtowu.
I TO PK CONTINUED.
CULTIVATING THE FEET.
An Expert Tells How Tliey Can Be De-
vrloiM-d Inlo an ArlaUx mtlc Mhupe.
Aristocratic foot may bo cultivated,''
remarked a fashionable shoe-dealer th
other day as ho bundled a pair of fifteen dol
lur French-heeled shoes in his fitting parlort
on Sixth avenua
"You tako the grandchild ron of suet
plebeians as Juy Gould and old Commodore
VandcrbilV- and they all have beautiful
foot," be contiuuod; "it's all a matter ol
shoos, bathing, stockings and care of Uu
foot
How sol Well, tako one of the Vander
bilt Ri-uudchililren or George Gould's baby,
for instance. Tho child's foot from its birth
aro carefully attended, bathed daily and
only tbo bost kind of shoes aud tho finest ol
stockings put on it
" Then for children jitst wnlklnfr we make
shoe with an instep improver -that is, thi
outer sole and heel aro mado a trifle hlg'ioi
than at tho insido of tho foot. This tends
to cultivate a high and can ed instep."
' But isn't such a shoo uneomfortabler
was asked.
" Not in the least. Wo have ladiea near
middie ago who come in hore and get fitted
for such shoes. Of course when the bones
are hardoncd It is not so easy a matter U
cultivate a high lnston, but most childron'i
feet may bo trained, so that even tbe flat
test lnstcn will become Improved.
"Tho difficulty with many parents Is 1b
selecting shoes that are just tho length ol
their children's feet," continued tho learned
shoedcalor. Now there Is nothing mort
Injurious to tho shape of the foot than a
short shoe. People of weallb soon learn
this, and, while tho narrowest possible
width Is choseu, tho shoo is always an inch
loneer than tho foot.
'Children who are permitted to walk oi
run about much need not have largo foot
Tho sec-rot is to bat ho tho feet each night In
warm water and ouch mnrninz In cold
water and a littlo suit, rubbing vigorously.
Then, if flno, darnloss stockings are worn,
and shoos that fit snugly without being
light, a beautiful foot Is sure to bo tho re
sult.
"Old shoes, shoes of different makers,
and shoes of various sizes aro more trying
to tho beauty of feet thun cither tight oi
narrow sho .".'. Y. MiurtuU.
"Can't you say something pleasant to
mot" said a husband to his wifo, as he was
about to start for his olllco. They had had
a little quarrel, and he was willing to
" moke lt up." ' Ah, John," responded tho
penitent lady, throwing ber arms around
his nock. " foraivo my foolishness I We
were both In tho wrong. And don't forget
tbe baiiy's shoes, dear, and the ton of coal;
and wo are out of potutoos ; and, John, love,
you must leave me some money for tbstgae-
man."
Yotxo women, if It bo truo that you can
only reach a man's heart through tho stom
ach, do no with pride in your skill as a
cook, offer your accepted lover, or prospec
tive husband that which may cast fatal
spell over all the coming years, Oivo him
cold poison, if you will, but' ne you value
your huppinoss and bis off or him no cold pie,
A an Instance ef the remarkable hlgb
steam pressures which are now adopted lo
flratrclass vessels, there is a stoamshlp now
under construction in France, with boilers
to work at proasuro of 223 pounds par
square Inch, tho engines Ming oi tripio ex
pansion type. , j ,
Two.rnoMisiXT St. Louis men have en
gaged in litigation over the ownership of
duok valued ut twonty-flve cents. The pre
liminary suit mudo cost, m addition to at
torney foes, forty-eight dollars, and now
the ease has been taken 1a Uie circuit court.
': r r , U I'. '-' ' "'' J '.'. '
The Oldest Furniture Store in Town,
Having had 3(J competitors and still lives.
Furniture of all designs can be
had al our rooms
- . '! ; ... .'. ' :;. .
Undertaking attended to with the usual
promptness, accompanied by a Funeral
Director.
EE IHISTCr .A. SPECIALTY,
A G. & G. L. COUCH.
SPECIAL BARGAINS !
Now offered by
The West Side Grocer. ' "
Regular 60c Golden Syrup 42c per gallon.
Extra fine cooking Molasses at 60 & 60c per gal.
Case's clean sweep 40c Tobacco at 32c per lb.
The best flour in the world at ordinary prices.
The finest prizes with Baking Powder ever offered
Also Fresh Roasted Coffee, Fresh Oysters, Fresh
Groceries and Provisions of all kinds at the low
est living prices.
Goods Delivered Promptly in the Corporation.
DOIAND'S
Is tho best Cart in the market and will ride as
iasy with a boy weighing 25 pounds as a man
.veighing 250.
"BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER !
Druggist and Optician,
PnOTO-ALBUMS-Very Choice.
SCRAP BOOKS-A full Hha.
PAPETERIES In late
FINE STATIONERY and writing material.
NEW PUBLICATIONS, selected with reference to perma
nent value and to meet all tastes.
LIBRARY SETS-of standard works.
CHEAP BOOKS-A large assortment.
CYCLOPEDIAS aud DICTIONARIES.
FAMILY BIBLES, TEACHERS' BIBLES Oxford
and Bagger.
AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY,
TRATEl) BOOKS. POEMS in leather bindings. JUVEN
ILE BOOKS in great variety. Optical Goods, Art
Goods, Perfumery, Toilet Articles, and
DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES.
West Side Publio Square,
WELLINGTON, OHIO.
THE TORNADO IS KING.
THE TORNADO FEED AND ENSILAGE CUTTER.
Power Cutter with
A now invention for cutting,
nay, sirnw una unsnsafl.
of 1,VM) revuliiti,,.,. itr nili.-
.lie Torn
cut on this iiiHiiilntt Is not left
n pieces with
I Is thoroughly pulverized. Avoiding nil such
save one half your feed by using -a Tornado
special discount to the trade. Now Is tbe
LGKERg
'ISO. EWV
f-..'yl Doni wmATi. rovr mmr en
ioTr.1Ti 1rtf"fi imip", frf tjevrirtlv -
at living prices.
-
(Ie8ign8.
DEPOSITORY. FINE ILLUS.
Elevator Attached.
ting. sphttliiKand thoroughly disintegrating eorn fodder, and euttlnt
N1 In Sillitoreiit litis, fr nail baud slse, to a large Htearo
fnwrrslie. The only machine
thst thoroughly cuts and splits
eorn fodder, either husked or
unhiisked. Economy Is wealth.
It will payroll to cut vour fod
der on a Turnsdo. Cattle will
est It up entlmlv elean, thus
saving much wsste, besides
avoiding trnuhlrsonie enrolled
corn sulks lu the manure pile.
The following cut below repre
sents our Cutting Cylinder.
whlnh tan hji ni n ti n ... m mnmA
Ado the fastest nitter In tha world. Fiutrinr
sharp corners or edges, to csuse sore month, but
danger. Atrial will convince you tbat ton can
Cutter the only perfect cutter In the market.
time to srrsngn for territory. Write for Catalogue
miifiBcst
root coat
ETufKaic.
ft rn or nwtr tmt HmFIRR UKANDftUCKWil
ttnanoow.mnd will kap jrm jrr la Ui ItardMl ioni.
IV auoiBa ftnJ tok mi masm
Uinciist; M A J 1 II W H R Jfl Fin

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