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Daily Ohio statesman. [volume] (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, August 10, 1865, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1865-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXXIII.
rr
COLUMBUS. OHIO, THURSDAY MORl'fNGi AUGUST 10, 1865.
NUMBER 3G,;;
- ! '.J
:.)'.! a
i'iilT
;-; ; n' ; "' j":'' .V"'- ' "-1 -!.' '.l.'i!S!-:t.: :, 11 ..Vi . . ''--"....; ' ...:. .'m--; '.i,'-. -.'i;. , . ,r , ,v, , v i
I
y i t - t . 1 l 4 , i i y (. r
.I;,!
.if;:.
VAht A JD WIIVTEK
CLOTHING, -
Furnishing Goods
VALISES, RUBBER GOODS, C.
"i-i:rJ3 ,T 'L. 3L '
Nos.6 & 7, Nell House Build
ing, South High St.,
OPPOSITE TO ."eRTMICE STATE CAPITOL
rTM' CORRESPOND WITH THE Pre-
X nl low pries of Gold, I bare determined, to
eiogeoutst ."o'C"":
GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
toy entire itock of
FALL" AND WINTEE G00D3,
- . .1,. .',!... I. I '
otalttinRof every artiole necessary for a oomplete
oUiLfortb -
CITIZEN AXD MILITARY TRADE,
iTavrnt tne largest and roost extorsive itock of
Jlotnmg in Uoiumbui, botn u regards
Quality, Style and Prices,
Itoan offer ennerint IndtiAem.nlji. u mv atanlr maim
bought drin the late decline in roods. To Mili-
HII J WIU UIIIHU Ibl.UCIB M WUUIU BBJ glVO 111.
call, 'and I can guarantee that Ton will to awa? sat
isfied. I have also constant! j on band a oomplete
saiorcmenioi
;!' T yi rf i- : -. : :
Swords : , r . ,i
'Belts;- '-- ; !
' Sashes,
'".'l'fitrapSjV..;.;:..;;:;-.,
-(.r.-... Ornaments,
Rubber Talmas,
..'it 'fi ,-t .r.
FUBBER COATS, LEGGINGS, &C,
r
'In Fnrainhtnt Goods, I bave an extra large (took
of 8earfs, Linen and Silk Handkerchiefs, Uloree,
Under UarmeDts, W'hiteand Woolen Shirts, Collars,
CO., o. ionnooiea witn me estaniunment is my
.11'
Tailoring Department
waare ean ba fonnil a ftill RtaAlr nf ClAth. f7aMlm nrea.
Bwaren, Meltons, and V eatings, which will be made
np in me laieumji. ana at ,
REASONABLE RATES.
u-t.t ! .. :. . :.n i ; ,i
DOT FORGET lilE PLACE,
MAKCUS CHIIibs,
WoaV 6 & 7, Nell Ifon-e Bnildin
' Two doort from Postcffioe.' ' ' " ,
Mee9 ":'- ' '
i ' Fuel for the' State.
I t.vi'i't m i i 'I it .i'i' . . I. . ; . 1 1 . . . t i
"Office of tBE secre!tart of sta.te.1
Columbus, Ohio, July 31, 1665. i
SEAIE1 PROPOSALS WILL BE HE
oeired at the offioe.of tbe tknretarv of atate;
until :.,. .).; ; v,,, i. . i-.r.i ',.
laradar, the 4th Daw ef September
ntt,t 1? o'clook, noon, for furnishing the Bute of
yAiawitn tuei jor one year, as ioiiows ; , . ;
, ,12)000 Buahela of. Hocklnr Coal,
of the best qualit of the lower vein of Hooking
liou, ana iree irom siate, siacK ana airi.
vn.rutn nii.hala at finks.
to'we'l'f B ttdt lesi than 40 pounds to th bushel, to1 be
made from Hooking or Cambridge Coal; and kept
-ui . ., -60 CoTde ef tVeod, i-.r: ,.,
the same to be drf Hickory, Beech or Sugar, -foar;
teat in lengin, straignt aua well split. ; - .
Tbe quantities above named to be increased at the
Option of the Henretal7 of ' btate." .''' '' J '"
. The fuel to be delivered, without ebarge for snoh
eliv.ry, at the titata House,. CJalumbua. Ohio.
rrobosais to be auoompauie I by sample. and to
specify the kind, quality and price or the fuel pro
posed Wbe furnished. . i- ,. -..i
Each proposal must be accompanied bj a bond,
witbatleat two good and sufficient sureties, in the
penal sum Of not exceeding twenty thousand, nor
less than five thousand dollars as required by law),
oonditieaed Tor the fuithi'uj performance of inch
contract ae may be awarded." '
The bids to be niaxte and the tontraott to be award
ed in accordance with the term of the act entitled
"An aet to provide for tbe purahase of stationery .fa
el and otner articles for the' General. Assembly and
State officers,." passed Marou II, 1863; ndT'A act
to amend sections four and six, and to, repeal section
five", of the above entitled act. fanned, : Jlaxqh
lidi' to be indoraed on iba an?elOpe,'ProposAla
forfurnUhing Pud fortbe SUte." . . , ''. .,
Fuel furnisheS bv the bontraotAr mnstln all 6asa
be equal in quality to the sample. TAU rtUf icilf
nr. ttt. ' n .r CI 1 T ry 1 1
-itn ' i ,'!" : i v i " iw ja suinni mu4
-Mgl-dtd" .'..'n'i ' I" t'u Beoretaryof fctate,-;
IJtCt zuo auii!ni-...'l-
Auction and Commission Room.
l-i Illlll tf IT HI II .' " " ' : Wl'tJl') .'';!
THE VlfPEBSIONED HAVE OPEHEr
,. an Auction and Commission Boom at , . s ,
?"h' TI. Ill EnilTown Slrte, '
;i ii( .v-uih-m! .i.-'v r. nm I .'.t . . . : -n''
where thjy are prepared tq do s general Auction
and Commission business.
8ale of all kliidn of property promptly attended
to.either in oity erooantry. u I . .. uutt ;ri
, Household'ffnrniture eold every market morning
at the room, oommenoing at 7 o'clock.
' Also, Furniture repaired and Varnished on the
tttorieit notioe and most reasonable terms. , hi-.. ,
TUBNKY A 8IM0y, l
No. lit East Town Street, ,
mohl-tf
7" ZETTLER ! HOUSE, '
(IT. .EOvriter el reairth nd Friend
?'' 'f iCJoIiimlus, Ohio.
Ji: C.-XOLL & SON;
TTAVIPrd HECEHTLY ASStTTTTED THE
JCLi manacement ofthis large and eommodloni
Hotel, we have newly refitted it with reference to tha
convenience and oomfortof guests. In aolioiting a
goodly share of the patronage of the traveling pnblle.
w assure our fxlenda that w e shall Use every etftirtttt
please. , .., oi:Jt C. T.0U, A BOM,,;;
junelTW-dly. -,
Attorney1 aod' Counsellor t Lawy
atnlJ- 'ln .!' i!inn -Aiii;lte 0
tobt-tL
cni
EMPORIUM !
wmm
CURE' WARRANTED,
IF DIRECTION ARK FOLLOWED.
CALL FOB A CIKCULAB DESCRIBING
ALL 8TMPT0M8.
SY MI'TOMSi
Tbempfonu of Catarrh aa they generally ap
pear are at first very slight. I'ernoKS find theyhave
a odd, that they have frequent attack, and are
more sensitive to the changes of toinpers'nre. In
this condition, the nose may be dry, or a s..ht di
oh ante, thin an aerid, afterwards becoming thiok and
Slheaive. As the disease becomes chronic, the dis
larges are increased in quantitv and changed in
quality: tbey are now thick and heavy, and are
hawked or ooughed off. The secretions are offensive;
causing a bad breath: the voice ia thick and nasal;
the eyes are weak; the sense of the smell is lessen
ed or destroyed; deafness frequently takes place.
Another common and important nyrnpUim of Catarrh
if, that the pf rson is obliged to clear his throat in
ttiemorningof a thick or slimy mueus, which has
fallen down from the had during tbe night. When
this lakes place the person may be sure that his dis
ease is pn its way to tbe longs, and should lose n
time in arresUni It. - .
Tht abort art but a Jew of th maim Catarrh
tpmptom, . ) ;, : . . ... ..,.,,. .
k Mingle Itottle will last a month
1 be luted three times) a day.
fftm S. Thai, J, Turner, Ba-ifember o( Congrut
from jutnou, mm npeaxxr or luinot uoust oj
HtprettntaUrtt.and Grand Matter qA.,J1, and
A.M.tqtA4iUaUqJUluU.
FKEBPOBT.Oot3l.l63.
DR.D.H.SEELYE: ' . . . . i
Dear Sir In renlv to vour notioe of the Iflih
nnt.. I would aav that I waa severely aflti ted with
Catarrh for years, when 1 became acquainted witb
youand bought two bottles of your Liquid C'atarrn
Remedy. .' Before I bad used one buttle I was sen.f-
filv improved, and belore tna seoona bottle waa nn
shed, was completely oured. I can recommend (he
medioiue to all atUicted with Catarrh.
Hespeoifnlly yours,
THUS. J. TURNER.
IR. D. II. SIvEIA'E it. CO
Soli Proprietors, Chicago, IU.
te Laboratory at Freeport, 111.
At Wholesale by ' '
JOHN D. PARK, Cincinnati, O
Wholesale Agent for Ohio.
At Retail in Columbus by
t i? rnnir n invruiuou u w tuMmrr
O. ROBKRT.S," MARFLB A BITfeON,' 8CHCEL
L E R A CO., and for sale by
DruKists Everywhere.'
febW-dAtweowly " .? 1 -
WHISKY, BRANDY, WINE,
AND
Liquors of all Kinds.
TEXYFAB OLD BOTJBBOIf TPHIS
ky. Thirty barrels pure 10 years old Bourbon
Whisky. Alio, twenty-live barrel pure 8 to 11
years old ; l. i ;: i . . : .-
i Jalonongahela WJusky,
' -;'. '. i;;.;. : -' ., ;' :,..::, ' . . .. ,.
of the best brands. Wilt be sold by tbe demijohn,
;keg or barrel; also, ail Kinds ot wines ana own
Liquors, by
LACELLE, ROSS St CO.,
iM South llinh utreet.
decll)
TEAS! TEAS!
TMIE ATTEWTION OF DEALERS,
! JL Hotel Keeper and Familiee, desirous of obtain
ing choice Teas at reasouabl. rates, ia respectfully
dueotea to our, y,-. -,:, , ! -..l-i. ...... ,- i
; iOKPIEIB ASSORTMENT 0F',;.,'i'7'i
,:-8REEV- BUCK AND NATURAL LEAF TEAS. -
-"loj' J,'!" I ...li 'i'ji i: ii f.' . . in;. Li:. .
Which we offer In arlanrial naokain. or in aaanti-
tiee toauitpurchaaerii; Wa feel justified iosayiag
that we pever fail to meet all reasonable expecta.
t)ons, and while orders are constantly coming in for
-it. ill. n ,".. .;y : .ill : n -m : .-.I'V,:
"Just' mieh Tea aa yoa sent ub before,"1 '
, . il.Ji " ;-...! iii. j il-.n-niin .'', :
eomplainWUrely Wur. Persons who, as a matt
of taste, or from hygienis consideration, use Bla
Tea, often find it dilhoult to get a good artiole,
.4.; .ii WOIML: CHOICE .hj;im i
l '.ll l.lol -.if ;"ii . ' . .-. 'i . : 1 . -.
eannot be excelled, and have established a reputa
tion for ua w greyer, we oave sola tbem. j
;;''bMR 'NATURAL LEAr;,
are 'of the purest 1 nd sweeteet ehops, ant being
oured in the sua are free from the deleterious f-
leqn proqueaq.oy oouukh. who ovpver. , .
,.A full line of ftaplf and fanoy (Jrocorieealwi
on band at lowest market prices.
1. - T.1 ., -u:l . .. 1). I.MIHIII X!1.H
always
1
' hfi i nn c1" PTn ri mo "f. fin '
onuuno. o i tun no - .b...iiu. i
1 . . :):: I in'l. o:'i ri iiir't i(iooi.'i 1.
Jon ov'l
au30 (Corner FneniJl.ii',,,:., ,,'..,
r r :
v y. i : r '
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OPCOLUMBUB, 1 "'
i,. i iif.-yfuiv.iv . '.i.'Kn.u-.iiH fi
Financial Agent of the U. S.
CONTINUES TO FDRNI8E V. B.i BONDSi
Notes,. and other , Government Beouritiea in
large or small amounts, as desired: All offering ard
free from Btate taxes, inclusive of ' ' "
;'iV,;ir-iW l'':'reasjiiyWptefc,;v
Thaa. ai a favoritainvnatmant. as Interest is nav
able semi annually at the rate of 1-W per cent, per
annum, and at the end. of three years from their
date, are convertible rntoGreenbaaVsor percent.
fold interest (-SO Bonds, at the option-of the holder..
janai-u 'ii .in .u. jan ouddaiuj, vaauier.
NEW DENTAL OFFICE, '
S i.M 'i.if
JiinuW ? WORTM A N,
alano:ii.i J- ilt.il i )p j ,,!V! if. am .li.isicifu !n
DENTAL) SURGEON:-"" i
x. PiuBAb serneee w toe eommuni-;
tv of Oolumbua and vioinitv. anH hu
hopes that any who may want NICK, LIFE-LIKK
and 1)U SABLE sets of new teeth at VERY LOW
win nos mi to Rive aim avail.' a
,!UlhMAin a seat and permanent- manner, so
as to render them as servioeable. as they were be
fore the decay oommonced.1 All operations known
to tha profession, carefully Oerformed and warran
ad entirely eatisfaotory. i j ii ,i;.. ,.i . k
OFFIOfi No. 10, north entrance (up' sfalrs Ori
er House Columbus, 0. ' tinohl-tf'-
Patronize Home Institutions and
Keep your Money in the Slat
HOME INSURANCE COMPANY ;
OF COIUMBTJS, OHIO. V
; AUTHORIZED 13Y TI1E STATE.
,, Offloe In . ,T7xxiox. Bloolt, ZZislx g3tz-oot.
, Inaarew ns;alnt Iom or Damage by Fire and Usbtnlni;.
nu'lnt:n Conuned to TlruUCltum Property, vr Itlila tlie State. !,
Thli Company, under RUte eontrol. eondoeto Hi business on the most approved and economical plan
takiug hskaonly in I int-Claai. Detaohed Property, t arm Buildings. Private Dwellings, and their Con
tents. making it safo.r than those insuring Mills, Factories, Wooden Rows, and other property of eimilar
baiard. It is theehief aim of the DirecUrt to do a safe, rather than a large business, as being a lurer
guarantee te permanency and of greater ultimate success; their rule is to settle all losses promptly and
fairly; and in soliciting patronage, do so with the firm convlotion that the plan adopted by them, will make
the Company permanent and safe to its polioy holders. ( . ' ,
! DIBECTOBSt
Hon. SAMUEL GALLOWAY. Columbus, 0. "
LEW1H CASH, Esp., do.
.D.B.nUBBAUD. - do.
'i officeks , . ', .
8amuel Gallowar, Prealdent. Alex. II. Hanley, General Agnf.
. Lewla C'aaa, Vice Preaident. W. A. Hartley, Aaa't Cicn'l Asent.
. . D. 11. Hubbard, Secretary.
auglS-ly . . .
i-.ji,
Ml-
C. V. L. BUTLER, Morehant, CoVimbi s. 0.
K. F. DRAKE, Preset X. I). A W. Ii. tt.,.)i enia, 0.
ALEX. H. HANLEY, Xenia.O.
HBEBi
1MM&C0
1 ARE DAILY RECEIVING
SUMMER GOODS
' OF ALL VARIETIES. "
Rich Dress Goods!
j"- " -IN-
Silks, . ,
Grenadines,
;'-7J'..Chalies, .
' T :;: Organdies, S:o.
FIXE LACES, EMBROIDERIES,
S . AND A FULL LINE OF , .
NOTI O NSi
Cloths and Cassimeres,
j SHAWLS, LACE POINTS,
CLOAKS, &c.
Also, the latest style of SILK BASQUE, from
3U,wart's. . ... ,
,c NOS. 250 AND 252,
South High , Street.
HAVE YOD HEARD .THE NEWS !
j: SAMArK
TTAS OPENED A LABGE AMD SPLEN-
XI.. did stock of , : , . ..
BOOTS. SHOES. HATS. CAPS
Watches & jewelry,
.('! In) . '. : At tha New Store,
No. 212 North High Street,
;WhioHiiewiir t .
. ti i . . t ! f ? ,'l ' "in ' ' I t ' ' i ' '
Tbanthe like was ever sold In tbiioity. jjj .
NO CHARGE MADE - F3R SHOWING GOODS.
... MAGIC OIL.
i, Halloi strangorl stop a minute, sir,
. l'.'e's a New Store, iunt drop in it. sir.
i . .' And vUw with wonderful surprise, air,
, . l neiiotiiio6s mat wiu meet your eye, sir.
it ., 1 ,l!.i.-.n....M :. ... ,-. . -x.l ... . I . -
-i' The piles of Goods you have poi seen, sir
Orelseynd must be dogged green, sir,
Te thus in haste go pan the door, sir, '
- 1 Of 8 Frank's New Boot A Shoe Store, sir,-.
,ii! 'i " I t., ; . . . .
' 'He's gotof Boots, surt the best, sir, ,'"".v"
In North or Houth, or East or West, sir. - ' ' ..
' 'Tie not made op of 'Sloueh' trash, sir, '
And ha will sell it oheap for CASH. sir.. . - '
1 Po come along,' come one.'come all.slr, ' ' ,
-. Come rich, eoiue poor, great and small sir, "., .
Come pious folks, ana hardened sinner, air, t ', . .
And help along then w beginner, sir.; . i,. ,.'i
at lit a em i.,l-.T,vl 8,-IWAiVK,'
r ,
.j,,, , U J. n , i No. 3 North Iligib, S traet, "
Sterling's
The tHair.
c It prerinta or -stoptv the ! JJair c
from filing; Cleansep, Beautifies,
Preserves,' and renders it Soft and
Gjtoy,. rand j tib ; UtolrfiM rfromj
Dandrttn.
It is the best Hair Dressing and
Preservative in the world.1
' .M l V'. . Ill. jJ
Sterxing 8 Ambrosia
ManCaacturJkq 4CpMPy,
L.J.. .NEW..YORfci,.
BLACK SILKS
CLO.
-;,aiTy
tiooii3 ffffVftTJ on .ir
,.. . ,., , 'id; 'ii ,..,.H j
'' t rr t KH'H-h'i'Vi BAIBf & SOJT. -juneii
' TiU. t3 and 29 South Uigh Street.
:
;
i
'
1
I
!
JOSEPH DO WD ALL,
No. 5 Union Block, Columbus, Ohio
, ISSUES POLICIES.
INSURANCE AGAIXST ACCIDENT,
THE ACCIDENT
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF COLUMBUS, OHIO, :
Witha
Capital of One Million Dolllars,
(li000,0O0,)''
Is now ready to insure against '
ACCIDENTS
, OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
CAUSING LOSS OF LIFE Oil BODILY INJURY.
This Company is organized under the General In
surance Laws of Ohio, and the applicant for a Doh
cy may readily satisfy himself of the responsibility
of the Company, by application to any of tbeofiicera
or agents of the Company,
This mndo of Insurance is preferable to Life In
surance, for the reason that it is much cheapor, and
gWes a weekly compensation in case of disability
arising from any accident whatever, whether thoy
occur m traveling by railroad, steamboat or stage
coach, walking in the street or at work in the shops,
and in every variety of oircumstanees in which men
are placed. "
UNDER
GENERAL ACCIDENT POLICY.
1 The payment of TEN DOLLARS secures Ten
flollars per week onmpensati'on while disabled for
period not exoeeding six months from any one acoi
ent, or '
Two Thousand Dollars
1 1 In the event of death by Accident.
The varment of FIFTEEN. DOLLARS secures
Fifteen Dollars weekly compensation, or .
I Three Thousand Dollars
I In case of death.
Any other sums up to Ten Thousand Dollars at
roportionato rates. - . i
1 Von can insure in this Company for any length of
Imefrom . .
ONE DAY, TO FIVE YEARS,
And policies will be renewed at expiration.
NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION IS REQUIRED.
It is the simple t and cheapest mode of protec
tion against want and suffering in oase of Accident,
and places the insured and those dependent uodh
him above the humility and mortification of asking
charity or contracting debts for daily subsistence.
The lollowing gentlemen constitute the Executive
officers, who Cordially invite inquiry and publio in
terest in the Compaar:
Hf.TSJ. E. SMITH. President.
DAVID 8. ilt A V, Vice President.
DENJ.K. SMITH.
WM.9. DESHLER
Executive
W U. A. rLAIT,
Committee.
OF.O. II. WRIGHT, Seo'y A Treasurer.
Columbus, Ohio. May 8. 1865. tf
7-30 U. S. LOAN.
THE FRANKLIN. NATIONAL BANK
: vOF COLUMBUS,
IDesinated' Governmeat Depositary.
: .i . !. -; .,. vi ; i ::.jt, '
THIS POPULAR LOAN IS NOW Oft.
1 fered by the Government through 'n
' JAY COOKE, '
,1 . I, i - j ' ... . i . ? .... :
Subscriptions are received and the nots kept on
hand for immediaca delivery by this Bank.
Five per oent. interest botes reoeived at Jar, and
accrued interest. .
" '"'.''Jl1 "os kiutcnEsowV'"'-
felUM-0 s ' i" ' Okahler
moa urn . Mmvurs
V ' it : a'.M
SUCCESSORS TO QBO. A WM. MoDONA U
Mm.' IOI Siinlh lll.h IImm.1'
,'ir.". :7. L,-m
-''i 'i' '.in i 'i I i ii. n ' - iii. ii i
iPBOPEurroRs of the coltjmbub POWrEH
ll)Vib :iiaqazisb., : .:.;,,',;
oi 'in t' .-'.I.-'" '. f. : i, . : .. .,,
0-:ti lli.rt , .1.. . I.-. .... 1, . . . ;.
AftErrm for" 'sale op thr
MPBERY WHITE WHEAT FLOUR. '
Aeents for the sale of Gardner. Fhipps A Co.'i Ha-
gM Cvre4 Hams. A . ; ..,( ,
' I Dealere.lM !ry
CHOICE ; FAMILY , . GB00EE1ES
Of every Description, Imported aad DomestiJ. "
Fine Wine; Corillals, filtutw, fiegars,' Oliva Oils.
Sardines, atb. , T All goods delivered free of
OOMge, ,,.., Tt.'i,l. v.'l ' I.:
- AIcCOLRr, M1I.E8 Ac SlcDON ALD9,
maylidly . ,. , .i . No. W South High St. '.
FRANKLIN NATIONAL BANK
r;: v 1 5; I , .es.. . )o v j-juii t,
1. -i.l. .' ' .f. j .l.i. -;; ,-i ...j:
vi:k i:i I-i':i .. . i.'.i'ii r fMp! ,. .j.i .t. ji '.Hi-i.'iir'
ii.i..-!. it..,. I '" i AJqir-a.!,! , .. , Jtl ,n
. .. -.i'iM ''' m . ll'.l'l 1.
FINANCI AL. AJUblM Ii.-ialu'l
.1 iT i .. . i u L. r.Klv
.x:;i'J Of the United States.
('l'vt
KoeiTC.rfculcrlptlo: fo( fko"
S-IO lean.
, f li f.l.l j Tr ,)rn iiill .r f.' ;nrt
-im-.i jii r Buysani Bella all kinds of ) ',.) I
And Discounts sod makes advances oa approved
voUeho.f.or.bl.jejm..iic;iMr,
.itol.!.'-' 1 fit chief.
taf Statesman.
A SCRAP FROM HISTORY.
LETTER FROM GENERAL MORGAN
ON GENERAL HALLECK.
MOUNT VERNON, OHIO, June 6, 1863.
L. Ttwmas, Adjutant General U.S.A.: .
General On the Gtli of December, 1802,
, I wrote to you from Memphis (eeeEshlbt
A), ttiat the Journals of that (lute announ
ced that General Halleck, in his report of
December 2, 18C2, Btated that "the alleged
cause of the retreat from Cumberland Gap,
'was, the want of supplies," bat that the
'commanding ofllcer had just beforo reports
ed that he had 'several weeks provisions,"
and "that he would not abandon that 1m-
Eortant post;" and that "an iuvestigatlou".
ad "been ordered.'.'
' A two month3 liad elapsed since General
Halleck had been informed of the evacua
tion, aud as I had not been notified that an
investigation had been ordered, eo that I
might have an . opportunity of producing
evidence of the facts upon which I acted;
and as no Intimation had been given of any
dissatisfaction at Washington, as to my con
duct, save an anonymous telegram, which
was discredited by the country, by the ar
my, and by myself; in the exercise of the
right guaranteed to every ofllcer, I de-
mandeu ii prompt hearing before a Court of
Inquiry or a Court Martial. To that de
mand, on the 20th of December, 1802. Gene
ral Halleck, through Assistant Adjutant
General Kelton, replied (Exhibit B) that
Major General Wright was directed, some
time since, to Investigate and report the
fact? concerning that affair; and that uif
that report should be satisfactory no fur
ther jroceedings would be required, and
that I would be held free Irom all blame."
' You will observe, Bir, that this assurance
of General Halleck was made on the 20th of
December, 1862, and that his report ol gene'
rul censure upon the operations of all our
armies was made on the2dot that month.
My astonishment, therefore, was great,
when, in reply to my letter of January Oth,
1803, General Wright, on the 27th of that
month (Exhibit C). informed me that on the
15th of October, 1S02. six weeks before Gen
eral Halleck wrote his report, he, GencraI
Wright, had made his investigation, and
had written to General Halleck commend
ing my policy in evacuating Cumberland
Gap; and had stated that he "did not see
how, with starvation staring him (Morgan)
in the face, and with no certainty of relief
being afforded, he. could have come to any
other conclusion than the one arrived at."
Gen. Wright further informed Gen. Hal
leck that "the evacuation was In pursuance
of the unanimous opinion of the general
officers of the command (Exhibit D, rec
ord of council of war); wasamatter of neces
sity, arising from their provisions being exliaust
ti, their comnutnieationa cut off, and no infor
mation of any prospect of relief being received."
And yet, with this report of the investi
gation, made in accordance with his direc
tions, and by the officer -selected by him
self, with this report lying before himrOen.
Halleck published to the world that he had
ordered an investigation; but suppressed the
fact that the investigation had been made six
weeks before the publication of his report, and
tiiai my action naa oeenjuuysusiaineti.
Although I have suilered public wronjr,
I feel too deep an interest in the great Issue
for national existence now being tried on
the battlefield, to add a new disturbing ele
ment bv makine a public vindication. But
1 would be tin worthy Of the cause in defense'
of which 1 drew my sworq, were i to allow
jtny personal' consideration to prevent mo
Irom placing on record a statement of facts,
as set forth, in this paper, ,
i Having waited in vaili ford further reply
from Gen. Halleck,' on the 18th of Janu
ary, 1803 (Exhibit E)! , I wrote to you that
r' I had Datientlv remained under the pub
lic censure ot Gen. Halleck for the period of
lour months, believing tnat time ana inves
tigation were only necessary to secure the
approval of my course ;" and I requested
to be informed "whether my conduct in
the evacuation of Cumberland Gap met
with the approval or disapproval of the
General-in-Chief." Tq that ' com muulca
):atioii Gen. Halleck has not found it con
venient to reply ; but In .his letter of Feb.
fcth, 1803. (Exhibit F), in response, to. Gen.
Wright'ii letter of Feb. 4th, 1803. (Exhibit
G), ;Geai, Halleck says t "The facts, as
fiow presented, Justified General Morgan's
k-qtreat,."., What facts? Gen. Halleck pos
sessed do facts on the 8th of February, 1863,
Kvhich he did not know on the 2d of Decem
ber, 1802, when' te published Mb . censure
fituhis letter of February An, 1803, G'eueral
Wright, simply re-afflrmed the facts' and
opinion already stated by, him, in his offt-
;Ial reportoi the investigation, made octo
iet 15th, 1803. And1 in renli' to General
Wrieht's letter of Feb'. 4th, 18C3, Gen. Hal
leck says, In his letter of Feb. th, 1803; "In
this letter (of Feb. 4th) and vour former
(letter (Oct. 13, 1802), you fully exone
rated Gen. Morgan from all blame in aban
idouing Cumberland Gap.; No lurther in-
pswyuiiiuu i win iiueieiuie ,uo umuc, in
ubstance, Gen,. .Wright's, letter of Feb. 4,
. I ' A ! ...11, I. ..... J It T
103, and Mis report ot October 15, 1802, are
euticaL as Gen. Halleck Admits. UdoiI
what principle, then, did he publicly cen-
Ibiika rv tt trti i -c a n nAn ranat ir? n f i t'hti nsf f'i
kevi ; ana privately justify my' condict on re
ceiving the','second,, when both sflstalued
liny-action?' "'
I . Gen. Halleck expresses "regret that Gen.
j Wright did not make a full aud fer'niai ln
Ivestigation at the time It was ordered."-?-'
And vet. when Gen, Halleck penned the ex
pression of that regret, he Knew ' that the
investigation was as ma anu tormai as it
could have been made except; by Court of
Inquiry, or Court .Martial. He says that
sucli an Investigation "was due to General
Morgan as well as to Gen. Wright and the
Government," If due to me, why did Gen.
i a court Martial
jfllA fl' I ll Hftll-
J i: v iw ,uv Jivy-
notrJeneral rfnllpolr nrri.
;ouro an oruer jor a vourt oi inquiry, or
ihimsjftdrdera CqurtMartial? Gen. ,Hal
i leek ought io know that Gen. Wright had
not the power to order a Court of Inquiry;
he (Halleck) refused me a court, ana did
inot order one himsel(j,but'ohlthe contrary,
;he ordered the investigation , to be made by
aingle oillcer-Tselocted that ofllcer hlm-'
isolf, and at this lateday he grudgingly and
; privately Justifies my conduct, on the report
I uen. xmiioch.- iuri.uer .sys; ( "uen. Jaor
gao,represented his force, as , able to hold.
Vi'umberlajid Gap, jagaiust any, number o
I tropps wmcn tueepemy couia,bring against
i him., lie was almost boastful in his confl
uence mame cyuiu, ao tuis. ..uq these as
surances the Government believed that the
post would N held by iis, and serve as a Be
rioMS,obtafile to the retreatof Gen.Bragg's
army?"- i-.-fi ,., n .
1 Gefi.Jlalkck, strangely confounds "forced
with 'Subsistence.", , Ididhpld myposltldu
against, a force oore than four times great-,
eritbao my pfvn the enemy completely
surroundedi.bwtdid not attack i me. , And
bad not Gen Halleck failed to open com
munication! between Lexington and Cum
berland Gait. At he promised to do (Exhibit
' IIS thalt Br.vnnirhn
. j I had sufliciynt force to beat, die, enpniy
JuaueoK reiuse to grant m
nr a Pnilrfc nf TnriliirirO '. Tf
ernmnnr. .nhv aid
If he had attacked me, but had not subsist
ence sufficient to keep, my troops two
weens longer irom starvation.
In his report of Dec. 2J, 1802, Gen. Hal
leck says that lust before the evacuation, I
reported that I had ."several weeks sup
plies;" but In his letter of Feb. 8, 1803, he
asserts that (u a dispatch of Sept. 11th, 1862,
alleged to have been written by me six days
before the evacuation. I said that I had
supplies lor seventy or eighty days. But
inuiaisame letter tieneral Halleck says:
"It is true that he (Morgan) stated inhis dis
patch that his supplies were limited.'1 ' How,
then, does Gen. Halleck reconcile the as
8ertion of seventy or eighty days supplies
with his admission that.I reported that my
supplies were limited? ' lid savs that I bo
stated in my dispatch of Scp't;ll, 1862; but
I deny having writtten such a dispatch to
Gcu. Halleck, Gen. Wright, or any other,
persou.; Aosucn uispaccu was written oy or
for me; and if any purporting to be such is
in existence, 1 denounce it as a.lorgery.
In my official report to Gen. Wright, Oc
tober 10. 1802 f Exhibit I). I said: "On the
ptli of September last (Exhibit J), I ad-
aresseu a letter to Maj.-Uen. VV rlgh t, by one
of my aids-de-camp, loith a verbal message
tliat by eating mules we could luld out sixty
days (Exhibit K); but on the 12th of Sep
tember, the able and energetic division
quartermaster informed roe that it was Im
possible longer to feed the mules, and sug
gested that they should be sent to the Ohio
river." I further stated that my troops had
been six days without bread, and that De
Courcy had failed to obtain the, hoped-for
supplies at Manchester. These facts were
all before Gen. Halleck while be was writing
his report of Dec. 2I, 1862, for which he so
bngracclullv apologizes in his letter to Gen...
Wright of. Feb. 8th. 1803.
Geu.. Halleck further says: "Had his
(Morgan's) true condition been known,
measures might have been taken to relieve
him." ,. . . , .
Does Gen. Halleck ' mean to say that he
did not do all he was able to do at Big Hill,
Richmond and Lexington? Does he admit
that lie did not cause Bragg and Smith to
be driveu from Kentucky at the earliest
possible moment? .H so, then it U certain
that Gen. Halleck is responsible for the
loss of Cumberland Gap; for the enemy
maintained his positiou iu the heart of Ken
tucky, one hundred miles this side of Cum
berland Ford, until more than two months
after my troops had been starved out of
Cumberland Gap.
However ill-informed Gen. Halleck may
have been as to the general theater of oper
ations, I propose to prove that he had no
excuse for being ignorant ot.tlie condition
of my command. He had been duly noti
fied that my division was surrounded on 'he
barren summit of the Cumberland Moun
tains; that Stephenson was in my immedi
ate J'ront with a force double my own; that
Bragg was on my right flank with a vast
army; that Kirby. Smith had gained my
rear, with a force represented as being three
times stronger than mine; ami that Mar
shall, occupied the sterile region to the
hortli, between the Gap and the Ohio river.
He had been further informed by ray offi
cial report of the occupation of that strong-
noia, under ciuce oi dune xm, isup, that
"While at Cumberland Ford I was compell
ed to haul forare (Exhibit L) a distance of
ninety miles, and that during the mouths of
April ana may the roaus were so bad that a
train of ten wagons could only advance
three or four miles per day.'' ;
That on the 30th of June, 1S02, I tele
graphed to Lieut. Col. Swords, Assistant
Uuartermaster (jieueral .
"We are in want of everything. We arq
(lestitute oj jorage. .. . : ; . .
' That on the 21st day of July, 1802. Chief
KTigmeeruraighiii, acting on my stau, tel-
fesraphed to Brigadier General Totten, at
WAsblDgtoti uty -v t . .
I "The country in our rear is exhausted.
That in our front soon will be."
That dh' the 23d of Jnlv, I telegraphed to
the Secretary of War and to Gen. Buell
uIfy supplies are very short."- 1
j That on the 20th day of July, In my letter
nnnai.....i.., m.i..f L,.. i n ti.:i,
U IllObl UUIjtVUB LV VI11C1 JUglllCCl VIAIXUM1,
about to i proceed to General , Ilalleck's
headquarters (.see Exhibit M), I stated
that. .. . ' '.'''.,, ,' ,
i "Eist Tennessee and Kentucky to the
Blue Grass region are exhausted.",,,
! That on the 10th of August I telegraphed
to the Secretary of War and to General
'Buel ": : ., . .i . r -, '! i
VI have about three weeks supplies"; ,i
That on the 16th of August, I telegraph
ed to the Secretary of War aud to General
Buel ..... i... . , " m ::
"Kirby Smith cannot possibly remain
three week in my immediate rear, while I
can hold this place Ave weeks ith my pres
ent eDmmand.''-''-'j ' ' " ,.
l (t did hold the'Gap four weeks and five
days from the date of that dispatch.)
) ' That on the 19th of August, I telegraph
ed General Halleck that 'One hundred and
fifty wagons loaded with forage aud sub
sistence nave arrived." -s :-i'-i :
Those supplies were principally of forage,
which hftd'been hauled over one hundred
miles, and as the teams had to be fed, while
Ion the road, from the wagons, tbe amount
was greatly red uoea. i; ... ,
Here, then, is the proof that General Hal
leck was repeatedly Informed of my true
condition as to supplied, and that if he had
the means to have given me relief, as he
says""he might have done," he is beyond
all doubt responsible' for the loss ot Cum-
Iberland Gap.' ' 11 1 '
General- Halleck says that "theGovern
ment believed that Cumberland Gap would
fonW'A mriotii obstacle to the retreat ot the
enemy.'
If the Administratiou.so believed, it was
the duty of Geseral, Halleck to have cor
rected so erroneous an impression. Jle was
aware that I had Invaded East Tennessee
in June, 1802, by two other gaps, find that
Kirby Smith had Invaded Kentucky by the
same, 'routes' lri ' August' of that year.
Hence, even'had Geri. Halleck furnished me
with supplies, as he Bays he might have
done, the forces of Smith aud Bragg would
have retreated by two or three roads, in-
Dlpml nl1 bv nnp. - ' -1 1 1 i.
' V - 1 1 - -
aria twice afterwards, 1 6ugge,5i;ed,lthe: Im
portance ot pr6't6eting thclmes of eommti
nication between'Lo'nlsville' lirid Nashville!,1
artl I m, ii-nn n 7 AvInfrlAii tu) Jri .ii
miu uvunvvu VAi(ininn auu vuuiuuimuu
Ford; and afterwards, t' strongly Tecorn
mepded tho.occupaudn; 6f Kogcr's and Big
Creek gaps.j Bijttjqth lines werij left' iih-
protected; the' caalry"I' 'had 'repeatedly
asked, for, was not, furnished, and the-natn
nil t-pmilt or th6 'w'eakfind,'ftnd phhrirl
condition pi entu6Xy' "w.ef e', tn' raids of
Johit .Morgan , and, this, lnyasron' of Smith
..Jlegardlng the iccBpallorf of East1 TenJ
nessee as ibr vital Impdrtantei'ili 'rafn 1
made every ort to bave &' rail.'or' other
good military rOftd constructed. to Ctiraber
land Gap, And,4oia thence to b1 extended
to Intersect the gt'eat road from Richmond
which connects East,' Tehnesseei,wjth virJ
ginia, bjB, Clinas, labama 'atjd Missis
ffiiree times earrislly1 irequested "toi be
allowed to, advance Sgalnst KnoxVlUe', and
pledged, myself, to Sweep East Tennessee
from jBrlstoI to Chattahooga. ' I bad tlp-i
plies ptjtrmif6r eiiadditonalreglm'ents
ol East TeBnesaeans, and all communication
with Virginia could bave befert cpt off, urf
til) Buell could have advanced :frotn ' the
! In obedience to. InstructWna fVonI, the
Secretar'ot'War, I kept' him'1 advise of
mV iuBvemelits. and on the ' lltW Hf Mk.
i .'.-.i.- ri'i tt- r.'v, i m f r:.'T;i i,-fv .
southwest. But I was, ordered not to as- (
sume the offensive. " ' ,ui
Had not these plans been interfered with,"'
the Invasion of Kentucky would not havel
taken place, aud East Tennessee aud Cum-....
berland Gap would be In our possession, tc-'.. !
, Gen. nalleck complains thiat I was "-ai- "
most boastful" in my "confidence that be
(I) could hold his (my) position against any
number of troops the enemy could bring
againsthim (me)." :! .jm'I-j.j'i : fi . ;
, There was a stern necessity fop,, a tone of r.,
confidence on my part, for I had reason to"
know that there was panic from Washing
ton to Louisville. And: although cut off fI
from supplies;., without a single sDldler-
wearing the Union , uniform . within two
hundred miles, of my post; threatened by'
cuuiuinuu. luainuuoea-r'ai ooantnil: conn- ;a
dence," and sought to Inspire at least a mocVr ,
erate degree elsewhere. . , '
In anKwer to in nlfinlol tootmr 1 f 'I
plied:- '"'' .'"- . : i. I'll. i'.. I;1, a';;
i-nu Buipiumu iu near umi inerr ; is m
consternation at Louisville,, or . elsewhere, i
Here (Cumberland Gap) all is quiet and or
derly. We are prepared for the eiieni '
whenever he may show himself."- :..,; M
, The enemy did show hiwselfi and the re-i ,t
suit proved that we were ready to receive
him. During the thirty-two days that we "
were Invested we captured over Ave hun--':
dred officers and soldiers, making an equiv--1
alent of five hundred and forty-two prl-
vates, and killed and wounded one hundred ' '
and seventy, making an aggregate loss of '1
over seven hundred of the enemy, against" '
a loss of less than forty on our part. ., ..i
' These facts were duly reported.
On the 19th of August, 1802, 1 telegraphed '
to General Halleck, "This position shall hot ' '
be yicldea while we have an ounce of pow-i t
der; but I trust the road will soon be open-
cd by a column from Lexington."
General Halleck answeredV'I will see that ' 1
you are very soon reinforced." ' ' 1 '
Ills promises only resulted In defeat and )
disaster to ourarms. On the 19th of August
his reinforcements were driven back at Big
Hill; on the 30th of that month they were '
. routed at Richmond, and on the 2d of Sep
tember, in hot haste, he abandoned Lexlng- !j
ton and Frankfort and retreated to Co log
ton aud Louisville. And Bragg maintained
his position in the Blue Grass region, more 7
than one hundred miles this side of Cum- I
berland Gap. for more than two . months
after General Halleck promised his speedy '.
reinforcements!
! Inasmuch as my advarrce against Cumber- ";
land Gap has been made a subject of discus- '
slon before the Buell Commission, and, as I ,j
have not been summoned as a witness, it Is .,
proper that I should here state a few facte,
. someot which were unknown to me when '
my official report ot the capture of that?
stronghold was written. . ,,,( ,, -,
i My camp at Cumberland Ford was four
teen miles north of the Gap, and to reach It "
in front was a ix. hours' march. But to
turn that position by a flank movement re
quired, from the Ford, an almost Impracti
cable march of ten or twelve days, over a '
distance of ninety-five miles. To deceive
the enemy as to my intention, I advanced
in two columns one passing the mountains
at Roger's and the other at Big Creek Gap;
thus threatening, at the same time, Cum- -'
berland Gap, nineteen miles east of Roger's ;
Gap; Knoxvllle, forty-five miles due south -ot
that Gap, and Clinton, about twenty
miles south of Big Creek Gap. Clinton
was the enemy's base for supplies. " r- 1
Before advancing from the Ford.T ffj-''
formed General Buell that Kirby Smith's
force was nearly three times greater than'r
mine, and requested that a diversion should' '
be made in my favor against Chattanooga. '
My request was complied With, and Smith A
believed the feint to be a real attack, and 1
recalled Barton from the front of Big Creek 1
Gap, and with twelve thousand men start
ed for . the relief of Chattanooga. But on
reaching Loudon, ou the Tennessee river,
he received a telegram stating that East :
Tennessee was being invaded by two col-'
limns.'1 This recalled to him a ruse rumor i
which I had, several weeks previously,' .
caused to be circulated, of my inteution to '
attack the Gap in front, with twelve thous
and men, while, at the same time. I would
advance in two columns, by a flank move- 1
luent, Into East Tennessee. , 1
i On the 16th of J une, I learned that Smith '
and Barton were on their return, and were '
Rdvanclngto attack (Exhibit N); but it was
hot until a week or ten days after our occu
pation of the Gap that 1 learned fully of
the disposition of Smith's forces. 'He left '
Stephenson with six thousand men to de-, '
fend. Cumberland Gap; sent Barton with"
four thousand men to tbe Big Valley, to '
cover the approach to Knoxvllle, while;
with eight thousand troops he tookpositlou
at Clinton. . ' ,.' ' 1
i Smith's disposition of his troops Indicates 1
his belief that I intended to advance upon
Knoxville, aud he hoped to meet me. with -his
forces concentrated. My order of march
i(ExhibitO) shows that 1 anticipated his''
plan, and was prepared tor it. My rapid1
advance i upou Stephenson .lolled the
execution of his design, and Cumberland
Gap was thus captured without the loss of ,
aman. " " ' - " "I - ; ' : i
i Gen. Buell knew that I Was maneuvering'
against a force nearly three times greater
than my own, and this explains hls-auxiety,
for the safety of my command. , ,
i Upon assuming command at Cumberland !
Gap, I adopted a conciliatory policy
hibit Jf.& Q), and the citizer-sof (he adjoin
ing counties of Virginia, . and Tennessee,
iflpcked In to resunje their -llegiauce to tha.'
'United'States.""-- ' "" '' '" --'i'.u,.;.i
j ,1 am, sir. very respectfully , i i' it !ily,
' .r.iijij'jvtX.rvervaut. ,;.,,(,y(,(--
I. r an. ....n.l .1 .A 1 . V i . , .
t
GEORGE W. MORGAN.
j T H E UN I f E D S T A T ES flOT EL
I Heach Street? Botrtoau itliaam,
(Directly opposite tbe Boston & Worcester
! , , , Railroad Depot,)
THE SUBSCRtBOR HOST RESPECT-
.fUbliV Inforuia pia iriandaand tha pubmio,.
that after an experience ol over nine years as an
; Assistant at the Amerioaa bonse . in .this eily.-bai
has leased upoq very favorable terms the U: ,Hj
i 7,"; UNITED STATES ilOTELyJii. .
I loo has'for'a UMii period' 'tinder this alii inj pojti-1'
i alar superintoadeooa tf 0ok Bpooner. reoeived ai
I very liberal patronage. , . , , . . , .
' ' Tbe undersianed will endeavor" to keep nptha
populatiof .theetblUbmentaai. ,j: :in.,., ,
I,, First. ClatsiB JEIotel, ii -ill'
and he solioits your patrons Re', asshring yea that no'
xertion on his part shall bevrantlns; to render you
yt hiiAooaa bothcomfortAlila ndan-ee-bW i.
..r.Jf'UAjNfayflt. PRATT.
a 1 ''"''' ;: i i 1 i.r i ; ,i;r;i.i ,i -.u
-v,', , HABRIS i& CO r iii.t
:vi Vaoais lit vai' ntviih bbalihs rr -
flAXOS, MELODEdXS, ORGAiVS;
X ;; sHkgt.iiiitsie : i. w'tf iiljs1tfdksr: , .
vDealrsappl!edatllan.aracUrers'prioee. Liber
ai diBoot to Clcvynieu. leaclier. aud Schools.,. .
- mm. Beeond'lani Instrument taVen lo'Tobanre
for iww.iiLeMona sivan oa the i'iano.. Will aUl,
eheapfoteash. FleaaeoaU.
ITov II Tom street, 1st Boor West of FranklW
tll.iil rij v.W.,'i t.i ,'Baalt,iiii.l viiii) ojlj ei.il
iiifico ii v in b v a. o m o.
uiayll-d3ino , - UAKRISACO. r
Ij ' uiayll-d3c

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