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The enterprise. [volume] (Wellington, Ohio) 188?-1899, December 22, 1897, Image 7

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WAR REMINISCENCES.
AT SHADY RILL.
An Incident of Railroading anil Bnih
ehnckln In 18UX
All day the train had been waiting at
Shady Rill for orders. Once in awhile
the engineer would ask the brakeman
to cut him off, and he would race up
and down the track in order to "pump
her," for there were no injectors on
the locomotive in' 18G2. All day the
conductor sat in the caboose, where
an operator was working, expecting or
ders to back away, for the Johnnies
were getting the better of the Yanks.
Once, when the engineer'went down
the track into the pine forest, he saw a
band of bushwhackers riding leisurely
through the wood in the direction of
Shady Kill. These were not men of the
north nor yet of the south. They were
marauders, murderers, masquerading
as soldiers, and equally dangerous to
each army. The engineer told the con
ductor what he had seen, and', 'taking
a couple o? muskets and one of the
brakemen, the captain put himself into
the wood tank and set out to hunt the
bandits. , It was an odd way to go to"
work, but the conductor considered it
better than remaining at the run to
be plundered, if not murdered by the
band. - The bushmen must have heard
HELPED THE BRAKEMAN TO LIFT
THE LIMP FORM.
them, coming, for they were sitting on
their horses, still as statues, when the
old woodburner came creeping round
a curve, her linksend chains rattling
like a dray on cobblestones.
- "Halt!" cried the leader, and the en
cineer hooked her over.
"What do you want?" demanded the
conductor.
"What have you trot?" asked the
bushman.
The negro fireman must have seen
the humor of the man's reply, for he
poked, his head round the corner of the
cab and laughed a laugh that seemed
to come from the very bottom of his
bare feet. . .!
; "Fo de Lawd. dat am funnv." said
ithe negro, wiping his eyes.
'. "Nothing that you can have," said
;the conductor back at the bushman
I Immediately the negro opened his
jmbuth and began to ripple again, but
this time the flow of his mirth was
broken by the sound of muskets. Bang!
bang! went the guns of the marauders,
'and the negro, changing his laugh to
a cry of pain, fell upon the deck and
begged the brakemun to shoot him,
: "I's done killed. Fo1 de Lawd, I's
shot plumb f rew de ha't."
; "Then die, you crazy nigger," shout
ed the brakeman; "think I'm going to
waste a load on .vou?"
i When the conductor and the brake
man had emDtied their cuns at the
'gang, the engineer opened the throttle
'and backed away with the bullets rat
!tling on his front end -nnd smashing
the glass in, the cab windows.
, Upon arriving at Shady Rill they
jfound that only the tip of one of the
megro's fingers had been shot away,
jand when the engineer had bathed the
finger in black oil, bound it up -with
a rag,, and kicked the negro three or
(four times, the felow was able to take
V : n1nn. ,i 1. .I n .1
jjiauc ui me iuiuuv:c uuui.
' The conductor instructed the oper
ator to report what had taken place to
the army officer In charge of the rail
way, and then went over to the Shady
jRill plantation to warn the women
there of the coming of the bushwhack
jers. He had been over once or twice
if or supplies, which were given, if not
grudgingly, reluctantly, for how were
these poor women, whose fathers and
husbands and brothers were down
ithere where the steady, monotonous
(booming of ennnon spoke of danger and
jdeath, to smile upon the people of the
. inorth? These men were come.lnto the
;country, the women were able to per
'suade themselves, to toke the property
jof the people and lay country waste; bo
inow, when, the conductor lifted his hat
iln the presence of the venerable dame
'and her proud daughter, the women
idrew themselves up and looked down
'upon him from the veranda.
' "If they ah no'jthe'n soldiers, I reckon
.they can't more'n kill us, and if they ax
iiiouthe n soldiers thev ah sonthe'n gen
jitlemn, so we might bettnh take ouah
ichauofl with them than with you all.
who ah not soldiers at all.
"Neither are thesfe soldiers; they am
bushwhackers and. murderers. Come, I
'beg of you, let me help you to escape."
At that moment the sound of musket-
chard, nnd a moment later an old
white-haired wench came falling round
!the house, rolled tip the veranda stepi
'and threw herself at the feet of her
young mistress.
To' de Lawd, honey," she howled,
l"de wood fai'ly full. o' Yankees.
fought dey dun been bur folks, case dee
. dux.' hab on blue clos, but mlnit dat
fool Jim poke his head obeli de fence
an' shout: 'Git out dis veah o'chad
dee ail bang loose at him, an, fo' the
Lawd, dey dun tnk' he hea't out an' eat
'l right fo' my ole eyes."
A negro caii alwayste depended upon
to supply the details In an exciting nar
rative, and to fill in With biU of pathos,'
but the women, making due allowance
for the exaggerations of a frightened
negro, had no doubt that they were now
in great danger.
Shall we have time to dress, sub.?
asked the lady with a hauteur that.
nder the circumstances, was pathetic.
bo; fly for your lives, said the con-
uctor, for even as he spoke, he saw. a
couple of men riding under the apple
trees.
The women saw them, too, and.
throwing on whatever lay In reach in
the way of wraps, hurried over to the
train. The old negressstill telling her
etory, went with the two women and
helped them into the caboose. Now the
wo robbers who had ridden through
the orchard snw the trainmen and im
mediately opened fire. The conductor
nd the brakeman, walking backward.
kept the desperadoes back, killing one
of their horses. Just as the trainmen
reached the caboose the conductor was
shot and fell near the rail. The rest of
the band hnd come to the Rescue of
their comrades, and now the lead was
raining upon the 6ide of the car. The
brakeman, having dropped his gun.
tooped to lift the conductor aboard.
but he could not do it. Now this deli
cate young daughter of the south, see
ing the danger in which these men, her
enemies, had voluntarily placed them
selves for her sake and her mother s.
leaped to the ground and, with her
white hands that had never lifted any
thing heavier than a riding whip, helped
the brakeman to life the limp form of
the conductor into the car. while the
bullets rained around her. When they
had laid him upon the locker, the young
woman lifted his head and held it In her
lap, and so, as the engine backed away,
the conductor died. N. Y. Sun.
EPISODE OF THE WAR.
Last Night of a Southern Soldier on
the Battlefield.
"Don't leave me, captain I Oh, don't
leave me!" words that came to me
with an agonized shriek from a bleeding
and dying confederate soldier on the
evening of the. great battle of Malvern
Hill, July 1, 18C2. He. a mere youth of
17 years, lay in. a heap, gasping for the
breath which was fast leaving him,
along with the rays of sunlight, on that
sad and memorable day. I, for whom
that piteous cry was meant, was a staff
officer of the brigade to which the Lou
isiana regimemt, the soldier boy s regv
menit, was attached. ,
Well mounted, 1 was galloping back
across that bloody field to report the
duty I had performed, when suddenly
arrested in my course by the voice of
despair and woe, coming from my
stricken comrade. The day was fast
passing away into darkness, a darkness
that seemed to enshroud this valley of
death. The terrific cannonading on
both sides' that had lasted for hours
from the surrounding hiHs (Malvern
niil being the central point of attack
by the confederates) was supplemented
by the booming of artillery and burst
ing of shells from the guniboats on the
adjacent James river.
Nature seemed to revolt at this scene
of blood and carnage. Thunder and
lightning nnd an avalanche of raincame
in quick succession with such great
force as to cause the stoutest heart to
quake. This great battle was the
seventh, day s fight to capture the city
of Richmond. It) was not an ordinary
battles bu t a demon's fight, o,nd the final
encounter between these two giants of
war, Robert E. Lee and George B. Mc-
Clellan. It gaive the laurela of victory
to the southern, chief tabu bedewed with
the tears of broken hearts.
Without stopping to consider what I
alone, could do for the dying youth
amidst the chaos and increasing dark-
r.esiof the night that prevailed, I turned
back and dismounted, to keep a lonely
vlgile with the dead. My horse, which
strange to say, Kid seemed frenzied
with feor, became quiet and tractable
as though he. kniew there was safety
with his master. I called the boy, who
had swooned away from loss of blood
and was glad to know he was not dead
Giving him the bridle of my horse to
ALONE ON A BATTLE FIELD WITH
THE DEAD.
hold, I tore the sash from around my
waist to bandage his torn and bleediug
limb.
The boy was praying and called down
God's blessing on me. HI petition to
Heaven- seemed to be heard. The storm
of wind and ram, although stil high
was abating. Naught but the mourra
ful wail of the wind through the sur
rounding forest could now be heard
The great armies that had so lately con
rooted each other in battle array had
seemingly vanished from tbo scene I
was alone on a battlefield with the dead
Wet and dripping, with the chill of
night upon me, I wafted for morning
and he, too, the brave soldier boy, was
waiting for morning. Oh, God, will it
ever come.?
He clasped my hand with hope feud
confidence, itud seemed to be happy and
without pain. I believed he bad gone t
sleep. Morning came, and he was f
asleep asleep to wake no more.-Da '
son A, Blnnchard, in Washington Pii
LOOKS QUITE SUSPICIOUS.
Effort of Land Boomers to Invade Indlai
Lands Seems Like a Scheme to Gull tbi
Unwary.
Washington, ' Dec 21. Interior de
partment officials are watching the op
erations of the land boomers who, it is
alleged, are making arrangements to
enter the lands of the Wichita, Kiowa.
Apache and Comanche Indian reserva
tions in Oklahoma. A treaty for the
opening of the latter is now pending
before congress. Some of the litera
ture of the persons who are working
up the boom has been received at the
department in which commissions of
membership are offered for sale at the
rate of $5 each. They have been scat
tered broadcast throughout the coun
try. The agents are said to receive S3
for each member enrolled.
The opinion is expressed at the de
partment that the persons behind the
scheme have no idea of being permit
ted to occupy the lands, but that they
will, after interesting large numbers
of persons in it, cease operations. No
particular place of rendezvous for tne
proposed "sooners" is indicated in the
pamphlets received at the department.
The Indian agents have been warned
of the proposed movement and have
been directed to call on the military to
assist in preventing any forcible occu
pation of the lands.
PENSION FRAUDS.
Uncle Sam's Nephew Appear to be Rob
bing Him on a Gigantic Scale.
New York. Dec. 2L In an article
which occupies an entire page of the
Sun it is stated that the nation is being
robbed on a gigantic scale by pension
frauds. The rolls, it is stated, are
padded almost beyond belief. There
are more pensioners than Burvivors of
the war. Abusing the country's bounty
are deserters, fake widows and or
phans, cheats and swindlers of all
classes. Government reports show that
there are 727,100 survivors of the war
now living, including widows.
The total of pensions on account of
the war of the rebellion is, according
to the report of the pension commis
sioner, 947,543, of which 65,669 are
children and 27,559 are dependent
fathers, mothers, sisters or brothers.
Deducting these from the total, there
remain 854,114 survivors and widows
drawing pensions, or 40,745 more "sur
vivors" and "widows" than there are
actual survivors and widows, who,
under any circumstances, could legally
draw pensions.
The blame is put on shyster pension
lawyers, reckless legislation and swin
dlers, who turn to the pension business
as one offering easy profit.
AN ARMY OF IDLE MEN.
Nearly 100,000 Wage Earner In New
, York City are Out of Work.
New York, Dec. 2 L According to
the World, of the 237,850 workers in
this city, the records show that 92,075
are out pi work. Last year at tms
time 125,375 were idle. ,
Ernest Boehm, secretary of the Cen
tral Labor union, estimates that fully
100,000 persons are in enforced idle
ness now. xnis estimate is prooaoiy
very near the truth, for if to the 92,000
shown to be idle by the World's figures
be added the many clerks, bookkeepers,
accountants, etc., who are seeking
work, the total would surely reach
100,000.
Comparison shows that so far as the
number of unemployed is concerned
the situation is a marked improvement
over that of a year ago. More men by
the tnousanus are at work. This is
particularly true of men engaged in
the building trades. Within several
years there has not been so mucn
building as now. The increase of em
ployment has come for the most part
to skilled labor. The only striking in
crease in unskilled labor has been in
the ranks of laborers on streets and
for contractors.
CLAIMS FOR A MILLION.
Bering Sea Commissioners Find that Onr
Government Must l'ay English Subject
Large Sam.
Boston, Dec. 21. After a week of
conference in Boston, Justices Put
nam and King, the commissioners for
the United States and Canada, respec
tively, in the arbitration of the Bering
sea claims have nearly completed their
work and will soon report to their re
spective governments. An agreement
as to the amount of the indemnity
claimed has been reached in alt but a
few cases and these are likely to be
settled without the appointment of an
umpire.
The amount awarded to Great Brit
ain will be paid within six months of
the time when the final decision is
reached, whether it is made by the
two commissioners or by an umpire,
It Is understood that the total approved
claims will amount to more than 81,000,-
000.
Sued for S)100,000 Damages.
Cleveland, Deo. 2L The' Cleveland
Car Service association, composed of
all the roads entering this city, is made
defendant in a test case brought by a
number of produce shippers and mer
chants of Cleveland before the inter
state commerce commission. Damages
amounting to over 8100,000 are sought
to be recovered. The railroad com.
panics are charged with having dur
ing the past eight years violated the
inter-state commerce law by discriml
nating against small shippers, who say
they were charged 81 a day for every
dav that cars were leit unloaded on
the tracks, while big concerns were al
lowed to enjoy storage favors free of
charge.
Our Christmas Gift to Europe.
New York, Dec. 21. The Christmas
money order business of the New York
post office greatly exceeds that of any
previous year. The outgoing European
mall has practically been closed, but
the incoming mail from foreign coun
tries has just begun to arrive. Allot
the foreign money order business is
transacted through the New York post
office and a great mass of orders will
be handled here this week. Our Christ
mas presents to Europe, represented
by the money orders sent durinir the
first 18 days in December, wera 81,580,
830, in 140,903 orders.' ' '
INTERESTING OHIO NEWS
Gathered. By Telegraph from
All
Parts of the State.
Hunting for Errett's Murderers.
Cleveland, Dec 17. Conductor John
Errett, of Gallon, O. ; his son Harry, 15
years old, and lira Iceman .ban Dal-
glelsh were in a caboose of a freight
train, near Berea, Wednesday night
Three men entered and shot Errett
dead. Dalgleish escaped with a ballet
in his shoulder. The boy was unin
jured. Half a dozen men suspected of
being, implicated In the murder
were brought to Cleveland and were
taken to the central police station. No
charges were placed against any of the
men. Railroad detectives are hard at
work on the case. The Big Four has
offered 8500 reward for the capture of
the murderers.
No Lack of Ilanna Headquarters.
Columbus, Dec. 2L Hanna leaders
have secured three separate headquar
ters at the state capital. They will be
Lively nooks until after the legislature
baa elected its candidate for the United
States senate. (Senator Hanna him
self will be stationed in commodious
quarters at the Neil house. Howard
Burgess, of Cleveland, will do the
honors at the Chittenden j while Charlie
Leach, also of Cleveland, will take
care of other parties at headquarters
In the Great Southern hotel.
Solved the Tramp Problem.
Bowling Green, Dec, 10. The tramp
nuisance has been solved by the chief
of police of this city, and during the
past month only 25 tramps have made
application for lodging against 140 last
year during the same length of time.
Only two meal tickets were given out
during the month, for which the va
grants cracked stone. When a tramp
applies at a kitchen door for a meal,
he receives a ticket that is good at any
restaurant in the city, when signed by
a police official. '
Will Work for Ilanna's Election.
Cleveland, Dec. 18. The members of
the Republican Business Men's clnb,
who did great service for McKinley
during the campaign of 1890, will visit
Columbus in the , interest of Ilanna,
and will be present at the opening of
the legislature. The great majority
of the dub are Hanna men. A special
train has been chartered 'and will be
decorated with Ilanna banners. It is
expected that 600 business men will
descend on the legislators and work
for Hanna.
Indictments Against McDonald are Nolled.
Columbus, Dec. 17. Prosecutor J. H.
Dyer yesterday entered a nolle in the
120 indictments standing against VV. L.
McDonald, former state inspector of
shops and factories. McDonald was
charged with holding a rake-off of
about 50 'per cent of the expense ac
counts drawn for bis deputies. Evan
H. Davis, renresentative-elect from
Cuyahoga county, and Deputy In
spector Armstrong, of Cincinnati, were
among the chief witnesses against
McDonald.
i
' ' Richardson Is Acquitted.
Columbus, Dec. 18. Robert Richard.
son, oi Martin's t erry, cnarpea wun
impersonating a pension officer, was
acquitted yesterday ' in the United
Slates court by a jury. It developed
that Richardson had been arrested by
a man who impersonated a deputy
United States marshal and this had
much to do with Richardson's acquit
taa
Disastrous Collision,
Columbus. Dec. 17. A northbound
freight train on the Little Miami rail
way collided with a southbound freight
near West Jefferson yesterday. The
engines were badly wrecked, as were
also a number of cars. The trainmen
lurnned and saved their lives. The
wrecked cars contained hoes and
large number were killed.
Coal Combine In Cincinnati.
Cincinnati. Dec. 18. A coal combine
including all but two of the large coal
dealers of this city, has just been
formed with a capital of 84.000.00a It
is not the intention to advance the
price of coal, but it will be equalized
throughout the year by bringing from
the coal district vast quantities oi coal
during high water.
Mo Inaugural Ball.
Columbus, Dec. 2L There will be no
inaugural balL Gov. Bushnell con
eluded that it is not desirable, and in
timated to Judge G. H. Seward, chair.
man of the committee on arrange
ments for it that he wished it omit-
rorl. All arrangements made for It
have been cancelled.
Will Bar Out Union Men.
Lorain. Dec. 17. The Cleveland, Lo
rain & Wheeling Railroad Co. has an.
nounced that no union men will be em.
ployed upon the docks here next sea.
son. This action is taken on account
of the trouble the local union is said to
have caused.
DePeyster's Trial Deglns,
Canton. Dec 21. The trial of Wil
liam DePeyster on a charge of
dering his wife a few months ago was
commenced here Monday. The case is
attracting much interest He is ac
cused of throwing a lighted lamp upon
her.
Ore Handler Strike.
Conneaut. Dec. 18. Ore handlers are
nn a. strike here. The srang bosses
went to Erie and brought back 40 men,
Fridav inorninir they refused to work,
even under the protection of deputy
sheriffs. '
Treasurer and Money Missing,
Cleveland. Dec. 2L L. O. Hall, treas.
nrer of Boilermakers' and Iron Ship
builders' Union No. 6. is missing and it
is said that his accounts are several
hundred dollars short The matter
was reported Monday to M. G. Fox,
manager of the American Surety Co.
which is on Hall's bond. The surety
company will make good the shortage.
Death ot Mrs. W. K. Miller,
Canton, Dec, 2L Mr.W. K. Miller,
of the late Nancv Allison Mo
Klnlev. died Monday. , Her husband
died a few vears ago. She 'was . about
08 years o! age, and leave two sons.
EVERY WOMAN
sv nandi nlUbli. macthlr. reca-Unc medio) d. Only hsralt
pans drugs aheuld ben. 11 you wsnt Ux Ms. ri
Dr. Pears Pennyroyal PHIo
Th.T an pto-pt. nf a srUin In wsalt Ths i .Maine (Dr. ,','T.f1
,iU 6iat air irosrs. 11.00. Add- Pfc UuaoM a Cfc, ClOTsUnd, O.
For Sale by F. B. TISSOT, PRUCCIST.
17
tJ
For Sale by F. B. TISSOT, PRUCCIST.
BUSINESS CARDS.
PHYSICIANS.
III. MILLS. M. D. Omce over Near's
. druK store. South side W. Main street-
0lUce hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 2 to 4 p. m.; 7 to I
p. m. Residence, Courtland Avenue. Tele
phone No. 235. '
R HATHA WAY. M. D. Specialty ot ree-
tal, bladder and kidney diseases. Kee
tal diseases treated without pain or detention
from business. Diseases of the bladder treat
ed ouiy after a careful examination ot the
urine.
HOTELS.
HOTKL DE FOOTE. the leading hotel in
Wellington. New house. elegantly fur
nished; vas, steam, hot and coia water oatns,
good sample room. Livery and teed stable in
connection. Kates, $2,00 per day. South Main
street, opposite park. O. D. Foote, proprietor.
FEED STORE.
rRATT k HERRICK. flour and feed store.
r Tee delivery to an parts oi me corpora
tion. Kallroaa street.
Genuine French
Brier Pipes
With amber mouth-pieces, all sizes and
Bbapos, at prices raug-lng from 2op to tlO
just recievea Dy
OWEN BRITTON.
DENTISTRY.
E. P. Grose, D. D. S.
Successor to Dr. A. W. Hazel,
Office Harvey Block.
For Insurance that
Insures, apply to R. N.
Goo'dwin, the old, relia
ble insurance agent.
farmer
and others can save money by insur
ing1 in the old time-tried, fire-tested
Ohio Insurance Agency. It represents
over $100,000,000 of assets, has large
surplus, writes the latest and most
liberal forms of policies, insures both
farm and city property, writes either
cash or mutual policies, also issues
tornado policies. Rates low, losses
promptly paid. Before insuring, call
on or address the manager, Jos.
Binehower, Wellington, Ohio.
Gity Meat Markel.
Choice Rose Brand
HAMS-
Highest market price paid
for
Poultry,
Frank Curtice, prop.
aU4d
BO YEARS
IXPCRIENOK.
TRADE MARKS
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Patents taken through Muun Co. rece)T
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SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN,
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anr scientific Journal, weekly, torms3.00 a years
11.50 six months. Specimen copies and 11NB
Book on Patknts sent free. Address
MUNN A CO..
361 Uroodwnv. New York.
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WELLINGTON, O. .
Transact a general banking business,
buying and selling notes and bills ot
exchange. Money loaned on satisfac
tory collateral, mortgage or personal
security. Interest at 4 paid on all
savings deposits, interest; credited an
nually. YOUR BUSINESS SOLICITED.
Safety deposit boxes situated in oui
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J. H. Rust, Cashier.
Bishop McCabe, of Mew York, on Dtw
James' Beadache Powder.
"With regard to Dr. James' Headaeht
Powders, I have no hesitation in com
mending them to suffers from headache.
They relieve pain speedily, and I hare
never known anyone to be harmed by
their use. I have been a great suffer
from headache in my life, but have
almost gotten rid of it by the constant
use of hot water and fruit, and by .doing
without coffee. The Dr. James' Head
ache Powders havo, however, greatly re
lieved me at times, and I never allow
myself to be without them, and havo
recommended them to others freely.
C.CMcCABE."
For sale by J. W. Houghton.
JAMES JONES,
Wholesale and
Retail Sealer in
Hard and Soft Goal
Coke, Blossburg
Smithing Goal.
Wood $1.50 a cord.
Telephone 60. East Main St -
LEMIK CAFE.
Superior Confections of all kindg
always on hand.
Cold Meats sliced to suit the cus
tomer. Catering for Wedding Parties,
.Picnics, etc., promptly and
satisfactorily doe.
A fine line of Cigars, Tobacco and
Smokers' Articles.
Prices always please.
Ready for Business.
I have just received a
very handsome and complete
line of
MENS' SUITINGS
and am ready to make you a
Suit of Clothes or an Over.
coat cheap. Drop in and in
spect these samples.
E. S. Hollenbach.
Uniformed Colored Porters attend first u4
second class dny coaches tn tkrongh trains)
insuring scrupuloualy clean cars snrout.
East! lead down.
All 'lck.l
1
T
Pat. Pa.teng'r
Train, Lilly.
... Cnic.10....
'.. Ft. W.rn...
TVetti r4 a.
T
10 15
10 35 1 03
I" iw
II 00
7 66
9 (0
13 Ui
4J
11 ....,
3 30
6 00
II It
.. fitaannlla ..
....Arasdla,...
... Foitoria ...
.OrwnHtrlacs.
... Bellwu...
ATfry ....
.. Terallfloa..
.... Loraia ....
...CItfIb...
.... Bnirsl.....
..Now York..
. . Roatoa ....
II 6)
H8
ISO
S 30
3D
10 43
S 14
8 K it
I9in i
.wily
113 06
I 65,13 W
S26
7 07!
1411)69
1 14111 05
1i Hill 40
13 01
8 OBi
1 i
1 II
T40
S 10
11 OS
8 39L
II M
1 sol
8 55
65
453
T 60
1 11
140
n 35
8 33
hi 61
11 St
10 m
13
811
11 03
6oe
!3V1)4S 11 48
00 i IS 10 16
00 t? 00.19 OO
t
10 301
17 00
Ll.ht tvi A "u" D.rb !.. M it
tDally .io.pl Sunday. I Daily auist Mnaay. ,
fswpoa&i(U "
Drawinii Room Sleopln Cars on Nos. 2, 4 al
5 tlirooRli to Cleyelnnd, Krte, Buffalo, Now Vorh
and lloston on Nos. 5, S and 1 to Ft. Wayne,
ilucniro or interme'liato points. Meals are
sorroil in up-to-date Dining Stations and Una
colled Diuinij Curs at opportnne tranl hours.
Hainrago checked through to destination. 0
inquiry you will find onr rates are always lows
than ia other linos, sarrioe considered.
For rates and dotailed Information a ddrma H,
F Jloranr,GnUPasenMiAU?elan4,(X,
or Local llcJcet Aat.
I

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