OCR Interpretation


Democratic Northwest. [volume] (Napoleon, Ohio) 1869-1894, February 12, 1891, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028296/1891-02-12/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE DEMOCRATIC NORTHWEST. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1891.
CHOICE OF AN ACTRESS.
. Being at fonmlation a womanly wo
man, she always expected to marry.
say expected, instead of hoped, because
she had constantly too many admirers
to donbt her opportunities to her mind
it was simply a question of meeting the
right one.
She felt sure that when the right man
came she would be willing to give np
everything for him; indeed, she content
plated with a certain serene satisfaction
the coming of time when her triumphs
and amhitions and fame and freedom
would be exchanged for the proud servi
tude of wifehood.
Still she wasn't in a hurry to meet the
right man. He would coma when he
did come and when he did come it
couldn't be helped, and she would be
glad. Upon various occasions she had
thought him come.
Upon these occasions she had experi
enced a distinct sensation of fretfulness.
She had conscientiously given the ad
mirer a fair chance to prove himself the
right man, but had always been down
right glaf 'when he had failed to do so.
The admirer always made some mistake
fatal to his interests.
Perhaps he lost his head, and went
down on his knees; that always immedl
ately settled it She was much too proud
and too humble a woman to be willing
to marry a man who went down on his
knees about it.
Or he lost his head, and threatened to
shoot himself, or drink himself to death,
or lump in the bay.
Now and then she was moved with re
gret at the storm which she had raised.
and expostulated in a kindly fashion
with her victim, but' more often she
shrugged her white shoulders, saying, if
sot to the man, at least to herself, that
the man who was foolish enough to want
to shoot himself because a woman did
not love him, had better shoot himself.
Some men were doggedly meek of
these she was a bit afraid yet so far
these meek, dogged wooers had presently
developed into bores, which, she felt.
lessened the danger. I say danger, be
cause she regarded the possibility of
marrying any man but the right man a
danger.
Sooner or later, in the course of every
admirer's attention she made a stanch
effort to dismiss or escape him.
She argued to herself that escape from
the right man would be impossible, and
that escape from any other was to be re
garded as wisdom, and hailed as good
fortune.
She never went out of her way to at
tract men in the first place she had no
seed to, and besides she really did not
care to increase the chances of coming
across this more or less to be dreaded
right man.
She kept pretty closely to her work,
enjoyed the footlights, spent her money
freely, rejoiced in her independence, and
thought herself a lucky girl.
Of course she had admirers. She con
sidered that a natural result of her posi
tion, profession, Bex and attractions.
She permitted men who loved her cer
tain privileges they might kiss her
hand, come to the theatre and see her
play, and give her flowers and feel mis
erable about her.
Any one of them, she realized, might
develop into the right man, so she treat
ed them all conscientiously. She never
misled them or led them on, and since
she was frank with them and never dis
courteous, she felt she had a right to be
exacting about their manners, and she
always was. -"J .a..
Upon the three or four occasions when
a man's devotion had stirred in her a
certain degree of interest she had rigidly
demanded time to find out and to make
sp her mind.
To find out meant to satisfy herself
that the man in question and the "right
man" were of one "identity." To make
sp her mind meant to decide whether,
right man or not, she would have him!
The candidate having always failed to
stand this test, she had, directly Bhe was
so assured, dismissed him promptly and
gentlv. 1
By what subtle sign of authority she
. would recognize the right man she did
sot know. He would be big, she was
sure of that, and very gentle; he would
meet her mentally, "understand" her,
satisfy her morally and tenderly, master
her physically.
He would be above all her little "arts"
and caprices, but he would admire them;
he would be too dignified to go down on
his knees from not being able to help it,
yet quite fond enough of her to do it.
For her part, she would never wish it,
and Bhe would be very meek and gentle
and obedient, and glad to be bo; but
but, meanwhile she was free, and of that
she was glad, too.
Really, her life was delightful; she
lifted her white arms into her pretty
, lace wrapper and laughed to herself as
she settled for her little rest before re
tiring. Her parlor was warm, and the
, light softened by colored shades; a bit of
sandalwood among the logs sent a spicy
fragrance out with the heat, she rubbed
her head among the cushions and laughed
again to herself.
It was a notion of her own, this half
hour rest before retiring. For the sake
of it she usually came home at once from
the theatre.
Going out to suppers and sitting up
and drinking wine was stupid, besides
such a course would soon spoil her good
looks.. A warm, all-by-herself half hour
in her own pretty room, with the crack
ling of her fire for company and her milk
punch and biscuit for refreshment, were
much nicer.
It was nice to feel that the comfort
around her was all of her own making,
and to know herself in the midst of it
to be very pretty and very sweet, and
alone, in spite of the ones she could
check off on her pink fingers as at that
very moment who were miserable for
sight of her.
As a rule, men bad sought her out and
made themselves as charming as they
found possible and permitted; but Crag
Demmon attracted her.
He was big, undeniably a gentleman,
and by nature apparently a savage. He
Religious persecution in Russia in
creases in intolerance. The Musselmen
subjects of the Czar are chafing under
Hand the Mennonites and other sects
Are preparing to emigrate to America.
I fell promptly in love with her, and hU
j personality riveted her attention in an
insistent way which she made no effort
to oppose. For the first time a man's
passion for her seemed to invest the man
with strength.
To face his savagery and do as she
pleased in spite of his fierce jealousy she
found an exhilaration; to command a
creature so much bigger than herself.
and" to feel his strength and not his
weakness obeyed, was an excitement
To look into his savage, somber eyes
and melt them with the smile in her own
was worth doing, and intoxicating.
One day he asked her to be his wife.
adding that unless she gave him some
definite answer he would see her no
more. She was much interested.
"Could you leave me and not see me
againr she asked.
"Yes."
"Would you shoot yourself?"
"No."
She felt aggrieved. After a pause she
asked, "Do vou loye me
"Yes." His teeth were set, his face
pale, and he looked at her as if he hated
her.
Her breath quickened. "Why do you
hurry me so
"Because I will be made a fool by no
woman.
A throb of fear went through her.
She flung her head back and made an
swer, "You may go at once," and then,
'because his eyes frightened her, she be
gan to cry and "How do you expect
one to decide at once like that, if she
loves yon? I can't, and I won't you
can go."
"How much time do you want?"
"I don't know."
"I will wait a while."
"Much, better go. I won't be put on
time. I don't think I shall care for you,
anyhow', and even if I did yon are so
ugly maybe I would not marry. Go
away and let me alone." She spoke in a
frightened rush.
"Don't be foolish," he answered; I will
wait a while."
During the "while" he saw a great
deal of her; he curbed his temper, was
always gentle, always devoted, made no
effort to kiss her, half strangled a man
at the club who snggested that all act
resses were alike, and looked at her half
the time as if he hated her.
She grew frightened and meek, and
made an exhaustive study of his tastes.
One day he spoke harshly to her; she
cried out that he must not that she
loved him.
Thereat he took her in his arms, kissed
her and said, "Will you be my wife?" A
month from that time she married him.
Her manager protested, and a good
deal of money was paid over. To the
wife the manager said, "You are a fool;
if you ever want to come back to the
stage let me know."
Demmon carried her off to Europe.
He was strong and gentle and devoted.
There was little trace of his savagery,
except in a fiercely jealous guardianship
over her.
Now and then he ordered her around.
Once she protested vehemently; he
looked at her and answered, "You for
get you belong to me."
He gave her all the money she wanted,
bought her anything she fancied, and
insisted upon her dressing richly and. in
dulging extravagances, but once, when
she received a check for a story she had
written, he tore the bit of paper in
pieces, saying: "I will give you all the
money you wantl Don't forget!"
She was happy oh, yes. Her one
thought was to please him, and to please
him made her happy. She gave up all
her own fancies, and endeavored only to
meet his moods. She kept up all of the
pretty petulance and caprice that had
pleased him originally, because some
times it amused him to see her childish
and exacting she knew when to be si
lent, though, and how to efface herself.
She read the papers faithfully, and. bv
dint of study and close attention to a
few political arguments within earshot
of which she came, she got a fair grasp
of the principles of the party opposite to
her husband's, and argued with him very
well.
To such men as he presented she made
herself charming he liked to have other
men admire her; herself, she took no
interest in attracting them, and she was
always a bit afraid of being too success
ful and so annoying her husband. Be
sides, attention from other men made
her heart ache; her husband loved her
dearly, but he did. not tell her so very
often, and sometimes when she made
mistakes he called her stupid.
Of course Bhe did make mistakes some
times. Being very anxious to please'
him, her instinct was not always true.
There were times when he liked to have
her creep to the side of .his Chair and
push her soft hair against his face, say
ing nothing meanwhile, unless the little
caressing breath from her lips could be
called speech; but then again this an
noyed him, and he had to be let alone.
Being very fond of him, it was hard to
come near or pass him without reaching
out a hand to. touch his shoulder or
cheek, and this fretted him dreadfully
when he was not in the mood. Also
there were times when she wanted him
to take her in his arms and be good to
her, and find out how she felt, or when
she wanted to cry and be miserable and
be, petted and coaxed out of it; all this
was childish and foolish, but oh, dear!
how her heart ached sometimes.
He loved her of course she knew that
so there was no need that he should
tell her bo all the time; besides, he did
tell her what an unfailingly attractive
companion he found her, and he praised
her tact and sense and the way she kept
her pretty looks.
She was happy when she was with
him, only happy when she pleased him; j
and she used to cry her pillow wet very
often.
At the coming of the child her hus
band was distinctly displeased; when it
died the mother grew sullen.
They got back to America; a letter
from her old manager inclosed a con
tract for the coming season. She signed.
left all her jewels, and with her maid
started for New Orleans. Emma V.
Sheridan.
The net cash surplus in the treasury
including subsidiary coin, in $70,088.-
uiu. ogaiustfui, uii,iud vu iauuarv i,
an increase of nearly $13,000,000 during
ZAK I C7 ET1 DID T - f.
me past jnonin.
ap no t ponojjtic tptqm
-qewn ipra pat tnolq aoov i.iqraos
IDM IMjiuoo SaLn tu.'joj JltSrl
9 jo Majtp saipitp sqx "I
it sand jo ao) ooo'OOO'CM. "
rot ion t Jqt tiqi tits 1 pitA
irtaroej tnq nq oq 'omojjf J. aaiStrg
'jA,oq !aoaDn t V vi.i
yi9 ri pXAjn tioaoj jaasu 2uAtH
TJO qt a ijti jpej pasodxa jo' ipoq
t8j u ls pnnoj (ana
ioj qutu jo etuvdx ima tVH
tout po, luo eqi qiqm puF sqi
jo jarjaeo qt O -pi-lA pat (trjuiitaq
I AMaeot eqi put 'jnnojd si noitti'OfaA
Bjavrafuoa jo jntm 1 1 iiit30 t qns
U toaisx o)U tarn ja pat
-oii jo tuat OOE Jao sut)uoo qoiq
'puti qi jon -pjo qj jo uep
-no eqt jb eao t tatSno u eqoej,
qi an tJaqi o? jtsqotjQ
tnaij ,noj sqi uo qs.it m tat eqtjatiu
maij tjorqja 'qDq sej cgj put is;
Dt UO D0)30 tt )tdU109 P!Ot
jna jo tuo 000 0O0 06 jo sstw y
iraa m Mra v i
11 japan aS
O t9S8nj)i 0tA J9qj qiM g9A9snieqi
etntnt o ja)t eqj uodn MOjq; uoqi
put sioq ej8M9 naq dn MOq o? peso
9M. tSojj asoqj" e!i eiton eq nop 08 0
siutM eq uaqjt )tq of 'p&ituui sniooaq
aAaep put too tq put adtosa eq? eSt
viva o? ttj jaauieq eq -3noqvnot3
put l0 eaiqvtai qi pnuaoi noX oj
emoo jt jo fliqM emn it eqi jo Saj
ttiq t iq paiutdmooat ;qtd jqtd jqtd
Jieunoi tioisnaat 01 BAtu noX qoiqM
0 esjou t Jtaq not put 'an bet D moi
jo luojj U sst8 eqi tiMop pmsjos iP(dtJ
euo emot .tdoinj. ' pututuioo eqi iv
snjSaq Su89j toejejjip t aoji i9j
imuo ou S iq9M eq) t eaaqM Matt
qi oiui UMop 08 noi neqi dii pinoqs
?toq eqi ; 4q8iiR putts iipjtq pinoa
not itqi paptoi 08 eat noi aoki -3tq
put istajq jnoi u pts put 's9os popto
U.H seoqs SieStttp t qiM noq t noX
uo jnd eq uaqx 'allien u ptoq gjq
ptq too j tt iponosai qoiqM 'onbgto eqi
put eioq-jiseu eqi qanojqi oiui 08 em
qaiqm itoa e(dtnt eqi samoo uaqx Poa
8H 1I9J iBAeu 9Atq 1 Viqs put dt9 '9soq
-loo 1U qiiM 'utantweiipapi eqi u
I8998n punoj eAtq I qoiq uonntoajd t
'tjjeqig jo poo eqi ejnpaa 01 ptq noX ji
tt noX gsaip Xeqx lai-iomem eiqtaej8t
ou teAte eaunjd isjg eqx ' :ins 8aAp
t u ineasap isjg t saqjjosep jaAip y
'qiltaq jo pjeputis Jaiiaq
t ojaj paijn Xqaaaqi eq pinoM uiaqi jo
u&i uj euju 'pojad pa8uoojd t joj peq
01 8uo8 e-iojeq pooj snojiiJinu 'adm8
jo jtam jo qouni iq8 t eni Xiq8(i 01
ss9da9g eqi put peitptoie eqi 'XtaM
eqi 9J9A4 itqi peusjits Xnj mt I
irnsaj om si joSia
tjeue8 paAOJdoi put iqg9M pastajou)
put 'paxojisep s utqi OJOtn sppt popad
Bqi 8ujnp peqsinjnj pooj eqi 'tnsn
s enuiiuoa XiA)iat eAiiuinu put uoji
-tira8st uoise8)p ai!1Al 'paqsjujniip
8upuod8ajjoa jtei put Jtam qiiM
'dcajs 8a;jnp pepuedsng s) espjexa Xjpoq
sv put !XintiA jo eej8ap pojaMoj put
uojitptuie Jieqi istjaiunoa pmoM sm. jj
Jtd MOoq esoqi uj Xnt;aed89 'snonuji
-uoo itqAiemos eq pinoqs inamqsijnou
jo Xddns eqi itqi 9A99q 01 it3(8o ejoj
-ojaqi sni i8u3jtA io 8udaai8 'enssii jo
uontjsoiuisip itniaajed t sj ejaqi xpoq
eqi ui itqi saqotai X8oioisXqj ejotn
-ma ;o 'II9113 'J. uhiiiiim un saiuM
leam uaijo os 9M sseaifteAi tjauaa pu
ssauggaideais uoiitotuie 10 lunomt eqi
01 X(itaj8 sppt 'da96 aujjpp qotnois
eqi jo gseuiidma oi9duio3 eqi Xntpad
B9 put I8jit3jq put jaddns U9BA4190
sjtAjaiui 8uo eqi Supnp Sujistj itqi
uoUdo eqi jo mt j put uty (tjauei
put qjSuojjs u; jtd MOaq daaj 'punos
Xntniot' ion qSnoqi suosjad Xut
-daaig Ujna pooj
The Gun that Killed Caster.
Of all my relics there is one that I
prize most highly, and that I would not
part with for any price, writes General
Miles. Not that us intrinsic value is
much, but it is prized for the associa
tions that surround it, and the important
part that it once played in the history of
the United States. It is only a common
rifle, but it belonged to that noted In
dian chief, Baln-in-the-Face, the slayer
of Gen. Custer.
Now you will understand why I prize
that old gun so highly. Two years after
that memorable and fatal battle of the
Big Horn, in which the brave Custer
and all his men were killed by Bain-in-
the-Face and his reds, that proud chlei
surrendered to me. At that time Bain-
in-the-Face was a fine-looking man, and
I thought as I looked at him that he was
a good specimen of the ideal red man ol
Cooper's portrayal. Well-dressed and
proud, he stood erect, and looked every
inch a chief fit to command and not to
surrender.
Yet surrender he was compelled to,
and it was then that I got this rifle1,
which he yielded up to me in lieu of the
sword he did not carry. He wore any
thing but a pleasant look as he turned
over this old "Sharps" rifle to the hated
white man, for it meant defeat and hu
miliation to him.
Check, for Millions.
A controversy is raging in England
over the question of the largest check
that ever was drawn. The controversy
was started by the fact that early in Sep
tember a check was drawn by the Great
Indian Peninsular Railroad Company on
the London County Bank for 1,350,000.
This was heralded throughout the coun
try as the largest check in history. Ii
was added that a check for S3, 500, 000.
drawn by Vanderbilt, stood second on the
list.
But now a number of rival instance!
have been cited. . A cancelled check foi
1,750,000 may be seen, framed as a curi
osity, at the office of the Manchestei
Ship Canal Company, in Deansgate, Man
chester. It was drawn by the company
on Glynn & Co., bankers, when buying
out the Brldgewater trustees. But It ap
pears that at least four of the Londoq
clearing house banks have paid checki
for more than 3,000,000 on several oeca-
slons.
The largest check that was ever drawn,
according to the latest advices, was on
that passed through the "House" in 1879
or 1880. It was in settlement for an an
bltration award, and the amount was
over 3,350,000. One would like mor
definite Information, but this is all that
is vouchsafed us at present Perhapi
further light may be granted in th
future.
A Fatal Mistake. ,
PhvRioiann make no more fatal mistake
than when they inform patients that nervous
heart troubles come from the stomach and
are of little consequence. Dr. Franklin
Miles, the noted Indiana specialist, has pro
ven the contrary in his new book on ''Heart
Urease." whiob may be had free at lea
Leiat's drugstore, who guarantees and rec
ommends Dr. Miles' unequalled New Heart
Cure, which has the largest sale of any heart
remedy in the world. It on res nervous and
organic heart disease, short breath, fluttering,
pain or tenderness in the side, arm or shoul
der, irregular pnloe, fainting, smothering,
dropsy, tttj. His Restorative Nervine cures
headache, nts, etc.
VoirrsACMEBIacking
MOisUSHINO RCOUIRCO.) o
And m n. tixxwtrt I had iMIngrfMI
Wtl mr bor. 1 ua not 7 BHiMnuit, iMkMk
tUtllw oHiiIjiiImIiiu4iiH
I KYxi OKI.
Bold
WOUTF a eajtoolfb, Philadelphia.
FDX-RON ubMUu (!: Immh ta.hatr
The boy may live to be 80, but
the poor horse for want of a blan
ket in the stable has to die at 20.
FREE Get from your dealer free, the
ViBook. It has handsome pictures and
valuable information about horses.
Two or three dollars for a Jk Horse
Blanket will make your horse worth more
and eat less to keep warm.
5'A Fivs Mile
5A Boss Stable
5A Electric
5A Extra Test
Ask for
30 other styles at prices to suit every
body. If you can't get them from your
dealer, wriie us. -
ARE THE STRONGEST.
NONE GENUINE WITH OUT THE S'A LRBCI.
Vnn'if tl by Wx. Atkks ft Hons. Phllnda. wu.
ike the famous Horse Brand Baker blanket
We
believe
we
have
a
thorough
knowledge
of
all'
the
ins
and
outs
of
newspaper
advertising,
gained
Geo.
ccnuiiiis
a .id
verifying
their
fulfillment, .
and
unrivaled
facilities
in
all
departments
for
careful
and
intelligent
service.
We
offer
Rowed
&
Co.
an
experience
of
twenty-five
Newspaper
Advertising
our
services
to
all
years
of
successful
business;
we
have
the
best
equipped
office,
by
far
the
most
coiuprehens)
as
well
as
the
most
convenient
system
uf
who
DliroOII contemplate
DUICdU. spending
or
$10,0(10
in
newspaper
advertising
and
who
wish
to
get
the
most
and
best
advertising
for
the
money.
10
tSpruce
' St.,
York.
EVERY ONE SHOULD TRY
PERRY frCag patckt ;
tit si, J
PENS
ecoc-rTinu ton THORP WHO WRITE RAPIDLY.
I Ulll kV.IWIl iwt. . 1 1
Impossible to make them stick in the paper, sport,
or blot. Write very smooth and even. Samples
lent FRBE on receipt of return postage, 3 cts. Ask
iot jr. runs,
PERRY & CO.e Newark!"'
WITHOUT PAIN
Try the Fain Annihila
tor. Come Mondays and
Fridava and get BO per
cent off. Come Tuesdays,
Thursdays or Saturdays
for Fillings. Come, write
or 'phone for a date. Stay
at nome weanesaays. vt.
Bizelow has Five Assist
ants,and promises prompt
attention and 11 rat-class
work. Oriental Dental
Parlors, 115 Summlt-St.,
Toledo, Ohio.
Hattie Grissey, Sje'y.
TO 17EAK mil
8ufierisc from the effecta of youthful errors, arlv!
dcay. wastisg weakness, lost manhood, eto, I will
end a valuable treatise (waled) containing fall
particulars for boms cure, FREI' charge, i.
splendid medical work s ihouldDe read by erery.
sua who la utrvone and debillUted.j Addrsn
REWARD of$500
Bowt's French Female Pills are aafe and reliable;
contain Tansy, Pennyroyal and Cottonroot. Never
fcll. t& drag stores, or sent by mall, securely
sealed, for 1.00; three boxes $3.60. Mention this
paper. I. M. EKED, Agent, Tolido, O.
AGENTS WHTEDSrk?SVs3:
M tmanmitt. ea. A. a.!, 4 Bnadwair. M
nn
7 iaEr
JOHN DIEMER
Proprietor ef
Napoleon Meat Market,
Teel, Mnttoa, Hssns sad Shoulders, gait Fork'
vernea ei, o. w srsaers aaviBg 1st earu, aoga.
sheep, hides and Belts for sal ahoald five bias
oaita
hop, Planer's Block.Perry Street,
E. F.J SIIUMAKER,
Practical Well Driver I
f XTiix drive tubular wells from t in. up to
v v 4 in. easing, upon the most reasonable
terms. Orders may be left at this office, or
at my residence 6 miles west of Napoleon, U
or I may be addressed through the Napoleon
ponomoe, oos eue.
tf E. F. 8HTJMAKEK
WM. TIETJEN,
(Saecessor to Henry Holtsrman.)
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
' AND
UNDERTAKER.
Lady Attendant if Desired.
Embalming a Specialty. Boom In Tyler Block,
Washington St., Napoleon, O.
C. P. BEARD,
Foundrv andMachineWorks
Manufacture r ofaudDealerla
Pulleys and Boxing,
BraasOoods,IrohPlpeand Flttingl. fob work t
specialty.
NAPOLEON. OHIO.
Dr. J. W. TALB0TT,
OffleeoverKehler'i grocery store. Palnlei
traction of teeth bv the u.e of gas. All
warranted and prices low.
Joseph Shaff
Theoldreliable at tho old stand, wlththelargest
ana neat stoct ot
HAND - MADE WAGONS,
Springwagons, Buggies and Carriages of my own
make, ever offered to the people of Henry county,
made of the best selected stock andanperlorwork
mansbinineverT deDartment. I am also ore Dared
to do all kinds of repairing and horseshoeing. If
you want a good wagon, buggy or carriage, come
and see me. II yon want any una or repairing done
call on me. If you want your horses shod, give mt
aeaiianaiwillguarantee aatisraeuon.
O. H. GIDLEY,
GENERAL
Insuranee Agent.
I would respectfully Inform my '-".ends that I have
opened a general Insurance agency In Napoleon
Will write policies on all kinds of town and farm
property, including live stock. Also special A col
dentCompanv for roadsters and breeding stock.
Only reliable companies represented. Your pat
ronage is soucitea.
Office in Geo. Baam's Harness Shop,
NAPOLEON, O.
J. Overmeyer,
PRACTICAL HOUSE SHOES
Clinton Street , Napoleon, Ohio.
-Manufaciui arsof-
Doors, Sash and' Blinds,
Moldings, Window
and Door Frames,
Scroll Sawing & Turning,
Inf actallwoodworltocomplete abuildlng. Also
dealersln
Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Lime,
Cement,
PlasterandPlasteriDpHairXump Salt forsaltl
uacticanatioraes,o. we Keepconstantiy
on hand
BUILDING STONE,
andallslzesof
Foundation Block Stone.
TMesen,Hildred&Co.
Q. & C. does not stain. Prevents Stricture.
Cures Gonorrhea and Gleet in 1 to 4 days. Out
Perfection Syringe tree with each bottle.
Sent by express to any address for One Dollar.
Package securely sealed. Manufactured only by
JOHN G. McLAIN & SON,
Wheeling, W. Va.
All communications strictly confidential.
To cure Billonsness, Sick Headache, Consti
pation, Malaria, Liver Complaints, take
the aafe and certain remedy,
SMITH'S
Ue the KM AIX Size (40 little Reims to tho
buttle). They aius tiib most covvusmm,
e91il-stl' tor mil Afgom. - ,
Price of either nlzs SSe. por llott .lev
PHOTOOIAVURt
PANEL 8IZH.
J.r.tUITHAt9.akm-jHiUI,lXANa,"ST.lOUra K9
(RaT
aSa
ATTORNEYS.
R. W. CAIIILL,
A.ttoney at Law,
HAPOLKOJI, OHIO.
OTTf OX over Bradley's groeery store, trst tisi
way wsi ef the Uumcbrev block. Waahtnano-
street, jaa ll-ss
JAS. P. RAGAN,
Attorney at Laiv.
HAPOLEON, OHIO.
AlXboalaeaa proiLpty attended to.
Janie-W.
MARTIN KNUPP,
A.ttorney at Lbt,'
VAPOLIOH, OHIO.
QPFIC1 ia No.t.Vocke's Block, Second Floor
J. M. HAAG,
ATTORNEY.AT.LAw,
NAPOLEON. . . OHIO.
D OOM 9 No. I A , Vocke Bloek. Wlllpractiee la
.nu.mrivoBnj ana unitea sues uosni.
Banness win receive prompt attention. Jan 10-i
Jdsti H.Iini. JTclub H .Ttlb.
TYLER & TYLER, ,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW ,
TILIR BLOCK, HAPOLEON.O,
Money to Loan in inmi of $500 and
Upwards.
J. V. CUFF,
ATTORNEY AT LAw,
NAPOLEON, OHIO.
Will practloein 8tate and United States Courts
TO LOAN
WMoney on good Farma.aj
JUSTICES.
PHILIP C. SCHWAB,
JUSTICE of the PEACE
PLEASANT Township, Henry County, Ohio.
New Bavaria Post offlos.
JOSEPH WEIBLE,
Notary Public and Insur
ance Aeent.
FLORIDA. WKTIBV mrrwTV nnm
nEED8,MortgsgesandContracfadrawn. A rent
tnplh..lJ.ii Mil. 1.1. t1 i i - . .
Hartford, and also agent forth People's Mutual
H.n.fl , .uMl.,ln ' -nr . i n. ... i ...
busmeespromptly attended to.
H. A. MEYERH0LTZ,
Justice or the Peace,
NAPOLEON, OHIO.
QFFIC Perry atreet, opposite Court Bouse.
PHYSICIANS.
DR.J.S. HALY
Physician and Surgeon,
NAPOLEON, OHIO.
WILL attend to calls In town and eonntry. Of.
Soe over Flak ACo's grocery store.
MISCELLANEOUS.
PHILIP WEBB,
Fashionable Barber and Hair
Dresser.
OPPOSITE Bltaerblock, Perry St., Napoleon .O
Patronage solicited and good work gnaranteeds
GEO. W. VALENTINE,
Fashionable Barber and Hair
Dresser,
NAPOLEON, ' - OHIO.
ROOM West aide or Perry Street three doo
South of Flsk A Co's grocery.
FOR A GOOD SHAVE
SEITZ & ROWLAND,
Tonsorial Artists,
McCLUKE. OHIO.
aWPsrlors open every day in the week exrept Sun
uaj.. vigor oumju lu vuuziecuon,
nov. 13-ly
GEO. F. CURDES,
Confectioner and Baker,
Keeps eonstantly on hand fresh bakery goods and
fins confectionery. Ice eream. bv the dish or
quantity.
Bakery East of Engine House. '
M.JH. KIMBEKLIN,
Contractor and Builder.
Takes contracts for the erection of both brick and
frame boildinga. Office,
McClure, . Ohio.
W. L. TAYLOR,
LIYERV AND- FEED STABLE I
McCLURE, OHIO.
LIBERTY HOUSE
W. C. ROGERS, Proprietor.
Livery and Feed Stable in connection opposite
Depot.
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS
Liberty Center, Ohio.
The McChre House,
iL jomrsoar, Prop'r.
A FIRST' CLASS HOUSE
IN IVEK PAETICULAB, WITH
FEED STABLE ATTACHED.
tyThe only Hotel in McClure.-MI
Established
I860
C. E. REYNOLDS'
Land and Insurance Office
NAPOLEON. OHIO. .
MONEY TO LOAN
In i omsof Jl.OOOandnpwards on ycars' time.
Also, fire, life and accident insurance.
All losses promptly adjusted. ' '
No lots ever contested in this agency.
: . t . . . .. .!'.
OfllceoverHenry Meyer'solothlngstor,;oppotit8
ConitEoneapoleon,Ohio,.'

xml | txt