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Democratic Northwest. [volume] (Napoleon, Ohio) 1869-1894, February 12, 1891, Image 7

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THE DEMOCRATIC NORTHWEST, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1891.
BEFORE THE SHRINE.
t Mil a atartna nd as y idol there,
1 Aad Basra ud aooa aad ibt y kaa I baa,
' Aad erM uood aotll atnawta
1h whlna kia antd pity rfta any prayer.
Bornetlnara at dawning. wtm tit My was tail.
Any at Bjrht to km etsra tW sent
The semblance oc a smile. "Ltoea b relent,
1 cried, "tha atraof god Lea, wtaoa hlfh prieat
la Despair!"'
But aooa earn oe, and la Ita full clear light
I saw aa 11 pa, aa rotaleea aa of aid;
Aad bjs ffea axx-ked ma lika reienlleas fata,
Till I waa fain to aids bm freta km tight;
Tbca oaa nrept off front aim hu mantle's fold,
Aad lol my Idol waa aot Lore, but Hate.
fT.irhange.
A HUT IN THE PRAIRIE.
x cnecKea mj mint, ana alter one
long, straining look around owned to
myielf that I in lost I had suspected
the tact soma time since, bat had stub
bornly fought down the suspicion, though
my hone evidently realized it With pa
tient endurance he plodded along, resig
nation plainly expressed in the droop of
his tail and ears. A Texas prairie is a
beautiful, soul inspiring sight on a bright
day, when the sky is an inverted bowl of
turquoU, and the wind conies sweeping
over the grassy wastes as fresh and sweet
as the bloom on a baby's cheek, but
there can.bs no greater sense of desola
tion born of nature than that aroused by
this same prairie when it lies black and
bare to the chill October wind, which
has plucked the glory of Indian summer
froin earth and sky.
I felt this as I gazed about me, discon
certed and even a trifle anxious, for the
sun had set some minutes before in a
cloud heap, which, closing over it like a
rebel horde deposing its king, overran
his monarchy with its blood red standard.
In place of the ranch, the hearty wel
come, pleasant words, bed, supper and
fire I had expected to reach, by sunset,
there was nothing to bs-seeo-befoW, be-
. hind. An miliar hand, hnt r.ViA AnnA IavaI
, i
of the plain. There were paths in plenty;
in fact, the trouble was there were too
manyall narrow and winding, for
whose meandering there seemed not the
slight" i excuse, except the general tend
ency f crookedness most things, ani
mate i d inanimate alike, possess. Bat
it woi I have taken the instinct of a
bloodl knd or a trailing Indian to have
said ' pich paths had been made by
horses set or those of cattle. It was
certainly beyond my powers to decide,
and in addition to their doubtful nature
they had a most perplexing way of run
ning into each other, crossing and re
crossing, going off at a tangent and fre
quently wandering off and getting lost
altogether. So I soon dismissed the
problem as hopeless of solution.
Now that the sun was gone, I found
my knowledge of the points of the com-
. pass gone with it As I sat perplexed
and worried the gloom of twilight gath
ered fast and the chill of coming rain
smote me through and through, while in
the distance there was the roll of thun
der. Glancing up I saw that the masses
Of cloud had closed together in a curtain
of gray mist My horse strode on of
his own accord, and hoping that his in
stinct would lead us to some house I let
' him have his will. Presently it began
to rain, a sort of heartbroken, passion
less weeping, but with a steady deter
mination to persevere all night, that
' awoke graver apprehension in my bosom
than any amount of blustering, show
ery downpour could have done. This
fine still rain was accompanied by a low
soughing wind that added its desolate
note to the general dreariness of the
hoar. Of coarse I did not mind a little
rain, bat the prospect of spending the
entire night exposed to it was anything
but agreeable, and I grew reafiy violent
in denunciation of the folly which had
led me, an utter stranger in the coun
try, to attempt to find anything less
than a volcano in active eruption on a
bald prairie.
The Texans are a fine people, in some
in many respects the most admirable
of hosts, bat individually and collect
ively they lack any appreciation of dis
tance. This is due of coarse to them
having so much space around them, but
to a stranger ignorant of the extent to
which the phrases "a little piece oat"
and "just outside o' town" can be
stretched this contemptuous regard of
miles is a little misleading. But in the
face of that dreary, monotonous moan
ing of rain and wind even my anger at
my own lolly could not burn long, and
though chilled to the bone and tired and
hungry I plodded on dully, grateful
that no night, even the longest, could
last forever. It was now quite dark,
and very dark at that, though at short
intervals close to the horizon a 'faint
gleam of lightning showed, too distant
to cast Dngutness on my path and only
sufficient to intensify the blackness
about me. .
- All at once I saw a man walking about
fifteen feet in front of me. . Yes, I know
I said it was intensely dark, but all the
same, I repeat it, I saw a man walking in
front of me, and furthermore I could see
that he was a large man, dressed in
. rough bat well fitting clothes; that he
wore a heavy red beard, and that he
AW.J WWVB UW 414 V 4VU1 UAUC1 LU LlAAuQ
with an expression of keen anxiety on
'" his otherwise rather fixed features.
"Hallo!" I cried, but as he did nt
halt I concluded ne did not hear me. As
, a second hail produced no result I sparred
my weary horse up to overtake the stran
ger. But thougV the gray responded
with an alacrity most commendable un
der the circumstances, I soon found that
this strange pedestrian did not intend to
let me catch np with him. Not that he
harried himself. He seemed without
i any exertion to keep a good fifteen feet
between us. Then I began to wonder
' how, with intense darkness shutting me
in as four black walls, I was yet able to
see my strange companion so clearly, to
take in the details of his dress, and even
the expression of his face, and that at a
; distance, more - than twice my horse's
length when I could hardly see hjs head
before me. I am not given to Supersti
tious fancies, and my only feeling was
of ctirty; 'enafter attempt after
attempt to overtake1 the stranger had
Ifailed, I took mercy on my jaded horse,
and resolved to follow my unsociable
Prof. Harriet Cooke is the first wo
man to be honored by a chair and equal
pay as a professor la Cornell Univer
sity. She is Professor of History and
-has taught in Cornell 23 years. v. -
guide, as he most hare some definite des
tination. We went on in silence for nearly half
aa hoar, when as suddenly as he had ap
peared be was gone. I looked around
for him, half afraid from his instant and
complete disappearance that I had been
dreaming, when I perceived that I was
close to a small, low building of some
sort I reined in and shouted several
times, but not the slightest response
could I hear, and at last I rode boldly np
and tapped on the wall with the butt of
my riding whip. Then, as this elicited
no sign of life, I concluded that I had
stumbled on some deserted house, or
that it was the abode of my eccentric
friend; so dismounting and tying the
gray I resolved to spend the rest of the
night under a roof or to find some good
reason for continuing my journey. I
felt my way along the wall till I reached
a door, and trying this and finding that
it yielded to me I stepped inside, strik
ing a match as I did so. Fortunately I
carried my matches in an air tight case,
and as it was dry the one I struck gave
me a light at once. I found myself in a
large room, close to a fireplace, over
which a rude shelf was placed, and on
this mantel I saw an oil lamp, to which
I applied my match as I looked about me.
On the hearth was heaped a quantity
of ashes, and over these crouched a
child, a little girl of Sort. At the other
end of the room, which was plainly and
scantily furnished, lay a man across a
bed, and as I raised the lamp I saw that
he was the same I had been following,
but there was something in his attitude
and face that struck me as peculiar, and
I was about to go forward and look at
him, when the child, who had at first
seemed dazed at the light, fairly threw
herself upon me.
"Have yon anything for Nelly to eat?"
she said, and then began to cry. "Oh,
Nelly so hungry H
I ran my hand into my pocket and
drew forth what had been a paper bag
of chocolate candy, but was now a pulpy
unappetizing mass. I most confess to a
childish fondness for sweets, which I
usually carry in some form about me. I
handed the remains of my day's supply
to the child, and then walked over to
the bed. Yes, it was the same man, red
beard, rough clothes; but setting oft the
magnificent frame to perfection; the
same man, but dead, long dead.
I took his hand only to find it stiff and
cold, while his face had the dull gray as
pect never seen in the newly dead. As
I stood gazing down on him a little
hand touched mine.
"Nelly so hungryl" said the child.
"Have you eaten all the candy?" I
asked her.
"Yes, yes! But me hungry, for me
had no dinner, no brekkns, no supper,
and papa won't get np."
The house, which consisted of the
large room, a smaller kitchen and a
shed, where I found a quantity of hay
and fodder, seemed quite bare of food,
bat by dint of searching in the hay I
discovered a nest, which Nelly informed
me was there, and in it two fresh eggs.
These I boiled for her. When she had
finished I soothed her to sleep on a bed I
made for her before the fire. Then after
I had put my horse in the shed room and
fed and watered him I performed as
well as I could a service for the dead.
When day dawned I was able to dis
cern at some distance from the house a
line of telegraph poles, and taking the
child with me I followed these to the
nearest town, where I notified the au
thorities of the death.
The dead man's name was Frederick
Barnstaple. He was an Englishman, so
I found, a recent arrival 'in those parts.
His daughter was restored to her family
across the water, and is now a pretty
girl of 17. I have never told this story
before, but I am ready to take an affi
davit to its truth. It all hamened about
thirty miles from Dallas.
r
Do the Deaf Dream of Hearing?
Dr. J. M. Buckley, an expert in mat
ters pertaining to the deaf and dumb,
has the following curious note to con
tribute concerning the dreams of persons
born deaf:
In visiting institutions for the blind
and the deaf I have made inquiry, and
have never found an instance of a person
born deaf, or of a child who lost his
hearing before he was 4 years of age,
dreaming of hearing. Among the results
of recent inquiries I present the follow
ing from the principal of the State Insti
tution of the Blind and Deaf at St. Au
gustine, Fla.:
"I have closely questioned the deaf
children here as to whether they have
ever dreamed of hearing, and the invaria
ble answer is 'No.' I have asked the
same question of upward of fifty deaf
persons with the same result, except
where the person interrogated had lost
his hearing after learning to talk. These
last mentioned are all grown persons of
some education who understood the ques
tion fully, and are very positive that
they had never dreamed of hearing more
than a rumbling sound." St Louis Re
public. Some People Never Learn.
It is surprising how some people will
continue to use things in daily life with
out any attempt to learn how properly
to use them. There is, for instance, the
man who can never learn to sharpen his
razor, the woman who winds her watch
the wrong way, the people who do not
know that the time of starting the prin
cipal trains on the different railroads
and the time of closing the mails is ad
vertised in the newspapers, the people
who blow oat the gas, the folks who
jump the wrong way from a moving
car, the unfortunates who are always
getting left or suffering injury or losing
property because 6f unfamiliarity with
things they ought to know. New York
Sun. .
How to Succeed.
' This is the great problem of life which few
satisfactorily solve. Some fail because of
poor health, others for want of lack, but the
majority rrom deficient gnt want of nerve.
Ther are nervous, irresolute, changeable.
easily get the bines and'Hake the spirits down
to keen the spirits up." thus wasting monev.
time, opportunity and nerve force. There is
nothing like the Restorative Nervine, dis
covered by the great specialist, Dr. Miles, to
cure all nervous diseases, as head ache, the
Dines, nervous prostration, eieeplessnes,
neuralcria, St Vitus dance, fits, and hysteria.
Trial bottles and fine book of testimonials
free at Isa .Lust's drags tore
Subscribe for the Northwest $1,50
A MODEST CHURCH.
riaas by L If. Glbaoaj ! Oaaaawn
aVaaa Aboat Yeatllatiaa.
(Copyright by Annsrlcaa Prraa AaaodaUoa.)
When a church is to be built one of the
principal things mentioned by those im
mediately Interested U that the entire
pace within the structure shall be made
available for hearing and seeing. In the
ease of a little church that seats only 800,
if there be a little room to one side, it is
desirable that the seating capacity of this
room be available in connection with the
Urge room, so that upon extraordinary
occasions all may be thrown into one.
This is an almost universal condition, and
Is particularly true of small churches.
Take the ease of the little plan here
given. In the main audience room there
is a seating capacity of about 235. In the
Sunday school class room back of the main
room there is capacity for about fifty more,
and thirty-five or forty may be seated in
the gallery above. The class room in this
and other structures of similar character
should be arranged so that it may be cut
off from the main room, and have its in
dividual use without connection with the
larger room. Thus the purpose of the
meeting is better subserved, and at times
heat and light are economized.
A vestibule of relatively large size is al
ways desirable in connection with a church
FBONT ELEVATION,
building. People come on a cold or rainy
day, take off their wraps and overshoes,
and arrange themselves in a way to dis
turb none who are on the inside. Then it
is much pleasanter not to have a door
opening directly into the room from
the cold or noise of the street It
is true that there is one door which
opens from the class room to the out
side in the case of this structure, but it
is placed there in deference to prejudice
and not to reason. The people who build
this church think that on general prin
ciples it is quite desirable that two doors
be provided, that upon the unusual occa
sion both doors may be open that large
numbers may pass through both entrances.
In case of fire it is argued that the church
can be emptied much more rapidly. Now,
in truth, the extra door will not be used
in this building, and in a one story struct
ure there is not much danger of being in
jured by fire. As it is, one can go into the
vestibule and thence to the main room,
or from this same room to the class room
or the gallery above. Thus the extra door
is altogether unnecessary.
There is nothing plentier outside a
church than fresh air, and it is almost uni
versally true that the air inside the church
is nasty. A great deaLpf energy has been
wasted in attempts at-f hurch ventilation,
and for anything which is so desirable as
fresh air it is really very strange that noth
ing proper has been done in the way of
supplying what is wanted. Now it is said
that fresh air is cheap. While this is true
as to fresh air, it is not true as to fresh nir
warmed to a summer temperature during
very cold weather. The coal combination
has something to say about the price of
warmed fresh air. There is one way to
furnish good air in the church building of
this kind. Warm it below in a furnace,
let it pass through the room and to the
outside.
The furnace should be ample, the air in
let large and the air outlet large. The coal
jX
PLAN.
pile should be ample, because large quanti
ties of outside air are brought into the fur
nace and heated by it, distributed through
the registers in the floor to the room above,
breathed and allowed to pass out. Now
this is simple, natural ventilation; but peo
ple will be wiser than they are now before
a church will be ventilated in this way.
There is always some one to object to the
coal bill. It is cheaper to breathe the
nastiness of foul air, and those who ob
ject to the coal bill do not care for the bad
ventilation. They are used to it They
are old; they have been brought up on it
It is hard to beat an idea into a man who
has been breathing bad air all his life.
This structure is of wood, sheathed,
papered and weatherboarded. It is sub
stantially built and cost about 13,000. The
details of the plan are self explanatory.
Louis H. Gibson.
Purchasing wall paper at one establish
ment, carpets at another, curtains some
where else and furniture upholstery in an
other place, frequently produces a perfectly
meaningless result when the work is done.
Itch on human and all animals cured in 90
minutes Woolford's Sanitary Lotion. This
never fails. Sold by D. J. Humphrey, drug-
gist, napoieon, u. decn-yu-iy
Subosribe foe the nobthwist; $1.50a yeai
rne and
1 N FANTS-cS-l NVAUDS.
THE (Perfect Substitute
CNLYf Mother's Ullk.
INVALUAILC
m Cholera Infantum
and Tccthino.
A Quickly Assimilate Food for
DY8PEPTIC9,
CONSUMPTIVES,
CONVALESCENTS,
A PERFECT. NUTRIENT
In all Wasting Dlsoases.
R EOUIRESNO COOKING.
KEEPS IN ALL CLIMATES.
send for f "The Can and
ttwr Book I Feeding of Infants"
K AILED WRKB TO AST ADDRESS.
00L18FB-C00DALE CO.
EUdTON. MASS.
D
O.
a
tp
0
3
m
u
2
O
73
m
m
Q
o
a
Now for Bargains in New Styles and Pat
tern in '
Furniture of Exclusive Designs
tyA Complete stock or Baby Carriages of the
ceieoraiea a ay wooa mane. KememDer,
onra la the only exolualTe
BEDDING & FURNITURE faOUSE
IN TOLEDO.
M. BARTLETT,
018 .Jefferson Street.
' a M n mnro
a v v iiivi w
Rubber Shoes nnlesa worn uncomfortably tight,
generally slip off toe feet.
THE '"COLCHESTER" RUBBER CO.
make all their thoes with Inside of heel lined with
rubber. Tbia cllnga to the shoe and pruvcuta tne
rubber trom (lipping oft.
Call for the Colchester"
"ADHESIVE COUNTERS.'
When I say CtrsB I do not mean inertly to
Stop them for a time, and then have them re.
turn again. I mean A RADICaXi CUIUS.
I nave made toe disease ot
SITS, EPILEPSY or
FALLING SICKNESS,
A life-long study. I TTaMAKT my remedy to
Crnts the worst coses. Because others have
failed ia no reason for not now receiving a cure.
Send at once for a treatise and a Fans Bottls)
of my Ibtallxblb Bkmedt. Give Express
and Foat Office. It costs yon nothing lor a
trial, and it will care you. Address
H.C.ROOT.M.C., I83PEABLSTKWV0K
C
OMMISSION
--SALESMEN
DOTY & WATKINS,
N. Y. C. Stock Yards,
EAST BUFFALO, NEW YORK.
S:rwSiams,ha!CATTLE.
Jas. Pixley, Salesman, HOGS.
B. V. Vliklns, Salesman, SHEEPa
SALES GUARANTEED
At Full Market Price on all Stock consigned
to as. Bin au suipmenra in your own
iu vur euro.
market Reports
-And Stock Provmu
Account Books
FREE
Communication!! by mall or telegraph will
receive prompt attention. Address,
DOTY & WATKINS,
1031 William St, East Buffalo, N. Y.
atFor LOSXorFAIIJIK MABHOODl
ftfChtoml and KEKVODS DiBILITYf
lilWeakaaaaaf Body and Hind, ESacta
lljnf Xrnraor ExnsiMl in Oldar Younc
MolMMt. Hebl. BAKMOOD rally Rtitorad. How t. MillrM .ud
suwatkwui,iSDiiTsLOFiDOKiiiisariaTsorsooT;
iwmit akiliu HO IBIATaiHT-SMrtu la
M IMMI7 na mV BWMHM .MvqjH l ..Ml nnwuMi
k. noluatlM aad anah OMlIrd (anted) fMa.
aadraia KRIS MEKlCAk CO.. BUFFALO. N. Va
0ERTESH3
orothen
this papet, obtsnTiW al
'll MIT Si
. ei. If-
.'"fJala'rr--
on advertising spec whan In Chicago, will nno It on
45 to 49 Randolph St., flRn ft.TI?n,5Vti
rcRD&TKoriiory:. eobthwest. suo
he Advertising Agency of
TIF.1E TABLE
PlSSnCEtt LUTE
NAPOLEON.
GOING EAST.
0. 42 X.T.and Boston Llmltai1. I: IS a at daily
" II Tolada Acoommodatloa i:M anax. ua
" 41 Toledo Irpreaa t:1Samax. Sob
- 44 Atlantic Zxpresa. 7:58 p m dally
TO Local Freight.... 135 a m ex. Saa
GOING WEST,
So. 4S Paoiio Eipraaa 1.00 am dally
- 41 KaniaiCltT Express 11 30am x. Sun
- JT DeflaoeeAecommodatlon.. Sd7pmex.8nn
" 48 St. Lonla Limited.... fA p aa daily
- 71 Local Freight 9:06 am ex. San
' H. L. ISICKRBOCKZH.a
CIHCINNAUHAMIUON &DAYT0N Rfl
THE FINEST ON EARTH.
THE ONLT
Pullman Perfected Safety
Vestitoiled Train Service
WITH DINING CAR
BCTWIEH
CIIGIIUTI,
I10I1I1P0LIS,
HIID C H IC AGO
THE FAVORITE THROUGH CAB LINK
CINClMATIto ST.LOUIS
Keokuk, Springfield and Peoria.
TBS ONLY SIBECT LKE
BITWISE
Cincinnati, Dayton, Findlay, Lima, To
ledo, Detroit,
LAKE REGIONS & CANADA
Pullman Sleepers en Night Trains.
Parlor and Chair Cars on Say Trains,
BSTWEIH
Cincinnati and Points Enumerated,
THE TEAK BOUND.
M. D. WOODFOBD, JS. Q. MoC OBM1CK,
vicsrrea. oen. r-ass. agt .
NOTICE
TEACHERS
The Board of School Examiners of Henry
county, Ohio, will hold meetings for the ex
amination of applicants for teacher's certifi
cates as follows;
InBasement of Court House in Na
poleon, Ohio, on the 1st and 3d Satur
days in March and the 1st and Sd Sat
urdays in April and Hay, the 1st Sat
urday in June and August, the 1st
and 3d Saturdays in September and
the 1st and 3rd Saturdays in October,
the 1st and 3d Saturdays in November
and the 1st Saturdays in December
and January, and the 1st and 3d Sat
nrdays in February.
Evidence of good moral character will be
required of all candidates. That evidence to
be a personal knowledge of the Examiners
concerning the applicant, or certificates of
good moral character from some reliable
source.
A. A. TYLER,
MRS. SUE WELSTED,
PHILIP. 0. SCHWAB,
Examiners.
VV. L. DOUGLAS
fcO atl 1 P aad other special.
43 n a J f tlea for Gentlemen,
, . 7 "a Ladies, etc., are war
ranted, and so stamped on bottom. Address
W.L. DOUGLAS. BraktontlUaaa. Soldty
M. HEISER, Aj;t
PATENT
Obtained, and all other bn sinessin the C. S.Paten
Officeattended to for MODERATE FKES.
Ourofflce is opposite the U . 8 . Paten to (Hoe, and
wecanobtainPatentein less time thos those re
mote from WASHINGTON.
Send MODEL OB DRAWING. We advise as to
patentability frae of charge; and we make NO
CHARGE UNLESS WE OBTAIN PATENT.
. We refer, hero to the Postmaster, the Sept. of
money vcuer iv., na w umcuuB oicne u.B. rat
ent Office. Forclrcnlar, advloe, terms, and refer
ences to actnalclients in yonr awn State or county,
addraai
- l
IB - V.A.0J.11VV Ob jJ.t
OpposltePatentOfflce.WasMneton.D. 0.
rum j CARini.
4350 il'V jlADlES
UCCKEYE ROTJXE.
THE COLUMBUS,
HOCKING VALLEY
A5D
TOLEDO RAILWAY CO.
COLUMBUS. TOLEDO. ATHENS, and
POMEItOY.
dtbsct un to aaa raoai
Detroit, Jackson, Lansing,
ct! michigan points,
chicago, st. paul
GREAT NORTHWEST.
T5S Note Following Time Card.
noiflDo3TiBSla3tnoat
Chicago.....
Detroit
..Lt
r.m.
a. a.
L.
Toledo..
so
10 S5I
Postorat
T M
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Oarer.. ....
Up. Sandusky..
Marlon.... .
it os
ft 57
ISM
A.
f
1 141
Prospeet
Ml
1 sol
5 M
Delaware.........
Colombos
10 121
1 sal
f II
. Ar
.Lt.
11 00
1 40
5 501
4 1
6 CO
IT 16
Colombna ,
P.M.
7 on
SOD
Laaoaatar
Ixwan
t 15)
7 08
7 50
133
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10 00)
Neiaonviila
Athene..... ....
MeArthnr....
Galllpolia ...
Mlddleport.....
Pomeroy
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19 17
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11 00)
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10 M
7 r
I on
1 10
12 28
1 02
1 12
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Ir. .i
soma aoBnu
no 331 no 87 no.,31 mo SSlno 40
Pomeroy
Lv
t 40
miaaiepoit
OaUinolis
4 50
5 M
( Ml
6 50
MeArthnr
Athens
Neleonvule
Logan
7 M
4110
I 00
Lancaster
Oolambai ,
Columbia.......
Delaware..
8 88
501
10t0
(80
880
-Ar
A, M.
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5 00
8 45
10 Nil
11 SO
5 58
SO
4 85
5 11
Marlon
Un. Sandnak..
12S10
,1145
7 Mi
16 If
Carey..
Foatnrla..
Toledo .
Detroit..,.
Chicago.
T a
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7 04
I 15
125
8 05
.Ar
2ni
8
r.
at.
r. at.
Ar
20
8 501
12
10 SI
I 25
Dally, t Dally, except Sunday. Meals.
Rates Tin theBnckeva Bonta an llnnulmlu
by any other line. Through tickets sold and bag
gage checked to dcstlnation-lfo. Q?J tli sTM1
it contemplating a journey'in any dlrection,pleaaa
call on nearest agent of the company, or address
any of the following representative of the passen
ger department for feldera. rates and other Informa
tion: E. H. DAYIDSOir. Northern Paeaenrar laanL Da.
troit.
H.A. Wiuoh, City Passenger Agent, Toledo,
L. W. L TOMAN. Southern Paaaenrer AmtnL
Gall'.polis, O.
L. W. BtTLnvASTn.' Citr cassensw isd Ticket
Agent, 31e W. High BU, Columbus, 0.
Chas. H. PooKwmx. General annerlntcnditnl.
Columbus.
W. H. Fishib, General Passenger and Ticket
Agent, Boom 81, Deshler Block, Columbua.
BALTIMORE & OHIO LB.
TIME TABLE.;
NOV. 18th, 1800.
WEST BOUND ,
STATIONS 7 9 3108 15
PM I AM AM FM AM '
Ar. Deflanoe 8 50 ( 80 11 47 11 20 2 8
FM AM
Ar. Chicago. 980 11 40 (4 6 K) 8 25
ninplnnnH A ..nmnMlln. n m. o.o
.M.v.imiuu.MVH .CCD fi.UnTUlBO.M
Colnmbus at 8:30 a. m., Oincinnatl 12:45 p.m.
AST BOUND .
8 ( 10, 14 1 10?
AM PM AM FM FM
10 10 3 65 t7 10 t 06 1004
P m PM AM
3 00 8 00 2 12 1 48 4 17
7 08 .... 7 06 215 11 58
PM
1 40 .... 7 40 .... 12 30
AM
I 14 11 31 ... 2 44 45
AM PM
9 30 3 60 .... 86 1 25
PM AM
A 50 11 35 11 25
AM PM
8 07 1 00 .... 5 001240
8 47 1 44 .... 5 53 1 30
1155 4 4o .... 10 00 5 10
PM
7 25 .... 4 00 8 00
AM PM AM
II 60 4 40 7 10
12 45 5 45 8 30
8 25 8 15 11 IS
PM
5 52 10 40 1 40
STATIONS.
Lt. Chicago.....
Defiance
Ar. Monroeville..,.
' Sandusky
Mansfle Id ......
Colnmbus
i
Lt. Columbus.....
" Newark
- Zanesvllle
" Wheeling ,
" Pittsburgh.,..
Washington..,
" Baltimore...,
" Philadelphia.
" New York...
Accommodation train leaves Colnmbus at 4:30 p.
m . dally, except Sunday, Newai k 6 :45 p . m. ; arrives
Zanesvllle 6 :35 p. m .
Columbus and Sanduskr Accommodation leaves
Colnmbus t7:30 n. m., arrives Sandusky 12:30p.m.
PULLMAN SERVICE.
Wheeling, Newark and Chicago on trains Nog 5,
6, 14 and 15.
Pittsburgh and Chicago, trains Nos. 6, (,14 and
15.
Chicago, Newark, Baltimore and New York trains
Noa. 5, 0, 7 and 8.
Pittsburgh and Cincinnati, trains Noa. 105, 106, 108
and 104.
Chicago and Chicago Junction trains Nos. 3 and 4.
Trains rnn'daily. tDilly except Sunday.
(Daily except Monday.
For further information call on B A O Ticket
Agent, or address O. P. McCarty. Asa't Goal Pass.
Agent, Cincinnati, C; L. H, Allen, Asa't Gen'l
Pass. Agent, Chicago, 111.
J.T.ODELL, CHAS. O. SCULL,
Gen'l Manager. Gen'l Pass. Au't.
EDW. DICKINSON,
Gen'l Superintendent.
THE
ANSAS
ROUTE
STANDARD GUAGE I
SPLENDID ROAD 'BED
NEW STEEL RAIL I
NEW MODERN EQUIPMENT
Everything Arranged for Comfort of Passengerx.
FAST
Express Trains
East i West
3 TRAINS EACH WAY between TOLEDO, On
and FRANKFORT,tIND.
2 T BAINS EACH WAY between FrJANKFOBT
IND., and St. LOUIS, MO.
(Dally except Sunday.)
All Toledo St Louis Passenger Trains
Arrive and epart from Union Depot, avoid
ing Transfer
THROUOHTICKETS
ON SALE AT PRINCIPAL STATIONS.
' BAGGAGE Checked to Destination
Full information concerning time of Tralna,
Routes Sates, o., will be cheerfully furnished by
agents , or the undersigned.
C. C. JENKINS,
Gen'l Pass. Aztnt,
TOLEDO OHIO.

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