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Democratic Northwest. [volume] (Napoleon, Ohio) 1869-1894, February 05, 1891, Image 3

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THE DEMOCRATIC NORTHWEST, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1891.
TAKING TEA.
I knew a rosea which simply to
BodsaraparadJeeof balsa, v
That war I cadled to one that has
Byroad the earth, la Uftad skies,
I UJ I'd rather cling totals.
Soft curtains gently shut away .
The chill and sonny ateraooa;
Aa opsa lira bun red and clear,
RoseaceaUl k tbe atmosphere
Aa (tardea aira la fragrant Jane.
Walla the arrange! cup and spoon.
Like snowy birtU her Angers fair
Hover about thml Chinsao tray;
Sweetly distracted is her air
Twlxt talklnj art and pouring cream.
Why does she think I haunt her bousa v
Each day as Ore o'clock draws neart '
Does she suppose the mild carouse
Of tipping tea aad nibbling cakes
b all the joy my soul can ask f
Yet such the attitude she takes;
Her friendly thoughts quite centered teen
Kot on my passion, not oa me.
But oa the very tririal task
Of pouring out a cup of tea.
Her earnestness Is sweet to see.
Her yearning eyes quite driTS me mad;
"Too strong f A little sugar No?
But you are sure you like it so
Perfection! I'm so rery glad:"
Sometimes I feel so broken up
I really think I'll smash my cup
Down on the hearth and tell her, "Sweet,
There let it lie, where day by day
My heart lies, shattered, at your feet."
, Pittsburg Bulletin.
ANN BEDES DEBT.
Tbe judges were In their places.
Outside the fog weighed heavily upon
the shapeless building, effaced the walls
and glued itself to the windows, conceal
ing their frosty flowering.
In the hall itself the air was thick and
stifling. It smelled ofsheep skins, peas
ants, eau de vie, and the leaden ventila
ors in the upper glasses of the skylight
turned slowly and slothfully.
The jurors, too, leaned wearily against
the backs of their chairs. One of them
had closed bis eyes and let bis band fall
inert, lulled to somnolence by the monot
onous scratching of the clerk's pen.
Another tapped and softly beat the rat-a-plan
with his pencil on the table.
The president pushed bis spectacles to
the tip of his nose and mopped bis damp
brow, bis Btern gray eyes, with a glacial
stare, bent fixedly upon the door whence
would issue, tbe culprits in course of
trial, and on whom they waited to pro
nounce the sentence.
"Is there not still another oner de
manded he, presently, of the sleepy look
ing tipstaff at his elbow in a hard, re
sonant voice.
"One," responded the other; "a girl."
"Eh bienl bring her in then," said the
president.
The crier called, the door opened, the
girl entered.
A current of fresh air glided in with
her and softly fanned the faces and
tickled the lashes of the curious assist
ants. At the same moment a ray of
sunlight pierced the shrouding fog and
danced between the frosty etchings of
the panes across the dusty walls and
furniture of the hall of audience.
"A girl" had said the tipstaff a child,
rather, scarcely more than on the verge
of maidenhood, and so pretty in ber little
furred jacket, embroidered with wreaths
and blossoms and fitting like the skin the
rounded waist, straight and slender as
the stem of a young palm. Her black
eyes were lowered to the floor, but her
white brow was clear and unclouded.
"What is it that you have done, my
child?" questioned the president indiffer
ently.
The girl nervously rearranged her
handkerchief . that covered her head,
caught her breath heavily .then answered,
sighing;
"My affair is sad, H. le President,
very, very sad."
Her voice, soft and dolorous, went to
the heart like good music, that, even
when one hears it no longer, seems still
to vibrate in the air and change every
thing by its mysterious influence.
The faces of the jurors were no longer
so morose. The portrait of the kinit, and
farther away still of the Judex Curire,
appeared to make to her from the silent
wall benignant signs, encouraging ber
to bravely recount the affair "so very,
very sad."
"But see you," said she, "this writing;
"it will tell you better than I can."
Only she bad first to seek it; to unclasp
the buttons of her, corsage and draw it
from her bosom a piece of crackling
parchment, stamped and closed with the
ponderous official seal.
"A judgment," murmured the presi
dent, running bis eye over the paper,
judgment against Anne Bede, assigned
to berin today a punishment of six
months' imprisonment."
The girl nodded sorrowfully; the hand
kerchief, loosened by the movement, fell
from her bead, and a heavy tress of her
long black hair, all unbound, veiled her
features. It sought, perhaps, to shield
them from the gaze of the people, for if
she was white as a lily a while ago, she
was purple with shame at this moment.
"It is a week since we received it,"
stammered she in a broken voice. "The
court officer brought it himself and ex
plained what it wished to tell us, and
my poor mother said to me: 'Thou must
go, my child, the law is the law, and
one should not take it as a pleasantry.'
I have come, therefore, to to begin the
six months!"
The president wiped his glasses, then
wiped them again, his cold, stern gaze
seeking the faces of his colleagues, the
windows, tbe floor, the great iron stove,
through whose grated door fiery eyes
seemed to sparkle and threateningly re
gard him,
"The law," murmured he, "the law is
- the law!"
And be read anew the summary before
hlm.the black, sprawling scratches across
the white page, declaring "Anne Bede
condemned to six months' imprisonment
' for receiving stolen goods."
. Meanwhile the leaden ventilator had
quickened its pace and spun furiously.
Outside the wind had risen, and now it
f shook the windows, whistled through
' the crevices and seeineft to hiss remorse
lessly about the ears of the gaping
crowd; . . - -,
"The law, yes, the law is the law!"
Itoh on human and all animals oared in 80
minutes Woolford's Sanitary Lotion. This
never fails. Sold by D. J. Humphrey, drug
gist, Napoleon, O. dec 11-90-ly
Subscribe for the Northwest, $1.60
Tb bead of the president bent affirm
atively before this importunate) voice;
be dropped Ida eye and touched the bell
for the tipstaff.
"Accompany Anne Bede," said he, "tc
the house of the inspector of prisons."
The man bowed, the child turned obe
diently, but her little rose red lips
opened and shook tremulously, as if
words were on them that she could not
speak.
"Perhaps, my child, said the presi
dent, noticing her distress, ."perhaps you
have still something to say to us."
'Only that I am Lizette, Lizette
Bede, M. le President; Anne Bede was
my sister, and we buried herpoor girl!
a week ago."
" Twas not you, then, that was con
demned and sentenced'" cried the presi
dent, surprised.
'Ah! bon Dieu, nol Why should I
have been condemned who have never
done barm to a fly?"
'Then why are you here, mad child
that you are?"
"Because, if you please, it is because
Anne died while this business was be
fore the royal table" (the lower court of
Hungary). "It was when she was lying
in her coffin all cold and white that this
order concerning the six months arrived,
certifying that she must submit Oh!
how she had waited and prayed for it,
and tried so hard to live to receive it!
She had newer dreamed of this, M. le
President, and when they bad taken
her away with closed eyes, mute and
deaf for ever, my mother and I told our
selves that wo must repair the wrong
she had done because of her fiance, Ga
briel Earloney. It was for him, and
without knowing it, that she sinned,
and we thought" r
"What, my child?"
"That to let her rest peacefully in her
mortal ashes, and that no one should say
she owed them anything, that we must
do as I said repair the wrong done by
her. My mother has paid the amende
for the goods, and I have come, M. le
President, to serve in ber place the six
months in the county prison."
To serve m her sister's place! '
What innocence, what simplicity!
The jurors smiled broadly; the face of
the president was no longer cold or cere
monious, nor was it precisely his brow
from which he mopped the moisture
with a large yellow handkerchief.
"It is well." said he; "you were right,
my chil.1, but but, now that I think of
it"
He stopped, frowned, and seemed to
reflect intently "now that I think of
it," continued he, "there was an error in
this affair. We have, my dear child,
sent you the wrong document." v
"The wrong document, M. le Presi
dent?" faltered Lizette, raising her great,
sorrowful eyes to bis face with a gaze of
heartbreaking reproach, "the wrong doc
ument?"
She could say no more, and the presi
dent himself was no less moved.-
"The wrong document, my child, yes,"
said he firmly, rising from his seat to
tenderly pass his hand across the shining
hair,, "beyond there" pointing to the
heaven above them through the mist
veiled window "Justice has given an
other verdict?
"Go now to thy mother and tell her
from me that thy sister was not a crim
inalthat Anne was innocent."
"Before God, at least," added he, in a
tone only audible to his own great heart,
"before God, at least!" Translated for
Short Stories from the Hungarian of
Mikszrath by E. C. Waggener.
New Mode of Engraving.
A French scientist has lately intro
duced a process for the engraving of de
signs on wood, leather or similar ma
terials by means of a pencil or tool, the
point of which is constantly at red heat.
After a series of experiments with hot
irons ar.d platinum wire heated by elec
tricity, a special tool was finally devised
by the inventor of this process, which
renders the operation extremely simple.
The tool in question is another applica
tion of the cautery instrument used by
surgeons. The pencil has a wooden han
die upon which is mounted a small plat
inum tube with a fine point. Two sepa
rate receptacles communicate with the
tool by means of a rubber tube; one of
these contains a hydro-carbon, such as
alcohol, benzine or wood spirit, and the
other contains compressed air.
A constant flow of the hydro-carbon
vapor is maintained at the point of the
tool, which is thereby kept- in a state of
intense heat. Both receptacles are pro
vided with regulating apparatus, by
which the supply of ink can be adjusted
or cut off, as desired. The operation of
tracing designs on wood work and leather
is thus simplified to the utmost possible
extent. A tracing of the design is made
on the article to be ornamented, and any
degree of relief is instantly effected, very
little skill on the part ot the operator
being required. The new process will be
of the greatest service to bookbinders,
carpenters and others, jus well as afford
ing a ready means of labeling cases,
barrels, etc. New York Commercial Ad
vertiser. .
The Mason and. Dixon Line.
The Mason and Dixon line runs along
the parallel of. latitude 33 degs. 43
min., 26 degs. 3 mm., separating Penn
sylvania from Maryland. It was
drawn by two distinguished English
surveyors? Charles Mason and Jere
miah Dixon, who began their work in
170 and finished it in 1767. The line
is marked by stones set at intervals of
five miles, each having the arms of Lord
Baltimore engraved upon one side and
those of the Penn family upon the other.
Besides these large stones set to mark
each fifth mile, smaller stone3 were set
at the end of each mile, theae having a
large P engraved upon one side and the
letter M on tho othar thesa intended as
initial letters of Pennsylvania and Mary
land. ' : ;- ;. , -v. ;
All of these '"stones were engraved in
England. The Mason and Dixon line
was not the line separating the free and
the slave StateB. ' The line settled on in
the compromiso of 1333 was S3 degs. 80
min. The Mason and Dixor. line, aa
shown above, runs along the parallel of
43 min. St. Louib Republic.
The man who wins the day ought
to have plenty of time at bis disposal.
The child that cries for the moon will
be wanting the earth la maturer years.
EFFECT OP WIND ON TREES.
BaeMoa rressurw Wktek Dt-
reatt Tkelr Tana.
Trees which grow la exposed situa
tions have their tops always leaning
away In the opposite direction from tbe
prevailing winds, and the casual ob
server concludes that the branches have
been bent by the constant pressure of the
wind and retained their position, now.
although such trees have the appearance
exactly of trees bending under a gale,
still It is not pressure In that way which
ha given them their -shape. The fact
Is, they have grown away from the blast
and not bent by It after they grew. Ex
amination of the branches ' and twigs
ill show this, says a writer In the
Garden.
We hardly realize the repressive effects
of cold wind upon tree growth, which It
partially or altogether arrests, according
to Its prevalence. Conifers show the ef
fects of this more distinctly than other
trees. Owing to the horizontal habit of
growth of the branches they point di
rectly to the teeth of the'gale from what
ever direction It comes, and cannot, like
the oak, lean over and grow in the op
posite direction, hence coniferous trees
growing In exposed situations produce
good long branches on their lee sides,
while on the windy side the branches re
tain their rigid horizontal position, but
make comparatively little growth, which
is simply suppressed.
Example: I measured the branches of
a JNordmann s spruce, growing in a po
sition fully exposed to the north and
south. One branch on the north side of
the tree had fifteen annual nodes or
growths, and was seven feet long, and
Its opposite bad the same number of
nodes, but was nearly two and one-half
feet longer, all the lateral branches
being proportionately long and well
furnished.
THE SAME THING.
Always on deck oakum. ' . .
An elevated politician Hill. -
Multttm In parvo sausages.
Means a long bill woodcock
Good all-round sport marbles.
Ready maid the up-stairs girl.
Men of many plans architects.
A point in real estate Hunter's.
A stock that ought to rise U. P.
Armed at all points porcupines.
A "beab" existence some brokers'.
A left-handed affair the wedding
ring. ' .-
The king's highway Unter den Lin
den. Special offers matrimonial proposi
tions. A stinging article the business end
of a wasp,
RULES FOR BUSINESS.
. Do not trust a man who drinks to ex
cess. .
Do not trust a man who lives beyond
his means.
Do not trust a man for more than one'
quarter of his visible assets.
Do not trust a man who is a constant
bettor on horse races, or is a gambler.
Do not trust a man who is unwilling
to make a statement over his own signa
ture. .
Do not trust a man unless convinced
that his daily profits are more than his
daily expenses.
Do not trust a man starting anew in
business who has not sufficient capital of
his own to pay for his stock and fixtures.
Telescope Revenge.
Astronomers in petticoats are so rarely
met with that It is not surprising if they
collect crowds around them when they
are supposed to be studying the stars in
a public place. This was the case with
Mile. Laprevote, a good-looking cook In
Paris, who, being abandoned by her
adorer, first threw vitrol at him, and
some time afterward bought a long tele
scope, sat on a chair outside her deceiv
er's place of business, and began to
watch his movements through her power
ful glass.
. For a considerable time the small boys
and idlers of the locality imagined that
mademoiselle was devoting herself to as
tronomical pursuits; but at last her atti
tude and actions were observed, not only
by her former admirer, but by his com'
mercial partner, and by many of his Im
portant customers. As the owner of the
telescope refused to give It up and go
away, she was summoned by her ex
lover, and made to appear before a mag
istrate, who sent her to prison for i
month.
With Moistened Thread. Y
"I very much wish the habit of chew
ing gum would become obsolete, " said a
New York dealer In literary Junk, "for
no book dealer can look In peace at
customer who chews gum. The reason
of this is that he cannot help fearing
that the customer is a thief.
"The favorite trick of the picture thief
and some people who are otherwise of
good repute steal pictures Is to carry a
thread the length of an octavo page un
der his tongue. Then, while the book
seller's back is turned, he lays that wet
string along the bound edge of some en
graving in the book In band that pleases
him, and straightway opens the book
fifty leaves away. In a minute or so he
can turn back to the engraving, and it
will tear out noislessly and with little
effort.
"The dealers in old books lose hun
dreds of dollars in that way every year
in this city."
Thing's O. K.
A Western man, who owned a great
farm In Dakota, was obliged to cross tbe
water for business purposes. For three
months he heard nothing from the. man
whom he had left In charge of the farm,
and at last he became somewhat dis
turbed. He was an Illiterate person
though a capital farmer, and the writing
of a telegram was a matter of some dim-
culty. At last he sent off the following
comprehensive message: "Is things all
right at the farm?" Impatiently he
awaited tbe answer. But his trusty fore
man was a man of few words and strict
Ideas of economy, and the envelope which
his anxious employer received as soon as1
possible contained simply this message
"Things is."
Marriage In liraxiL,
The new Brazilian marriage law makes
civil marriage' obligatory. Any mar
riage not made before civil powers Is
null and void. Relatives of the first and
second degrees, girls under 14 and boys
under 10 years are prohibited from mar
rying. . , v
Lucy Decker Young, eighth wife
Brie-ham Young, is dead. There are
only seven left, including Amelia Fol
som, tne tavorite.
Protect Yoar Eye.
Dr. George 8. Norton Rlvee the read-
era or Harper Young Irople an rue
good advice about the use of tbe eyes.
Here are his rules:
1. ever read by a dim Ileht. It Is
common habit for children and even
grown people to read between-daylight
and dark, or In the darkened cornner
of a room. The strain thus produced
is often sufficient to imnair a healthv
eye, and surely will weaken one that u
diseased.
2. Never read or write with the
light shining directly In tbeeye. The
light should either be covered by a
shade or be placed above and behind
tne reader, sntnlng over the left ehoul-
er. if tne person is right banded. In
this way the page will be illuminated,
and the bright rays of the light will not
enter theeye and so Irritate it.
8. uo not read lying down. It Is an
nnatural position, for It require an
extra strain on the muscle of the eyes,
ana iavors congestion or tnese organs.
4. Do not read or write with the
head bent far forward. It is a common
practice for young people to lay the
book on a table, bend over it, and, with
face close to the paze. continue reading
or writing for a long time. This posi
tion causes an increased flow of blood
to the eyes and bead producing symp
toms of weakness and increasing any
existing nearsightedness.
5. Avoid reading on the cars, or
when riding in a carriage. The strain
made necessary In the endeavor to
overcome the unsteadiness of the page,
and to see distinctly, is often sufficient
to cause great injury to an eye.
6. Avoid briinfinir the book too near
tbe eyes. Hold it as far as the print is
distinct and clear about fourteen to
sixteen inches; but do not carry it so
tar away that it is an ettort to see clear
ly. When the book is brought too
close to the face an undue strain Is re
quired both upon these muscles which
adjust the vision at different distances
and also upon theme which turn the
eyes inward. As a result, marked
symptoms of weakness in reading will
in time be noticed.
7. Never read or continue the use of
the eyes after they begin to tire, or the
head commences to ache. These are
certain indications that you are doing
too much, and that rest is necessary.
MISS NELLIE O'HAGAN ANNOYED.
Tbe Popular Senate Clerk Explains
the Sensational Stories Sent Ont
From Denver.
Columbus, O., Jan. 28. Miss Nellie
O'Hagan. of Sandusky, the well known
lady clerk of tbe senate is considerably
annoyed over a sensational dispatch
from Denver, Uoi., stating that sue
would be arrested for Inducing promi
nent people to cash worthless checks.
Miss O'Hagan said that she was at Col
orado KpriDgs, south of Denver, and
when about to board a train for 'home
to go to the bedside of her sick mother
in Sandusky, she found that she bad
not enough money to get home and
gave her check for $1SJ and got it
cashed. The check was forwarded to
ber bank at Sandusky for collection,
but d urine ber mother's illness their
bank account had been overdrawn and
tbe check was returned unpaid. She
became sick and forgot all about the
check until her attention was called to
it. She called in a friend and crave
hm money to pay it, failing to take a
receipt for it as she believed him to be
thoroughly reliable and trustworthy
She does not think this has anything
to do with the above mentioned swind
le at Denver. She says she thinks she
knows wbere the story originated and
proposes to sift tbe matter to the bot
torn.
HOT-WATER REMEDIES.
Headache almost always yields to the
simultaneous application of hot wa 'r to
the feet and back of the neck.
A towel folded, dipped in hot water,
wrung out rapidly and applied to tne
stomach acts like magic In cases of colic.
There Is nothing that so promptly
cuts short congestion of tho lungs, sore
throat or rheumatism as hot water when
applied promptly and thoroughly.
A towel folded several times and
dipped in hot water and quickly wrung
aim appneu uvur hue wuuirouo ur ucu-
ralgia will generally afford prompt relief.
A strip of flannel or napkin folded
lengthwise and 'dipped In hot water and
wrung out and then applied round the
neck of a child that has tbe croup will
usually bring relief in ten minutes.
Hot water taken, freely half an hour
before bedtime Is tne best cathartic pos
sible In the case of constipation,' while it
has a most soothing effect upon the
stomach and bowels. This treatment,
continued a few months, with proper
attention to diet, will cure any curable
case of dyspepsia.
HINTS FOR DOMESTIC USE.
Ojte tablespoonful ot liquid makes one
half ounce.
Jellv-baos should be made of flannel
and pudding-bags ot linen.
Washing floors and shelves with strong
pepper, tea or hot alum or borax water
will destroy ants and roaches.
Add two tablespoonfuls of kerosene to
the pail of water with which you wash
grained or other varnished furniture.
Do not put soap In the water with
which you clean a mirror; it is almost
Impossible to polish the glass if soap is
used. 1
Hands may be kept smooth In cold
weather by avoiding the use of warm
water. Wash them with cold water and
soap.
Tak can easily be removed from cloth
ing by immediately rubbing it with
clean lard, and theD washing out with
warm water and soap.
The Royal Family.
Her Majesty's family circle numbers
fifty living descendants, including sons
and daughters, grandsons and grand
daughters. Besides whom she has four
sons-in-law, four daughters-in-law, five
grandsons-in-law, and one granddaugh-
ter-in-law. The Queen has lost one son
and onodaughter, five grandsons, one
zranddauehter, one great-grandson, and
one son-in-law. If these wero living her
family circle would number 74.
Rncklen's Arnlcaalve.
The best salve in the world for Cuts,
BruiseH, Korea, Ulcers, Salt Rheum,
Fever Sores, Tetter, Chapped Hands,
Chilblains. Corns, and all WKin .urup'
Hons, and nositivelv cures Piles, or no
pay required.. It is guaranteed to give
perfect satisfaction, or money reiunaen.
Price 25 cents ner box. For Sale by D,
j. Humphrey. 1 JT.
SaboJribefor the mohthwest; tl.SOa 'ea.
INFANTSgjSNVAUDS.
THE Perfect Substitute
0NLYf Mother' Uilk.
INVALUABLE
IN CHOLERA INFANTUM
AND TECTHINQ.
A Quickly AMlmllated Food for
DYSPEPTICS,
CONSUMPTIVES,
CONVALESCENTS,
A PERFECTiNUTRIENT
In all Watting DImasm.
REQUIRES NO COOKING.
KEEPS IN ALL CLIMATES.
send for f "The Can and
Our Book l Feeding of Infants"
HAILED FEES TO AST ADDRESS.
DOLIBFC-COODALE CO.
BOSTON. MASS
ESTABLISHED 1874.
C. A. IIABLEY & CO..
, -RELIABLE
PUR AND CLOAK HOUSE
07 TOLEDO
TOLEDO ROUSES
Combined.
Absolutely Perfect Styles. Decided
Saving in Price. nov 21-4t
OMMISSION
-SALESMEN
DOTY & WATKINS,
N. Y. C. Stock Yards,
EAST BUFFALO, NEW YORK.
W. H. WilHams, ( -CATTLE.
Jas. Plxley, Salesman, HOGS.
R. W. Watklns, Salesman, SHEEP.
SALES GUARANTEED '
At Full Market .Price on all Stock oonslffned
to us. Bill all shipments in your own name
to our care.
Ylarltet Report
And ritock Drovers'
Account Books
FREE
Communications by mail or tetefrraph will
receive prompt attention. Address,
DOTY 4.
1031 William St,
WATKINS,
East Buffalo, N. Y.
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141 AIAIAI&I AIS7m
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Legal Notice.
JAM IS W. CARaOW, wtawealteeof fteWeaoeto
aekaowa, late af I'hfioa V.il, VtrtiDla,wtU
lake aetlca that oa Ik ttta oar iaaaarr, 1891, la
the court vf eoauBoa aieaa at Hear maty, Ohio,
where the attloa to aew needing, the asdarilgaed.
Ella Oaraoa. ilea bar aettiloa against the sail
JaBtea W. Oaraoa, anrlna for dirorot from blot and
forreatoraiioatober foraw aaae of Ella HULoa
tbe (Toond of groas argleot of dory aad for ex
erase oraelty. fte eald James W.Caraoa to teanlr.
d to anew tbe eald BMIiloa aot tolas Uaa aU
woeas allot uaciaiaay of Jaaasrv, I8S1.
ELLA CaKSOH.
J. M Haag. attorney.
Jaaaary t, imi. Jan S-M
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, that J. B. Celbertoon,
as gnardiaa of Zero U. Mclntite, ha . lied a
first account of bis admlnlttratloa. whiohwiilaa
for hearing and settlement Feb. t, 1891.
jt.uuciaKLLY, rrooate jaage.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, that Stephen I. Wllosg
as Eisenlorof Anna 0. Oonnaelman. baa Had
a flnalsoconnt of bto administration, which will be
for bearing and settlement Feb. , mi.
at. wnntLLi, rroDstejuaee,
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, that If. J. Grltnss, a
guardian of Uora and kfur Hftrfm.n. hu slH
a first eeooont of bto guardlanaoln, which will be tor
bearing sod settlement Feb. . 1891.
t. DONNELLY, Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE to hereby (riven, that Fmdlc. P. Knlpp,
KQUdiin of Or and Berth Rhumbr hu mt
a Srat aoconnt of hit awdtinihlp, which will be for
aearing ana settlement Feb. 9, 1891
m. ljii Jill,, rrobite Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby glyen, that George Kgeers, as
guardian of Ella Nora Beekmtn, has filed a
first sooount of his guardlan.hip, wbloh win be for
hearing and settlement Keb. 9, 1891.
M. DONNELLY, Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, tbst Franklin 0. A.
ontsteen. as adm(nl.tFta nt t n r-.
Shasteen, hss filed a filial aooonnt of bis admlnial
trstlon, whloh will be for hearing snd nettlement
Feb. 10, lsl. M.IO.NSELLY.
, Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby (riven, that Andrew Patterson,
as administrator of th mtmta ,r u n. . '
ri.htflJ.'!d,.' f' col" of his sdmlnlstratlon,
Tost hearing and settlement Feb. 10,
A. UUflHKU.Y
Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE is hereby given, thst R. B. Prcktrd. aa
executor of the will of Dmui v p.int t...'i
ed a first account of his administration, whloh will
be for hearing and settlement Feb. 10, 1891.
m. uukctelh. Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOJfOB s hereby given, that R. B, Paokard, SI
u JfrmU,',,r,tor of the of Jane E. Paokard.
m. t . 5111 o00"'" of his sdmlnlstratlon, which
will be for heating and settlement Feb. 10. 1891.
JLDQNMBLLY, Probsts i Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, thst Catherine M.
Ke. ExeoutrU of Helnrich Wlluelm
&ruse, has filed a final arennnt nr k.. jimini.M-
1 wbloh will be for bearing snd settlement Feb.
uu. joki. 1. 1)U SELLY. Probata Jndim.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, tbst Sophia Bahn, SI
, . guardian of minor heirs of Anton Haan.hai
filed a first aoconnt of her guardianship, which will
be for hearing and settlement February 18th, 1891.
sa. vun a aia. 1 1 rrooate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, tbst Jacob Wolf, M
guardian of Joost heirs, has filed a third ao
oonnt of his guardianship, which will be for boat
ing and settlement February 16th, 1891.
m. DUHaBLLii Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, that Christian Blery,
as guardian of Louis Onhl. has filed a first
aoconnt of his guardianship, whloh will be for hear
lng and settlement Februsry 16th, 1891.
JH. DONNELLY, Probate Judge.
Probate Notice.
NOTICE Is hereby given, that Henry Mangus, as
guardian of Simon O. Zierolf. Frederick O. Zier
olf and Casper E. Zierolf, has filed s first aoeount of
nis guarmansnip, wblcb will be for bearing and set
tlement February 21, 1891.
M. DONNELLY, Probate Judge.
NOTICE
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