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Cincinnati daily press. [volume] (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1860-1862, November 05, 1861, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028745/1861-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAILY PRESS
Xblihd KVer-r IC-vening,
Utaun numi)
HBMHY Tl K K D As CO,
fBOPBIBTORsj.
orric . visa -sr., orr. tmiToa-Boun.
YHB OiBOI"ATi DAtLTPHSSi to delivered
subscribers In Cincinnati, Oovlartoa ant
surrounding eltls and tswas,
Ten Oent a "XATaoIs.
riTAiia to ti oAaaiia.
Pmn v Mail BlDgle renins, 3 anti on,
fitli, ROo ! tbree months. SI -J,, nns r ear, 1 1
AMUSEMENTS.
It I K B S O 1' K R A - H O U S E
To-Night and Following1 Ercningj.
HKCONU WKBiK
-or the- .
BRILLIANT rEBFOBMlWES '
AND
CNPABALLBLED
0K-
SDOOBSS
rnoFEssou andkrsox.
KN1IBELT NEW EXPERIMENTS.
ENTIRELY NEW EXPERIMENTS. '
' ENTIRELY NEW EXPERIMENTS.
GREAT CHANGE OF PROGRAM ME.
GREAT CHANGE OF PROGRAMMS.
GREAT CHANGE OF PROGRAMME.
FIBBT NIGHT OF
Inexplicable New Mysteries
OF THE
SECESSION DOLLARS;
Oi, Tns Com, that Cam Not ub Cotnted,
TUB BABITB FROM OYER TOE RHINE ;
Ob, Tm Two Bauits Bollid into On.
TUX BIO-DYNAMIC MYSTERY OF MR. J. B.
ANDERSON, Jb.
A second Grand Afternoon Performance NEXT
SATURDAY, at 3 o'clock.
ArwifmoN To Panjiu-tte and Dress Circle, SO
cents; Gallery, !19 rents.
Doors open at 7,f o'clock ; commence at 8. no4
r O O T S THEATER,
TV Corner Sixth and Vino-streets.
Managsr.Geo. Wood ; S'agc Manager, Q. H. Gilbert;
Treasurer, Q. T. Collins.
Pbics to Binr tub Times Dress Circle and Par
quet te, 30 ceata i Gallery, 13 cent.
Fetor, d night f the re-engagement of Mli KT
T1K IIKNllRRSON, who will appear as ''Char.
Mte Okir-ier," in CAPTAIN CHARLOTTE, and
"Little Pickle," with Bong and Dance, la TUB
BPUI LKU l III bll
I DIS (Tneefay) EVENING, Not. 5, the perform
ante will commence with the amusing Farce of
CAPTAIN CHARLOTTE,
Charlotte Ck pier. .................. Mi Ettie Henderson,
JUance. ......... Mies Stella Mason,
l'u Lo followed tr the laiuhublo Farce of
Til . RPOII.ICI) CHILD
Little Plcklo, vath Bong and Dunce, Mils Ettie
jinnaemon.
To conclude with the operatic Farce of
THJfi SWIBS CuTTAGK.
5 tlXlL, n
AT THE ,
MKTHOPOLITAN HALL,
' Corner of Ninth and Walnut-st.
TIPH H .TOT! ANN fARTi SPILLS. AH.
MM. S1S1BD by his eon an1 daughters, Teachers
tf all the VaHhlonable Dances of the dar. would
respectfully Inform the ladies and gentlemen of
Cincinnati and vicinity that their School for the
above instruction will be open on ana aitor
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1861.
At the above-named large and well-fltted-np Hall.
Dat of Tuitiom. Wednesday and Saturdays,
for Misses and Blasters, irom Jtonr. s.i lor uen
f Umni). f mm 7 to 10 P. M .
Tinas. t or throe months1 instruction, twenty-
ronr lesions, 15, payable in advance.
M...I. enmlohnri f.MP hall.. nrtvatA THM-tlAS. tfl.
For particulars, inaulre at Spina's Band Office, 11a-
con's Building, corner or butn ana yvainui-sia.,
Jioom AO. 1U, ana at nia resiueuve, n. w
erett-at., betareen John and Cutter, Cincinnati.
Inrfvll
MUSICAL.
New Publications.
-wT-wn lasnnTs t?h OE S
DES MON-
f I'AGMES, Trois Morceaux de Sa-
Inn Utf V Iliit.ten.
No. 1. Betty-No. a, Loreley...No.
8, Martna-3o cents eacn.
Grand Marche Trlnmphale. By Knhe. S5 eta
The Bustle Gate; or, Be Sure Ton Call, etc Po
etry by Cha. Swain. Music by F. More. 36 eta.
tient by mail on receipt of price.
. - , JOHN CHURCH, Jr.,
Importer of Bra.s Inttrnraents and Manufactory of
. ' ...nom L 1 1 1 1. 'I' II BPDVU.,
AruniS f) , n sol r vv . i u oin.nii "'
NEW BOOKS
TVBT FtJBliISHKB ' WIN N E R'S
w Perleot ulmo ior tne uu"ar,. (;jrr5jp
'Winner's Pe-teot Guide for the Vio-VHtWrjJ ,
lin ;" in which the Instructions are so
rl..r1. a.. H .imnl Irented ftA to mkkt
It unnecessary to require a teacher. For practice,
more than 1M) Operatic and Popular Airs are added,
forming a complete collection of the best Melodies
Price SO centa each, for which they will be ton
warded aer mail peat pajd. 0htjroHi
tltj west rounn-av..
Publishers of Music, Importer and Dealer in Musi.
leal instruments. r r
rrtHE liARGEST STOCK OF PIANOS
Ja in Ulncini.ati can be luunn at
7 -A West Jb'onrth.tt. ; and if jou will
irlve me a call before on buy, you
will hnd that my prices can not fail
An suit. Piatl(.s from 425 to Sl.'rilO.
Remember the number 1 i West Fonrth at.
- - CM. MURCn.
Old Pianos taken In exchange for new. ocl-tf
T1IANOM FOR RENT. I HAVE ON
M. . hand sixty-five new and eecond
, liai d Piinos tbut I will rent by the
mouth, and let the rent pay fur th
Piano; or will rent by the quarter
ah low tea anv other house.
irtp
Remember the number 1 Wlt tfonrth St.
C. M. MURCH.
Old Pianos taken In exchange for new. ocl-tf
Goodl Better I Best
THE ALLIGATOR COAL
AND
Foreat Queen Wood
COOKING-8TOVK8,
WIlbeir-Yentlllatlng Ovens,
PATENTED DEO. 7, 18M, AND JOLT SO, 1861.
ADAMS, PECKOYER & CO.,
'cell B. W. COB. FIFTH AND ELM, CIS.
SHIRTS!
PERFECT FITTING
- s zx x rt-jr1 a. ,
BOSTON 13HIRT PAOTORY,
!. A. Keppner, Afiient,
S0BTH-EA8T OUR. FIFTH AND. VINB-BTB.,
Over Oole A Hopkins. Bntranoa on Fifth -ft.
SELF !VI EAtOCHBIHENT rOR'IHRTI
rioted dlrectious M..t free everywhere, anfl
asy to understand thrift any oua can taka hie own
measure for Shirts. I warrant a good tit. Theoaak
to be paid to tbo Ei areas Uompani oa xeeelpt
foods. mhl-tl
MILLINEIIY.Q
Having Just returned from the Bast, I ant
opening a full aasortmeut of
BOSNETS, RIBBONS,
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS,
BILKS, FEATHERS, ROUCHES,
tSillc Milliiiory,
Embracing all the novelties of the season.
W The attention of Milliner is callwi to our
VlaENCU PATTERN BONNETS,
s. , 4o. W holssala and relalU
eTa "C7" X1I3I3, Jr.,
M26 134 Fifth-et , between Raoe and Blm.
THE WEEB.LT Pt!gL,0.W; BABY,
coutainlitg tbe News of the Week, both Forelgd
and Local, and a Telegraph lo Summary of IvaalA
elsewhere, np to the hour of going to preaa.
ku aW at tU ti.iu.Uug tvgtf,- i'tlti U etaU,
v ' , t ... f - , . , ,
VOLUME TI.
CINCINNATI. TUESDAY EVENING. NOVEMBER 5, 18(51.
9min
AM)
iw .....
NUMBER 69
[COMMUNICATED.]
Army Purchases—"Regular" and "Irregular."
alar.'.
I
?
AdjutsntrGoneral Thomas, in hi, report,
lav s much Btresi npon the fact that Qenoral
Fremont has made, many of his arm- pur
chases In an "irregular", manner; that the
articles had not been regnlnrly ndTertier
for by the regular officer, whose duty it was
to make the purchases.
This, eren if true, is a poor argument
Bgnisit the competency of General Fremont
to command an army. It should be the duty
of a commnndiDg General to supply his army
with those things .necessary and Indispensa
ble for its use, even though, in so doing, he
should have in the nature of circumstances
to resort to some irregularities.
Now, it is a fact, apparent to the mind of
every clear-beaded business man, that pnr
rhnses of certain articles caa be m.vle to bet
ter ad van! age in the manner which the Adjutant-General
charges . as irregular, . than
by his regular method. We will take
a cafe in point :
A few weeks since the Quartermaster-
General paid a flying visit to St. Louis to
look into Fremont's affairs, and while there
we presume it occurred to him that he must
do something regular in order to show Fre
mont's irregularities, and forthwith there
appears an advertisement for, together with
other articles in like large quantities, ten
thousand uns of hay. At that time hay
was worth in this market, the cheapest in
the country, and at points of delivery on the
river between this city and Louisville, from
$7 to $8 per tun. The cost of transportation
to St. Louie would be $4 per tun, making the
hay cost, delivered at St. Louis, from $11 to
$12 per tun.
Kw this contract for ten thousand tuns
was awarded in the regular way to a batch
of political contractors at $17 95 per tun, or
at a cost of more than $60,000 to the Govern
ment more than it need to have cost.
The effect of this Tegular advertisement,
together with others which have since ap
peared for the same article, was to advance
the price from $2 to $3 per tun upon the
very article the Government was desiring to
purchase cheap. .
Complaint isalsomadeof tne construction
of a pontoon bridge at Paducah, and that no
advertisement for the purchase of materiaLi
appeared.
Whether or not the bridge was necessary,
we shall not discuss, but we presume that
General Fremont thought it was. General
Fremont had just taken possession of Pa
ducah, an important strategic point, by a
small body of troops all he could spore for
that purpose. It was an advance into the
enemy' country, and a prudent commander
must observe great prudence and caution.
Pillow, with a large force, variously esti
mated at from thirty to sixty thousand, wag
within thirty to fifty-miles, and reported to
be advancing on Paducab. Fremont, having
an eye to the safety of bis troops, saw that,
should they be attacked and overpowered by
a superior force, they had no possible means
of escape and must be captured. Any one
having a knowledge of the position of Pa
ducah will see this. Bounded as it is by the
Tennessee and Ohio Rivers, had a superior
force come upon onr little army there, with
out fortifications or intrenchinents as they
were, they couff not have escaped even by
the aid of an old scow, or the ferry-boat,
which the Adjutant-General suggests would
have been much cheaper. Fremont,Mn order
to prevent any such possible calamity, con
eludes to construct a bridge, and to do
spends $100,000 irregularly and unnecessa
rily, as the Adjutant-General thinks.
Now, the second count in this charge
that the bridge was built without any adver
tisement having been made for materials.
it' can be shown that the materials cost no
more or less in this way than they would
have cost by advertising for them, we
presume the charge has no weight. We
ere informed that the average cost of the
barges for the construction of the bridge
was about $400 each. Also that the aver
age cost of these barges when new was
about $750. That all the barges takea
were good and sea worthy. Now it would
seem that these purchases were fairly
made, and that the prices paid were not high.
It required for the bridge all the good barges
here they were wanted at once; and had
advertisement appeared calling for that num
ber of barges, the owners, who knew how
many were here, might have asked much
more for them. A weightier reason, however,
for the purchase of these bridge materials,
was this : That it was not thought by the
General desirable to inform the rebel com
mander, through the newspapers, which were
at that time going regularly into Eentncky
and the South, that he intended constructing
a pontoon bridge, to save his army in case
they were attaoked by superior forces. ,
The whole offense of Fremont in this and
all other matters seems to be that be dared
to think and act without a close consulta
tion with all the Departments, which would
only have been furnishing the enemy with
plans. His Adjutant General, however, con
cluded to dog Fremont through Missouri,
ascertain bis forces and their disposition,
nlans and ODerations. In order that they may
bo to Richmond through the columns of
JTltiune ana tieram. vruuc uur orcreiarv
of War, Adjutant-General and Cabinet
reaping the indignation of our own people
for their contemptible course in relation
Fremont, tbey are doubtless being thanked
and toasted in Richmond for the valuable
they are constantly furnishing
those in arms against ns.
now
(
The Manchester calico dyers and printers
have discovered that apple juices supply
desideratum long wanted in making
colors for their printed cottons, and numbers
of tbem have been into Devonshire and
lower parts of Somersetshire, bnying np
the apples they can get, and giving such
price for them as in the dearest years hitherto
known baa not been offered. It is stated
that one farmer in Devonshire, who has
large orchard, for the produce of which
bag never before received more than
haa told it this vear to a Manchester
for 360. There can be no doubt that
discovery will create quite a revolution
the apple traae.
The quantity of gas annually manufactured
in London is 8,000,000,000 cubio feet-one-fourth
nt which ii wasted bv leakage. There
are constant eomplainta that tbe escape
oa, from tbe Joint or pipes decay, tne water
I a . . 1 1 . . J.' LUM aA
1 '"pes tmu eeuuuajy utuitai tu? utwuu nnavx
Blunder Buss.
[From the Cleveland Plain Dealer.]
are so away
their feelings that 1 hey make moat comiral
mistakes, one of which occurred in this city
yesterday, which we must give at the haztrd
of "pistols and coffee for two." Loyal II ra
business man of Cent al Ohio, so thoroughly
cVvotc d to his calling as to give little time to
Pocinl life, and consequently almost losing
the memory of the countenance, of relations
in this city, came to town yesterday, aceom-
pnmea Dy an accomplished lady mend, and,
to prevent being burdensome to bis friends,
ftniped at the American for refreshments,'
and then rushed out to find his relatives. As
he reared tbe house he began to swell with
emotion at the warm reception his lady com
panion would see him receive, and glowing
with pride at the thought of the pleasure he
ttoula give in introducing his sprightly and
iotrrestinr ladv friendto his Clevelnnden.
With shortened breath he approached the
door and pulled tbe be'l, bis face already be
ginning to draw with the exhilaration of ap
proaching surprises as he heard the step ad
vancing to the open door, and jumping at
the conclusion that his late married cousin
was comm?, when the door opened Loyal
flew to her embrace, lavishly loading her
with the kisieg which warm friends only
may indulge in. The lady at home thinking
it poon would appear all right, for such liber
ties certainly foieehabowed no common
friend, took a deliberate look at the stranger
and went in for full reciprocity; mea'itime
tne stranger lady stood back, like a tittb. calf.
looking decidedly tlat. A lull in the greet
ing, and Loyal turns with pride and great
natiieir ana said, waving nis nana, "Mrs 1 ter
allow me the pleasure of introducing you to
my friend Mrs. Mrs. Mrs " (then bend
ing forwatd he whispered : "I don't recollect
your husband's name." " My husband!" ex
claimed the astonished Miss. "I am not
married. ' 'Ain t your name Eastman?"
"No, Madam," said Mr. L. II., "and I am now
catishea it is neither or us, and the sooner
we take this all back and begin again the
oetter. "
The onini-Jm followed the blunder-iiMf.
Grain Receipts at Toledo.
By the tables which we publish to-dav
tinder our commercial head, it will be seen
ibat the receipts at this port, by . rail and
canal, tor tne montu ot uctober, toot up:
Flour, brls.....' 2H,M)
v neat, tnnueis 1,079,1
Corn, buebelr M 7& ?4
Other grains 9 627
Total far the month (flour to wheat) 1,7'J7,S9"
The receipts from January 1 to Novem
ler 1, 18G1, were:
Flour, brl l,f)9 073
Wheat. Imhel ft.SM) 444
Corn, hnshelp 4.6'..; 6"1
Other grains, bushols 6a, 653
Total, Jan. 1 to Nov. 1, bushel lA,4ftj,253
By comparing tbe receipts of flour, wheat
and corn tor tbe month of October, 1800 and
isui, we nave vne lonowing:
f.'our. W-at. Corn.
1C61 2.'.S,NU 1,67'J.SSl 7a,tl74
l&CO m.DM Taa.'oO M3,S72
132,794 6M7,101 1 19.40
Reducing flour to wheat, the increase for
the month ol October, i mi, over tbe same
month last year, was 1,CC6,473 bushels.
Toltdo (0.) made, Kov. 2.
it
is
Railway Ihventiohs. A method has
lately been dovised for .hardening the sur
face of rails and tires of wheels, after wbinh
they are formed in tne usual manner, ny sub
jeetiog them to a peculiar process. The rails
anu urea nru pauccu iu n euiittuio lruu uuuiu-
ber with peat or wood sawdust, previously
saturated witu suipnuno acid, eovenng tne
surface to be bardened. Tbe chamber i
then closed, so as to exclude the air, and
witn its contents is raised to a red neat by
a fire, and maintained at this temperature
for thirty-six or forty hours. The bars and
tires are then withdrawn from the chamber
and tempered by any of the usual process!
and they are fit for use. It is also proposed
to Introduce tne process ot charring the sur
ihcb oi rnnwuv uuiuura. or tfaturuiinir mem
first with dilute sulphuric acid, then heating
them in an oven raised to a temperature
two hundred and fitly degrees Fahrenheit.
Tbe strength of acid preferred is about three
degrees Twaddles' hydrometer. Railway
timbers, wnen cnarred on tne surface, en
dure much longer than if exposed with their
natural surfaces. This is certainly a Decu
liar way of charring the face of wood
such a low temperature. The sulphuric
acid is said not 10 injure me nmoer.
If
aa
his
his
the
are
to
in
formation a
fast
the
all
a
a
he
260,
man
the
in
of
Tn Scbvivob o thb GiBBBT. In the
Memoir of Joseph Bashridge, published
London several years ago, is the following
strange incident:
A surgeon in Gough square had purchased
for dissection the body of a man who had
been bung at Tyburn. The servant-girl.
wishing to take a look at the defunct pre
vious to his coming under the dissecting
knite, stole up stairs to the room, where she
expected to find him extended. To her sur.
prise and horror she beheld him sitting
on tbe board, and instantly facing about, she
went down stairs again in a moment. The
surceon, bearing of the resuscitation of
subject, humanely concealed him in the
house until be could get him conveyed
Ameiica. which he did shortly afterward.
Eroviding him with a comfortable outfit,
is own expense. The man evinced, in
subsequent conduct, a degree of industry
and gratitude which showed bim well worthy
of his singular escape from death. By tbe
exercise ot bis Industry, be amassed a Hand
some fortune, and bis gratitude was exhib
ited by leaving it all to bis deliverer ana
benefactor.
Am Irish Solpikb'b Aoventubr The vast
majority of the incideuu that occurred dur
ing the retreat from tbe Virginia shore were
most mournful in weir cnaracter, out mere
were some that were ludicrous in the ex
treme. One told of an Irishman, la com
pany D . of the Massachusetts Fifteenth,
very funny. When the retreat was ordered
be threw off his coat and pants and plunged
into the icy current of the Potomac.
swam boldly across the river, and bad
cained tbe Maryland shore, when be remem
bered that be had left $13 25 in tbe pocket
his coat. "Bejabers, Billy," said he, "them
$13 is in my coat, and the bloody ribels
git 'em, and besides, I can't coaBint to
with the amount, so I'll just go for them,"
and in he plunged again. He got safely
over, found bis coat, secured the money
reeros8ea tne river, a v uitu iu vauii
morning, and congratulated him on
pluck, endurance and success, to which
renlied. "Oh. vis. sir. 'twas all I'd saved from
my three months' sarvice, and I'm very
of me pipe
Incbiabs or Hono Kono. In 1855 the town
of Hong Kong, Victoria, had thirty thousand
inhabitants: it now has one hundred thou
sand. The destruction of Canton and
foreien bonga not only drove foreigners
for protection, but also' thousands and
of thousands of natives. Property has
enormously in value. The Baptist Mission
premises, in process of building when I
bam aix veara aeo. at a cost of $6,000.
last vear for upward of $20,000.' the Lon
don Mission premises cost $15,000, and
now worth $50,000. The same prosperity
bag attended Amoy, Fuhchau and Shanghai
Missions. Property hag, of course, shared
a general rise. For our own mission prem
iaa in Fuhchau we could get to-morrow
twice what they cost, and tbey are annually
riaino- In valua. The infiux of trade is
toniahlng. . Commerce is the handmaid
Christianity. It is undermining idolatry,
and DieDannff tbe p-ronnd for tbe reception
of tbe seeds of Gospel truth, Ur
VX It CMKWfv.
[From the Chicago Journal, November 2.]
A Frightful Boiler Explosion— Coffee and
Spice Mills in Ruins—Five Men Scalded.
I
Between eleven and twelve o'clock this
morning a fearful explosion occurred in tbe
cqff'ee and spice establishment of Measrs.
Downer 4c Co, Ixos. 43 ana 45 r'ranklin
street, between Lake and Randolph, causing
tbe complete wreck of tbe lower portions of
the building and its contents, and seriously
injuring a number of the occupants.
In tbe confusion incident to the explosion
it was impossible to obtain full and definite
particulars, but such as . could be gathered
are given.
Tbe boiler was situated in tbe basement of
the store No. 48, nearest Lake-street, and in
the extreme rear, but abont six feet remain
ing between its end and the rear wall of the
building for firing purposes. It was well
covered with brick masonry, upon the top of
which sat the engine that drove tbe machin
ery of the establishment. The rest of the
basement was used for storage and packing
purposes, i ne lott above, constituting the
firBt floor of the store No. 43, was used for
grinding epicos and ether purposes' incident
to its manufacture. ' The adjoining store was
occupied as a saleroom ana office, and com
municated with No. 43 by an open partition.
just previous to tne explosion, tne engi
neer Lynch was in one of the upper apart
mente, and noticing some irregularity in the
running of the machinery, hastened below
to see what was the matter. When he
reached tbe engine-rocm he discovered that
tue main driving belt bad run on from its
brum, and the engine was pounding away
with fearful velocity. Just at this instant
the explosion occurred with a report equal
to a pieee of heavy ordnance. The explo
sion seemed to be rearward through the
fire-box, throwing scraps of iron aud brick
through the wall and across the alley, and
completely shattering a frame building on
the opposite side of the alley. But tbe most
singular incident was the reaction of the
explosion on the boiler, which forced it from
its setting, bodily, electing it through the
front of the building and completely acro?s
the street, a distance of upward of a hundred
feet from its original location. In its night
it tore away the flooring of the main room
above, knocked the front of the store into
fragments, tore np the steps and gratings
coveting the front way, struck end capsized
a dray that was passing in tbe street, in
juring the driver somewhat, and demolished
a muggy Binuuiuff iu iuu umiuMie uubier.
At the time ot tbe explosion there were.
it is supposed, nineteen men in the building
fifteen workmen, three clerks and Mr. Joshua
Downer, one of the proprietors.
Mr. Downer was standing in tbe front part
of tbe room abovo the engine, and was badly
Beamed and considerably bruised.
the engineer, Dynca, escaped witu a
nrettv bad scalding.
His brother, Patrick Lynch, was also Quite
badly scalded.
UeorgeUurney, a salesman, was very badlv
bruised and scalded, and it is feared has
suffered some internal injuries. He seems to
have been burned the worst of any one in the
building. .
w ben our reporter left it was not thought
that any others belonging to the building
were hurt, ah Known to nave been there
had been found. - Tbe rubbish, however, wag
not all cleared away.
'Hie a ray that was struck belonged to G.
A. KarHer, liquor dealer. The driver wag
cut aud biuiitd cohBiderably. The dray wag
completely wrecked.
it is fortunate that the explosion was out
ward rather than inward, acircumstance that
saved the building trom total ruin, aud saved
tbe lives ot a number ot tbe occupants.
Tbe boiler was eighteen feet in length by
r j. . r. r .
ruur in uiHuieicr. it was manuraciurea in
Patterson, N. J., five years ago, since which
time it bag been in constant use. It was
patched about three years ago, and it was at
this patch that the explosion occurred. The
immediate cause can not now be stated.
of
up
to
at
bis
Thk Oil Tram. Many who read the ac
counts of oil wells in this and other States,
says Ibe Philadelphia Ledger, are, perhaps,
curiowa to know whether the business ot
procuring coal-oil in this way is profitable
or otherwise. A recently-published state
ment shows that the amount of this oil trans
ported to a market over tbe We? tern division
ot the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad dur
ing the past months of 1861, had greatly
and progressively increased over the
quantity transported over tbe same route
duiing tbe corresponding period of last year.
The editor, bowever, ot the Jtural Argus,
paper published in the Western part of the
State, has recently visited the oil regions,
and gives the result of bis observations in
late number ot bis journal. Among other
remarks, be says that the price of oil is so
low that nothing short ot a bowing well will
pay. And even a flowing well,-be asserts,
may endanger the financial standing of its
owner by compelling bim to incur great ex
pense in tbe purchase of barrels before any
return can be had. He adds, moreover, that
innumerable troubles attend the business
every stage of its progress. A few have
made themselves rich by it, and a few more
will do the same thing, while a vast majority
of those who have invested in it and who
will yet do so, will, it is thought, never realize
one per cent, on the investment. Tbe rapid
increase in the expenditure and consumption
of this oil would seem to give a contradiction
to this conclusion. It some can make for
tunes at the business, others, nnder like cir
cumstances, can do the same thing.
is
He
just
of
will
part
and
tuis
his
be
The Positioii or Loan Lyons. The Wash
ington Star says:
We apprehend that a profound misappre
hension of the position of Lord Lyons to
ward the cause of the Union exists in
p'opular mind. We draw this conclusion
from the invidious comments of our presses
npon what they evidently regard as being
attitude, and from our personal knowledge
that tbeir impressions are not shared by this
Government or any member of it, who,
will be remembered, are in daily intercourse
with him. We are satisfied that not a word
has fallen from his lips concerning our public
affairs to which they have taken exception:
and further, that they have no fault what
ever to find with any portion of his personal
course In our present nnhappy national con
troversy.
It will be remembered that the recent let
ter, bearing big official signature, to which
Mr. Seward necessarily wrote so causuo a re
ply, was not big own, but the letter of
British Minister of Foreign Affairs, whose
views in the premises (not his own) it
his official duty to make known to
Government.
fond
its
bere
tens
risen
was
sold
are
in
as-
of
rota
The English people have for some year
depended upon American composers for their
popular melodies, and " Annie Laurie"
other delicious aiit of English origin have
been eclipsed by importation from
United Suites. "Ob, Susanna," after
worn out in this country, did good service
England, and "Lilly Dale" and "My
Ann also naa a popularity osvonuing iroui
tbe Highlands of Scotland to the Valleys
Devonshire. At the present date, a gong
rhich hat almost passed into Oblivion in
gountry of its birth the song Known
" Rosalie the Prairie Flower' -ia on every
street organ in tbe Mother Land. The well
known "Dixie" is also sung and whistled
all tbe boys in London, but not .the original
words, some local scribbler having priated
the music and bestowed, it npon
aerie ui upiu w
recur the words "on iue oiranu, on
Strand" alluding to tbe well-Known street
in London., Besides singing "Dixie"
shouting it aud humming It. the London
tfumin, play it with considerable skill on
little leaden pipes (shaped like those of
organ) very muvU in TOguejcujt pow,
BY TELEGRAPH.
NIGHT DISPATCHES.
The Jura off Father Point.
Nsw York. November 4 The steamshin
Jura, fiom Liverpool on the 2 Uh, via Lon
donderry on the 25th of October, arrived at
rather 1'oint at four o clock this afternoon.
She brings one day's later news. 1
Captain Semmes, of tbe privateer Sumter,
reached Liverpool in the steamer Edinburg.
A competitive trial bad taken place ot
rifled thirty-two-ponnder service guns of
different inventors. The trial was brought
to a close without any very satisfactory re
sults. The Whitworth and Armstrong guns
alone appear calculated to meet the require
ments ot tne fury.
it is expected that the aanK or r ranee
would immediately adopt some new meas
ures to palliate the existing crisis.
The accouchment of tbe Kmnress of Ans-
tria wag expected to take place at the com
mencement oi i eoruary.
a fang telegram, dated Uctober 25, says
the Sfonilew to-day contains the following :
a judicial investigation has established the
fact that the congregation of the ladies of St.
Lnione, at Doui, have voluntarily abetted
tbe abduction of Jewish girls. The facts
would have justified the Government in re
voking the authorization of the society of St,
Unione, but it bag confined itself to with
holding tbe acknowledgement of its legal
existence. This measure will remind relig
ious congregations that neither their charac
ter, objects nor rules excuse them from
obeying the laws of tho country.
Liverpool, October 25. Cotton brokers'
circulars report sales of the week at 140,000
bales; tbe market is excited and prices closed
JiMia. higher, with still an unsettled and
excited market : 82,000 bales were sold to
speculators and 13,000 to exporters. To-day's
(Friday) sales are estimated at 20,000 bales,
including to speculators and export
ers, closing with still an advancing tendency.
The authorized quotations are as follows:
Fair Orleans, 12d ; middling, 12d.; fair
Mobiles, 12id.; middling, ll?4d ; fair Up
lands, 12d.; middling, llJsd. The stock
in port Is estimated at 614,000 bales, of which
321,500. bales are American.
Advices from Manchester are favorable.
Prices for goods and yarns are still advanc
ing. Breadstuffs have still a declining ten
dency. Wheat dull, and all descriptions are
slightly lower. Provisions quiet, but steady.
London, October 25. Consols quoted at
the close of business at 92?i92 for Money.
Erie Shares are quoted at 2ti aud Illinois
Central at 3838M discount.
: Bullion in the Bank of England increased
211,500.
Thurlow Weed and Archbishop Hughes
Going Europe to Head off the Rebel
Commissioners—The Potomac Blockade.
Albahy, November 4. Tuurlow Weed
and Archbishop Hughes are about starting
for Europe, probably by the steamer Africa
on Wednesday,, to endeavor to counteract
the operations of the Southern Commission
ers, and to prevent the recognition of the
Southern Confederacy by France and Eng
land. It is understood that General Scott
goes out in tbe same steamer.
Washington, November 4. The steamer
Resolute came up from the Navy-yard last
night. One of our batteries on the Mary-
and shore has been completed, and tbe
range of some of our thirty-two pounder
Putrot guns was tried on tbe rebel steamer
George Taige yesterday afternoon. Three
thoU struck her, but with what effect is not
known, as the water being very high, she
was enabled to run up Quantico Creek out
ot range.
[Special to St. Louis Democrat.]
Definite New of Price's Movements—
Whereabouts of Pope, McKinstry and
Hunter.
a
SrsiKoriELO, Mo, November 1. Our
tcouts bring us this morning definite infor
mation that Price has left Sarcoxie, and has
moved via Neosho toward Oassvilie, Barry
County. Opinions differ asto whether he
will march north from tbat point on Spring
field or continue his retreat into Arkansas.
A body of rebel cavalry was seen twenty
five miles south cf bere last night, doubtless
a reconnoitering party.
Generals Pope and McKinstry should be
nere 10 day.
General Hunter is on tbe Pommede Terre.
ten miles south of the Osage, waiting for
iations.
Remarkable Obiter Dictum of a Philadelphia
Judge.
at
Philadelphia, November 4 In the Cir
cuit Court, this morning, tbe rase of the
pirates ot tbe teirel was called, but postponed
till next Monday.
While the Assistant District Attorney was
urging the trial. Judge Grier said he could
not consent to have the regular business
tbe Court interrupted. It seemed like
farce to try them at this time, when the
country played civil war. The dictated
humanity would counsel the Government
treat captives on the sea the game as those
taken on laud, and be could not understand
the policy of banging the first and holding
the latter aa prisoners and releasing tbem.
Let the rebellion be crushed, and Gad grant
tbat it may be speedily, and then these men
can be tried for treason or piracy, and
would assist, no matter how much he might
te called Jenries or acroggs.
Skirmish on the Missouri Border.
the
his
it
Leavibwortb, November 3. A skirmish
took place yesterday about six miles east
this place between a small force ot Missouri
militia, under Major Josephs, and one hun
dred and fifty rebels. . The rebels were scat
tered with a small loss. .
A battalion of the Kansas Second Regi
ment, recently mustered out of service, were
collected in this city, and held in readiness
to march to the relief of Josephs, but were
not required. This regiment is being reor
ganized. Portions of Linn County, Kansas, have
recently been pillaged by marauding parties
from Missouri. -
The Forces in Maryland Increased.
the
wag
this
and
Niw Yobk, November 4 A Washington
special to the New York Commercial saya
New Jersey Brigade marched Saturday
morning.- They will, doubtless, - complete
tbe perfect preparations for preventing
passage of rebels into Maryland, nnder cover
of the gnns of their Potomac batteries.
Tbe same letter says that all regiments
the Army of the Potomac have their camp
equipage, wagons, ambulances, horses
mules, and other appliances, ready for taking
the field at an hour s notice. Tbe organiza
tion of wagon trains hag -been one of
most difficult of task i.
Important from Eastern Kentucky—Occupation
of Prestonburg by General Nelson
—A Fight Imminent.
of
the
as
' Mays villi, Kt, November 4. A messen
ger arrived this evening, and reports
General Nelson took possession of Preston
burg on Saturday morning, without resist
ance. Williams had retreated six miles across
the river, and it was expected he would make
a stand therg to day.
A Rebel Camp Broken Up in Missouri—
Fremont using Mules for Transportation.
a
Hon. '
us
and
the
an
; ' JirriRsoH City,' November 4. General
Prentiss hag broken np a rebel camp
Boone County. Some loss Is reported
both tides, but no particulars have been
ceived.
T -V. .V... at ..tl, iMnanM.tlnn
Fremont is having provisions forwarded
from Tipton on fa.ee ruuies,
FROM MISSOURI.
FROM MISSOURI. How Fremont's Men Receive the Rumors
of his Removal.
[Special to the St. Louis Republican.]
HiAD-QTAntiRS CaRp Lvov, Spsinnrmi.B
October 31. A good deal of excitement has
firevailed in cttno for some days past respect
ng the report of Fremont's supersession, but
Washington advices at head-quarters men
tion nothing of the kind.
Fremont's removal would cause Intense
excitement, and we siupect no little trouble
in the camp.
A number of officers declare they would
resign in that event, or insist upon creating
him Dictator of the South-west, independent
of the Administration, which is bitterly de
nounced in camp, for its vascillat.lng and in
judicious policy respecting this department.
The list of rebels killed in the battle of
Friday last nownumbers one hundred and
twenty seven.
Ne intelligence has yet been received of
general Johnston s assumption of the com
mand of the rebel forces In Missouri.
The cause of the cannonading in the direc
tion of Sarcoxie is still unknown. '
Further from Gauley—Floyd's Forces Surrounded
by Rosecrans.
MAfSTtLLS, Kt, November 4. A gentle
man of this city, from Gauley Bridge on
Saturday evening, reports that Floyd had
cut a road around the hill where Rosecrans
was encamped, and was shelling his camp.
Rosecrans was returning the fire, and had
silenced two batteries. Ho had also sent a
detachment up the new road to attack him
in the rear. He had Floyd completely sur
rounded. No Federals had been killed when
the gentleman left. t
The Great Expedition Seen Off Hatteras.
Nkw York, November 4. The schooner
Andromeda, from Havana, reports that on
October 31. at sundown, off Hatteras, she saw
a fleet of thirty steamers, but no sailing ves
sels, bound south.
Rifled Cannon.
Nrw York, November 4. Six rifled can
non left bere to-day tor Ueneral Sickles'
Brigade. Their range ia said to be five and
a quarter miles.
American Missions in Switzerland.
of
a
A corespondent of the Boston Advertiser,
writing from Lausanne, Switzerland, nnder
date of September 27, gives this account of
the American - Missions established in that
country:
There are several missions in Switzerland,
which have been founded and cherished by
American benevolence. We were present
at a meeting held by one of tbem last even
ing, one founded by the New York Method
ists. The room was crowded, and those
present were exclusively Germans, most of
tbem from the humbler grades of society.
Many were laborers and mechanics whose
time was fully occupied during the day, and
who could, therefore, only attend in the
evening. The pastor, a very intelligent Ger
man gentleman, opened the meeting by giv
ing a brief but clear account of tbe reaaona
why he had called his people together, and
what was meant by praying for the United
states. Alter concluding bis remarks and
making a brief prayer, he invited those
present to continue. As is customary with
this denomination, both men and women
accepted the invitation. Many of those
present bad relatives in the United States,
others had received assistance trom the
American missionary friends, and all of them
bad some tie to bind them to the distant re
public which they had never seen.
I have never in my life heard such earn
est, devoted supplications as those men and
women made. Maoy of them in rough
words, but with a spirit that sanctified their
words. People such as they were, accus
tomed to the hard work and practical think
ing necessary to earn their daily bread, do
not hold prayer meetings with vague notions
of tome general edification to be obtained
thereby; they come together, and these peo
ple came together, because they wanted
something, and they asked for it as if they
wanted it, with tbeir whole souls. One
woman prayed for a brother who bad left
two years ago, and had never written since.
She did not know on which side he was
fighting, but be had been a soldier, and she
felt sure he was one now. And she prayed
the Lojjdto make him defend the holy cause,
and to 3r& Jnsjieart if he had joined the
wicxea rebellion..
Another woman' had a dear friend in the
loyal camp at Washington, and prayed for
bim ana his adopted land. Ana thus, with
out ceasing, during the allotted time, prayer
was made unto God with an earnestness
personal entreaty that kept tears in my eyes.
And wben the meeting was over, certain
biown-fisted men came around me and took
my band with a warmth and rugged tender
ness of sympathy which had no tendency
diminish my emotion.
of
te
be
of
the
the
of
and
Thb Gbiat Naval. Expidition. Though
tbe great expedition fitted out against
Confederate States will not compare with
tbat againBt Sebastopol, which numbered
some 600 vessels and 90,000 men, it figures
respectably by the fide of any other that
be named. The world-famous "invincible
Armada," dispatched under Philip II
Spain for the conquest of England, to be
numbered 137 ships, but tbe largest of whose
vessels were mere cockboats compared
some of ours, and they all together embarked
only 20,000 soldiers and 11,000 sailors. So
expedition of Charles V to Tunis numbered
500 Genoese and Spanish vessels, but carried
only 30,060 men. Tbat of Peter tbe Great
npon tbe Caspian sea numbered 270 ships.
but onlv 20.000 men. The expedition
Gnstavus Adolpbus to Germany numbered
15,000 or 18 000 men; that of Jussuf against
Candia, 30,000; that of Kionperti against
same stronghold, ou uuu; mat of Charles
npon Denmark, 50,000. Hoche, in bis
tempted descent npon Ireland, counted
Bonaparte's expedition to Egypt con
sisted of 23.000 men, with 13 ships. 17 frig
ates, and 400 transports. Abercrombie's
pedition to Kgypt numbered 20,000 men;
Catbcart's to Copenhagen, 25,000; Welling
ton's to Portugal 15,000, and to Spain 30,000.
Bonaparte's contemplated expedition,
which preparations were made for throwing
1UU,UUV U1BUI1H1UCU fCW4W IH UUKIBUU
by means of 3,000 pinnaces, protected by
ships of the line, is not entitled to be brought
into comparison, inagmuch as it was never
carried out. The English expedition against
Washington numbered 8,000, and against
New Orleans 15,000; the French expedition
against Algiers, 30,000, the United States
expedition under - General Scott, against
Mexico, fuuu. ivet J or worut. ,'
that
in
on
re
Quietly Divorced aid Sfcbpily Maseiid.
A decree of divorce was granted at the
gust term pf onr Superior Court, which
tne position or the parties might nave
as much of a furore as any of that
class of cases. It wag that of
King against her haeband, Rev. W. W.
formerly pastor of the Wabash-avenue
Church. ' The bill wag filed br
attorneys, Lowry and Perkins, setting
a variety ot castes, but was disposed of
proof of big having abandoned her, he
ins made default. We learn that within
twenty-four days after the decree of divorce
wag granted to Mrg. K, he wag again
to a lasly from Minnesota, and it
preaching in a neighboring town, and
etly enjoying ' tbe honey-moon.
journal, iiwtmsiri, -
A suicide wrote to his wife that:
Mary: If I am not at home to-night,
of Abraham where I am if not found In
bosom, be U J.now where I hay jrona, '
,!. "( ( , I .III ..VA, t ..
BJEITI0 It TNE FOliOWIRI MTU I
k. .-VlT !
-nsTanLZottSe
AtTertlseawBta, ot exceeding 8 re lines
Ii huertioo. , 1 Jw 94 Isumtloasu.-
(agate
w
lattger advertise M.,t, Meted a ,M tbriowlBC
rate per square of tea lined ; , ,,'
Owe ra,rtl -.. 01 11 Inmlna mm
Ceeh additional. 5 13 ti-n; ""2 JJ. .
m laeartlow....... t I 4 1-eaTtKma.rT. I hi
SEWING MACHINES.
WHEELER WILSOrlT
Bowing - TlzLcliinoz
PRICES REDUCED I
The wnin.iR mt witiopi iiw-JN-slAOBIJS
COMPAKT, having
all their suite at law wl'ti Int.-fnging mantra. .
luran, propoe tka, th pwMt shall b beasntwl
thereby, aud hv aeoorulugly fcsU(iOsU liAar ,
PK1C of their 8ewlng-Dwlfn-a. T
Having aiade, fcr over sevea year, the soer"-1
alar FanM'y t,-wlu nic jlr.s in the ocnniti' K
Bowemplyln St,PO.4OV In their rm.tn.as, ana "
making Octal HllMIiHBl) MACHINB8 per day
they are prepared with snob extraorrilaary flint- '
Hies and evperisaca to guarantee to th parafcaaee ,
entire satisfaction. AU oar Kachiaea ar Bander
equally waU, and ar
" WARRAHTKTHRKIBABgJ."
The dlleraeo In prlo Being sasrety a dfflsrrao fet '
Antra.
I.SOB Marhlne sold 1b !,, hedrg don tM
Sales of ary other company la the Cn'.osA. .
Awarded the First Premium la the
O. . FAIRS OF 1868, IBM ABO ItM, .
Ad at the Cltiolnriett Pterhsnlo,' Institute tag
POOR SUCOKMHIVB IBARS w have tafren
First Premium ovvt uli oonpeUtor a the beat
BEST FAMItl EWIHO-MAOaiHH,
II tne n Jn tile, makes th loek-atlu-h atrke ear
both side"1 th) goods, leaving no chain or rfdaw
n th uof-r.Bl.1e of the sear; and uae hut tails)
s mnoh thread ae the chain-stitch marine.
send er call for a Olroolar, containing nine,
testimonials, M. ,
C WM. SVKIt BR & CO., Afentaj
77" Wert Fovirth-at-l
PIBLE'S OFBBA-HOCSB,
dH ' OUT (TIM, ATT.
WILLIAMS & OaVIS'S
DOlDLE-THBXADrD Si? FAMIIaT SEWlJitJ
MACHINES
ARB JTST THR THING FOR MANTJ
FMfl RING soldiers' pantj, blouses, eto.
Call and see tbem at J 04 Race, st oczs
UBrIKIHBKR, EVPRV RIIOY, THAT
WILLIAMS x ORVl.s S Sowing Machine for
funilly use can't herent. Price 8'J3.
no. ie racu-bt. eon
gINGKR'B BRWlnq-BlAClIINsT.
Great Kcilactlon in Prices!
EINQXB'S No. 2 Standard Shuttle Machine,
Reduced from Jltio to 873
BINOEB'S No. 1 Standard Shuttle Machine,
Reduced hum f HO to 870
BINOEB'S Letter A Machine Is tbe best la thsr
World for Family Sewing and Light Manufactnx.
Ing Purpose.
Price, with H-xmer, Ac, J30 ess.
' i
U1KOINNATI OFFICE:
Commercial-office) Building-,
Corner of Fourth, and Rstce-ataW
anil JAMES SKARDOW, Agent,
SHIPPING LIST.
.
of
to
the
can
of
sure
with
the
of
the
All
at
25,
000. ex
in
60
Au
front
ex
cited ex
isting Mrs.
King,
Uni
versalis her
forth
on
bav
mar
ried now
aul
"Dear
Inquire
hit
Sa7 T B A .TI
WKKKI.V KMPtVRKN N stust
Aa it LivaaruuL. aa
Liverpool. New Turk at d Phlla- iZ&'if
deiphta SteanuhiB Comnanv in- "'f'nnsisi
tend dispatching their foil-powered
Clyda-baixl
into oiee.mnips aa iouows ;
A'TN A .ftatnrday, Not. '
KANGAROO ..Saturdy, Nov. f .
And every Saturday, at coon, from Pier it, Nor; a
River. . .. .
BATB Or PASSAOB !
First Oabin..... 875 Steerajr.........;......g
First de. to London..,. riO Sterae teXoudojUM. 3g
First do. to Paris 8,1 1 Steerage t Paris
First do. to Uambnrg. 8s j steerage to Hamburg-1
Passenger fnrwarned to Paris, Havre, firotnetts.
Rotterdam, Antwerp, eto., at equally low rate.
after Persona wishing to bring snt their friend
can buy ticket here at the following ratoe, to New
fork; From Liverpool or tlnoenstown. First Cabin
75, fas aud 11U5: Steerage from Liverpool, t-w;
from Queenetown, B30.
These Steamer have superior aoeommodationa
lor passengers, and carry experienced Burgeons. ;
They are built in Water-tight Iron Section, and .
have Patent Fire-annlhilatoraon board.
For further Information apply in Liverpool te
Wl Ham Intnan, Agent, 'Jt Vt ater-at. ; in Qfaigow,
to Wm. Inman, A St. Enocb-sonare ; in Queen- .
town, to G. A W. I). (Seymour A Co : in London, te)
Eives A Maoey, 61 King William-eV ; la Paris, t
Jnlea Lecoue, 5 Place de la Bourse ; ia Philadel
phia, to John O.Dale, 111 Walnut-St., or at th
Company's offices.
JOHN O. TIALB, Agent, IS Broadway, N. Y.
. And W. B. Barry A Co., Burnet House, Oic, O
IT S. MAIL STEAMER,
FOB
LONDON, 801TIIAMPT0N,II1VRB
; J , AND HAMBURG.
r-BMiF. BPT.ENrjID IRON MAIL 8TEAH-
JA MlLf DBA. Ill F.N Will Sell lrOUl
I4ew lovk to L,ondun. boathamnton.
tlavre aua Hamburg, ou b&lUA-
vai, uctouer .
BITES OF PASSAGE. '" '
FIrrt-tlasa State room . .fine
Lower Saloon M sv
l b ud Class (found wlch Cooked Provisions) ...... ts
For freight or passage apply to
BENNO SPBYER,
General Western Agent, '
ocH-x 7 aad t West Third-. .
U. S. MAIL STEAMSHIP
3-Xt.e3 GOW,
for IaIVerfocJij.
THB NEW YORK, PHII.ADFl.PHTA
and Liverpool Stoaiiiahip Coiupauy's hrHt-claaa.
hill-powered, Clyde built, Iron SteanierULASIlOW.
will sail from New Fork ,0 Liverpool, on SATUR
DAY, October 28.
BATES OF PASSAGE.
First Cabin ........ ..gra,
cteerage
For freight or paasa-e, apply at the offloa of tAte,
ttumpany, No. IS iirutdway.
JOHN G. DALE, Agent,
BENNO SPETEB,
. 1 aad 9 We,t Third st., Cincinnati,
oelt-x
FOR CALIFORNIA Via PANAMA.
A FIRST-CLASS STEAMER WILaV
leaie New York on the lot. 11th and JIhI of
each month, except when these dates fall on S unt
ax-, wnen tne aey 01 departure wui n en to aa.ua
day following.
For freight or passage, apply at th onlv offloa. TBeu.
B Bowling Ureeu. 1. U. ALkEN, Agent. ,
BENNO SPBYER,
ocU-x 7 and 9 West Third st., Cincinnati.
Parcel Express for England.
Ireland and Scotland.
PACKAGES FOR JBNGLANB, IRE
LAND aud gtxrrLANfTwill be taken and for.
ardedbyeach SATURDAY' Steamer. Tas de
livery and forwarding of these packages will b at
tended to by ths Klmntona Express Compear, a
Ajcndon, Liverpool ana i-uuun.
Articles must be delivered DreVlous ts 6 P. M. esT
each Tuesday, at th omee of
. BENNO 8PBYKR,
ocU-x T and 9 West Third-street.
Foreign Exchange.
FOR SAT R. SIGHT DRAFTS Off sTN
ULAND, Ireland and Boolland, at th lowest
tale, by . , w .
BENNO SPBYER,
oell-x 7 and West Third -stress.
. B. BBBBBaAn. Sk B. SBS BMAJL, B, BBaBrBBsaa
Philadelphia. Olnemaats. LasoaslaS.
Camtxrgo MaAiiAoturl C-i
tf WBsrT FOORTHHtW.. OIBOIaTBATls
, MMnftoMrsn astd Dealer t
; tVaU Papon Wdw-ha4I
la ha beea BaaJiaJactoeedeseieaelf I
nra Ma-M WHS
m stock
ABfTB CtOOJ
Mtaly lur this -
... In. at laa era all sew, as prto SB Boa srwsB
I W 1 HMI
. AiLa.
kMINM.MUIfsalVa)etaf, t-
. t ., . , , ' ..- 1,: .; . v .1.. fc. i y,-, r

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