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The Stark County Democrat. (Canton, Ohio) 1833-1912, August 05, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028490/1868-08-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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A. M'CRECOR & SON,
PUBLISHERS.
TEB.MS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
CASH. M ADTAICE. . -
3,00
A Pallor, te sobiy a diaconuruaoce at the end ef
the time subecrlbea for will be conaldered the
sane ee a new engagement OT subscription.
.aNo psper will he discontinued eseept at the
spiles of tbe publishers. ,
DIRECTORY.
ARCHITECT.
J PIT Nl MSBY. PLAIN AND ORNAMKN
lei FtuOrar. Canton, Ohio. Reference, F.
M. Mnrc K-o. r. Canton. 8. C Porter, Architect.
Clevclaud. noetf
.1.
C. UOXtE, AROIIITKCT. PENN ("MARBLE
Bui LI In. 430 Wamut street, rhila.t.-lpn'a
an' a. tOca hoars- a to ia, to a. iuoj oi-ij
HE. JIYER, Architect, Clove
. Wad, UBIo. OOlee 161 Superior Si.
over Koehler'a Clothing Store. S3m6
UMUa GISTS.
c
J.QE10ER. DRUUOIST. KAST TCSCARAW-
a eireel. Canton, Onio.
I -0- WILLIAMS A CO., DKrGOISTS AND
. pbarmaceutiata and Oraerai Dealera in Drug
PalMaOlls. Putent Moillriore, Dye Stuffa, Ac
Vint (Uxr Weal of Poet orBce. Main alreel, Alilauce,
Ohio. lav-Precrlptioua pryarcd at
day or nlbt. .
all bour
. TAILORING.
ERCHANT TA1LOB ABSALOM KITT, AND
Oltl
to.
l dealer In Clothe, t'aniiim Ve.tmK, Kealy
fade Clothing,
. 4D, Ohio.
Eae Tuacarawae blreet, Oan-
janl
PRINTING.
STARK rOUNTI UESIH.KA1-A. .llnt.rcKor
a aoo. Fubuehare, aul Plata end Fancy Job
rnourt.
xjuOKINDING.
HIRAM TIITJH9TON BOOK-BINDER AND
Blank Book Manulaoturar. all or.lvm from
a hroad promptly attended to. Bin-Jerym 11 trier's
IUoc I up alairat. Canton. Ohio.
' " UND liliTA K i N G.
r-RrNCK a IIAA8.
A. tslie, end all kiada at Colbuaalwava on hand.
Two llaaraaa alwaye la readine.e
e' Tuscarawas atraat canton, O.
UNbKKTAKKKS. ME-
on hand,
r-ael end
PHOTOGRAPHER.
EDWIN BMITI1. PHOTOGRAPHER, etc, PAU
llcular ttiuoiim given to copy in? and to
larctus pictures. Oval Kraatea and Albania eou
etantly oa baud. Rnoran lu alatthewV HI'Kk, klrd
boot aoalk Market Susans, CautoaO. luuU oOif
PHYSICIANS
JOHN A- McDoNAXB. M. D.. HOMCSPATHIO
f livalnau. Canton, Oulo. Offloa In bt lllock
aprTJK . ;
DENTISTS.'
li. a 1 D D A L L DENTIST. OFF1CK IN
Ilartor'a Bank Block. Oauloo. Ohio. All oa-
eratio a id Mectiaalcal LK.'Ulil.r iXTiormra lu me
Itteat and moat ImprtiTad maim or. lie would cnll
eapacial attention tn hia Gold r. limit, in wh'rh, la
tha worda or A. Ward," he ta auaila by lew and
zeal 14 by Bona.
SURGEON DKNTI3T A. J DOUDS, OKF1CK
up ataira aboea Ixubal'a Jwirjr Store, Canlou,
Ohio, All operationa connected wita the rorea-tiao
promptly attended to. dee 18
J.
BANKERS.
CtEORGKD. BARTER BROTHER. BASK
J Kits, ttouth Maaket Street, Canton. Ohio. Re
culra DeiMMiia, Loan Muuey, Buy Oold, Silver,
IbMide and Compuaud lutoraat utee. Jkxchatio
Kouht and Sold. uov.O T
ATTOR-KEYS.
at
f ' O. -MnGREUOR, Attorney at Law. and Ocn
ill a rial CollvcuiiK A
Moaoort.
geut, CarthaKe, Ja'pvr Co.,
oci-uu
HHTXY LAVGIILIN. ATTOUNElf AT LAW,
Notary public and Military Claim Akani. Alli
ance, Ohio. SKtf.
'CHAKTER A LYNCH.
lormed a co-partnerahip in Ilia lYaciica of Law
, Atark eouatT,
ATTORNEYS. DAVB
tin
O.
1) ffiOw 0 io a.
GKORGE S. BALDWIN, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Cavotoa Ohio. onto is J rump's BuUtiiajt.
"I") KX.BEH A McKINLKY. ATTORNKTS AT LAW
JL- Csvuum, OaH. unlet m 1 runo liuutuu
ccoxui aIofj. I Jua i IbwT.
II. S
tel.
MARTIN. ATTORNEY AT LAW. CAN-
Oaotoo, Ohie. Ortlc. opponte St. I luiiii ti o-
. . - mar 'us-it.
T W. MoCOKO,
I e ueaerai uoiiecuoo agent, am
e-naaa eatrueted to hia care will receive prompt
sttntioa.
aotf
ATTORN KY AT LAW AND
General Collection Agent, ailianr.. o. All bu-
Omca la Commercial Block up ataira.
GROKOB W. "RAFF, ATTORNEY AT LAW
Canton, Ohio, baa permaaaatly located In
Canton, and will.devot. azulnaive atuatioa to the
practice of hia profeaaion. All touainaaa entruated
io him will be diligeatlv and promptly attended to.
OIBee la Martar a Itew Block up ataira. t
JOSfiVTH CRRVOISIE. J a.. JCSTCE OF TUB
Peeoe and Notary Publio. Ortlce North-Eaat
eorner. Public square, tauten, Ohio, will attend
to drawing deed., mortgagea.aowera ofattomey.
Ac. Is additloa to tha Kngliah, he alao apeaka tha
taernwaa and French languag ea. Be will alao pra
eura paaaporta for paraona wiehlnx to go to Kn
Vpa. ill
(
JEWELERS.
IVEUBLX fc BHOTUJCK, UH&LI.RS WATCH
J mm. UtocKa. Jwirv o oiivr Wurt Jtc.
sxio of th Publin Houai Ctkutoo, 'b.u. ir
Miriiev0 dons oa shork bvoUc.
J
OSKPU A. METER, DEALER IN WATCHES,
Clocka, Jewe ry and ram-y Aruclea, nottnweat
eorner of Market Square, Canton, O. aa . impair
ing of Watv-hesaasiocka and Jewelry aai'.ract-irily
done.
HOTELS.
iiTu:LoL'l HOTEL TUkCAlCa.aAaV tllikT.
-O Weet of Coifrt lliaac, Cautou, ttlio. L. W,
fook dt Son, propnatora. . .;. . najniso.i
tXCBANOB HOTEL, JOHN FIBLDINU. PRO-
i pnetora, at
A. Piaao. Clerk.
I J nnetora. at ilia Leuot. Canton. Ohio. F.
. ANIRL SOtTRBECK ALLIANCE IIOCSE-
attha Station, Alliance. O. Mull alwaya
trwadaseaa as ana arrival of the Gara
TACKSON UOTKL, LOUI9 OIILIQUER, PKO-
aJ prielor. North Market-t. Canton. Ohio.
MISCELLANEOUS.
c -IKAL KSTATR. W. C. THOMPSON, DEALER
at-A w In Keal Katala. Honaea and Building Lota
near ina l aw xh-pak ana juacnine pnnrw.
lea at tha American Hotel. aprS ,Ctf.
COUNTY SURVEYOR'S OFFICE
'Is Irxutted with the County IWonlur's
la tba Wlkidal Building;, north of the old
Court House, Canton, Ohio, where ho can
found when In the city : if riot, nny bu
siness wanted can be left with Jacob Kep-
.-llnirer. Eea.. County Recorder, who tvul
o-lve due notice to the undersigned.
The law authorises the County Surveyor
to tike the acknowledgment of any in
strument of .writinu- he will therefore
write) and ' acknowledK Airreeuients,
MoiiKHfteM, Deads, Ac, do , at , fair prices
and upvn Hie shortest notice.
J. U. WILLI AR).
' ' ' Surveyor of Stark county,
Canton. Jan. 15 ixoa.
aar "
MEDICAL.
MJ) ESTABLISHED HOSPI-
J TAL On tha French system.
QUICK CURES aud LOW PRICES.
Twenty Thousand Cured Annually.
Iff wetler-conthiaea to be covfldentlally and
comralted on ail brmi of private diaeaaee,
at bla old ealabllahed lloepllal, So. Ilcaver aureet,
a ik.nv New York.
Tweuty yearn devoted to thla partlcnlar branch
nractlce. enabiea him to perform enree each aa
rhr Dhvalclan cam and h'a tacllitlraare auch
inia In correannndrnce with the moat emUirn!
aiclana of the Old World) for obtaining the anfat
well a the la teat remedice fcrr the diaeaaee, that
can wlfor inducamenta to the nuUirtiiaaLre.of a
cure to oe eutainea at mi ointjr nine, in America,
tn Srtihlllta. Qunorrha), Stricture, Eiiiarifement
of the Teeticlee, aud Spermatic Corde, bubo, L'leer--,-a
Throat. Son Nim. Toudrr Shin Bonea.
seooa Emptlona, Bilee. TJlccre, Abceea, and all
.r Impunueaei me ayiri. - .
YOUNG M.N
addicted to secret habits, who have impaired
k...nh aud deatmyed tha vigor of their mlnrle.
..r.rlvlni; tncmaeivee of tue pieaanrea or Married
Lire, are not.ned that ta conealUn Dr. T. they
a puyviciaa yt liu
find a frtena v coaaoie,
cured ttiouaanue.
C UK. TELLBU'S GREAT WORK
,H. Married aad iboea contemulatinir marrUure'
) pagea full of plate, price Ho ceuta. Sent
all parte audef seal, by mail, poet paid. The
married and tbe married happy. A lecture on
or sow to chooeo s partner a Complete work
midwifery- It conutiua htutdrada of aecreta
aofore publlahed M cenU enclosed will aecurea
Mm, h. return mail.
copy ' to THK LADIES
Dr. Teller still retatne In America the agency
aale 01 ur. vicnoi. aiaiiao aeanaia moauil
Pllla, for atoppagee, Irrtgulartuea and other
. , t'.n a In femalea.
receipt of one dollar, the price her box,
nil la will be seat by mall or cxprca. to any part
aha world aeeura from cnrloeily or uainaxe.
Odea ooara trom o a m ta a p a' aua oa onaaay.
B. Peraona at a dletance can be iurcd at
by addraaeing Dr. Teller, eocloetng a reaiirtance.
Medicine accural y packed from obeervrtlon aeut
ctl the world. All caaea warranted.
-charge lor advice, tio atudenta or boya employed.
notice Uuot eaoreea au leaira va .
' taO'Lv J. TKIXER, . D.
Besvst.,AblAyN.T'
a
i , . . : i . . . I ' '
171 I It f : I it II i I I I II i I I 1 S I
W4
VOLUME 35.
CANTON, STARK COUNTY, OHIO, AUGUST 5, 1868.
NUMBER 9.1
as
YOU ALL
art aaa ar
HOOFLAND'S GISMA5 BITTESS,
HOOFUNO'S GERMAN TONIC.
Prapaiad by Dr. O. M. Jaekaos, Philadelphia.
Tlielr lotrodoctloa Into tbia eouatry front Oermany
oeaurred ta
THKT CURED TO0R
FATLLEH3 AITS . MOTHEH3,
And will enre yon an4 ynnr children. They are
entirely diuVreniawaina aaareawa from the many
preparation, now JE 1 In tha aountry
called taituna or 11 11 Tordca. They are
no tavern prep. aaaUawl aaaLaaai ration, or anything
like one ; but good, houaaa, reliable medielnea. They
are
Tka grtmltl faaeam natadialer
Liver Complaint.
DYSPEPSIA,
Nervoua Debility.
JAUNDICE,
Diseases of the Kidneys,
ERUPTIONS OF THE SKIN,
Dal all IUiwmi arlalna: from a IMaor
larMl Unr, Staxnaob, or
inpuairr of vim blood.
Constipation, Flatulence), Inward Pilaw.
JToilBeas of Blood to th Head, Acidity
of taa Stomach, Nauaoa, Eaut'
a orn. Plagoat for Food. Fulaeaa
or Weight in tha Stomach. .
Boor Jmctatioaa, Sink-
inr or riutterink at tha
Fit of tha BtomacB, Swim
mimr of tba Head, BnrTiad or
Di (acu.lt Bratthmg, Fluttarins
at the Heart, yaaaaaaj. Chokinir o r
Baffoeat 1 sgf f Ttttnittloni
when in a Lv-VV 'JJinsr Postnre.
Slmniii of aiaaa Vial on, Dota
or Web before tha Sight. Dull
Fain int the Head, Xeoxnency
f Perspiration, Yellowness
of tae Skin and Byes.
. Fain - in the Side. . -
Back, Cheat, Limbs, etc.,
Sudden Flushes of Heat, Burn-lna-in
tha Flesh. Cnaatant Imsarinings
of Evil and Great Depreseion of Spirits.
JLU IAcm intUont a'tjaaat of Ui ixxr er HgMv
Ovyaaa, eewiefried antA ratpart hloed.
- Hoofland's German Bitters
la eatlrcly vegetable, and contains no
llqsor. II li a rompeuud ef Fluid Kc
tracts. Ttte steals, Merlw, and Harks
rroaa whte-la - tlicse eitracta are made
are aathemd wfyaaaaaaa. I ta 4araaaay.
All (be medl f Trlnal virtues
are nlrai-tad v ' IJtrom then, sy
a ael 1 1 c ?)aaaw -ehesiUI, 1'heaa
llracU are Lbeu larwarded ta tbia
country to- he nud cxnreaaly for tba
maauranure er thee liiiura. There la
ae alcohellt ahuance efany kind need
let eamaeuadlng tba afillej-s. beaaee It ta
lly Aaitters that caa be uaed la
tba anlr Aaitters
eases whrra alcoholic aumulauta are
set advlsabls. ,
Hoofland's German Tonic
it a biiiatian ay all flat imgrUitmlt ay U JNttara,
mtK r a. seals Cnu Hum, Oramgrn, ate. Jt it ufd
av tea mm aUaaaaar ea faa Bar, ua caaf apA-r aaai.
yera aleaAalae ataiaiua ta ravarad. Yow anil eaar- as
Wla, l.ai laaaa laaaMiicv mrm wum; iiw.ih j
aa atAara sdMrtiVdar (Aa ewe a Ua duasjaj aaaid.
awaa UMy ariaauiac prrparajiofM v a"1 wwa",
Aala Iht atten er, mm dteoetitmt mf rwaa m aseas
enavi The TOs IO aa dreadaaly ewe er IAe aaoat SfeS
aal was ajrwaim i aaii uiii avar wjr i .iayn
Aa atata aa axevinta Jt if a tlaorre tojba-it. yokiU its
ueyrnas, i.ailai at. and aMataenui eiiakliu Asas
I u a ee aweavs aa uaaarwaiaai w eat aaaa
J.
m
Hir
O
DEBILITY.
..i r. !,rt',er v7i-mhb.
. rr. . itj diM V" ixlltly.
Vi s aJ.jn.t i it-..r tilt u hJ-
Vrno VATi 1A' .1; "". caae:
- . .. I raa.av . i-UL't IA -'
. 'i, .tr 1. r.;. .v.. i Jrom tht-
N Y-,r .1 I...- w- tht ehrrli. .ml iA Mafiraf
, ft .a. raMO-tfrd- ap-u. fad ifrruva?
-. J ,a fiti j, ii a'-4 cad riff'-iU tTfUH.
an'', Htlicalc thi'rfron are-
t . I'niji; ly iiMiifci tbc ttiticia or
tun. iSaa-v arc I ami!
rln-a. I liry rutt lir atlllllllill-rrd Willi
1 (a-cl .-at- I. .1 eullil Hires luoutbe.
old. !. inoM tall-aia K inale, or a niau.
01 iiiitciy.
1 aaacrei aV era th
nitvod Partners
rf r --a, taJ ra ' .-r mlt UiMifmt rt'uUft.g fnt
... ... . y:.v r-.a. a t IJ I !... .r ,- k-rptfntr-
J. tar tit a.rfrr : av-. i-'A yuur dtgrttr organtt
1 jeiiNte, I ciI.'mjt li imruutliltuit, 6v a-
A'. rrii',,rxBaaeew -Md mi. iiM't'tc will
irfi faaM y -a. I'fu 'cai mcm in Jt' rvuutry rei-'-atwrrid
IV rtrt ' .ioni. ir,ltiltnn tfe Jtr unv(aih
VMaaf S; Jt 'tiarntiottt. a
Vi:Oil HON. OhO. W. WOODWARD,
Cliir' J mile, of the fur uia Court of rmnaylTiiiila-.
I aiLAUKl rata, .vnn-n iu, ikii.
htul la!la-r b'rraaa Uuun ta ae aa nUam-
if Hi q lfraua, lut la maid laaac, wm aa auww
tt.t tt. tittte iriMM. and ttf artal txittlU i. Ctfe ar
aiatu';y uJ uumt of nfrvou ai-tiaa, in Uu ytcm.
Jowrsfrauv.
iiXO. If. H-OOJTdJfl.
rUOM HON. JAM E3 THOMPSON,
Ar,l.- Si. mm., llatirtaf IVniiavlvanlXk
I'lttLaaiaLrafa. Ai-ri'l -a. IM
I rtiiKldrr a-v Ilaulland'a
t.musii tit JrK torn a volu(a
wI.cih, lu avnex. jlaaa ' A of sttaclts of
I 11 dlgeaileiahw 1 1 h icr Uyaawpala.
1 cau cci-.lly liilalroiu my experience of
It. Vaura, with reNiii-rl,
J A .life rnorso.'i.
FUOU 'ilCV. JOSEril U. KHNNARD,I).D.,
i'aator f the Tenth Baptlat Church, Philadelphia.
J la. .lacaa.a llKAa sia: i aa-w aa yranaaur
rruf'tJaiict aty aema avilH racoN.MCM4ali.Aa of
dijltfcni hittd f Maiiicin,, but r'grtimg tht practice
atuitt ay Ufjirnjtriatt ifAcra, J havt in all euacj dt
cl 14,1 1 but iailA o faor proof iu Mrioai iaalaacc,, oaxt
fKtrtieltfarty in Me era.amiy, er IM uttmnt ey
Uoonaud t Heiwuu. BUtrt, I scpen jar eace rea. wiw
usual caawaf, lo tsprttt ma full eeeiviciiea Uiat lot gen
eral doMllly ol lli- avalcra and eapecially for llver
uoraplalnl, n la aaaaa waiuw mm ,wiui.
nranar.llaii. k .-.W I ami ceara U Mae
faU: Siai utuaUa. -VV1 i doubt not, it wtli
ear.. aanaAco. Baaawa as le laaa wn awj or
ran th abort caeeaa. xearl, vary rtiytctfuPy,
J. H. XKNJiAKD,
MigldJi, ealaa, Coale, Mi ca.
I r, a hair dexea for to,
OAUTIOK. .
KootauaVt flaw,, JfaMid, are etmnUrfriUd. Th
eanaiaa Aaaa tht nyuaturt of C. IH. JatklOa M
1 aana'UU anwu lluwa aa aaafc eeaUa. JUi atXtrt era
MawJ orfatu
Price ar tbe Bitters, 1 OO par battle
or. a nan aozen lor vw.
Price of tbe Tenia, fl 60 per battle)
ane
veeatully of
no
fh
phy-
aa
he
rapid
.
t'uta-
olh-
their
The tonle la pat tro In quart bottlea. -
nac aval it it Dr. UooHuWm Qtrmam RtmoJict
thao art mo uniarronua utod aud mo ktjhta reeoaa
Mciadad ; and do aotanaaaa, alia, tAa mtrugftua
la uduct you tatakt li anyVuny tltt tout
aa, HI U jaa t I ilMI, occaaua
: auAca a larorr BrerifaaaUawasaa on it. That Jin
am utu at tad 0 tmprttt lu ana iuauiiy upon apptou-
n taint
thi
will
uaa
to
arable
Love
oa
never
tor
these
of I
. I
homa
to
Mo
,
PRIDCIPAL SFFICK,
a
AT THE GERMAN BLEDICIN3 STOSK.
aVa. 031 ARCH STREET, Ph.UaoUtpX.ia.
CHA3. OVL EVANS,
Proprietor,
Formerly C. M. JACKSOH ek CO.
Tbeae Reraedlee are for sale by Brag.
(lata, Storekeeper, and HedlcLae Deal
ers every w here.
Be not forgot at amamint omU tn mrUtht yea fray,
eruar la gel me gtuutut.
CAMPAIGN IN OHIO.
LARGE AND ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING
IN DAYTON.
SPEECH
—OF—
HON. C. L. VALLANDIGHAM.
ABLE DISCUSSION OF THE POLITICAL
ISSUES.
(From the Cincinnati Enquirer.)
DAYTON, July 28, 1868.
The mere announcenicnt tliat Sir. Yallau-
dibaiu would address the Democracy of
Dayton, at Bcckel HalL to ui-bt filled the
Hall to rciilction.
: The meeting was not intended aa a great
demonstration, and no effort was made to
make a big show of numbers or display. An
impression had prevailed iu the early port of
the evening that the meeting would be held in
front of the Court house, and a considerable
number gathered there about dark, so that
there were really two meetings assembled at
different points to hear the same speech.
Finally, the heat in Beckel Hall became so
oppressive that a motion was made and car
ried to adjourn to Court-house square, where
the concluding portion of Mr.Yallaudig-
hanis speech was delivered.
The mention of the names of Blair aud
Seymour was the signal for the most unboun
ded enthusiasm.
Mr. Vallandigham's Speech.
As a Delegate to the recent Presidential
Convention, I report to you, my Democratic
frieuds, officially to-night, the result of its
labors, and propose to consider also, briefly,
and without rhetoric, the political situation
and prospects.
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES.
Not originally a member of that Conven
tion, but called to aid in its deliberations af
ter iis session had beguu, I wrought with fi
delity and earn est uess to secure that object
which, iiet lo principle, seemed nearest to
the hearts of the Democracy of Ohio for the
last six mouths the nomination of George
II. Pendleton. "We failed because of reasons
not necessary nor proper now to consider.
But iu all else, the labors of the Convention
could uot have terminated more in aecnr
ttnee with the wishes aud purposes of tnie
patriots and Democrats, or better for the
x)uutry. Fur President we have nomiaaL-d
Horatio Seymour, an eloquent orator, and
able and experienced statesman, an aco-n
niched centleman. sober and rigtiteona .u
the enlarged, catholic sense of the term ;
man of the strictest pecuniary integrity ; the
candidate of no "ring" or faction, and one
who will neither himself 6teal nor permit
theft in others. And this, after the larcen
ous experience of the last seven years, which
have mocked and dwarfed the gigantic pec
ulations and corruptions of even Koman or
English history, and wherein, as in periods
of physical. epidemics, every phase and spe
cies of public crime and offense speedily as
sumed the form and type of robbery or theft
is high, exalted eulogy upon the candidates
and gives promise of a return to honest times.
Nominated, to my personal knowledge.
against his will, and without a pledge or
promise to any one, he is under no obliga
tion of any sort, other than that which binds
the patriot and gentleman. And if he be
'insane, " as little creatures with false, ma
licious tonsues insinuate, I would tnat the
same method were in the madness of all
public men.
For Vice President we Jiave nominated
General Frank P. Bras' a civilian and
soldier, bold in the Cabinet and brave in the
field ; readj to take all just and necessary
responsibilities ; skillful in adapting means
to enda, and prompt in executing his purpose;
liberal and tolerant to the opinions of others,
and in the very midst of the furore of the
late civil war. capable, as I know, of dis
cerning and conceding the highest patrttfiisiu
of motives in those who differed widest from
hinL
Such arc the candidates put in nomination;
and iu view of their superior excellencies
and qualifications, I may justly say that vo
ting for them is the highest exercise of true,
genuine "manhood tsunrage , ana moreo
ver, that in my deliberate judgment ana
deep conviction, this ticket is a winnim
ticket, and will receive a decided majority
the entire electoral college, veu without
reckoning upon a single vote from the States
lately composing the "Confederate Govern
ment." - -
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES.
At
no
va
As to the candidates, General U. S. Grant
and Schuyler Colfax, who make up the tick
et of the UcpublicaB party, I have not
word personally of denunciation or detrac
tion to utter against them. I leave that whole
style, fashion and system, of political war
fare to pur enemies, and I pray. Heaven
put it into then- hearts to devote every hour
of tunc, and every instrumentality as to man
ner, through the press and upon the hust
ings, to its widest, amplest scope, and foul
est, falsest, bitterest malignity. And I pray
further that the war and the things of
war,' may make up the sole subject of their
speeches, their documents and their appeals
every way to the people, leaviug to us,
they did last summer and fall in Ohio,
exclusive discussion, in every form, of
great living qua tions of the day Restoration,
Negro Supremacy, Taxation, -Tariff, Debt,
Currency, and whatever else relates to
civil, the political and the material prosperi
ty of the country. These be our topics be
fore the people, while to them we tire- am
plest license to bowl on about 'Rebcls,Cop-
perhcads, Ku-Kluxs, Traitors, Convicted
Traitors, the Life of the Nation," the glory
of the war, and all similar subjects of de
nunciation orof praise. As for my t single
self, glorying iu every word spoken, every
yote given, eveiy act done, and every wrong
suffered by myself in behalf of right
liberty throughout the. war, I am yet not now
to be provoked, by any taunt ' or denuncia
tion, into a discussion of anything connected
With it. It is upon trial, along with all
actors and all Us sufferers, before tho dread
tribunal of history, and by the judgment
therein hereafter to be pronounced, I
content to abide. "Where was Yallandig-
ham during the War ?" may be a very pret
ty aud telling conundrum in the mouths
"loyal" oratorsj; but it neither restores
Union, maintains the' Constitution, upholds
liberty, pays taxes, reduces the debt, stops
stealing, alleviates distress, nor iu any other
way reaches the wants and necessities
the people, or tends to bring them relief
from burdens now too grievous to be borne.
Then, gentlemen, I have no word of per
sonal denunciation for the Republican ran-
didates. I would not detract one jot from
the fullest measure of military glory to
which General Grant may be justly entitled.
I have not a syllable to utter as to his per
sonal habits. I care not what his name is or
may have been, by baptUm or usage. I
know Ulysses S. Grant only as the candi.
date of the revolutionary Republican party,
and the rcprescntatiye of its principles, its
policies and its purposes. TVe are not choos
ing the ring-master of a circus, nor the mag-
ister of a feast, nor the keeper of the royal
horses or hounds, nor even the commanding
general of our armies to wage war ; but the
Chief Executive Oflk-er of the Republic, to
restore peace and prosperity through the
arts of statesmanship ; and I know Ulysses
8. Grant only as the symbol of negro su
premacy, debt, hard times, high pnees, low
wages, gold without taxation for the bond
holders, rags and taxes for the people, and
an imperial military despotism instead of
the simple and beuificcnt Republic of our fa
thers. Beyond these General Grant repre
sents nothing except the cold lava of the
burnt-out volcano of civil war.
So"euch then, gentlemen, as to candidates.
And now for a moment as to platforms.
PLATFORMS COMPARED.
a
The Chicago platform of 18G8, exults in
the labors and fruits of the last seven years
of Republican rule, and promises a continu
ance of its blessings, such as they are. The
Democratic Platform of 1868, recurring to
the fundamental principles of the Govern
ment, and proclaiming the ancient and sound
ntilicics of the Democratic party, under
1 -
which, for sixty years, the country prosper
ed, flourished was happy aud became truly
great, denounces the ideas, the wrongs, the
burdens and the oppressions of the present,
and demands a chancre. It buries the dead
past with all its discords and differences,
and goes forth to meet the living present
and the quickening future, full of the hope
ami limmise of better times : and rallies to
its support, on terms of perfect equality, cv
cry clement of opposition to the revolutiona
ry doctrines and practices which threaten
the overthrow of both the ideal and the actu
al Government which our fathers established.
It begins with the declaration that its trust
w in tli intelli-reuce. patriotism ana dis
criminating justice of the American people
and however this people may for a time run
into madness and folly, or do, aqr permit
of outrage or iniustice, yet, under
Providence, no trust is more sure aial stead
fast than in" the sober, second thought of an
intelligent, civilised and religious people.
It reccnizes the Constitution as the foun
dation of the Government and of its powers,
and the limitation of them, and the sole
bond of Union, and the guaranty of the lib
erties of the people, and it admits of no foun
tain of power higher than that instrument
no "military necessity" or political necessi
ty, and no pretence of public 6afety justify
ing usurpation of power, and the doing
o lu for nartizail tiurnoses. outside of the
Constitution.
It accepts aa the only fixed results or con
sequences of the war, the indissolubility
the Union, and the final abolition of slavery
bv the voluntary action or the boutuera
States in Constitutional Convention assem
bled ; but proclaims that the original theory
and fact and nature and practice of the Gov-
ernment as a Federal Union, and not an im-
rverial renublie or lecislative oligarchy, re
mains just as in the beginning.
It demands the immediate restoration
all the States to their right in the Uniuu, un
der the Constitution, and denounces the mili-
tary despotisms and negro governments
which reduce ten States to territories
provinces, and excludes them from the Un
ion except on terms dishonorable to them,
and destructive to the fundameuta princi
ples of the Government itself.
Recognizing the subhuie maxim, .that
err Is human, to forgive divine, it proclaims
in the very spirit of peace and pure religion,
universal amnesty for all past political offen
ses, thus putting to the blush of shame
6hallow hypocrisy of General Grant, who,.
deaying both portion and political rights
hundreds of thousands of his fellow citizens
whom mors than three years ago ho over
came in open battle, and delivering them
over to a degraded aud ' brutish race lately
I their slaves, yet impertinently proclaims,
of
to
as
tbe
the
tbe
and
us have peace." Of him we may well
as said the greal historian of the desolators
of the Roman Provinces, "he makes a soli-
tude aud calls it peace."
Denouncing negro equality and suprema-
cy, yet, in accordance witn long eataoiimieu
doctrine, it remits the legulation of the elec
tive franchise in each State to her own
without intervention of any sort
the Federal Government.,
Rejecting the insolent dogma, that a pub
lie debt is a public blessing, it demands
ment of the debt as readily as practicable,
and, unless otherwise expressly required
law or contract, in the lawful money,
greenback currency, of. the country.
then in the spirit of true Democracy,
claims 'one currency for the government
the people, the laborer ' and the officeholder,
the pensioner and the soldier, tha producer
and the bondholder.
It demands further, equal taxation of
property, government bonus included :
revenue tariff : economy ; the restoration
the rightful authority oi the Judicial and
ecudve Departments ; equal rights for
and adopted citizens at home and abroad
the right of expatriation, and the resubor-
dination of the military to the civil author-
ity.
It proclaims the scalled "reconstruction
acts" of Congress, delivering over ten
to the supremacy of the negro, under
ernments controlled by negroes, to be
pations, unconstitutional, revolutionary
void.
- To the soldier and sailor it guarantees
faithful execution of every pledge -' given
their favor by the Government ; to the
tial settler it promises the public lantjs ;
finally to the working men it tenders the
sympathy ot the Democratic party, in
efforts to protect the aights and promote
interests of labor and the laboring- class
the country. .'.
PARTIES COMPARED.
its
am
of
the
of
So much for the platforms in general.
And now allow me to consIi3er
of the primary and fundamental dh?erences
in principles and policies, between the
and Democratic parties.
1. The aim and purpose of the ' Republi
can Revolutionary leaders is to centralize
the powers of the General Govern uent,
as to establish ultimately an Imperial Repub
lic ; which in the judgment of the
and best statesmen of America, from
beginning, can here be but another name
a military despotism.- To secure this
they began by denying and usurping the
Constitutional reserved rights of the-
, Next they assumed, absolute power to
;
;
of
of
in time of war in the President, whom they
designed "the Government";'! and when af
terward they quarreled with the Executive,
they stripped him of every accustomed and
even of very many of his clearly Constitu
tional prerogatives ; and finally sought, by
a gross abuse of power of impeachment, lo
remove him from an office to which little
remained except the title and emolument.
And when the Supreme Court stood in the
way they began, by hostile legislation, to
circumscribe and cripple its jurisdiction, and
to bring it into contempt with the people by
bitter and venomous denunciation of its Chief
Justice.
Upon the other hand the Democratic par
ty insists, in the language of Jefferson, on
"the support of the State Governments in
all their rights as the most competent ad
ministration of our domestic concerns, and
the surest bulwark against anti-Republican
tendencies ; aud the preservation of the
General Government in its whole aud Con
stitutional vigor, as the sheet-anchor of our
peace at home and safety abroad."
As to policies or ideas, the two parties
differ fundamentally in this : the basis of
the present Republican organization is big
otry, hate and revenge. It tolerates no dif
ferences of opinion. It would forever fan
and keep alive the flames of that civilwar
which for four long aud weary years scorch
ed the hearts aud tlcsolatud the homes of one
third of the people of tho United States. It
wculd cherish forever the hot passions and
the bitterness, and the feuds, and discords
which in our very midst arrayed neighbor
against neighbor, and wrought dissension
and 6trife among those of the same house
hold. It refuses to forget the vile epithets
which found no apology, even amid the fury
of a bloody conflict, and glibly spits forth
from its envenomed lips, "rebel sympathi
zer, butternut, copperhead aud traitor."
Professing a religion which is founded on
eternal love, it builds itself up on immoral
hate. Invoking mercy and forgivness from
the God of heaven, it denies all pardon or
grace to fellow men on earth.
But do these, our enemies, realize that
they, themselves, are the very children of
political wrath ? llave they forgotten the
accumulated wrongs aud outrages which
they heaped upon our heads the deuuueia-.
tions, the calumnies, the espionages, the
mobiiings, the arrests, the exiles and the
murder and assassinations which we, their
fellow citizens, suffered at their hands ? It
is we, too, who have wrongs to forgive or
avenge. It is we who might shut the gates
of mercy upon them, and demand a fiery
and consuming retribution. Animated by
their own relentless spirit, L too, might well
exclaim :
'A plague upon them t .Wherefore should I
curse them ?
Would curses kill, as doth the mandrake s
- groan,
I wpuld inyeut as bitter, searching terms,
As curs't, as harsh, aud horrible to hear,
Delivered strongly through my fixed teeth,
With full as many signs of deadly hate,
As lean-faced envy in her loathsome cave ;
My tongue should stumble in mine earnest
words ;
Sline eyes should sparkle like the beaten flint;
My hair be fixed on end, like one distract ;
Ay, every joint should seem to curse and ban.'
But, gentlemen, if such be the spirjt of
our political controversies forever ; , if there
I is to be no truce to our passions ; if the past
of
is never to be forgotten nor forgiven ; if the
dead carcass of the civil war, with all its en
gendered griefs and wrongs and hates, is not
some time to be buried out ot sight, then
welcome to the fierce waters of the deluge
in which perisked the ante-diluvian world ;
I thrice welcome the fierce fire from . Heaven
or
whieh smote and consumed Sodom and Go
morrah, so that in God's Providence a new
and wiser and better race, worthier of their
noble heritage, may populate thus North
American continent.
TWO WAYS TO PEACE.
the
to
'let
say,
citi
zens; by
pay
by
the
And
pro
and
all
a
of
Ex
native
States
gov
usur
and
the
in
act
and
full
their
the
- of
some
Re
publican so
wisest
the
for
object
just
States.
exist
Depend upon it, Gentlemen, no party
whose only commending element is a sympa
thy of hatred, can ever be permanent
power, or even in existence.
With large multitudes of men, this spirit
was the controlling... motive turouguoui
the late civil war, and has continued to gov
ern them at every slcp in their efforts at re
construction. But with a smaller but far
more dangerous class of politicians, the sole
aim for the last three years has been the
perpetuation of Republican rule, through
the negraes of the South. To tliis basest
motives and Durnosts. the public good and
the pacification of the cotuitry have been
steadily sacrificed, and, worse yet, all Con
stitutional limitation altogether disregarded
Signally defeated in their efforts to establish
negro suffrage iu the North and West, they
have now impudently in their platform pro
claimed tnat here each State" shall regulate
suffrage for itself, while at the South the
elective franchise shall be determined by the
Congress ot the United States. Acting upon
tike double motive of hate and the desire
mahaasin partizan supremacy, they have dis
franchised a large majority of the white pop
illation of the Southern States, and confer
red upon the negroes, by acts 'of Congress,
the right lo voir, nd then,, at the point
the bayonet, have proceeded to establish even
State Governments, eontrqlled by negroes,-
or white adventurers evmj. meaner than they
mere sojourners, birds of passage, and
very foul, birds at that ; anal have gone
through the farce of admitting tiiem into
the Union and to the right of representation
in the Senate and the House, and a full yote
in the electoral college for President,.
this manner, gentlemen, they xpect V coor
trol the legislation and elections of the counv
try. And these ignorant, brutish negroes
South Carolina and Florida, and the other
States, do now make laws and levy taxes
aud create public debt for tod, white men
of Ohio, and they expect to overrule your
choice for President Yes, gentlemen, un
der these Republican Reconstruction acts,
enforced by an army ..for which yo'i
heavy txes out of your hard earnings,
half a million of negroes in South Carolina,
reinforced by some thousand of adventur
ous white loafers from the North and West,
will control as many electoral votes as
million of white men in Ohio. Aye, and
this present moment, the "Governor,'.'
of that State, elected by negroes,
an act of Congress, and through the
of your army, is a citizen of Ohio, having
legal settlement here"; so that if he would
become a pauper and South Carolina
very poor now, and no longer able to enrich
her satraps the proper towuship iu
Couuly of Henry, in this State could
compelled to maintain him as a public charge..
And moreover, General Willard Warner,
,.I.Ia ti.:. X ' a-l.s 1
uuuic 1.U1U1C1C ui ins jruiu vmiu, uas
been elected United -States Senator from
' '
These arc the doings of the Republican
party, aud if not marvelous in your
they are at least costly .in your pockets.
These are a part of the. blessings over which
the Chicago platform exults, and a contin
uance, and, indeed, a multiplication of
which they promise upon the election of
General Ulysses S. Grant.
RANK INJUSTICE OF THE RECONSTRUCTION
POLICY.
.
Now, gentlemen, suppose for a moment,
that the case were reversed, and that the
South had waged a successful war of con
quest against you here in the West, and had
compelled, by force and arms, the introduc
tion of slavery here, and you had surrender
ed in good faith, under pledge and promise
of all other rights within the Union, under
the Constitution; and that when you had no
further power to resist, a Southern Congress
had, at the point of the bayonet, forced con
stitutions, governments and laws upon you
against your will, and that victorious and
insolent South Carolina has sent up here the
meanest and basest ot her vagabond "Sand
Hill" citizens with carpet-bags in their
hands, to represent you, the once free white
men of Ohio, in the Senate and House at
the Federal capital, and to usurp the places
once filled by the Morrows, the McLeans,
the CorWios, the Ewings, the Hamers, and
the Aliens of this glorious Commonwealth,
what would have been the emotion of wrath
aud indignation which would have burned
within your bosoms ! And yet to just sueh
indignations are South Carolina and Virgin
ia and their Sister States of the "Old Thir
teen," searched and scarred all over with
the flames of the war of 1776, subjected, by
the false and degenerate sons of the New
England sires, who stood shouldorto should
er by them in that grand revolutionary con
flict, which in blood and suffering, and with
precious treasure firtt brought us our liber
ties. Ah, but "these men are now rebels and
traitors and !you, the Democracy, received
them yith open arms and gushing hearts to
your recent Presidential Convention."
Thank God., we did: and by none were they
hailed with more cordial welcome than by
not the bloodless though bloodthirsty homo
loyalists Hancocks, the Franklins, the Ew
idgs, the Blairs, the Slocums, and tho Steed
mans, who had met them in deadly conflict
amid the sulphurous canopy and shock of
battle. We mean to have peace indeed: we
intend to restore the Union in fact; and to
day we know these men only as our friends
fellow-citizens and brothers-the descendants
of the Washinstons, the Lees, the Hamp
tons, the Sumters the Marion, tho Pres
tous, the HayneicHhe Laurens and others,
who, side by side, stood with the Hancocks,
the Adamses, the Starks, the Putnams, the
Gales, and the Waynes of the North in the
heroic Revolutionary struggle of '70, or with
their sons and grandsons in the latter conflct
of i812, or the Mexican war of 1846
Americans all whose fame is the patrimony
of the whole country. This is peace; this
Union; this aloue is the blessed vision of the
seers and prophets of an age gone by; One
Constitution, one country, one destiny !
So much for reconstruction. And now,
gentlemen, a word upon humbler, j et more
practical and scarce less important subjects.
TAXATION, TARIFF AND REVENUE.
of
of
of
pay
a
at
so
called un
der aid
a
is
the
be
a
And firat as to taxation in its double form
Tariff and Internal Revenue. The sole
foundation of the right of Government
appropriate any part of the property of the
citizens by taxation, is the necessy pf sup
porting the Govrrnniient in its several depart.
meats, working strictly within the line
their duly; and the only measure of the right
U the extent of the necessity, a reasonable
economy being the fixed rule by which
terminate that necessity. Every dollar
which the Government extracts from th
people beyond this, is sheer downright rob
bery. Now, a protective tariff in its very
nature, implies the levying of a tax not
the necessities of the Government, but
the benefit of a class. Levied uyon articles
of manufacture, it is money transferred,
act of Congress, from the pockets of
consumer to the bank account of the nianu
facturer. And this is robbery. Previous
to the war and the Democratic times,
average duty of some fifteen per cinL
laid upon imports; and without a dollar
internal revenue collected by the Federal
Government, the amount received was am
ple to pay the theu seventy or eighty mil
lions of expenditures. Now, as part ot
blessings of Republican rule, a continuance
of which you are promised under General
Urant, these duties run 179m .a nominal
or nothing, on raw material, to three hun
dred per cent, on manufactures, averaging
upon the whole list more than forty-five
cent. And of this, pms half at least is
absolute gift, by the Government to the man
ufacturing interest a gift taken by robbery
from your pockets. Eleven times has
tariff been raised by several acts of Congress
since 1800. and we have now just barely,
by the adjournment yesterday, escaped
other elevation. Oh, the choice blessings
Republican rule, which are to be continued
and multiplied under Grant I
' But the iniquity, and the iniquity too,
the tariff, is greatly aggravated by the
that iu chief burdens fall upon us of
West. One-half of the proceeds of the
go to swell the .profits of the Eastern
inanufacturer,wbo buying our produce cheap
sells us his wares dear, and then investinst
his rapidly .accumulated wealth in bonds,
purchased with "greenbacks" at sixty
on the dollar, escapes taxation, receives
interest in coin, and after his bonded
against the Government, has, in the
gunge of the Chicago platform, been
tended over a fair period of redempUon,"
hive the English debt, he or his heir in
tenth generation, expect to be paid in
at the rate of one hundred cents to the
1 Oh, the blessings of Republican
to be continued under Grant ! But
West, blinded during the war by the veil
"loyalty," at last is beginning to open
eyes to this enormous wrong piled upon
aud I warn the East, in no sectional
but in all kindness, yet in all earnestness,
that the strong, patient man of the
staggering under this burden, is resolved
inexorable purpose, to shake it from
shoulders at every hazard.
I have said that the necessities of govern
ment economically administered, are
limit of iU rigl t to tax. Wherefore,
it is true that eveiy dollar stolen from
Treasury, and every dollar mis-applied
the legltlnrBte purpose of government, Is
much robbed from the people. And yet
j the very first year of Republican blessings,
j the year of grace, 1861, wo had the
niony upon the floor of Congress, of a
iog Republican, that "the Treasury
lwn nlimdnred well nLrh in that siuzle
luat
Al
abama. ;
eyes,
as much as the entire current yearly expens
es of the Government during Mr. Buchan
an's administration." Republican petit
was then in the pulp or embryo;
seven years of rapid and vigorous growth,
have developed it now into the bone
! grizzle of sturdy.and gigantic theft and
bery. And to day the expenditures of the
Government, legitimate and larcenous, are
nearly five times as great as when eight
years ago, the power was snatched from the
Democratic party, and delivered over ta Re
publican misrule.
THE PUBLIC DEBT.
is
to
of
to
for
for
by
the
an
was
of
the
emu
per
an
the
an
of
of
fact
the
tar
iff cents
his
claim
lan-
"ex
the
gold
dol
lar rule
tha
of
her
her;
spirit,
West,
in
his
the
also
the
from
so
in
testi
j lead
; had
And now allow me a word as to public
debt. It is a vain thing to day to inquire
how this debt came to be contracted,or how
much of.it was originally necessary or just.
It may have been the most essential, the
most Constitutional, the most righteous and
the most wisely and judiciously managed
that ever a people incurred; or in may have
been in every particular just the reverse.
No matter. It exists and must be dealt
wi h accordingly. The Democratic and Re
publican parties both recognizing it, differ
widely, radically, in regard to it. The idea
or notion of the Democratic party may be
best aud most significantly expressed by a
paraphrase of Dunuing's celebrated resolu
tion against the royal prerogative, a hundred
years ago, in the British Parliament "that
the Public Debt has increased, is inereasing,
and ought to be diminished." The Repub
lican platform declares that it ought to be
"extended over a fair period for redemp
tion"; a phrase curiously felicitous in ex
pressing infinite uncertainty of duration. It
reminds of Charles James Fox's answer to
his creditors, who, vexed with his long delay
ironically proposed that he should execute
. , . . . . , - j .
to them his-bonds payable on the day of
judgment. "Ah," said he "just please
make them payable tlujlay after." Upon
the other hand the Democratic platform de
mands "payment of the public debt of the
United States as rapidly as possible, apply
ing all money (brawn from Jhe people Ivy
taxation, except so much as Ls requisito for
the necessities of Govcnment economically
administered, to such payment." The Dem
ocratic party mean that this debt, with all
iU burdens and all its corruptions of every
sort, shall be paid off; aud I say to you,gen
tlcmcn, that in my firm conviction, Republi
can Government can not long endure here
even hi form and shadow, if this huge
mountain of debt is to continue; and that no
form of government could exist pure aud in
corrupt, if this debt is to become permanent;
Uiion another subject, gentlemen, the
poncy or tne two parties is m marked con
trast. Planting itself firmly upon the fixed
principle of all just governments, tliat taxa
tion ought to be equal, the Democratic par
ty demands that the bonds and oilier securi
ties of the United States shall be taxed the
sunie as other property. The justice aud
equality of the proposition are too plain for
elaborate argument. These bonds and se
curities have every legal element of proper
ty in the hands of their holders, except tax
ation. Why, then, the exemption? They
now amount, in Tarious forms, to some $2,-
600,000,000, or about one fifth of the entire
property of the country. And yet this one-
fifth claiming the special care and nurture
of the Government, drawing its interest in
gold, and in the hands, chiefly, of the wealth
iest men, and soon to become exclusively
theirs, pays not a dollar of tax in the man
ner or to the extent which it would pay if
were other property. To-day your capital
ist owns a hundred thousand dollars in lands
and goods, and pays no taxes, income in
cluded, State and Federal, according; thus
bearing his full proiortion of the burdens
of the community in which he lives. To
morrow he sells all, and invests in Govern
ment bonds, receiving his interest, paid now
by other wen, his neighbors, in taxes, but
lo himself pays not a dime in taxation,
saye the inconie tax, deducting yirtually
iu psper from the golden interest which he
receives. Aod now tbe entire burden
taxes, remaining just the same as yesterday,
falls upon those of his community who own
no bonds. And yet leaders of the Republi
can party, high in position and influence,
have the audacity to tell us that whoever
is for taxing bonds is no better than a peni
tentiary convict ! Well, be it so;' but there
-are three millions and more of white Amer
ican voters in the United States, w ho are re
solved that, penitentiary convicts or not,
they will have these bonds taxed.
I come now to the mode of paying
the public debt, and the subject of the
urrency in general.
Gentlemen, I am a hard money
man. I always have been. There
110 other real money in the world ;
least of all is irredeemable Govern
ment paper, money in any proper
sense of the term. It is not even
representative of money, but only
vear.
lat
ceny but
rob
Government credit ; and Varies,
must ever vary, with the fluctuations
of that credit. And it is by so much
a greater evil when Government seek
to raako its own paper, its own prom
ises to pay, a legal tender for pay
ments and debts. If Government
were to issue no more paper, or little
more thaD it wanted for taxes, it need
not declare it a legal-tenaer. If
issue more, and jt.st..in proportion
the excess, no kind or amount of
penal or otherwise, and
number of legal tender clauses,
save it from depreciation. I voted
against the legal-tender act of 1862.
did not believe It Constitutional then.
I do not believe it Constitutional now.
Moreover I felt assured that it must
sooner or later bring forth its
frdlt, and that abundantly. Govern
ment paper could not be made or
equal to coin ; and there is no more
mischievous agent of financial
commercial distress than a deprecia
ted paper currency. And the evil
greatly "aggravated if there be
currencies of unequal vajue. I concur
fully in all that Gov. Seymour
said upon this particular subject,
In the purposes of his recent speech
as I understand them ; and that
to warn the Democracy und the
ple of the United States not to swing
wholly from their ancient hard mon
ey moorings, and become too deeply
enamored of the green goddess
paper money ; to love wisely, and
too well ; not lo accept the extreme
medicine of the public debt and
as their daily bread. I think
the caution was timely and well
- I am in favor of ono curren
cy, if practicable, and as' soon aa prac
ticable, and that currency gold
silver. This twenty dollar gold
which I hold in my hand General
Bchenck intimated last fall thnuLetole
it ; no matter ; it was certainly
from him ; and moreover let me
him that it is not the wages of politi
cal prostitution, uor yet of that
which is political death ; pardon
and digression this gold piece is money
'not indeed "lawful money," in
language of th ley d-tender act, but
Constitution". 4. ouey, and the only
money known to that instrument. No
act of Conere&Ei. and no number of
penal provisious, could persuade me
that this twenty-dollar legal-tender is
as good. as this twenty-dollar gold.
This (the gold) is not the representa
tive of or substitute for money ; it is
money. It does not say "1 promise
to pay twenty dollars," but "I am
tweuty dollars." Now, gentlemen, I
should be very glad to make this pa
per money as good as gold if I only
kuew how. I remember in ancient
mythology one Midas who besought
the gods lor power to turn everything
he touched into gold ; but 1 recollect,
also, that in the eequel of the story
Midas was written down an ass. I
know, then, of no way of making
your Government paper as good as.
gold, except either by immensely re
ducing the volume somewhere nrar
to the standard of taxation or requir
ing it to be redeemetl on demand in
gold at the Treasury of the United
States. Rut neither of these is now
practicable. What then ? Necessarily
we are to have two currencies for the
present gold an 1 greenbacks ; a dol
lar in coin cquai to a hundred cents.
of
to
of
and a dollar in legal-tender represen-
ting'variously from fifty to seventy
. . J . . ' ocijf
it
cents. Ana now. nam monv-man as
I am, odious as a depreciated, irre
deemable Government paper, forced
upon the people, is to me, I meet the
issue squarely. If you have gold
enough lor all, let u. all have gold.
But if not, and there must be paper
for some, then paper for all; and in
the language of the New York Dem
ocratic platform, "one currency for
the Government and the people, the
laborer and the officeholder, the pen
sioner and the soldier, the producer
and the bondholder ;" and whosoever
would have gold, let him buy it in
the market at its value in currency.
And let us have no petty quibbling
about the phrase "lawful money." In
the platform it is tho antithesis of
coin;" and in the entir legislation
of Congress upon the subject for six
years it means the legal-lender'green-baek'
currency of the country. Re
deem, then, in this lawful money
lawful to the plow-holder and lawful
to the bondholder as "rapidly ns
practicable," all obligations of the
Government not expressly upon their
lace, or by law, made payable in coin
Abolish forthwith your National
banking system ; take up the bonds
whjch tjjey hold, save twenty mill
ions of interest to the tax-payers.and,
instead of redeeming three hundred
millions of National currency with
greenbacks, issue a like amount of
greenbacks at t nee to supply their
place. Here is no inflation ; nor is
there any, the smallest hazard, of
having "too much money," even, ot
"lawful money," iu the. country.
With the disappearance, too, of the
present National banking monopoly,
we shall secure again oldfashioncd
specie-paying banks, whose credit
shali depend on their solvency, and
whose promise-to-pay is .redeemable,
not iu another promise-to-pay, but in
gold and silver, the Constitutional
money of the land.
CONCLUSION.
of
I have now.my Democratic friends,
finisried what I had to say upon the
political issues and situation to-day.
One word further upon another sub
ject, and I have, done.
You hear from every quarter, thro'
the Republican press, the alarm that
it is the purpose of the Democratic
party to reinaugurate revolution and
civil war. Let no man be in tho least
concerned. Unquestionably it is the
fixed purpose of thre millions of
Democratic voters, with all the inten
sity which can tire the
8ee that he" is Inaugurated at every
is I
&
!
the
born freemen and scornine1 to die
slaves, if we shall fairly, constitution-
'an a a, a. . "'
any ana legally elect a President, to
hazard. It is our rieht.and our dutv.
too ; as also it is the duty and right of
me itepuDiican party, lr they shall
legtlly, constitutionally and fairly
elect uenerai Grant. J3ut no man
meditates openly or covertly, any
thing beyond. No. gentlemen, it is
the Republican leaders who are the
revolutionists. It Is thev who resolv
ed by all means and at every sacrifice
of of the rights of the States, the liber-
it
to
no
can
I
evil
kept
and
is
two
has
and
was
ties of th people, and the peace of
the country, to perpetuate their pow
er, would again plunge us into both
civil and social war with all its hor
rors. But to the ballot, and not to,
the bullet, we now appeal. The people
are wearied of the Republican
party, ana oi its wrongs and its perfidies,
of its debts and its tariffs and
its taxations, of its negro govern
ments and military despotisms, of
dishonored Constitution and a broken
Union, which four vears of war and
three years of peace under its con
duct and legislation have failed to
restore ; and they demand and will
have a change. And unless every
sign and omen by which the political
iuture may re discerned, shall rail, so
signal and disastrous will be the over
throw of this party in November,
that they themselves will make haste
to recognize and hearken to the voice
of the people as the voice of God ; and
as chastened children in silence will
submit to the judgment which in mer
cy to themselves, as to us and to the
whole country, shall drive them from
the seats of pwer. No, gentlemen,
no ; there will be no morecivil war
the land ; but the 6un at high noon,
shining on the Eastern front of the
Capitol on the 4th of March, 1869,will
look down peacefully upon Horatio
Sej'mour, President of the United
States. -
Mr. Vallandighani was loudly
cheered at the conclusion of hisspeech.
of
not
cur
cency, be
stowed. and
not
tell
sin
the
;
the
Onk of the absurdities of the "ten-
ure-of-offtc6' law, enacted to relieve
the president from responsibility
executive appointments, Is seen
the frtrf. thnt nuti:Wt wVr,
serving out his sentence in the Alba-
ny penitentiary, Is still revenue col-
lector for the district of Brooklyn.
The president cannot remove him,and
the sen ite obstinately refuses to con
firm any of the president's nominotM
for his successor.
A Western editor, iu response to
subscriber who grumbles that his
morning paper was intolerably damp,
fays, "that it is because there is
much due on it."
A million arid forty thousand yards
oi canco were printed in North
Adams in March a piece long
enougn to reacn irom jvLassachusettaj
rtny ui Liaae autcuigan. . , "
THE DEMOCRAT OFFICE.
Having lately received a new snpprj of JOB Mia
EBXAL. is now famished ia a tyle equal te "a,.. ,
country office la Ohio, having - "-t
TWO POWES, -PEE5SE-J.
And a fall assortment of tbe latest styles af Tya
with tha nsnal facilities for dolag: work of every
description In the best of style, sad' as raea"!
can be done in any flrat-claae city en.ee.
CAMS, PAPER., EHYEXOPBSa As.,
- Always kept oa hand, .r .
MfBasassBwsBsajiassa
er
e.-ii
1
1
Democratic Platform.
The Democratic party in National Con
vention assembled, reposing its trust in the '
intelligence, patriotism, discrimination and
justice of the people; standing upon the
Constitution as the foundation and limitation
the powers of the Government, and tbe
guaranteeing the liberties of the citizen, and
recognizing the questions of slavery and
secession as having been settled for all time
come by tho War, or the voluntary actiou
the Southern States in Gonfititutional
Conventions assembled, and nover to tie re
newed or reagitated, do with the return of
peace, demand :
First. The immediate restoration of all
the States to their rights in the Union under
the Constitution, and of civil government to
tho American people.
Second. Amnesty for all na.t political of
fences and the regulation of the elective
franchise in the States by their citizens.
Third . The payment of the public debt
of the United States as soon as practicable : '
and that all moneys drawn from the people
by taxation, except so much as is requisite
for the necessities of the Government ec e
noniically admiuistered, be honestly applied
to such payment : and where the obligations
of the Government do not expressly state
upon their face, or the law under which
they were issued does not provide that they
shall be paid in coiu, they ougiit, in right
and in justice, to be paid in the lawful
nioney of the United State.
In demandiug these measures ami reforms
we arraign the radical party for Its disregard
of right and the unparalleled oppression and
tyranny which have marked iu career. Af-
i
I :
aUk
'; r,
': i
ter a most 8"leni11 aQd unanimous pledge of'
both Ilouses of Congress to prosecute the ?
war exclusively for the maintenance of the
Government and the preservation of .the
Union under the Constitution, it has repeal- -n
edly violated the most sacred pledges under
which alone rallied that noble volunteer
army which carried our flag to victory ; in- -..
stead of restoring the Union it has so far as .-.
in iu power dissolved it aud subjected ten .
States in time of profound peace to military
despotism and negr6 supremacy; has strip
ped the President of his constitutional power
of appointment even of his own Cabinet. ,
Under iu repeated assaults the pillars of the . -Government
are rocking on their base, and
should it succeed in November next to in-,.
augurate its President, we will meet aa a
subjugated and conquered people amid the -.
ruins of liberty and the scattered fragments .
of the Constitution.
Jiesolved, That in the future as in the
past, wo will adhere with unswerving fidel- .
ity to tho Union under the Constitution a .
the only solid fouudation of our strength, ,
security and happiness as a people, and as ,
a frame work of government equally condu- ,
cive to the welfare and prosperity of all the
States, both Northern and Southern. . m.
Jtaolrfil, That the Union established ba
the Constitution is ft Union of States, Fed
eral in its character, comiHiseu-'of Sialts .
thereby united, and is incapable of existing
without the States as its continuing integral
parts, and therefore the porpaluity of the
Union in its integrity depends on. the pres. .
ervation of the States ia their political in
tegrity, the Government of the United Slates
being a Federal Republic and not a consoli
dation of the whole people in one nation. :
Jiesolved, -That the perpetuity of the
Union and the maiBtenance of the Govern- - ,
raent, asliolh 'Were established by the Qoc- .
stitution and as both under the Constitution.
have been expounded in the foregoing row-
lutions in conformity with the venerable,
teachings, of Jefferson, Madison and Jok-
souyhave ever been held as cardinal docjrirs .
of the Democratic party, and Zhoy acts now
reiterated with increased earnestness, under
the Solemn conviction that constitutional ,
liberty can be preserved on this continent
only by'bringing back the administration of
the Government to those time honored prin- .
clples on which for tixtyyears there was ',,
such unparalleled happiness and prosperity, Jl
and in rescuing it from the hands of those
who have ever held the Constitution itself to' ?
be no better than a co aiaut with death and f
an agreement with hell; whose revolution-"
ary policy and measures have brought such
general discord, strife and war, with iu at
tendant ills upon a large portion of the
country, and Buch wide spread demoraliza
tion throughout the whole of it.
Jiesolved, That the Democratic party la
sustaining the Federal administration io the
late unhappy conflict of arms did so in good -:
faith, with the hope and earnest wish to ;
maintain the principles above set forth, and
with no view of waging war on the part of
the Northern States in any spirit of oppres
sion against their brethren of the South, nor
for auy purpose of conquest or subjugation,
nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering
with the righu or established institutions of "
those States, but to defend and maintain the
supremacy of the Constitution, and to pre. .
serve the Union with all the dignity, equality,
and rights of the several States unimpaired. '
The subjugation of thews States or holding
them as conquered territory would be, ia
t ttheu
, . a
vm-H
t
t
-rrt.
, b.-fo
'
ow
i uO
l:
i.a.
'
.
. all
i 1
,
1
.
r
V
x
r
.
I-
ji
i-.
1: :
'i
;
:
'
i
tlle judgment of ibis, Convention, the des- '
traction of the Union nse.f. ' , '
I Ft 7. v. . 7 fTM. 1. VI -V n aV . naaail a-.- ,
-"". iuD uiBue- mew .
patriotism is uue uuu niioittu ever uc tcini
ed to all those who in the recent war periled,
life or fortune for the maintenance of the
Union and the beneficent system of Ameri-"
can Government thereby catahJiRhed. upoa
the fundamental principles -set forth iu the.
foregoing resolutions ; but we have nt-ilher
thanks nor sympathy for those who entered
and carried on the contest for the subju
gation of States and for the subjugation by ,
f ederal authority of the white race in any.
of the 8tateB to the domination of the black;
the right of suffrage, or who' shall exercisa
political power, is a matter that rests uadT.,
the Constitution exclusively with the "eveial
States ; there it properly belongs, and there
it should continue ever lo remain.. j. -1
Political.
a
Pendleton speaks in 'Springfield,
111., August 15th. - i
Tbe Hon. C. L. Vailnndighom mi-r
the Hon. A. P. Edgerton will addrv-i
the people of Allen ami a'ljoiii:iii
counties, at Fort Wayne, . Ind.,. tu
Saturday, August Hh on 'the living
political issues of the campaign. " -.:
A Cincinnati paper s-tys "'tho KiWir"
family is like the small-pox, becffun
every administration must hay" it
once," It means by tus .that tiie
next administration will ti.v,-e aTilair
in it Frank P. " . , -
There are evidences of "hereditary
insanity" in Geaeral Grant's family.
That paternal author of hia, who
who wrote his lamous "biography, i.s
either a fool or decidedly insane, and
it would be chatitablc to opine the
latter. Grant ia himself insane upon
the subject of horses, wine, cigars aud.
pups.
How does Seymour Btand? Buffalo
Express.
Without staggering. World.
The tax on whisky has been reduced
to accommodate Grunt on his Weatftra
tour. JinUon Jost.
Wendell Phillips and Theo. Tilton
ar the Radicals who maintain that
Grant is an inebriate. When they de
ny It, theu Democrats will cease to re
iterate it.
a-VS,
i
t
in
'tVZ$$g
Radical Convention was the founder
' tbe Andersonvllle prison. Boston
a
so
JJost.
The party which makes it a crime to
! sell a thirsty Teuton a glas, 0f beer on
Sunday, presents for the Presi
dency a juau who Is charged in their
own organs as a drunkard. Hartford
Times. . . , ,, .
The lUdieals thought they got a
"Iooo"-tnotive when they nomin:tUd
Grant ; but tho result proves that they
only obtained a "luintny".-vii'J a
broken down one at tnat- v .: e ois.-jO..
A printer In 'setting up the sentence,
"wo are b it parts of a stupendous
whole," by the mistake of a letter It
read, "we are but parts of a- stupend
ous vhsh?." '

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