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The Stark County Democrat. [volume] (Canton, Ohio) 1833-1912, January 20, 1881, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028490/1881-01-20/ed-1/seq-3/

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Railroads,
VALLEY RAILWAY TIME TABLE.
Taking effect November 15, 1880.
UU1NU HfUTUt
Expr's Expr' Frelg't Coal,
No.L No. A No. 6. No. 7.
MTIOMS. '
A. H. r. M. A. M. P. K.
Cleveland ......Iv iH) .M 11.10 700
Broadway ........ar ;(! M ll.aa 7,09
Brooklyn........ ..... 11.5 1 -..
WU'.ow '8 44 W.U0 ....
In(lepiicii'iii.e. ......... 8.51 4, ill lia 7.M
Tinker's (IreaK . 8.65 '4.30
' AlexttudHr'a..M. iZM ............
Breckavllle..... 40 12.4H 8.14
Bootou 9.17 4.W 1.14 ID
Penlns .i !... i:U 4,57 1 27 Ml
Everett...................... 0..II 8,is1 1 M 8,58
Hawkins 9,; 5,ll 2.06 ...... ..
BotniMin . 9 41 6.15 2 15 0,11
Old Portage... - aa ;
Akron,. .M ,iM Ml 9H8
KustAltroil 10 10 8,43 8 41 10110
' K rummy .. 10.20 6.54 4H7 12,20
Unloulowa ... 10..1I 8.0.1 6,00 ............
Greentown 10.41 6,15 6,20
New BirUn...M......M.. 10,50 6,24 6,62 ............
Red Mill J"7
Lake Park H,0l 0,M 0.ia
Tuscarawas Av... '(! 00 6,40 . ......
CauU)U,...M.....M.-. 11 10 6,46 6,26
A. U. I u. r. U. A. u.
GOING NORTH.
Expr's K.ipr'a Frelg't Coal.
No, 2. No. 4, No.6. No 8.
RATIONS.
P. If. A. M. A' U. A- K
Canton lv 7,20 8.45 9 0
Tuscarawas Ave. .ar 7,28 3,61 9.31 ............
Lake Park 7,33 3,bii 0.44 .....
Hed Mill 9.54
New Berlin............. 7,44 4,07 1 0 09
Greentown 7,53 4, HI 10,41
TJnlenUiwu 8,1)3 4,'" 11.24
Krumroy 8.14 4,37 11,53 12.30
East Akron 8,26 4.48 12.20 1,00
Akron 8,35 4,6i 12.69 '1,16
Old Portage...- l.46
Botmm'B. 8.63 5 16 2 16 tl,68
Hawkins ........... S,1P 2.27
Kven-lt 9,03 ' 8,26 2.39 t2.09
Peninsula..- 9.12 6,3:1 8,00 2.21
Boston - 9.17 8 38 8.12 2.30
Brecksvllle 9,29 6,60 8,42 f2,63
Alexander's 4."2 -
Tinker's 1 :reek..... 93 B 01 4.M)
Independent 9,13 8,06 4,211 t3,13
Willow - - 4,9
Brooklyn 4.58
Broadway...- 16,07 6,20 8,10 8,48
Cleveland... 10,15 ,3 6,26 4,00
P. II, A. 11. P. M. A. U.
All trains run dally, (except trains 5 and 6.)
Trains slop mi nIkiiuI. tTrn'sdo notatop
CONNOTION VALLEY RAILROAD.
NOVEMBER 20th, 1880
Trains going North. Trains going
Pass Mai
Past Ma
P.M. P M.
2 00 8 10
"i" 48 825
1 40 8 15
1 80 8 00
1 OH 7 60
1 03 7 46
1 00 7 43
12 62 7 36
12 43 7 30
11 80 7 25
12 SO 7 20
12 V6 7 15
12 (5 6 55
12 00 6 50
11 55 6 44
11 411 8 81
11 26 8 15
A.M P,M,
P M
6 20
"535
, DELL ROY
.CONNO'TON SIDING..
, scot re
, A I WELLS
CAK ROLL I ON
8IEMHLES
, MAPLES
, HIBBEIT4 P, O
HORTONd
ONEIDA
, JUNCTION
, PEKIN
MINEKVA
, HIRSH
ROBKRI'BVILLE
MAPLEION X
, OSNABUKGH ,
CAN ION
5 4ti
6 00
6 10
6 1!)
C 18
6 25
6 30
6 35
6 44
8 6U
7 10;
7 16
7 20
7 35
7 80
Temporary Freight and Passenger Htation for
Canton, on Eighth street, near the Rank Bros
jnounng mm.
ALLIANCE & LAKE ERIE RAILROAD.
Condensed Time Schedule.
To take Effect November 4th, 1878.
Trains Trains
Goino HonTH. Names Ooins North.
of "T3T
No. 4. No. 2. Stations, tances. No. 1. No. 8.
8:45pm ii:00am a. Alll'nced. 6:00am 1:30pm
6:43 " 10:58 " Tow Mill, 0.6 6:02 " 1:32 "
6:20 " 10:40 " Bents. 4.1 6:20 " 1:60 '
6:14 " 10:35 " Boheckers. 6.1 6:26 " 1:56 "
6:07 " 10:28 " Benton, 6.3 &; " 2:03 "
6:02 " 10:23 ' Carters, 7.1 6:36 " 2:08 "
1:66 " 10:15 " Deertield, 8.u 0:43 " 2:16 "
6:44 ' Ilr.iM " Mott Town. 10.0 6:52 " 2:26 "
6:36 ' 9:55 " Keans. 11.1 6:58 " 2:32 "
6:16" 9:30 " Palmyra, 13.8 7:10" 2:64"
4:66 " 9:15 " PrltcharUs, 16.2 7:;t5 " 8-10 "
4'40 " 6:00 " Booths. 18.8 7:50 " 8;30 "
4:30 " 8:50 " Newt'n F'Us 20.3 8:00 " 8;40 "
4:16 " 8:35 " d.Br'c'v'lea. 23.6 8:20 " 4;O0 "
Train Nn. 1 connects at Bracevllle with A A G W
train at 8-27 a m and 11:30 a m, for LeavltUiburg, War
ren Youugsuiwn, Greenville, Meadvllle and Sala
manca; wuu tnv :io m Ul iiniu lur ivnvaiiiin ul avu,,
also with C4 M train at Phalanx lor Cleveland, ar
riving at Cleveland at 11:00 am.
Train No 8 connect at Bracevllle with A AG W
train at 6:10 p n, for Warren, GraeuvUle, Meadvllle,
VnnniMtdwn and Kharon : with 5:10 D m C A M train
at Phalanx for Cleveland, arriving at Cleveland at
7:06 p m.
Train No 2 connects at Alliance with CAP train
north aud south, for Lima, Atwater, Bayard, 8a
Unevllle, New Philadelphia and Wellsvllle; alsowith
P, P W A O trai us cast and west, for Halem, Euon and
PlttHburgh, Canton, Maasillon, Wooater, Crestline,
Ft Wnvue and (hlcaEO.
The Alliance A Lake Erie RallraO Is now open for
the transportation or freight ana passengers rrom
and to Alliance via A AG W Railway to Cincinnati,
New York aud Intermediate points i also to Cleve
land via C A M Railway.
Trains will stop at Stations named on this Schedule
rains run by Columbus time,
H, SHA FFER, Superintendent,
H, BLEAKLEY, Gen. Manager.
CLEVELAND. MT. VERNON &
RAILROAD.
Time Card.—In Effect June 23, 1879.
GOING NORTH.
No. 17. 1 No. 1. I No. 8. I No. 15.
Stations.
Accom. Aocom. Expr'se Mixed.
Cleveland.... Arl
10,16am
7,80pm
Hudson.
Cuy'h'gaF'lli
Akron
New Portage
Clinton Canal Fulton
M&Bslllon
Marshalville.
Orrvllle
Apple Creek
Fred'rloksb'g Holmesvllle -Mlllersburg...
KUlbuok
Black Creek..
Ganu
Danville -
Howard
Gambler
Mt. Vernon...
Mt. Liberty...
Centerburg...
Condlt
Sunbury
Galena
YVeBtcrville....
Columbus... .Lv
8,56
8,35
8,17
8,02
7,45
7,83
710
7,24
7,10
6.18
6,00
5,44
6.15
1,25 pm
4,09
8,80
1,00
2.85 "lv
2.03 "M
.31
9,32pm
4,43
4,12
8,50
2.60
2,82
2,17
1.44
1.23
1.17
1.00
9.13
8 58
1,01
12,42
8,47
8,32
12,16
11.45 am
8,19
8,04
7.34
7,22
7,12
7,02
6,48
6,26
6.15
6,02
662
5,46
5,39
6,05
11,20
10,87
10,19
10,02
9,46
9,18
8,45
8,28
7,47,
7,30
7,20
6,50
600
12.35
GOING 80UTH.
No. 18. I No. 4. I No. 2. No. 20,
Mixed. Expr'i Accom. Aooom.
Stations.
Cleveland
8.20am
8,45pm
Hudson -
Cuy'h'g&F'lli
Akron ;
New Portage.
Clinton
Canal Fulton
Maasillon
Marshalville.
Orrrllie -
9,40
9,57
10,12
o,u
5,27
5,M
6,09
b,26
6,42
7,18
6,49
7,05
10,85 a m
11,00
!11,25
10,30
10,46
12,08 pi
11,04
arl2,2S 1
lv 1.03 I
11,17
4.50am
6,00
6.24
Apple Creek..
Fr'd'rlckab'rg
rlolmesvllle -Milleniburg.-
KUlbuok
Blaok Creek.
Gann
Danville -
Howard -
Gambler
Ml, Vernon.,, 1
Mt Llberty.
Centerburg... Condlt
Sunbury
Galena.
VYestervllle...
1,81
11,87
1,65
2,10
2,30
11.60
no mm
5.88 .
L"JY'I"
-2,14
650
2,56
1,80
16,07
8,30
4,20
12,43
6,21
7,00
7,21
7.81
7,41
7.54
8,16
8,28
842
8,52
8,58
9.16
9,46
1,10
1,22
1,81
1,40
1,58
4,48
5,06
6,28
6,44
7,01
7,26
7,46
8,01
8,10
8,38
9,28
2,24
2,40
2 50
8,05
Columbns ... Arl
Trains do not stop when time Is omitted.
Trains stop for passengers on signal.
In addition to above local trains, carrying pas
sengers, and stopping at all stations run as follows;
SOUTH.
Lv Hudson 8,56 a m, Ar. at Mt. Vernon 8,24 pm
"ML Vernon 6,18 " " Columbus 10.00am
NORTH.
Lt Columbus 8,66'pm. Ar. at ML Vernon 7,48 pm
"ML Vernon 6.80 am. " Hudson 6.10 pm
CONNECTIONS,
At Colnmbus-Wlth P. 0. A t. L. Ky., L, M.
Dir., arriving 12.50 a. m., 8.80 a m, 12,20 p m-,
Leaving 1.15 a m, 6,80 a m, 10,00 a m, 8,40 p m, In
dianapolis A Chicago DIv., arriving 12,50 a m, 8,
40 a m, 12.20 p ni. Leaving 6,30 a m, 8,40 p m, 5 40
p m. Pan Handle DIv., urivlng 12,56 a m, 6,20 a
m. Leaving 1,00 a m, 8,66 a m, 12,36 p m. Colnm
bns A Hocking Valley R. R arriving 9,46 a m,
4,55 n m. Leaving 8,20 s m, 8,86 p m. Scioto Val
ley 11. R., arriving 8,30 a m, 4,55 p m. Leaving
7,80 a m, 8,35 p m. C. C. A I., arriving 1.00 a m,
9,00 a m, 1.00 p m, 7,06 p m. Leaving 1,60 a m,
9,16 m, 2,50 p m, 50 p m. Cincinnati, Bandus-
If" " loveiana k. h nrrivuig lAiupm, n.rrz p
s (,10 pm. Leaving 10,00 a m, 8,30 p m, 6,00 nm.
At Mt. Vernon With B. A U. R. R., north, (,24
a m, 8 05 p m.j sonth 12,05 n m, 11,18 p m.
At Orrvllle With P. Ft. W. It C. Ry., east, 7,00 a
m, 9,15 a m, 2,26 p m, 9,38 p m; west, 4,50 a m, 12,
66 p m, 2,26 P m, 7,11 p m.
At (hlnton (Warwick Junction.)-With 0..T,
V. A W. Ry., north, 7,1 a m, 4,00 p m; south, 16,08
a m, 6.83 p m. m
At Akron-With A. A G. W. Ry., east, 7,24 a m,
1,00 p m. H,6p m. Went, 6.30 a m, (,67 p m.
At HudMin With C. A P. R. K- east 9,40 a m.
1,25 p m. 6,06 p m, 9,60 p m; West, 7,10 a m, 9,00 a
m,l,89 a m, 9,00 p m,:8,20 p m.
At Clevcland-With L. fi. A M. 8. Ry, emit, 7,80 a
m, 11,15 a m, 2,60 p m, 10,80 p m; west, 7,00 a m,
2 00 p m, 5.30 p m, 7,85 p m.
6. A. JONES, Supt, J. A, TILTON, Gen. Agt.
ML Vernon, O. ML Vernon, O. 1
Railroads.
Railroads. PITTSBURGH, FORT WAYNE AND CHICAGO
RAILWAY
Condensed Time Card—Nov. 7. 180
CHAINS GOTNCt Wsmx
I lON. HZ. NO. 1 KI. HO. 7 IX. NO. 8 tl I
Pit ourgh. 12 Olp.m. 916a.m. 1.60p.m. 7.30 pm
Ro estur- 1.11 a.m lu.10 " 2,56 "
AU noe 8.30 " 120p.m. 5.85 " l)2o,i.
0,1 ION 8.6 14 it.OU " 8.20 " 11.60
Orr, le 6.00 " 818 " 7.18 " .
Man eld 6.65 " 6.40 " 9.20 " .. .
Crer tie, a 7.25 " 6.16 " 9.45 " am
Crej; ie,d 7.50 " 6 3) " 9.65 " i44
Foe 9.25 " 8.18 " 1128 "
Lima 10.40 " 9 8) " 12.32t.rn
I, W 'ne, 1.16p.m 120S.m. 2.40 " 7 85 "
P m Hh, 8.16 " 2.Wt,m, 4.56 " 7 10 "
O& it 7.00 " 6.00 " 81111 " 9 40 "
TRAINH GOING BAST
TATI .nS. IBX, N0.4IIX. NO. 2SX. NO. 6N. 8 H
Chicago.
Plymouth,
Ft. Wayue
Lima,
Forest,
6 16p.m.
9.26 "
12 16t.m.
2 88 "
8.55 "
6.50 "
640a.m.
7.20 "
9 28 "
10.60
1126 "
2.10 "
815f.m.
8.80a.m
1153 "
8.30p.m,
10 ni
MM m
2.85 p m
9 35
55 "
Bi "
(18 "
4iar
05p.m
,3-
26
4.00
6.43 "
7. 10 "
7 30 "
8l'8 "
10.06 "
10.26 "
114 "
2 4v.m
815 '
Crestline, a
Crestlino,d
12 as "
12 40 "
1 '64 m
2 57 "
8.28
425 "
11
"7,'3)p.m.
Manslleld,
Orrvllle,
CANTON
Alliance,
Rochester
Pittsburgh
I
,0'
2j.it,
30 "
Trains Nos, 8 and 6 and Nos. 6 aud 4 rati
dally. Train No le&vos Plttibarira dally ex
oept Saturday. Tral' No. 8 leaves Chicago dally,
except Saturday, k others dally, exnent Sunday
F. K. MYJiRS.
General Passomrer and Ticket Age .
;
!
;
1
NEW YORK. PENNSYLVANIA & OHIO RY.
NEW YORK. PENNSYLVANIA & OHIO RY. ( ATLANTIC & GREAT WESTERN.)
Time Table—Adopted Nov. 7th. 1880
STATIONS.
hi, 2
12 lOpif
8 10
4 04
4 60
6 48
7 40
8 26
9 10
11 20
U 65
12 08iir
1 08
2 40
3 65
4 58
6 29
6 14
6 27
7 45
10 00
l'i 20'"
121 pa
2 55
NO 12
9 20pm
6 ip
2 4 a
1 IM
3 18
1 05
4 41
5 22
7 '.'4
t n
8 17
9 10
I 10
1 40
:3 ii
I 03
NO 8
NO.
Dp. Cincinnati
" Dayton
" Bpringaeld
" Urbaua
" Marion
" Gallon
" MansOeld..
" Anhland....
" Akron
" Kent
" Ravenna ...
" Warren ....
" Greeuvllla
" Meadville.
" CniouClty.
" Corry
" Lakewood
" Jamostowti
Ar. Salamanci
" Bull'alo
" Rochester...
" Hornelsv'i
" Klmlra ....
" Bingliamt'i
" Albany. ..
" Bontou
" New York
" Boston
";
6 15
6 45
8 15
8 45
201p.m.
8.00
8.13
'628
7,30
U 40
12 38 in.
1 U3
1 67
3 10
6 (0
9 20
6 30
8 67
10 68
6 1 iimn
24 po
9 Yutt
lUOnn
2 67
3 10
8 10
9 20 ;
SO 30
8 f'7
10 58;ir
11 no ij
2,40 II
B 'n n
4 2 pn
9 JO
7 H'an:
WBHTWABD.
STATIONS,
Dp. Salamanoa
" JamestowD..
Lakewo- d
" Corry
" Dnlon City..
Meadvllle...
" Greenville .
" Warren.
" 3aveana...
" Kent
' Akron
" Ashland-.,.
" Mansfield...
Ar, Chicago
Dp Gallon .. .....
" Marion
" Drbana
" Bpringfleld .
" Dayton
Ar. Cincinnati..
" I.OII 1
no, 1
i.
NO 5 11. 7
6 85rr
7 40
7 60
8 85
8 67
10 00 6 00am
10 01 7 07 u
12 ( 9 8 32
1 13 10 03
4 25 10 25
5 00 U 00
7 86
8 20
Too""'
I120prr
10 504IT
11 67
12 27an
1 20
1 43
2 45
8 41
4 54
6 47
6 05
6 80
8 50
9 30
100an
1 22
2 40
8 36
4 44
6 42
6 10
6 38
8 28
9 20
800an
10 02pm
11 02
1 30111
2 15
8 60
6 00
11 85
7 10in
10 15
11 02
115pn
I 50
8 OS
5 30
II 40
7 1 I r
" St. Louts
1'ralns Nos. 8. 8 and 12 ran ualiy.
Palace Bleeping Coaches on trains No. 1, 2, 8
an 12. between Olnnlonatl and Now York 1iiT,
Sleeping Coach on No. 8 and 12 between Clnclnnutl
and Boston dally, via Albany.
riuiel ooaou ou iralus 6 aud 8 between fltilnagi
and New York dallv. via Mansfield. t
Connections at Mansfield with Pltsbnrgh.Ft Wayne
A Chlcaho Ballroad: at Akron with the Valley U R
at Ravenna with the Cleveland A Pittsburgh H K,
at Meadvllle and Corry for Oil Keglons; at James
town for But! Wo and Niagara Falls; at Salamanca
for Rochester; and at Binghamton lor Albany and
Boston,
Close connections at Cincinnati with tralni rti
the sonth and Wt.
W. B. 9HATTCC, General Passenger and Ticket
Agent, Cleveland. 0.
P. D, COOPER, General Superintendent, Cleve
land, O. nna
;
.
& PITTSBURGH RAILROAD.
CONDENSED
CONDENSED TIME TABLE. Dec 12, 1880—( Daily Except Sunday.)
Mollis
C6HMMOC 00
1"
B
I
Q
O
J 3 fJT C7 t 00 j-
S w to ie S S
" B
-4 CO M
: : . 5
-1 UXHH
!Ss s -!?
BS BB
pa-jo: i I
SSSi I i
'P j j
t 1 0101 WOO
I tOo!n
hi
i 0
010 on
s3s
:H j
s s :
Tjeava Bavard 12.20 n. m. and 4.L5 n. m: Am,
New Philadelphia 1 55 and V. 5 .1. in. Leave Ne
Philadelphia 8.03 a, m. and 2.40 p. m Arrlv
Bayard 12.16 p. m. and 4.49 p. m,
RIVER OIVIHIOW.
GOING BAST.
ma.
10,60 a.m
11,00 "
11,67 "
1,30 p.m
2.25 "
3 26 " 1
Etprent.
Aooon
4,45'plo
5,00 "
6,0 "
Balla!re...i
6.55 a.m
6,C6 "
7,04 "
8,10 "
9,15 "
10,20 "
1 55 p.m
Brluironort..
205 "
Kill "
6,50 "
6,40 "
7,45 "
Steub'nville
Wellsvllle...
Rochester ...
Ptttso'rg..ilr
GOING WKHT.
Mail.
9 05 a.m
10 00 "
11 05 "
11 67 "
12,53 p.m
1,05 ."
Ezpreu.i Aosom,
Plttsb'rg..Z,
1.40 p.m
2,45 "
8,45 "
4.49 "
b,88 "
5.50 "
3,?0p.tr
4 iO "
6 0! "
6 50 "
7 50 "
6,05 "
Kocnester,
WellRville
Steub'nville
7.5Ta.r
8 52 1
9,06 "
Bridgeport
Bellalre..,Ari
t. R. MYERS,
Gen'l Pass, and Tlokut Ageut.
THB OLKVKLAND, TtJHOA'ia AS vAidil'
In effect Sept. 27th, If 80, and until further notice,
TRAINS 80IHS ViHTH
WheellngUrlchsv'le Accom.
rations. xprn Accom. No. 11,
Black River .......Lv 7,10am 410am 7 10 in
Kleria 7,32 4.38 7,47
Cleveland................. 7.15 4. 0pm
Grafton 8.20 6,10 9."6
York 8 42 6.85 10 80
Medina 8 60 6.43 10.' 0
Chippewa Lake......... 9 00 6.12 11 80
Seville 9.12' 6.08) 12 00
Russell 9.19 6.18 I22pn
Eaeton 9 83 6.26 1.05
Warwick...- 9 48 6 86 1 60
Fulton 9 66 6 44 2 10
MasstUon -..... 10,17 7.06 835
Barrs Mills 10 44 7.86 4,0
Dover ... 1109 8.(1 5 45
New Philadelphia...... '1,18 810 610
TJrlohsvUle...... At 11,40 8.35pm 705
TRAINS BOMS N BTd,
CltrtUod Olarslu 4 Accom,
STITIONI. Aocom. txprtil No 10.
Urlchsvllle Lv 645m SSlpm 6 65tir
New PbUadelpbia... 6 07 4 17 7,87
Dover 6,15 4 25 6 40
Ban's Mills. 642 4M 9.44
MasstUon...........,... 7,09 6 13 11.88 1
Fulton ..... 7,80 6 39 12.l7pn
Warwlok.M 7,40 6 48 12.9
Easton .... 7.60 659 1.06
Russr" ........... ....... 802 618 1.46
Seville 809 620 1.10
Chippawa Lata)..-... 8 21 6 82 2.49
Medina........... 8.81 6 43 3.16
York 8,42 6 62 8.46
Cleveland......-.... 10.16 8 20 ... ...
Grafton - 18 725 615
Eleria 1000 7 45 6 00iw
Blaok River - At 10,20 8 05 6 40
All trains daily, (mi mays mounted.)
OONNKMTIONH, 1
At Cleveland wltu fast trains for the Fast. Al
so with Cleveland and Detroit Sally Line 01
Hteameri.
At Klyrla with L. 8. A M 8, By. rat Sandnsky
Toledo, Detroit, Chicago, Ac
At Grafton with 0. 0. 0, A L By. for Indianapo
lis, St. Louis and the West.
At Russell with N. Y. P. A O. R. R, (formerly A.
A W. ) for snuv. a hi land, Mansfield, Ac
At Warwick with O. MU V, v, aj. for Mt Ver
non and Columbns.
At Masslllnn with P. F. W. A 0. Ry. for Canton
Pittsburgh, Wooster, Ao.
At Canal Dover with M. A 0. R'y, (formerly M,
P. A 0. Ry, for Cambridge, Masslllon and Park
ersburg. At ((rirtiwIUewith V. C. A Rt. L. Ry, forHteu
benvllle, Coshocton. Znvnesville. Ac
At Wheeling with Rnlliosris diverging. Also
with Ohio River Hti amers.
OSCAR TOWNHEND, Will, H. O.-OUT,
Gen'l Manager. .... Oen. Frght Ticket A Agt,
any
evr
at
to
nave
once,
dny
will
settle
are
a
grt-utpiiy.
uiake
week
dres
Medical
FACTS WORTH KNOWING.,
Ginger, Bnchn, Haadrake, Ktllllngla and
many other of thebeHt niedlcines known are so
skillfully combined in Parkeb's Ginoeh Tonic
as to make it the greatest Blood Purifier and
lbs Usst Health and Strength Bestorer '
l.mr I i(d.
80 perfect la the composition of Paukkh's;
Omasa Tonio that no disease can long exist'
where It Is used, lt you have Dyspepsia, Head-;
ache, Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Bowel, Kidney,
or Liver Disorder, or if you need a mild stim -
ulont, or appetizer, the Tonio is just the med-;
Iclne for you, on lt la highly curative and In-,
vigoratlng but never intoxicating.
If you are slowly wasting awny with Con-;
umption or any sickness, If you have a Painful,
Cough or a bad Cold, Parkib's Ginoeh Tonic.
will surely help you. lt gives new life and'
vigor to the feeble and aged, and Is a certain;
cure for Rheumatism Jod Cholera Infantum. .
It Has Bared Hnndreds of Lives It Hay;
Save fours.
II you are feeling ml seroble don't wait until'
Sou are down sick, but use the Tonio to-day.;
o matter what your disease or symptoms may,
;be It will give prompt relief.
Hememberl Pahkhb. 's Omara Tomo Is not;
a rum drink but the Beat and Pureat Family,
Medicine ever mode, compounded by n new.
process, and entirely different from Bitters,'
ginger preparations and all other Tonics. Try,
a 60a bottle. Your druggist can supply you. ,
PARKER'S HAIR BALSAM
The Beit and Host Ed nomkal Hair Dressing
exquiiitely perfumed and perfectly harmless.
Will Always Restore Cray or Faded Hair
te Its original youthful color and appearance, and Is
warranted to stop iu falling, aisibt its grow til and
prevent baldness. .....
A few application! of the Balsam will loften tha
hair, cleanse all dandruff and cure Itching and hu.
noun of the scalp. Sold by dldruggisttateKrsortt.
A Compound Tlnoture of the most valu
able remedies known to the medical
profession, prepared upon strictly
pharmaceutical prlnolples.
An experience of twenty-five rears proves it to be
the groatant Antidote to Miliaria and all other Ague
influences known to the world.
The only abtoluit mrt for all Affections of the
Kidneys. In Liver Complaint, DvNiH'Psiru
all DiHorders of the IIoh cIh, and all Au"co
linns ol the Throut mid I.nn, it is equally
efficacious, while as a remedy for complaints peculiar
to the female sex it has no equal.
NOT A BEVERACE
fiut nn old rnllnblo nnnpt?liold Kemedy
tliorouBhly adnptod to jurist nature.
It Btippliea tone to the stomach, roinrfgoratfl thd
oiffofttive orffanfl, stimulatt the secretions, and pro.
motiuK a regular aotion of the dowpIb, enabl(u every
prfrun of the body to perform its allotted work regu
larly and without intorruption.
Its highest oommendationB come from those who
have UHftd it lonffOBt and known it best.
Nowhere so popular as in Lancaster, Pa., where it
haH been in use for more than a quarter of a century.
Highly comineiHlrd n n Onncral Tonio
aud Appetizer. .Sold by DmumnUi everywhure.
THE MESSENGER OF HEALTH
A targe sized paper doHcriptive of disease, its origin
and ou re, will be mailed free to any address on
application to
THE MtSHLER HERB BITTERS CO.
Lancaster, Pa.
tlftVe stroniarly reoommend to mothem Prof.
Pnrker's lMnumnt Worm Hyriip. It never
fails, is easy to take, and no ttfUir-phybio ia required,
rrlce, 2d ceutH
SYMPTOMS OF A
TORPID LIVER.
IjOrs of Appntlt. Nmisen, bowelscowtiva.
jpnin in the .Utma, vvitli 11 diillnuiiMiit'ioiwn
the bimk purt, Piiin under the Hhouldor.
mjhjdJjijTmm
mBmorywirnjwem
mfimorv.withatonlinKOln living nrKi
some
Yellow Skin, Hoadnche, HostleHHness''at
SiigTirTIiKnyooIoreTTJ
IF THESE WARNINGS ARE UNHEEDED
SERIOUS DISEASES WILL SOON BE DEVELOPED.
TDTT'S PIIX8 are especially adapted t
neb rases, one dose ettectnsuch achange
of feellns; B to ntonlwh the wuflerer.
A Noted Divine says:
Dr. TUTT: Dear Sir: For ten years Ihave been
a martyr to Pyspeiiaia, Constipation and Piles. Last
Bprinnyour Fills were reoommonded ; 1 used them,
lam now a well mar., have good appetite, d ideation
fierfect, rfljrnlar stools, piles gone, and havegnined
ortr DounaHllosb.'rhpy are worth theirweiirhtin gold
Kev. H. K SIMI'SOV, r,ouiBville,Ky.
Theylncrrnso llio Appetite, und ennso the
body to Tnlio on Flesh, thus the system is
nonriehed, nud by their Tonio Action on tho
Digestive Organs, lteguliir Stools aro pro
dneeil. PrlreSr, rontx. !il IHiirrnyHt.,N. Y.
tott'shair"dye;
Gray Haib or WHiBKEns changed to a Gi.obbt
Blaos by a Ringle application ol! this Dye. It im
part A Natural Oolor. acts InstantaneouHly. Bold
by Druggiijt, or Beat by ezprms on roceipt of $ 1.
Offloe,35 Murray St., New York.
Wintx anb liquou,
Schwalm & Bro.,
Wholesale Dealers In
mm, liquors
Cigars, Tobacco,
23 East Tuscarawas St.,
CANTON. O
$10
lutflt ft.rntohfid free, with ftill lnstrno
tons for roudu' tlnir tho most prorttabt
MiHlnens that aivvonenftn eimaue in. T'lt
biishiwi la ho pimv to ltarn. and our I
ntructlons are ao Mm pie and plalu, tb4
one ran make great protite from the very mar.
Noonecan foil who in willing to work. Women ar
annucceHNtnt a men. Boy" and girl can earn lartv
turn. Many have made at the bualneM over o
hiindretliloliarfl In a ntnle week Nothing like It
known bet'ere. All who engage are mirprlrted
the fane and the rapidity with which they are able
make m ney. You can engage In thin hunlne-MS
during your spare time at great prorlt. Yon do not
to invent nanltal In It, We take all the rink
Those who ned ready money, should write to us ai
am mrmsneu iree. Aaureaa iiui a uo.
Augusta, Maine.
imw'i 1 m g.
(P 1 Lra ica m
Dissolution Notice.
Notice Is hereby Riven i lint theoepartnershlp here
tornreexiHilna; between A. II. Ileininh. J W. Wolf
under the linn name of lieniuth A Wolf, has this
been tliMMilv,d ny ninttial consent. The nnslneHs
tn carried on by Mr. A. 11. Dotnutli, who will
all accouuts of the drill.
A. U DRMHTH,
Deo Slst. 188a JauS dw O. W. WOLF.
$5;
Outfit pnt Iree to thrwe who wtth to engage
m me moHt, pieasum ana (irontaine misiueHfl
Known, Hvrvthlng new ('ni-lttil ma re-
nlred. we will turn nh vnn I'vervthfnir. tin
a day and npwanl b easily made without
staving away from home over night. No risk what
ever. Many new workers wtuiiwl at once. Mmiy
making fortune at (h (multie-. I.xdien make
miii:h as men. und voung lovn hiid uirh niane
No one who h willing to work hills to
more rnoitov ev rv ditv Mum cmi he untile In a
at any ordinary en'piynient. Tho-e who en
gitgeatonre will llnd n Hhort road to lortune. Ad
U, IlALl.u'iT A Co., Portland, Maine.
Miscellaneous.
A LECTURE ON THE TRANCE.
Some Curious Experiments Which Dr.
Beard Illustrated His Remarks.
The rooms of the New York Academy
of Medicine were crowded last evening
when a lecture oc "Trance" was deliv
ered by Dr. George M. Beard before the
New York Academy of Science. Doctor
Beard had on the stage eight Bill jects fur
trance experiments. He said that a true
explanation of the many and strange
phenomena of trance, was one rf the sci
entific questions of the hour. Its present
prominence had been caused by two re
cent events in Europe, the march of Dr.
Slade through Europe carrying men of
science with him into the domain of
Spiri ualism, and following in Slade's
wake, the careful investigation of the
phenomena of mesmeric trance by Ger
man and French men of science. Dr.
Baird of Manchester, has proved that
the phenomena of mesmerism are entire
ly subjective, and not otijective or ac
complished by an outside lorce. This is
the most important discovery ever made
in this branch of science. For forty
years the French Academy and Euro
pean men of science have tried to find
an explanation of the phenomena of
trance but have failed. They still cling
to the idea that the cause is objective
and that bright buttons to fascinate and
manipulations or passes of the hand
were necessary. Wm. Stanley Grimes
was the first man to disprove this theo
ry. The operator tells the subject he is
to go into this or that form of trat ce and
if the conditions are right the subject
will go, even if the operator goes and
drowns himself. It is by the action of
the mind of the subject alone that the
object is accomplished. "Trance," said
Dr. Beard, "properly defined, is a con
centration of ntrvous activity in some
one direct. on, with corresponding sus
pension of nervous activity in other di
rections, and its varieties are cataleptic,
ecstatic, intellectual, epileptic, alcoholic,
somnambulistic, emotional, self induced,
soufaneous and mesmeric, the latter
being the so called hypnotism or animal
magnetism. Infant prodigies, such as
Shannon, the boy orator, often go into a
state of intellectual trance. Great ora
tors and actors are frequency in trance
while before an audience. Bsecher and
Salviol are examples. M"ary Anderson
feigns the deep breathing of trance. The
case of the Rev. Mr. Marsland, the Con
necticut preacher, who disappeared and
found himself a month later at Bing
hampton hired out as a workman, was
one of spontaneous trance. Emotional
trances are the most common and are
produced by sentiments of fear, expect
ancy, wonder, reverence. Alarms of fire
and Spiritualistic seances are very po
tent as trance producers. Trance in an
imals is produced by fear. The scien
tific value of the mesmeric trance is that
we can handle, tent and experiment with
it and expose the secrets of all the other
varieties. We have had the facts for a
thousand years. What we want ia inter
pretations and ideas. My theory is that
if there are one hundred units of force
in tbe t rain all are active in the natural
state. In sleep they are less active, but
in mesmeric trance all activity is sus
pended except in one direction. The
nerve force is all concentrated on one
thought and the rest is practically dead
The best subjects are modest, retiring,
shiiuking, sensitive persons, while the
nest operators are bolt), positive and con
fident. It is a question of mental chem
istry. The great influence of George
Henrv Lewes over George E'iot is thus
explained by ber retiring, difluient na
tare, although eh? was intellectually his
su tenor. We can do three things it
trance with all functions under the con
trol of the will we can take it away, in
create it or modify it."
Dr. Beard's expermenfs were of the
most interesting character and held the
attention of the audience until after 11
o'clock. He would point a finger at one
of the subjects and the latter would
bring his nose to the fingT and follow it
everywhere. Another subject was made
to hunt on his knees an imaginary lost
article, l wo or tnem looked in ecstasy
heavenward for five minutes, being told,
"See tbe angels up tuere." Une face ex
pressed joy ; the other man was in tearf.
f wo of them were placed in attitudes (if
statues with bands upraised: "1, 2. 3. 4
5," said Dr. Beard, and one subject on his
back on the floor became so rigid that he
could be carried across the room by his
head and heels and stood on his head as
stiff as a board. To test tbe genuineness
or tbe trances a sunjact was told be had
no feeling in his left cheek, and
pin was s'uck into it a dozen times by
Dr. Beard, and a man in the audience
and the subject did not f'el it. Another
man s band was cauterized with a red
hot iron and he made no motion. Two
others had teeth pulled bat did not
witice. At one time four of the subjects
were speaking in stentorian tones in the
trance state, one was preai hiug, one
talking temperance, one politics and one
against woman's rights. A man was
made deaf and did not hear a pistol
shot on at his ear. Tbe tests of the great
est scientific value were made with the
eye, ana it has been proved that men in
trance can be made totally blind, blind
in one eye, or color blind. Cayenne pep
per was taken by two of the subjects
with delight, they being told it was
sugar. JV. r. H or IdUU..
IRISHMEN AND FREE TRADE.
In the last public utterances made by
Mr. Cobden he said :
"If I were five-and-twenty or thirty
instead of unhappily twice that number
of years, I would take Adam Smith in
hand and I would have a league for free
trade in land, just as we have had a
league for free trade in corn.
If you can apply free trade to land and
to labor too that is, by getting rid of
those abominable restrictions in your
parish settlements and the like then I
say the men who do that will have done
for England probably more than we have
been able to do by making free trade in
corn.".
In another speech made not long be
fore that from which the quotation is
taken, Mr. Cobden, while discussing the
same subject, used a phrase which led to
sharp quarrel between himself and Mr.
Delane, the reputed editor of the London
rimes. He said :
"The English peasantry has no par
allel on the fane of the earth. You hare
no other country in which it is entirely
divorced from the land. There ia no other
country of the world where you will not
find men turning up the furrow on their
own freehold."
The Times distinctly intimated that
the "ugly" phrase "divorced from the
land" was the topic and talk of "an in
cendiary." Mr. Cobden was not then, if
ever, a convert to the cynical teaching
of Mr. Disraeli that "no time is lost so
much as that which is lost in making
explanations in newspapers," but M:
Cobden was certainly unwise in making
a personal quarrel with Mr. Delane
on account of the criticisms in the
Times.
All this happened 'some fifteen years
ago, and a great deal has come to pass
since 1865 to bring the question of land
tenure iu Ei gland and in Ireland sharp
ly to the front in British politics. Acre
after acre of fresh soil has since that day
been opened to cultiva'ion in the West
ern States of America; mile after mile of
new railway has been constructed; the
steel rail has taken the place of the more
expensive iron rail; great econo ies have
been introduced into railway manage
ment by men like Vanderbilt (for which
by the way, tbe Conklin-Arthur ma
chine proposes to punish Mr Depew);
large and bv ift steamers have been made
to navigate the Atlantic with a am zing
regularity and cheapness of transporta
tion. Chicago is now as near to Liver
pool, in the sense of cheap freight, as it
was to New York when Mr. Vanderbilt
took hold of the railway business. The
supply of cheap food and cheap meat in
England was never so great and so little
precarious as now, although the supply
is a foreign supply. Free trade, great
ocean steamers and steel rails have dem
onstrated the truth of the paradox about
foreign supply so vexing to protection
ists. To the absence of proper security
for the tenant in Engl md and Ireland,
growing out of the system of Eng'ish and
Irish land-letting consequent upon en
tails and settlements under which even
in England the proprietors of the soil
can deal on with life interests which de
ter large investments for permanent im
provements, Mr. Cobden twenty years
ago traced the defective agricultural con
dition of Great Britain.
No class of people in the United Statt s
understand better than the Irish-Americans
what are tbe real causes of the pres
ent discontents in Ireland. They know
how much of these discontents conies of
actual tufTering, and how much is to be
attributed to Irish imagination fed by
cunning agitators. They appreciate bow
much over-population, Bterile soil and
the absence of habits of industry and of
temperance have to do with the terrible
ills of Ireland. They can form a pretty
good idea whether any change of land
tenure will tend to remove those terri
ble ills and make good government in
Ireland secure against the consequences
of bad harvests and famine. This much
however, tbe Irish immigrants into the
United States must feel which is that
they, as Americans, have contributed to
compel the English people and the Sax
on race, as represented in Parliament, to
at last come face to face with Ireland
and with the Celtic race in Ireland.
There have been famine and revolt and
suspension of the writ of habeas corpus
in Ireland before to-day, but to-day it is
the cheap food from the Western States
of the United States which not only al
levates tbe sufferings entailed upon Ire
land by the bad harvest of 1880, but has
driven the British Parliament to send
hither a commission to inquire into the
conditions of American agriculture, and
to inquire by another commission into
the land system of Ireland. It was the
free trade legislation in England which
Mr. Cobden and Mr. Bright promoted
that opei ed in Great Britain a market
for the wheat of America by repealing,
thirty years and more ago, the "protec
tive" duty then levied on cereals. Surely
every Irishman in the United States or
in Ireland should be a free trader in the
sense of forming a "tariff for revenue
only." If the Irish laborer is ever ner
mitted to resettle the soil of Ireland from
which Mr. Cobden said the Irish farmer
had been "divorced," free trade will have
been one of the moet powerful agents of
iriBb emancipation rrom oppressive land
lordism. if tbe Irish immigrant to
America is now a Western farmer, his
lnsb wit tells mm that nothing is so im
portant to his as freedom to choose a
market for his surplus crop freedom to
trade with whomsoever he will, in Eu
rope or in oouin America or in Mexico
If American manufacturers are so blind
as not to see that they also need a Bimi
lar freedom, then all the worse for them;
but the Irish farmer in the West feels,
and will if wise act upon the feeling, that
in order to ten bis wheat and pork and
meat to the best advantage abroad, he
mutt have tbe freedom to exchange
them tor foreign articles, and the freedom
to bring those articles into the United
States unhindered by a protective tariff.
An Irish Western farmer knows well
enough that he cannot sell his crop to
advantage in tiverpooi or Bremen for
gold coins alone, and then bring these
coins to America. If English or Irish
manufacturers are freely to buy his W st
ern products, he well understands that
he must take in exihange their wares,
which a protective tariff will not permit
him to take and freely carry to his West
ern home.
But that is not all that Irish immi
grants to the United States have done
for Ireland. They have demonstrated
to the Saxon leaders in Parliament that
members of the Celtic race, in a land
where they have something to hope for
and live for, alike for temselves and their
children, can in time become as orderly
as saving, as industrious, as temperate
and as enterprising as any of the races
which have peopled America, Is not
that a lesson which is worth whih for
Britons to learn? New York World,
loin xnn.
FEATHERING THEIR NESTS.
FEATHERING THEIR NESTS. [ From the Philadelphia Times.]
Mr. Hayes's Cabinet officers have been
very successful in feathering their own
nests. Mr. MiCrary has got a Judgeship
and a good salary; Mr- Key sits on a ju
d'eial bench, with a pretty good salary,
and Mr. Thompson is drawing twenty
five thousand a year for directing the
American branch of M. de Lesseps' Pan
ama Canal scheme, whatever the Amer
ican branch of that concern may be. Mr.
Sherman is sure of cirrying off the Sen
atorial prize in Ohio, unless there should
be some sort of a political earthquake, of
which there are no present indications.
Mr. Maynard has bright dreams of a seat
in the Senate from Tennessee, and now
comes news from Mr. Ramsey's own
mouth that there is a spontaneous
movement out in Minnesota to elect him
fo the United States Senate from that
State. Before the 4ih of March Attor
ney General Devens exoects to obtain a
Judgeship, and if there thould happen
to be a real nice place lying around
somewhere awaiting an occupant, Mr.
Schurz will probably leave his St. LouiB
newspaper long enough to take it. As
for Mr. Evarts, he would take the New
York Senatorship, but he can't set it.and
he fortunately has a law business that
will pay him more lhan any official no-
sition under the Government. The sad
dest rart of the whole business is that
the President is unable to pick out an
easy place, with a good, big Balaiv.
to which he can appoint himself.
WORDS OF WISDOM.
The bltu' man's peck should be well measured.
Tbe day ye do weel there will be seven moons
In tbe lift aud ane on the mldden.-Soots Pro
verbs. The best charity Is to teach tbe people bow to
wmk most productively, and to elevate labor by
placing It on a level with science, aud making lt
a part of education.- Elizabeth Ttom'ou.
The pasMons may be humored till tbey become
our master, as a horse may be pampered until he
gets the better of h i rider; but early discipline
will preveut mutiny, and keep the helm In the
hands of reason,
THE NOBLE NATURE.
not growing like a tree
In bulk, doth make man better be;
Or standing long ou osk, three hundred years.
To fall a log at last, dry, bald aud sere.
A lily of a day,
Is fairer far In May
Although lt fall and die that night,
It was the plant aud tluwer of light.
In (mall proportion we last beauties see;
Aud In ihort measure life ma- perfect be,
Ben Johnson.
Kindness Is the music of good-will to men; and
on this harp the smallest Angers may play Heav
en's sweetest tunes on earth.
"See," said Luther, one evening when money
to supply bis wants was scaice, "see that little
bird bas chosen his shelter, aud Is about to go to
eltcp, sits In peace on lit slender branch, leav
ing Ood to ptovldo for lt,"
Calumny would soon starve and die of Itself If
nobody took lt In and gave lt lodging Ulghton.
Evil ministers of good things are as torches a
light to others, a warte to none but themtelves
only. Hooker.
There never was a time when young men
should not be wamsd that power doesn't come
tiy treasure, and tbat prosperity dcesu't follow
wickedness. I tell you tbat manliness is prt fina
ble. I tell you tbat there Is no maullueu with
out truth; fidelity, integrity, purity. These are
real; and he that disbelieves them does so at bis
own peril. Beecher.
He that cannot forgive others breaks the bridge
over which he must pass himself; for every man
bas need to be forgiven.- E. Herbert.
Were Cbilstlns In general all that they pioftss
to be aud ought to be, I douot whether thero
would be need of offering any other evidence for
Ohiisllanlty than the lives of lis ditclples. An
drew P. Peabody,
The best security fo; civilization is the dwelling;
It Is tbe real nursery of ell domestic virtues.
Lord Bcacontfleld,
There Is no creature which creepeth en the'
earth but God provldeth ltB food; and He know
etb tbe place of Its retriat, and where lt Is laid
up. The Koran,
Infinite toil would not enable you to sweep
away a mist, but by ascending a little you may
olten look over It altoRether. So lt is with our
moral Improvement; we wrestle fiercely with a
vicious habit, which could have no hold upon as
if we ascended Into a higher moral atmosphere.
-IHelps.
Quarrel Dot rashly with adversities not yet un
derstood, and overlook not the mercies often
bound up In them; for we consider not sufficient
ly tbe good of evils, nor fairly compute tbe mer
cies of Providence in thlrgs b filleted at first hand
Sir Thomas Browne.
Never does a man portray his own character
so vividly as In his manner of portraying an
other's. Diogenes bas well said, that the only way to
preserve his liberty was always being ready to
die without pain.
Love of truth shows ltfelf In discovering and
appreciating what Is good whenever It may exist.
A generous man pieces tbe benefits be confers
beneath bis feet; those he receives nearest his
heart,
It would be belter for the world If the word
pity and kindred expressions were out of use;
klndnecs and tender feelings would then only be
exnresHed.by actions.
The hills of lofty endeavor and high achieve
ment lie all around m, and If we never catch a
glimpse of the views they afford, we need not
complain that lt Is because of the insuperable,
limitations of our surroundings.
Has It never occurred to us, when surround"
by sorrows, that they may be sent to us only for
our Instruction as we darken the ceges of birds
when we wish to teach tbem to sing ?
L - I
FRANKLIN'S MAXIMS.
Plow deep while sluggards sletp, and you shall
have com to sell and keep.
Pride Is as loud a beggar as want, and a great
deal more saucy.
Silks and satins, rcarletsand velvets, put out
the kitchen fire.
Diligence Is the mother of good luck.
Pride breakfasted with plenty, dined with pov
erty, and supped with Infamy.
Extravagance and Improvidence end at the
prison door.
It is easier to build two chimneys than to keep
one In fuel.
If you would know the value of money, go and
try to borrow some.
What maintains one vice would bring up two
children.
He that goes a-borrowing returns sorrowing.
Rather go to bed supperless than rise Iu debt.
Sloth, like rus', consumes faster than labor
weais.
A life of leisure end a time of laziness, are two
different things,
Creditors have better memories than debtors.
Tbe rolling stone gathers no moss.
If yon would have your business done, go ; If
not, Bend.
It Is foolish to lsy out money In the purchase
of repentance.
DR MARY WALKER AT THE POLLS.
The New York fnnsays; At the polls of the
First election district in Oswego town, Dr. Mary
Walker stepped up and offered her vote. Tbe in
spectors said that she was not a legally qualified
voter, and they could not receive the ballot, She
insisted on ber right to vote, and the oath re
specting the qualification of the voter being read
to ber, she said : "I'll take that oath ; I am a free
male citizen," but that could hardly be. The In
spectors refused to receive her vote, and she
warned tbem that she should commence proceed
ings against them.
Some pert young fellow In the crowd said If she
was going to vote, they might as well disss np all
their women folks In men's clothes and bring
tbem down and vote them.
"I don't wear men's olothee," retorted Mr. Mary
Walker, sharply ; ' I wear my own clothes."
HIS GIRL AND HIS WASHERWOMAN.
A young gentleman who was very particular
about his olothlng, the ether day wrote a note to
his washerwoman and one to his sweetheart, and,
by a strange fatality, put the wrong address on
each envelope and sent them off. The washer
woman wss well pleased with an Invitation to
take a ride the next day ; but when the young
lady read. 1 If yon tumble up my shirt bosom any
more as you did the last time, I will go some
where else," she cried all the eveulrg and declar
ed she would never speak to him again.
In Germany, including the free cities.
about eighty-five per cent of the popula
tion have incomes under $300; in Berlin,
Hamburg and Bremen, 140 per cent.
have incomes from $300 up to $1,500, and
one fifth of one per cent, (that is to say,
about 3,000 persons in the three cities
taken together) have incomes e xceeding
$15,000 per annum. This does not giye
one a great idea of the wealth of Germany.
OLD, TRIED AND TRUE.
Remember Dr. Gursott's Yellow Dork and Sar-
aarmrilla la not a new, untried compound. It haa
stood the test for forty years' use, aud has proven
Itself to be the best veuetnble compound ever diss.
covered fur curing anrnfula, syphllltio disorders,
skin and blood diseases, liver complaints, urina
ry troubles, eta. tf

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