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Daily Ohio statesman. [volume] (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, February 11, 1864, Image 1

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;OL; x. ;NEW .SERIES.
COW MBUS, THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRU
. . . r aSmW HHmiHHMMMHMMBaM.' ' -
i lhe Ohio Statesman:
:;l M)iftlLV, TRI-WEEKLY AND WEEKLT.'-:
PRINTED AND POBLTSIIED BV
iTlie OHio Statesman Compaay,
jb$c&No's. 30,38and.4O North High Street
:)
a (IN VARLIBLT. rH ' ADVAKCK.)
V Daily, mi year.............' ....., 09
, , 7 "e carrier, per wees. . 120
i ' fc1YH'lJ',Pr yM'- 00
Weakly, single eopy, ona year ., j 00
? J ; ' lixmontht. 1 00
tV Qltjblof fottt soviet, ona year-.w.... T 00
' nubof teneoples, ona year ......M 00
lflJ V ' r "5x onth. 8 0
I:it v.lJJOd Of vWffiV oopiai, ona year .30 00
nri.v ..... . lxmonthi 1600
ti A)
UUATDllOOTHYllJsaful
.1S -' . ' .:
. Appllcabla to tha
naaful rti.
' " ' ; A now thin
... 7" - i. . ,'
'!..:.; t.-
f 1 IU CombinUon.
Soot anil Shea
anufaotureri.
' Jawalan.'
'....faaillai. ,
.rf-r-.'I-!-'- t i' tt
j
i
Remember.
Sold by Lord &
Agonts, to wnom au
una iv, mej-aiy
A VfllliahlA
Discovery! i
HILTON'S
Insoluble Cement !
Ia of mora ffenaral nr&aticil util
ity than any invention now be
fore tha nuhlio. t b&i. hmn
tuorouhty teatad dorinjt tha laat
iiwo yeara oy practical man, and
pronouncea oy an to oa
SUPERIOR TO ANY
Adhesive Preparation-known.
Hilton's InsblOble Cement
la a new thing, fend the remit of
yearn of study; ita combination
is on
Scientific Vrinclplee
And under no eiroumatincei or
change of temperature, Willi it
oeoome corrupt or emit any ol
fensive ameU. , v - .
ROOT & SHOE u
Uanufaoturers, nsins! Machines,
will find it the be4t-xttale known
for Cementing tha Channels, as
it wnrkfl wiLhnntdelKV. in not nf-
faotad by any ohanga of temper
ature. , .
.rinvEi.i:iis
Wilt find it auffloiently adhesive
lor tneir uae,aanas ooen proved.
It In especially ndipt
. cl to LieatHcr.
And we claim as an epeoial
merit, that it aticks 1'atchen and
LininzatoBootaand Shoes aiiffl-
piently atrong without stitching.
IT IS THE ONLY '
extant, that it a sure thing for
- meoaing
Furniture,
. Crockery, ,
. Itone, . .
. . Ivorj,1
And artioles of household use.
REmiEiuuEn i
Hilton's Insoluble Cement
Is in a liquid form add aa easily
applied as pasta.
Hilton's Insoluble Cement
Ii insoluble in water or oil.
Hilton's Insoluble Cement
Adhere tP p)ly substances.!
Supplied in Family or Manufao
turers' packages from 1 ouncaa
to iim pouoas
mXTON BROS, Co.
Proprietors.
. PROVIDENCE. R. I,
Smith Wholesale Drugiists. S3
Ueneral ' Western
orders may oa addressed. .,
.nt
LOOK HERE!
FURS I FURS I ; FURS 1
"L A SHIAlL ADVANCE FRO IB WANUFACTURERS'
COST PRICES I
SIG(f;p.FTHE! BLACK BEAR,
( -
. i Russian Sable Sets.
nuason uaysame sets
nrK nn.i ksjii. c
:r-t.t: aisvss .wai v miiia aoto.t.
' s ' tone Marten Seta,' ' ' 1 " i
. ' : 'f, Sq.ulrrel St, .
Fter MlnU Sets, '- 1
, , . .,..1.., , . .
'"' Coner Seta, ,'!'4';
"'. "Fur Capei,
Fur Collar,
'ivv nr. :.faaisjrv- Pom,
rtra hoods, !
" ' "iTUR TRIHUINQS,
. 1 . 1 r: o J GENTS' P1TR COLLARS, '' t
ttOl .U .!Yl v wit. OENTSMUB GLOVES
"5ren't -Fur C?apW,'" : r-' i '
5.' 1 .y.;. Carriage Robes, i
.P.."'1'...'.1 - Y. .';' Uullalo Ilobes, : ,
,,,.!Arrtt:..".'';." &o., &o., &c.
.Wishing toreduoo oar Stook. we offer theabove
Qeed.i. i u h . d X L: . .
At ' Great" Bargains.
WaTAte (ht flaeit and largest stook over bronght
to Calumhus. , K . . . . . ;
CALL 5EIXA.MInB.;;
cSmith; &
New Neil House Block, :
"
S-njanWtf
COIATMBLS, OniO.
FURNITURE MANUFACTORY
1
JAt6n FISHER, HAVING-FURCH AS.
tJ ED the. entire stook and business of Messrs.
bboediuger A Brown ia tha Furniture Manufactory,
Ho. 103 South IXlffh Street,
. ri!! contiaila ti builnau at the
ZXTZS, STAND AS HERETOFORE),
(1 a so'icita tha oustom of the old patrons of the M-
t!il i(.(im,ut aud tha publio generafiy. All busiuass
Wilt D ....... , ;
" ;J?unctually , attendpsi, to
r.id. Furulttire naaufaotured or repaired pirttuptly
aocoriliiig to order. . -a w" a .3
J. i'loHElt ia alao engaged in the business of aa :
.. .hieB U wiU gira iptej ifii pronjit aKastioci '
f-Ut. . 1, .-; 7
. a .
T
ity;
.V.
ty
and
..'-f
A
-
XX
We
and
V
Own
1
on'
B B N NO " S P BYE R'S
BANKING HOUSE,!,
i. f
Commission, i! Forwarding and
f j. u .1 jo a ii
GENEBAL PASSENGEB AGENCY
.ill.' J
.IH't ,
roi TBI
Bremen, Hamburg & Havre Steamers.
AND ALSO
I
RAILROAD TICKET 'AGENCY.
'' v: ' east Ajro wEsrr.- .
.
Wo. T and Wtmt Third Street,1
''"'(Corner Main.)
Olioliaai,ii 'o. " i
: oi.i86-tf 1
.
!
V7M. H. RESTIEAUX,
SUCCESSOR TOT MoKEJE .4 KE3TIEAUX
Wo. 100 South High Street, j
'.'- OOIsT7MBTJSf !
'.. . ' DEALER IN ;
GROCERIES, PRODUCE.
.!' ''.'' 1 ;? . . . .; '
PROVISIONS, !
Foreign & Domestic Fruits,
FLOUK, SAJLT, MQUROS, Ac
Sjojago and Commission. ,
RICHARD KENNEDY,
. -DEALER IN .'' ';."".'
Books, Periodicals. Stationery,
PICI0RK8, FANCY ARTICLES, ETC., -1 i
No. 56 South High Street, j
Next Door to the Postomoe, ' ,
f " -" A
oettm-dly
COLUMBUS. OHIO, j"
Mrs,1 m. a: vAN'ridUTEN
. i. ... - . 1
f;M3XUner,
AND DEALER IN
MJJiLINEEY. & FANOT, GOODS,
'. "' ' : if -ii ,., .. 1 '
so: 68 East Town Street,; !;
ootto'ea-diy ' .
WATER PROOF CIRCLES,
vrAbElnthemoststylishWner.forsaieby 1
ft 1 , , j : " , .......
., , ; : . BAKV A.SOW, -.
-i ; Noi. IS to South High Street.
G EATS! PAPER COULAKS iv I
.,.od ?oy P!" P,01' ? U the fwhionable
,hP. Paper Wriat Bands, Ladies' Haper Collars
and Cuffs, Uente' Neok 1'ies of all kinds. " .
. ' " ' MAIiH A SOiV, !
. No. M to M South High Street.
IMPERIAL.' SHIRTS.
THE
HE pattern of these shirts is new, the Bowles, (
?XE(h r..v."i1?rafreormeitS th,ef'
r"1" ? oort, and each Shirt ia ;
luaranioea wen made. Hoys Shirts and Shirt Col-
ars. Gent.'s Cotton Flann.l Dn. ilnj rY...
menta in scarlet, white and mixed Merinoof the very .,
Deal quality. , :
Not. 23 to is SouuTriiirh strt 1 '
. iiirv Ar- turn 1
ABIES' and GENTS' Enrlieb and .
AJ German HOS1EH V
iosiehv of thevery best qnai-
great rariety. French '
also nil lr.
Woran Corsets.
BAIN 4c SON, t
. Nos. 33 to 39 South High street.
ALEXANDRE'S Plain and Embrold
ere id Glove. Also Undressed Kid
Gloves with Embroidered Backs. Mines Kid Oloves.
. . . MAIN & SON, ,
' : Jfo. S3 to 29 South High atreet. J
PLAIN - Bine and Brown ' I'onlard
.Sillie. , Alao elegant Plain and Fanoy Silks for
Street and Evening Dresses. Extra heavy Black
Corded Silks for Baaqaes and Presses. Seeded Silks.
,..- :;: , . .... . BAIN & SON,."; '
- 1 ...... Nos. 23 to S South High street!
rrvABEiE LINENS, eonsistini ot Damasks. Ta
X 1 ble Cloths, Naukius and D'Oylies in great varie
ana at reasonable prices. Also, Wine Damasks
Fruit D'Oylies, Turkish Bath Towels, Laoe Cur-
huu, .to. 1 , 1 1 siain sun, .
'- tlfoa. S3 to 39 South High street.'
EE.EOAWT'! LACE GOOUS. , ''
THREAD!ahOrenchLaoeBarbes.''.' '.'V'. H U
Black and, White BarboXaoe for Sashea n
PoiM Uoeollar. Snd Set,:"'' l""" '!" I :
iValenoiennes Laoes. Collars and Handkerchiefs, j '
hread and Freneh Lace Veils. ..'I;
eal Thread Guipure and Blond Lace Edgings.',' ' 1
lack Yak Lac Inserting for Dress Trimmings.'; 1 1
ace Collars and Sleeves in Sets richly trimmed. ' '
fhita Blond Laoea for V.ils and nmu . i.
Ruohea for Trimmings, Beading and Footings. JVJ
Point Applique Lacas in aU wiiths. ' 1 ;
JaaiM i ',Ki ton South High.atreit.
R OS B &-B B itf-
,Mei!CIiaiitr Tailors,
. Corner Totm A HLsrh Htn.
TYAVIN6 aSs6ciae a Arrrtkri?irri
- tneelher nndor th. a.hv named Irm fnr1k
Purpose of-earryiDg on the above named buainessT
ask tha attention oTtiie jpubli to our Urge. ricS
well selected stock of Goods in our line. We
Eeep oonsianuy on nana tun auorunens or to
est grade and stylea of Cloths. Cassiraere and
astjngw also.. full stock of Genu' Fnrdishinl
Goods. W attend to business personally, do our
eutting, and warrant the beat 4u and lnes
wprlu-spoaial atUatioa iapaid to Military Oaoare
r 'nil z : 7: J'rose' sibeeh.
A?t AUTHORIZED BIT JOHN 8.
11ALL to lnflMnt .nil nnmh.M I af T.Mtrm
im. lean b. t'omirliili. Vn. nriiumj nii..-
the Johnstown road, or at the ottoe of Hall. Id
i
i
.
;
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so
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war
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the
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a
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.
this
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has
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out,
.
that
'
Ji
'force
1
ana
of
are
of
of
'
same
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each
law
the
wno
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hi
laws
brin
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but,
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for
up
SPEECH OF
HON. WILLIAM E. FINCK.
ON CONFISCATION:
ON CONFISCATION: Delivered in the House of Congress on the 28th
of January, 1864.
abrogates the treaties which had existed be
sHoiaeryin tween the belligerents. Sir, I respectfully
Thejolutresolutlon (H,R.STo. 18) to amend
a Joint resolution explanatory of un act ito
fl..vooi.ioui.TOivu, u pmusii treason ana
rebellion, to seize and confiscate theproper
. j.ty'.of rebels, and for other purposes, tp.
proved July 17, 18G2, being under consider
atioivMr; FlNdtsaid: , .
Mr. Speaker, the debate on the resolutlrtri
under consideration has led to the exitminB-
DtmnitIDU Iliail.HAnnn 4a f..l. X 'I' .
tion and discussion of questions of grave
iiiLcieMn w uie uuiuury, mill ucnilUKl Iroln
this House, as I have no-doubt they will
reci'lye from the people, a most careful and
prurient consideration. ..
We.live, Mr. Speaker, In an eventful perf-
wu ui iiio jiisiory 01 tins imiion. JCverf
thinffieems to be Ofi9ettled and thrown un.
on a sea of uncertainty. Plain provisions
of the Constitution, which have heretofore
been regarded as settled beyond contro
versy; are now called In question, and new
ana unneara-oi constructions placed upon
them." The provision contained in the
third section of article three of the Consti-
tution, which provides that "the Congress
shall have power to declare the punishment
ui treason, duc no attainder or treason shall
..... Hi. , .. .!.... I. 1 1 J . ..
Hum tuiiupuun oi uiuuu, or ioneicure ex
cept during the life of the person attainted;"
is now gravely argued in this House- by
iu juts aim uiBiuiguisneu statesmen
to mean that Congress may, in declaring the
uuuimiiueiii, ui trensun, iroviue ior tne ior-
feiture of the estate not for lite only but in
fee. Sir, before the year 1802 there did iiot
exist in tins country any cllllrence of opin
iuii uijuu una clause oi rnn t nnst. irnr nn
No one dreamed that the Constitution had
vested in Congress any power of declaring
.unciiuio ucyuuu uie mu oi tne person
convicted of treason; but that by express
provision the forfeiture was to be limited
to tne ine ot the traitor. That such was the
construction of the framerS of the Consti
tution is evidenced by the writings of James
Madison, justly entitled to be called the
father of the Constitution, find hv tha Wla.
lauiuu.ui mu i lest vongress, oi wnicn manv
1.. .io vi me vuuBLiuiuuu were
members. The opinions of Justice Story,
already cited in this debate, show how
clear that distinguished jurist was on this
question.
Sir, I was about to say that I was aston
ished that there should exist in this House
any riiflerence of opinion upon a clau e of
tne constitution which Has for more than
seventy years been regarded beyond con
troversy; but the sad occurrences which
have unfortunately taken place in this coun
try within the last three years admonish me
that I Should not be astonished at nnvthW.
seems to me, Mr. Speaker, that the hon
orable, gentleman from Pennsylvania'! Mr.
Stevens has exhibited more boldness and
frankness in this discussion than any gen
tleman on that side of the House". He does
not seek by- any subterfuge to avoid the
force of this provision of the Constitution,
plain in itself, but marches boldly out,
leader bf his side of the House, and
takes the distinct ground, that the Union is
already dissolved, and. that thia auentinn .1
one outside of the Constitution. He says
that
The United Hljitxn u .1 a.tv ..ui
edged bellmorent, with a foreign nation, and as such
has abrogated all former compacts existing be
tween them, neither the United States, nor the Coo-
jpueniH) ouwes eantas against Mh other, claim
aid of the Constitution or the lawa passed nn-
it. ; ... . , -, :: ) .',.,.;
inat the btates In reheiiion are no lono-er
portion of the United States, but are out
side 01 the Union, and are to be conquered
andjheld as subiueated territories: and ar
gues that this Government, on hecoming
conqueror, Is, by the laws of nations,
clothed with the right, and should exeroise
to confiscate and appropriate the proper
ty of the people of the, States thus to be
conquered. , Well, we have here a distinct
recognition of the Confederat States,' and
concession of what Jeff. Davis and the
leaders of the rebellion claim. They insist
wiaiiney are "outside 01 tne Union," and
that the "former compact existing between
tnem . ana tne united states lias been abro
gated, and the honorable gentleman from
Pennsylvania admits it.
The questions discussed bv the trentleman
from Pennsylvania Mr. Stevensf are of so
important a cnaracter,' and embraae a jange
'han anything which has been advanced in
discussion, that ! shall feel it my duty
cAuuiinaiiou souiewnat more extensive
.r.mln. i.i cnw,i .i.'i.i. i.'
u J j i T 1"" who which 11c
alluded to in his argument. To snstftin
position, that the States in rebellion are
of rhn TTnlnn unri onnafifnfo afArdrtn
:. :r : ".r .v.v.s..
S?"i f.ue. ?T gentleman, quotes
irom vatiei, rnuiimore, and Kent, to show
a war between two nations annuls and
submit that the authorities cited are not In
point. . These States were not held by the
of treaties, but by a Constitution
adopted and assented to bv each of them.
Dy tneir people tnrongn their conven
tions. 1 muy admit that when a civil war
breaks out between the different members
the same society the contending parties
each entitled to all the rights and usages
war as against each other, This is a rule
necessity, and is established by the plain
est dictates of humanity and Christian civil
ization. Writing on this subject, Mr. Whea
ton says in his excellent work page 520i
A civil war between the different members of the
society la what Grotius oalls a m-'xed war; it is,
aoeording to him, publio on the side of the establish
ed Government, and private ? the nart of the Deo-
resisting ii authority. But the goueral usai; of
uab.vua iciaiuB BUIiil a rrm &g VIlbllllUK UUIU fcuu OOD-
tendine parties to all the rights of war as against
other, and even as respects neutral nations. .
But I claim that there is nothing in this
sound and necessary principle oT public
which implies in a case like ours that
these States are outside of the Union and
constitute a foreign nation.. It is not against
States as such that the war is to be pros
ecuted, but against the people in the' States
are in armed resistance to the author
of. the United States. :- i
A rebellion exists within a portion of the
States, carried on by a portion of the people
those States. - They have for the time be
ing prevented the execution of the Federal
within certain boundaries, but their
ordinances of secesstonhlbelng. invalid and
uncnsutuuanal, vBoJ?oxce which they may
2 to-jnaintain such acta can trive them
legality nntil they shall successfully estab
lish their Separation, and this would be suc
cessful revolution, and constitute them be
fore the world a distinct nation.-,'- i'
believe, Mr. Sneaker, this unfortunate
result of breaking up the Union may be
averted by wise and prudent statesmanship;
elr, I do not believe - the polioy advr
cated by the gentleman from Pennsylvania
Mr. Stevens that wbloh is presented by
President can do so." Slril am for the
uiiiuii vi uicee oiatce, not as BuojUKatea
conquered States,: but as equal States,
as our fathers intended them to be. j '
J.he people J have the honor to represent
this floor are for the old Union. I be-
llrtVA th A TIAnfllA nt thn antlva TCnr hnroct srk
that same Union under which they grew
and prospered ; but, sir that Uuioahas
U
1
of
x'-o:
1
1
a-j
been denounced on this floor. The Const!-
I tution as it is and the Union as it was are
assailed not only by traitors In arms, buby
gentlemen In this House. They want an
amended Union, an amended Constitution.
. Sir, If the policy of this Administration
and its friends shall prevail, we never shall
nave tne union as it was nor the Constitu
tion as it Is. Sir, was it for some other
union, some other Constitution, that a mil
lion and a half of brave and gallant men
nave Keen sent to the field and a debt of
two or tnree thousand million m in in.
enrred? Sir, Is all this sacrifice of blood
and treasure to result in the dissolution of
uie oia union and the permanent change of
the old Constitution?.' I trust not . , , i
Mr. Speaker, we stand before the world
ro-aay n great military power. The devel
opment of the strength and vast resources
ui tins country during the war, both upon
the sea and unon the land, have njitnniani
the world, and are perhaps unparalleled In
history: and who doubts if this combined
strength had been used for the simple and
single purpose of vindicating the rightful
authority of the United States, and restor
ing all the States with their rlchta
Institutions unimpaired .fco, the Unlonac-
vumpauieu Dy a wise ana , conciliatory
v.vuisc ui civil policy, out wnai me strug
gle would now be closed, the Union restor
ed? . :-. ... . ,
If this war is to be continued for some
other and different purpose, If it Is to be
waged against the DroDortv and local insti
tutions Of the States and for the nnrnn nf
euuj ugmion ana conquest, as advocated by
the bonoxable gentleman from Pennsylva
nia Mr. Stevens, it cannot fail to excite
moredesperateand united opposition on the
part of the South and continue the struggle
...vl j . . r-r---
niucn longer, and nnally terminate In the
permanent dissolution or t ia nninn. S r
there is a limit beyond which this war, and
beyond which no; war can be continued,
without utter and comDlete bankruntr-vonrl
exhaustion. It must sooner or later come
to an end, and it becomes us wlaplv and
carefully to consider whether the. hio-hnsr
considerations of patriotism and duty to
n.o icjiu tins country ao not require
uiui. mm war snail De limited to tne nnr.
injsvB niuiuuuceu on tne part. oi uiis uovern-
uieni at tne commencement
7.ff o i t . .... . i
trine advocated here by the distingished
gentleman from Pennsylvania TMr. Rtflvpnii
., . iuiu,ui iii uie uuu-1
on the subject of confiscation, either as ap
plied to real or personal nronertv. I under
stand him to maintain that bv the law f
wr me conqueror may seize and convert
everything that belonirs to th enflmv. nnr.
only public property and the territory of
the enemy, but also the private property of
uiuiviuiiais, men; women andchlldren, both
movables and Immovables.
Sir, no such instance has taken place since
tne conquest of England by William of
wormanuy, unless indeed the case quoted
by the gentleman from Pennsylvania Mr.
Stevens of the conduct of Enirlnnrl with
uer suojeew in inoia De authority.
air, it seems to me tnis is the last author
ity which should be quoted before this
House. : The conduct of Great Britain to
ward her India possessions has been marked
by a violation- of everv law. nuhHn and
private, and I trust M ill never be adopted
oy this country, and no such doctrine has
UP tO this time been recoo-nlzAri or nasantirl
to by the United States, aa I will endeavor
to show before I close. And now, first, as
to real estateBy BVeonqnestof an enemy's
territory the wrocessftit-party does not ob
tain such absolute rights to the real estate
as will warrant him in disposing of the soil.
He only obtains the mere right of occupan
cy, and the possession does not ripen into
tiue uniess it snail De connrmed by treaty
or by the total abandonment by the con
quered party of an effort to regain it But
tnis doctrine does not Include private prop
erty, and has reference only to the property
of the belligerent enemy to public proper
ty, un wis question mt. wneaton, In his
excellent Treatise on International Law,
pages 596 and 597, says: .... . ,-.( -i .: j
In anoient times both the movable and immovable
Sropertv 01 ine vanquisoeo passed to tne conqueror,
uoh was the Roman law of war, often asserted with
Roman provinces subdued by the northern barbari-1
anaontb.-deolineaodfallof the western empire.
uuio.ou.iiig scrum: una suon was tne late or th.
UndaWngiri'toth.
oonflscated anf partitioned kmonir th. om.SJ, .
was that of Enirl.nd hv W.lfUm nt J.
ine lasi-examn e nr hurmie
of such a eonquest
SincO that neriod amnnd. 4.hn ;vil..Ml n-nil'ne
voruienaoin conqnest, even wnen connrmed by a
treaty of .pease, has keen followed by no general or
paruai transmutation ot landed property. The
property belonging to the Government of the van
quished nation passes to the victorious State, which
also takes the place of the former sovereign in re-
spectto the eminent domain. In other respect pri
vate right are nnaffeated by conquest. .
Tliis authority is direct and in rtoinr- anrl
the same principle of law has been recog-
uiicu oy i.uiB uovernment on several occa
sions, to which. I shall refer hereafter.
Allow me again to read from Wheaton,
pages wu ana nnk t.; i.m :.
We have seen that a firm possesion, or the sen
tence of a competent court, is sufficient to confirm
the captor's title to personal property or movables
taken in war. A different rule is applied to real
property or immovables. Tha nriorinalnvnm nftki.
species of property ia entitled to what is called the
posUuniny.endtbe title acquired in war must be
confirmed by a treaty of peace before it can be oon-
Bidered aa eomnletAiv v.li.l. . Vhia -mU ..umI u-
freouentlv .Dnliml In th.MMnf mM mttA nMn. I '
ny
erty, which by the ganeral nsage of modern nations
extmpirom eoniteaUm. at onlv becomes nreo.
troally important in questions arisineut of aliena
tiona4f real property belnnring'to the Government
made by the opposite belligerent While in military
vuoup.uon 01 tne country. auett a title must oe ex
ressiy eonnrmwl by the treaty of peace, or by the
teneral operation of the eeasioaof territory made by
iuv.uviut in muou mnij, . . . y.
Jt will be observed that this rule.goTerns
he Dr'ooertvTielono-Inir to thn u'f)nruirnnumtn
the conquered belligerent, and does; not
upiJi .to. viuere private properxyv'u. -t.
.
'
'
'
01
to
(Contlnded To-morrow. .
PpoJca & , Stationery.
JOSEPH H.
- ( .
COLUMBUS
aflUlaf
,ubMerl.''B6oItsQUer1& Stationer,
-r mzjric -rr-wm-'i - 1
aT61 XTrlnTEtSr, Uliicler,
' L
BlankBook Manufacturer
BLANKS; BILL'- HEADS, LETTER
HEADINGS, ;CHECKSj- NOTES,
: BONDS, ul CERTIFICATES, i
In Letter Pre and Lithography.
foreign & Domestic Stationery
on u-rs ..I asso'vawo. y.
RtKCH AND AMERICAN . PAPER HANGINGS,
nnnnc-Bi m nrrnDATinMt-
window anAzma,
i rames ajna jxouicungWi
''e&C4.''f"fcC)
Ml..
,,J08. H. RILET.
5shjr-d4i
House & Lot for Sale.
GOOD BRICK DWELLING, HOUSE,
eohtaini'ng twelve rooms, and cellar, and other
eonveniencea, well, aistern, wood-house, ooel-hpuae.
- j .,.1.1 . T" , 1 ' itI1
fjt JFS"!! For m U If
SSmm'mmm " ' ' '..-.o
1 : lI it
;iiAXEy
J..-.
to
' .
for
the
i
TELEGRAPHIC.
REPORTED EXPRESSLY for the STATESMAN
For Nlajht'a Dlepatchee ace 3d pay
Morning and Noon Dispatches.
Washington Items.
' ifmv York, Feb. 10. The Times' Wasii-
i iK"m aispatcu irom D airrax C. H- states
that a contraband reports his escane from
conslderable force of rebels. infiTntrir .nd
vsvairy, six mues soutn or the station. A
force was dispatched to ascertain the truth
of it, but had not returned this afternoon.
In the House to-day, Mr. Arnold, of Illi
nois, Introduced a bill,for investigation into
the proposed improyement of the Chicago
harbor, to be paid by tonnage duties. Be-
lerrcd to thfl rnmmlrtoa nn lVn...
L' .i . . .
The i Times' Washington dispatch report
wu uiSuiiin(u)iii wuiskv merciianttl
aretodncjng effect, andit wouldnow seem I
mat uw senate amendment of the wniskv
(4T ..i n rr V n n.lnK.J 1 .1 IT.
maj auuyiKix uy las llOUSe. TU6
President has acceded to tlie wishes of the
State Convention of ArEansas, and ordered
vreii. oteeie to noid an election on the day
designated.' In other respects he hasre-
neweu nis instructions to Oen. Steele, to
make sure of averting a collision between
the military and civil authorities, forheias
commissioned Gen. Sickles to go to Arkan
sas with full and discretionary power to
keep things straight , .
Gen. Butler has commenced the estab-
lisnmont or a common school system at
Norfolk and Fortress Monroe, precisely like
thattn Massachusetts. It will insure the
education of hundreds ol children.
Commissioners from the Dominican re
public, which was suppressed by Spain in
1861, are here anDlvlnsr tobn
beward laid the case before
the Cabinet to-dav. and did
!
f
Rebel News.
w , . w. .v. .biuuuipiiu uuycro
IV 1. w iniiir nun ' 111 IS 1 il I .v. n n . K n -
w 1,110 0111 re receiveu. ine lixaminer r
ports the arrest of a W. Heinz, a hnn Ii pi
charged with being connected with an or
ganization to release Yankee prisoners, as-
aassiiiate jcu. uavis and destroy the (lav.
ernment buildinars and work shons In Rli-h.
mond. Other arrests were likely to follow
w iuu rou 01 memDcre was seized with
uetnz. '.'.;.'
The arrest of Hon. Eobt. Toomha . f?.
vannah for treason and disloyalty was ru
mored in Richmond, bnt it nroverl to hn.-
originated in the fact that Toombs attempt-
j get aooaru a train at savannan aud
was put on Dy tne guard.
jiajor ien. urcckinndge Is appointed to
relieve Samuel Jones In command of the
reDei department or Southwest Vlrirtnia.
A rebel disDatch from OrAno-n rnnrt
House, 7th, says: The enemy crossed In
jarge ioree oaturaay at Morton s ford, but
iter u enarp contest were repulsed by Oen,
J6.U. Johnson's divlson. and driven hanlr
over tne river, uur troops returned this
morning, ine enemy also attempted to
cross at Barnett's ford, but were rennlserl
by Gen.: Scalers North Carolina brigade
a i rl I .omaa'a iakaI m . fpu. ......lit
our side were slight. . The enemy has re-
" . iiUvD b invauvs Aim tmiim.i LiJt nn
urcu.
A letter from Walhalla. S. C Jnh. 21tJi
states that Western N. C and.towns in thn
county of Georgia, were recently invaded
by fifteen hundred Yankee cavalry, who
uiuateu inaiscnminateiv. earned orr ne
groes, horses, food, fcc. they captured two
ionieaerate soiaiers, wnom they handed
over to Uie bushwhackers of Western N.C
and Tennessee, who shot them. The letter
says tne bushwhackers have murdered the
rebel JLleut. col. walker, his son, Mr. Young
and Col. Davidson's son. and others.
. The Savannah Republican of January 30
sees no Indication of a formidable attack in
mat vicinity. It reports, however, an at
tack on-the rebel pickets at Whltimare.
Shelling a thunderbolt battery, by a monitor
Without effect.- ,
H""0 0f Caroluia-
died on the 25th of January.
. Jit was- omciany scatea tnat tne whole
nurnoer or troops enlisted for actual service
since uctooer is 100,000.
Morgan was at Colnmbus.' Bragg had
u:ii juoutgomery ior menmono.
News via St. Louis.
St. Lotus, Feb. 10. The Senate vesterdav
passed the House bill for a new State Con
vention. ? The bill defers the election , of
delegates until n ovember next.
The Memphis correspondent of the CM.
cago Journal, under date of Feb. 4th. savs
advices from Vicksburg are that Sherman's
army leu mat piace last weeK, the 16th corps
under Hurlbut. following the 17th umlnr
jucmersoji, which has the advance.
Gen. Smith's cavalry exnedition lpft.Mpm-
phis for Corinth on the -evening of the 3d,
and will soon be heard from in the interior
Mississippi and Alabama. i 1
IhO v-X
ine union lorces in Arkansas are also
id to be preparing for an early movement
southward, which will put Magruder's ar
my Between tsteeie s command on the north
and Uanks columns on the south... 1 .. ir '
The Democrat's -Leavenworth .dispatch
says: A joint resolution for a Senatorial
election to-day passed both Houses under
tne gag ruie, irotests nave already began
come in from various counties, and in
dignation meetings will be held all over the
State-. The people are utterly opposed to
the fraud and will vote it down bv. an over.
whelming majority, at the first State elec-
'
ft
From Newbern.
NrwBERN, Feb. 5.--Laree numbers of rle-
serters from the rebel armv hnvn hpon Mm.
ing in since yesterday morning. They re
port the rebel General Pickett nrf hu
command, then consisting of fifteen thou-
eaiiu men, tnat mere were dui two tnousand
Union soldiers In Newbern,.and that he in
tended to take the city bv a nlo-hr. .a.aiiH
The ' arrival Ot a retdmont 'tVnm Ron fnrt
just oeiore me enemy out our communlcA
. . . . - v
110ns wim mat point, togetner with the
arming of firemen and citizens, white and
black, satisfied the enemy that we are mor
than a match for them. Hence ,ihelr failure
make an attack. The enemy has fallen
back to Kingston, N. C. The town of War
saw, N. C, was destroyed by fire on the
81bV accidentally : -
' a " '
1
naw ,-.-;
New Y6RI. Feb. 10. The Herald' Wach.
ington dispatch reports the entire susnAn
sion of pay, by order of the Secretary of
a. , vi wuiuwuuuiK AlUJUOX Ul DetWCen
thirty and forty regiment and 'batteries,
neglecting to forward proper returns to
Adjutant General's office, and also the
of nearly two hundred field and company
officers for neglecting' to forward military
history and returns to the ordnance officer.
ne suspension is to continue until returns
are' forwarded. ". -,:;'..- v -r :
" y 1 :.,r--.f.nri
IV'
11
Cxntcs Feb. 9- Th steamer Stenhan tO.
catur, from Memphis to Pittsburg, arrived
inu evening wim puu oaies or cotton, for
Cincinnati. . The Bteamer Baker was seized
yesterday at Paducah, with a cargo of cot
ton. She was released to-day, the charges
against uer aoc rouig sustained . ,
:iNO;i95.
New YoRxIFeb. 'in a .nani.i
Herald . from headquarters Department of
West Virginia,. 9th says: Information of
high Importance reached one of our out
posts to-day. It was brought In by a mount
ed deserter from Karlv'a nnmmanrl XI a ant
mat when he left a rumor was prevalent of
removal or preparation made for the Imme
diate removal of the Yankee prisoners from
the neighborhood of Kiehraond.- Alscv the
Richmond authorities had detained malls,
iiewspapers, etc., going from Elchmond to
soldiers In camp. . : .ai . . ;
'" i .,
Datton, Feb, 9-Thomas Parrott, of the
i m or .tlt f feon' .Unseed oil manu-
""'pures, oj mis city, and one of the
oldest
and most respectable citizens.
died this
morning after a short illness. .
Nkw York, Feb. 10. A nerald corre
porident captured by the rebels In Louisiana
and recently exchanged, writes that the en
tire rebel force west of the Mississippi on
January first was thirty-five thousand
men'
Nkw York. Feb. 10. Thn nenWm a,-
il:- i r.. Y!""" '"pau;ii piaces tne loss m
thA I Jfll I Vl H M linf 1 . 1 1 f .nn! ... . -. ,
the 14th Connecticut recrlmpnr. at nna hun
dred and thirteen killed, six known to be
taken prisoners and nineteen wounded. We
lost no portion of Artillery, nor was any
portion of our infantry forced out by the
rebels and forced to cut their way through
New York. Feb. 10. -The lfoi-Alrl'a
respondence says: Price Is at Camden, Ar
kansas, and has been strengthened by five
thousand men under Minton. and preparing
for a movement against Little Rock. Klrby
uuubu a ucuuquarierB were at nureveport.
New York, Feb; 10. The Richmond
Whig says the Virginia Legislature has
been occupied In secret session with a reso
lution requiring the Confederate authorities
to 8U8nend the ban of outlnwrv nr(n.t-
Gen. Butler until an exchange of prisoner
is effected.
New York, Feb. 10. A refugee from the
South says Atlanta will be destroyed rather
than fall into Grant's hands, who is expected
to move on it in the spring. The refugee
says there will be no starvation South as
soon as sweet potatoes are abundant;
CHEAP GOODS
-AT-
HEADLEY, RICHARDS &CG7S,
.
South Hiffh -Street.
' ;.'', . i
Cloaks. ",
Shawls,
.''Furs,''
Rich Silks,
Balmorals, n
Blankets, '
PlanniBls; v ' "'
f. ' :'..! .T
Hoods, &o
janS
HEW HAT, CAP & FUR
STORE.
WE WILL OFFER AT
Keduoed price, our atock of -
GHEATLT
LADIES SUNK FURS, :- - - t
...1; - FITCH FURS. 1 . . . -r.
;.!.: r. ).! V. RIVER HINK, -?
v' I ,. .. .. .', CONYWRS,:
1
SIBERIAN SQUIRREL,
!
Etc
chiLdbens tuite conV,': '
' '' ' "' ' ' ' ' COLORr.n rnvvJ
7 ' " i.
SIBERIAN
M'-r'f . . ... :.
SQUIRREL SETS ' '
LADIES '.
Fur Trlm'a Skatinr- Can.
v.
IS- ,,,:'LADIES v
Fw Xrixad Xloods.
LADIES '
Silk, Beaver to Flt, Jltttm.
r At No. ; J3b-& ' ' I
SaaUi High Street, Sonthaat rrw,
p sa,'a oarwaaa,
A. Ul.b . ... .
1-
CtoluXl&iauflS.'' eC.!"?""-
O. BBBKLY & CO.
deeM
. . .. ..... i ... ) 1 .
lL ULtf. t 1:'
BELLS & GumnxiL
Wholesale' 'Orbcera
'6 ' " ".' .
.:iiiT'.-'l "! (!? nii-.-.i i,rg vj:.-. 4
at ru..'j;'jDKALEM ' j
Floor, jEat,;.FWi,..WatOTkIima, ijidiriasfcf
ilC.i lt . J J
Peuthaart, nrTowaaa Fswtk Streets, a

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