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Cincinnati daily press. [volume] (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1860-1862, November 06, 1861, Image 1

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THE DAILY PRESS
Xn.bllabd Brcry Knlng,
ffnBDATB IMIBO)
..-' at t
MBNRY.nBBD Ac CO,
OFTfOS V1W. ST., OVti UUS! 0 H - B OtTSB .
vhi oiroibbati daily perm Bvs.uvsnt
nbwrlbwf OlselB.sti, OoTlaftoB and
. urromfflna ikim and towae, ai -res.
' Oont w elc
t-ATSSLB TO rai UUIII.
Pbtcs t MAiL-Sinda copies, 3 wntil one
sxvoth, ROo I three months, Ml '4.1 1 on year.
AMUSEMENTS.
IIK1'8 OPERA-HOUSE
a
To-Night and Following Evening.
BIECONTJ WICK It
-oftiir-BRILLIART
PERFORMANCES
AND
UNPARALLELED
SU OOBSS
-or-
PROFI SSOR ANDEHSOX.
ENTIRELY NSW EXPERIMENTS.
imiBI LT NEW EXPERIMENTS.
ENTIRELY NEW EXPERIMENTS.
ORKAT CHANGE OF PROGRAM.
GREAT CHANGE OF PROGRAMME.
ORKAT CBANGB OP PROGRAMME.
FIB8T NIGHT Of
Inexplicable New Mysteries
or TDE-
BICESSION DOLLARS;
Ob, Tin Cows that Can Mot bs Coontid.
THE BABIT8 FBOH OVEB THE RHINE i
Ob, Tbi Two Rsbits Rolled into Oni
THE BIO-DYNAMIC MYSTERY OF MR. J. H.
AND1R80H, J a.
A serrrrd Grand Afternoon Performance NEXT
SATURDAY, lit 3 o'clock. ,,.
Aimimion -To Paniuette and Drew Circle, SO
cer-tei Gallery, '23 cent,.
Doom open at 7X o'clock ; commoncw at 8 nos
OD'H THEAT
E R
Corner Bixtn ana vine streets.
Manager, Geo. W"od ; S'see Manager, G. H. Gilbert;
Treasurer, G. T. Collins.
Pbioik to Sure tht. rman. Dres Circle and Par.
QHette, 30 cents ; Gallery, 13 cents. ,
Third nlsht of the re-en ganemont of Miss KTTIE
HHNDKK80N, when she will ' ' h"r
ni' it favorite charaters-" Julian," in THE CaU-1N-H'Y,
and "Caroline," In ol'll GAL
THIB Wednesday) EVENING, Nut . the per
formance will commence with the Petite Comedy,
THE CABIN BY.
Julian.......................... ....Mi liltie Tlentlerson.
Dance - Mm Stella Mason.
To be followed by the laughable Farce of
OUR GAL.
Caroline Mlw Fttle Henderson,
To conclude with the comic Burtetta of
8IA1R SKUM.KIS.
.DANCING ACADEMY,
AT THE
MKTROPOLITAN HALL,
Corner of Ninth and Walnut-sts.
m-mvan. .TnniNN riiRT, RPILLI4. AS.
MM. BIMTKD by bia son ani daughters. Teachers
,,t mi ,hA P.ahinniilila llancaa of the dav. would
respectfully lu'orm tbe ladies aud a-eutlemen
Cincinnati and vicinity that their School Kir
bore Instruction will tie open on ana alter
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1861,
At the above-named large and well fltted-up Hall,
Dats or Tuition Wednesdays and Saturdays,
for Hisses and naatrrs, from i to o r. at. , tor uen-
tl.mn. frnm 7 to 10 P M.
Tebms. For three months' lnstractlon, twenty-
rolir lesions, payaoie in auvaoce. .. .
Jamie finished for balls, private parties, etc.
Vn, nftrtlr-nlara. innlllre at Seil'a'a Baud Ofnorf. Ba
-eon'. Building, corner of Siith anM Walnut-sis.,
Room No. 10. and at his residence. No. 79 Ev
.rett-st., between John and Cutter, Cincinnati.
roc?-n
MUSICAL.
Now Publications.
'BT1TST IITEDBCHOBB DBS M Off
al I AGNES. Troia Morceauxd. Sa
lon. By F. Human,
r-o I. Betiy...No 1, Loreley.i.No.
3, Martlia -It conta eacn ,
; n .nil Man-he THiiinnhale. Br Kuhe. 85 eta
The Rustic Gate: or, Be Sure Von Call, eio.
etry b? Cbaa Swain. Music by F. More. 3i eta,
Bent by mail oa rece.at of price.
JOHN CUUHCH, Jr.,
Importer of Bra-s Inttrnments and Manufactory
1 rums tjtf irioi ruuoiq oiiha.o.1. u-j.
NEW BOOKS
TItBT POBMSH KB WI fl N E R
. av I'eiioct ucioe ior me uuuar ; tm,
" Winner'a Pe-lnot Guide for the Vio- J5jLhJ3?.-
IId ;" In men me inatructtona are so
rfoarl and flimalv trt-aled aa to make
Ik nnr.NUMin tA renuira a teacher. For eracttoa.
' m or e than LM) Operatic and Popular Alra are added,
tormina a complete collection of tbe beat Melodist
Affh-Huv
Price 50 cents each, lor whloh they win be
ded Bar m.M aost mw
f9 neei rourio-a..
Poblislert of Music, Importer and Pettier ia
frcal lnstrnmenta. uiy.
rTWIE LARGEST STOflK OF PIANOS
M. lu I'luclni all can be I .u- d at
!l Wnt Funrth.ft : and if tun will
give me a sail before you buy, yon
will nud that my prices cau not fail
-to emt. Plan a f4in f 26 to tl.MKl.
Remeniber the number 1 4 Weat Foorth-at.
. - : ., O. M. 0ITJROH.
Old Pianos taken In exchange for new. nol-tf
T3IANOS.FOH RENT. -I HAVE
m baud wlxtr-tiTO pew aud aecunq a
Tiaid Piinoa Iln-t I will rent by thi T.
month, and let the rai.t pay for th
Piann ; or will rer-t by the quarter
as low as ar y otner nouse.
Remember the number 7') Wast Fourth St.
C. M. MUHCII.
Old Pianos takea In exchange far new. .ocltf
Good! Better . Best.
THE ALLIGATOR COAL'
-AND- ' '. ; .
Port Queen Wpodl
COOKING-8TOVBS,
Wlih ficir-Ventniatlng OYens,
PATENTED DEO. T. 1848, AND JULY SO,
AD A1IS, rECKOVER & f!0.,
ocll 8. W. COBk FIFTH AND ELM, G1H,
H I R T SI
' ,, PERFECT FlTTlNO ' '.'
AT THE
BOSTON SHIRT FACTORY,
ts. Keppner, Agent,
B0RTH-EA8T COR. FIFTH AND VlNl-BTtv
Ovss Cola A Hopkins. Rntraao OS) Fifths.
' C9KI.tr M RSHIIH StlMKNT fOK. AfllHVtT
a3 aritited dlreotlooa se. t free everywhere, aud
aay to nmlerataud that any one can take his
lueaaurefoi Bhlrta. I warrant a aood tit. TbeoaaK
to be paid to f. Expraaa Oompaar oa receipt
- Bibl-tl
1W TT.T.TMtlTfV fl!
ea.f a eaai mm m, aw -a aa. m,
' Harlot Just returned from the Beat, I ant
' opeuu g a IUU sassrtmsut ol .
B0NNKT8, RIBBONS,
. ARTIFICIAL FL0WKR8. "
SILKS, FKATUERd, R0UCHES,
tSillt jMlllinery,
, Ksobraeina ail us novelties of the season,
aw Tbs attention of Milliners is called to our
FBtNCH PATTBBN BONNETS,
As. , AO. W ooleaale and retail.
, eT- XAT 13X1X1. eTx-.e
aeU
154 Fifth st,
, between Rao. and Bio.
THE WEEKLY TRESS NOW RB
n.i.i.lnln. tl.- Nawauf Lua Week, both aorelCl
.and booal, and a TetearaphM Diwauarii rf
iaawuere. up vo mw i,..ur wi .uin. i" - .
. for aU at tU QvutiW- tVV, liiM it
t.i a .. -.'ui j.te
' i. . 'I '
VOLUME 71.
CINCINNATI. WEDNESDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 6, 1861.
NUMBER GO
The Report of General Thomas on Fremont.
meat.
Allusion has been made to a report by
Adjutant General Thomas, who accompanied
Secretary Cameron to St. Louis, on the mai-
apemcntof the military department of the
West by General Fremont. The important
points cfthe document, which is a very
leoglby one, are contained in the following
abstract: '
INTERCOURSE OF FREMONT WITH HIS OFFICERS.
General Curtis en id of General Fremont
that be found no difficulty in Retting access
to him, and when be presented businej? con
nected with bis command it was attended to.
Centra! Fremont, however, never consulted
bim on military affairs, nor informed him of
bia plans. General Curtis remarked that
while he would go with freedom to General
Scott and express bis opinions, he would not
dare to do so to General Fremont. He
deemed General Fremont unequal to the
command of an army, and said that he was
no more bound by law than by the winds.
He consideied him to be unequal to the com
mand of tbe army in Missouri.
IRREGULARITIES IN THE PAYMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.
NT.
Colonel Andrews, Chief Faymaster, called
on me (pays ueneral l nomas) ana repre
sented irregularities in the pay department,
and desired instructions from the Secretary
for bis government, stating that be was re
mit a to mane payments ana transfers or
money contrary to law and regulations.
Once objecting to what be conceived an im
proper payment, ne was tnreatenea wita
cot.finement by a file of soldiers. He exhib
ited an order for the transfer of $100,000 to
tbe Quartermaster's Department, which was
irregular.
APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS BY GEN. FREMONT.
Colonel Andrews exhibited an abstract of
payments by one Paymastr, Major Felizer,
to forty two persons appointed by General
Fremont, viz; One Colonel; three Major?;
ine (Japtainp; htteen first lieutenant?;
eleven Second Lieutenants; one Surgeon;
three Assistant Surgeons. Total forty-two.
Nineteen of these nave appointments as en
gineers, and are entitled to cavalry pay. A
second abstract of payments J was furnished,
but not Touched for as reliable, as the Pay
master was sick. It is only given to snow
he excess of officers of rank appointed to
the Major-General's Body-guard of only
tbree hundred men, the commander being
Colonel, ic. Tbe whole number of irregu
lar appointments made by ueneral r remont
waseaid.by Uolonel Andrews tone nearly
two hundred. Among tbe appointments
was ODe given to an individual on General
Fremont's Staff as director of music, with
the tank and commission of Captain of En
pincers. This person was a musician in
theater in St. Louis.
IRREGULARITIES AT ST. LOUIS.
of
the
Major Allen, principal Quartermaster; had
recently taken charge at St Louis, but re-
nnrifii oieHt irrecnlanties m thiadenartmcnt.
ported meat irregularities in this department.
and requested special instructions. This
deemed important, as orders were communi
cated by a variety of persons, In an irregular
manner, an requiring aiBoursements
money. These orders were frequently given
verbally. lie was sending, nnder General
Fremont's orders, large amounts of forage
from St. Louis to the army at Tipton, where
corn was abundant and cheap. Tbe distance
was one hundred and sixty miles, lie stated
tbe indebtedness of the Quartermaster's De
partment at St. Louis to be $4,506,309 78.2
ARMY CONTRACTS.
Po
of
s)
for.
It is' the expressed belief of many Intelli
gent gentlemen in St. Louis that General
Fremont has aVound bim, and in his staff,
persons directly and immediately concerned
in furnishing supplies. By directions
General Meigs, advertisements were pub
lished for proposals to furnish grain and bay,
and contracts were subsequently made
specific sums za cents per ousnel tor corn,
SO cents for oats, and $17 05 per tun tor hay.
In the face of this, another party in St Louis,
Baud, or liaird At rainier, ( I'aimer being
tbe 'old firm in California, Palmer, Cook
Co., General Fremont's agents in tbat State,)
were directed to send to jeuerson imy,
where bay and corn abound, as fast as possi
ble, 100,000 bushels of oats, with a corre
sponding amount of hav, at 33 cents
bushel for the grain and 1 19 per tun for bay.
Cautain Edward M. Davie, a member of
staff, received a contract by direct order
General Fremont for blankets. Tbey were
examined by a board of army officers, con
sisting of Captain Hendershott, Fourth Ar
tillery ; uaptain Harris, commissary ot sno
BineDce,' and Captain Turn ley, Assistant
Quartermaster. Tbe blankets were found
be made mostly of cotton, aud to be rotten
and worthless. Notwithstanding this decis
ion, tbev were nurchased and eiven to
eick and wounded soldiers in the hospital.
EXTRAVAGANCE.
ON
Amone the supplies sent by General Fre
mont to tbe army now in the field may
enumerated five hundred balf barrels,
carry water, in a country where water
abundant, and nve nuodred tuns ot ice.
We examined tbe barracks in course
construction at St. Louis, near and .around
i be private bouse occupied by bim as quar
ters tbe Brant House whi'.h, by-the-by,
rented ilbr $6 000 per annum. These bar
racks bave brick foundations and brick outer
walls, weatber-boaroed, and are sufficient
quarters and stables tor one thousand men.
A pontoon unuge oas ueen ereceq. across
the Ohio River by General Fremont, at Pa-
ducub. A ferry boat, in a region where such
boats are readily procured, would b just
efficient and much less expensive.
THE CAMP AT TIPTON
1S61.
As soon as I obtained a view of the several
encampments at Tipton, I expressed
opinion tbattha forces there assembled could
not be' moved, as scarcely any meant
tiansportaiioo were visible. I saw General
Hunter, second in command, and conversed
fieely with him. lie stated tbat there
great confusion, and that General Fremont
was utterly incompetent, thav his own
was greatly scattered, and the force
there present defective in many respects)
he himself required one hundred wagons,
mat ue wss unuer oraera to warcu iubi
some of bis troops were already drawn
out on the road. His cavalry regiment
(Ellis's) had horses and Indifferent arms,
no equipments. The men bad to carry
cartridges in tbeir vest ' pockets coose-
Jioently on their first day's march from
City, in- a heavy rain which fell,
cartridges were destroyed.
THE GUNS PURCHASED BY FREMONT.
sa
own
S
Atooda Boar
' ' General Hunter stated tome that he
just received a written report from one of
colonels, informing him that but twenty
of a hundred of bis guns would go
These ' were tbe guns purchased by General
Fremont in Europe.- I will here state
General Sherman, at Louisville, made to
Similar complaint of tbe great inferiority
of these Europead arms. lie bad given
men orders to file, dawn tbe -nipples. .'.
conversation with Colonel Swords, Assistant
Quartermaster General, at Louisville,
from California, he stated tbat Mr. Selover,
who was in Europe with General Fremont,
wrote to some friend in Ban Francisco
bis share of tbe profits of the purchase
was $30 -
CLOSE OF THE REPORT.
Bsu
The remainder of the report it general
review of the operations of the military
after it was placed in charge
Fremont. Orders for the movement of troops
' without being la any way prepared ; orders
Issued, and only countermanded when it
demonstrated that it was impossible to
tbem executed f the failure to reinforce
ItU 14 on t,( VYWon a uxk, ana Rauigaa
.i j t ... i ' ; t
at Lexington- all of which, says the report,
"go to snow tbe want of military toresigti'
on the part of General Fremont in directing
tbe net ts'ary means for putting into and
maintaining in the field the forces under bis
command.
GENERAL OPINION OF FREMONT.
The opinion entertained by gentlemen of
position -and intelligence, who have ap
proached and observed bim, is that he is
more fond of tbe pomp than of tbe stern re
alities ot war that his mind his incapable of
fixed attention or strong concentration that
by bis mismanagement of affairs since his
arrival in Missouri the State has almost been
lost; and that if he is eontinned in command
tbe worst results may be anticipated. This
is tbe concurrent testimony ot a large num
ber of the most Intelligent men in Missouri.
The Pursuit of the Privateer Sumter.
a
a
he
ot
Z
of
fur
.
ot
k
An officer of ..the war steamer Powhatan
sends to the National Intelligencer a long ac
count of that vessel's chase of the privateer
Sumter. The following are extracts :
' We found a curions state of affairs exist
ire in Maranham, the people, from the Gov
ernor down, being Sumter-mad, and politics
running aa high aa they ever did in the
South the Brazilians sympathizing almost
to a man with the Secessionists, under tbe
impression that tbe South was fighting tbe
battle of Brazil fighting to protect their
property in slaves.
Addresses were made by Captain Semmea
to the Governor and people of Maranbatn, in
which he n?ed the most specious argument
to prove that after tbe North bad abolished
slavery in the Southern 8tates she would
turn ber attention to abolishing slavery in
tbe Brazilian Empire. Of course tbe arrival
of the 1'ovihatan was looked noon with dis
trust, and a reward of five hundred dollars
(made by an American) to any one who
would knock a hole in her bottom so tbat
she could not follow tbe Sumter was received
with erent favor, tbe Government taking no
steps to stop such rroceedinirs.
In all communities there are weak minded
people who can not keep a secret intrusted to
tbem; there were some such in Maraoham.
Captain Semmes particular friends let out
many facts in relation to bis movements
which be would rather have kept Becret.
We found out all we wanted to know about
tbe Sumter, what coal she could stow, what
was her speed, what number of men and
what kind of crew she bad, and where she
v. onld likely turn her attention to capture
1 rizes.
A description of the Sumter, taken
from a Tattnlul photograph, may not be un
interesting to merchant captains who may
wisn to avoid ner. sne is an awKwaraiy
rigged bark, half man of-war, half merchant
man. Her mizzen mast is a long way off
from ner mainmast, ana ner sans bear a great
disproportion to her bull, being too little
canvas for so long a vessel She carries three
trj sails, all being larger than those carried
d d h bowgprU head
J'"i " . . ,
by a sailing vessel, sue carries a tore-stay
bcoms have no stove. She has two large
quarter boats, and one haneine at tbe stern.
She carries topgallants, add has a seven foot
royal pole witbont stays. Her courseB are
deep, particularly the mainsail, and her top
sails look as if they have a reef in tbem, being
short. She carries no guns on the spar deck,
and ber pivot nun beiuir nearly in the middle
of the ship, it ran not be used in chasing
without yawing tne ship six points.
Any smart sailing vessel can run away
from her on an easy bowline, for on a wind,
nnder sail, she can do notbingof consequence,
and she can not carry her sail on that course
without its shaking or getting aback. Tbe
ranee of her lareent sun is onlv two thou
sand yards at bbh elevation, and Bhe could
not hit anything at a greater distance than
fifteen hundred yards, and could not carry
ner ports out witn a heavy sea on
I truBt that with the above description
(which may be relied on merchant ships
may be able to avoid her.
My opinion is that the Sumter will finally
turn pirate against all commerce. She has
R crew composed of all nations, the greates
portion , being Portuguese, Spaniards and
English. 3 . 1 '
per
his
of
to
be
to
is
of
is
as
as
the
of
was
di
vision that
but.
uay, -and
but
Jef
erfon the
had
bis
ont
off.
tbat
me
tbe
Ia
just
that
of
'
de
partment of
was
have
Gan-
Sharpshooters in tbe Army. The "An
drew Sharpshooters," who rendered sue
signal service at Edwards' Ferry Jast week
when General Stone crossed a portion of bis
column, are armed wiih heavy telescopic
riUcS, which, in practiced bands, are deadly
at a distance of thtee-quarters of a mile.
Tbe company was organized and accepted
mainly through the exertions of Senator
Nortbend of Salem, Mass., who prevailed
upon Governor Andrew to give the experi
ment a trial, notwithstanding the unfavor
able opinion of military men about the State
house. The company, indeed, has been re
garded by military men generally as fanciful
and ini-'lficient, but tbe experience at Ed
wards' Ferry and Ball's Bluff will probably
open tbeir eyes to the importance of this new
aim of tbe service when properly used. At
Bali's Blnff our principal loss, especially in
I officers, was from then sharpshooters of tbe
enemy. Tbe loss from platoon tiring was in
significant, and in tbe only bayonet charge
which the enemy attempted tbey -were seat
to tbe ritiht about in double quick time. At
Edwards Ferry the Andrew Sharpshooters
checked tbe advance of a.rebel force of nearly
tbtee thousand, every ball tbey used hitting
a rebel and the force was completely re
pulsed by the help ot a few sliots from Rictc
etv'a battery . 1 . . '
Families Divided by thi Civa, War
Tbe division of families in the war is strik
ingly illnstrated in the case of two of the
most distinguished families in Kentucky.
Henry Clay, tbe grandson of the statesman,
is Assis'ant Adjutant under Brigadier-General
Richard W. Johnson, in Kentucky. His
uncle, James B. Clay, it violent Secession
ist) now under bonds to appear for trial for
treason. ' Another uncle Thomas, in the
1 lined States service is responsible for the
appearance for trial of Jamel B. Clay. 1
brother, Thomas Clay, jr., is oa the Btaff
General Beauregard. Hit sisters husband,
with whom young Clay resides in Louisville,
has lately entered tbe United 8tates service,
with two other brothers, for the war. Here
is another example: John J. Crittenden has
one son who ia a Brigadier General in tbe
rebel service, after having served and been
honoied by the Government for many years.
Another son is a Brigadier-General in the
Army of the Union, but holding his com
mission from the State of Kentucky. An
other holds the rank of Captain in tbe Fede
ral Army. John J. Crittenden himself,
tbe age or seventy-six, bears arms a a pri
vate in the Home Quard of Frankfort.
A QrJALiricATloN for Office. In any
honest community, it would ba impossible
recommend a citizen fpr nigh- civil station
simply on the grjond that he was uot a thief.
Soch an announcement wonld be likely
aaloniBh every body, if it should not. indeed.
be esteemed aa a sneered itabla impeachment
of the character of the State.- Yet, in
Corxmtrrial Advert- of New York, we find
a communication, to which the- writer urges
the election of a Mr. Washing ton. Smith
tbe State senate in tbe following language
"At the expense of being considered
of line, I desire to say a word in favor of
man who baa served tne city or.jNew rone,
year alter year, wimoui stealing, ana with
out being rewarded by indirect contract."
One-sixth of the railways of Switzerland
are underground. An "underground rail
road" in that region, however, simply meant
that there are forty-nine tunnels through
which the tracks pass. The longest tuauel
It at Lara, in the J ura. being n.3b maters
length.) Bex comet that of Haunstein. 2,495
meters: then that of Mont Sague, in
iura, Va mews.
J
The Closing of the Potomac.
Every succeeding dispatch from Fortress
Monroe or Washington, sayt the Philadelphia
Ledger, telle us a new battery has been dis
covered upon the Potomac. For all practical
purposes, that river might as well have no
existence, for it is closed entirely to naviga
tion, to the no small inconvenience of the
army and the Government. Occasionally
we hear that the Government means to take
some action toward opening the navigation.
This we should suppose was one of the first
duties of the army. It is almost as necessary
to keep tbe Potomac open as it Is to keep up
the communication witn Washington through
Baltimore. If few batteries can not be
dislodged there by the force which can be
brought against them, the expectation that
fottitied harbors further South can be as
saulted and easily carried must, be a fallacious
one. A little ol tbe energy ot tbe army and
navy expended on the rebel side of the Poto
mac would probably be attended with happy
effect. If successful, it would, at least, re
move a great inconvenience, and possibly
also some deprivation to the army.
-- Witn but a single line of railroad to tup
ply Washington, the difficulties of doing to
are largely increased, and subject, as this
communication may be by the accident of a
bridge burning, to be entirely cat on, tne
danger of Btopping all supplies and of pre
venting our troops from easily reaching
there becomes imminent. The Government
would then be in a worse condition than it
has yet been placed in. While the Potomac
was open, it baa easy access to vv asoingtou,
no matter what resistance it met wiw in
Marvland. But this avenue closed, and the
route through Maryland obstructed, it
would be left in rather a helpless condition.
with a large army for defense it is true, but
surrounded on all sides by enemies, and
every day more and more weakened by the
absence of its supplies. No army like this,
upon which tbe existence of tbe Union de
pei as, ought to be reduceu to tne necessity
of receiving its supplies by only one means
of communication, which it is possible to
obstruct either designedly or through the
action of the elements.
North Missouri.
It seems difficult for many of the people
living north of the Missouri River, to settle
down to tbeir peaceful occupations, lhese
dis?atiBfied. uneasy spirits are constantly
making trouble, either in tbe organization
little guetrilla bands to annoy tbe loyal resi
dents" in tbeir neighborhoods, or else in re.
ctuiling volunteers for tbe army of General
frice. certainly tne secessionists oi norm
Missouri bave no interest, except, perhaps,
that of sympathy, in the present struggle
Genert 1 Price. .
It has been announced that the campaign
In Missouri is a contest for boundaries. So
it is regarded by the disunion statesmen
Richmond, and to it is regarded by the
prominent men in the " Missouri State
Guard." Thousands of dollars' worth
property has been removed from the upper
side of tbe Missouri River, to tbe country
below; Martin Green and General Harris
beve abandoned tbe fields of their early " tri
umphs," and united with the main body
the rebel soldiery ; and, indeed, North Mis
souri has been left to the Union by tbe gen
eral consent of the Confederate politicians
and officers.
It is very evident to all who lay claim
tbe least sagacity, that whichever way the
greater pert of the State falls. North Missouri
ia incontestibly to be on the Bide of
Union. It seems to us, then, that our rabid
fellow-citizens above the river had as well
making peace all around, if they expect
continue living in that section of country.
If they do not intend to permanently reside
there, let tbem Keep quiet tin tbey get ready
to depart. sl. i-ouis Kepuoitcan, 4th.
A
of
at
to
to
tbe
to
out
ont
i
tn
the
"Vermont's Quota. The Woodstock (Vt.)
Standard Bays
Probably no State in the Union will
compelled to put forth the effort to supply
ber quota tnai rremooi win. not becanse
ber people are not as patriotic and aa brave
as any, and as ready to spill their blood
defense of tbeir cherished institutions,
because ber young men, ber nghung men,
have left in such large numbers during
past few years to seek tbeir fortunes in
great west and talilorma. it is a noticea-
b e fact, tbat in many Western reinments
Vermonters may be counted by fifties and
hundreds. We have no lares cities or man
utaoturing towns from which to draw, as
sister States bave done, but are essentially
rural community, and, owing to these
if we should fall short in numbers, It ought
not to be set down against us. ut one tbiog,
however, the country may rest assured; that
is, thar what our quota lacks in numbers
be made up by tbe efficiency of our troops.
A Georgian on Secession. A letter just
received from a friend who went out in
JZuropa on her last voyage to Europe, gives
tbe following "inside view" of what is going
on In Georgia. We quote:
' The most interesting character on board
is a Georgian, fat and jolly, wbo is seceding
from Seces9ia, in disgust. He says the pres
ent difficulties will all be settled satisfactorily;
tsysayote of the real slaveholders would
... a ; i . i . it. : .- .
put a quietus upuu oeuetiuuiuj, mai u ia
non-slaveholders only that 'must have room
for our slaves.' He says tbe South is gov
erned by a mob, not by the Confederate
Government, and never will be; tays
country has more to fear from the abuse
suffrage than from tbe South; puts the whole
difficulty upon the shoulders of Southern
politicians, not upon the Aorta, ms version
makes our English passengers stare shuts
tbem up. Uartfora vourant.
Disastrous Ovekflow or tbs Nils.
Tbe unusual rising of the Nile this year
to have wrought immense
Large tracts of grain-producing lands
been swept clean ef their promised harvests.
A Liverpool paper says :
A question of momentous importance
involved in all this a question which,
the short harvest in France and the general
low average crops of European countries,
threatens us with that terrible 'domestic
enemy, dear bread.. Supposing that the
portation ot grain irom Alexandria be
which is highly probable, it would
be futile to dilate upon the evil consequences
which would inevitably ensue.
' The jury in tbe case of the privateers
in New York Ibr piracy, were allowed,
separate every night and go to their homes.
It ia not surprising after that tact that
jury could cot agree, four stubborn
poiuing out against eigut. in case or
much Importance, in which the lives of
many persons were involved, it would
aiDgularlf tbey did agree with tbe influences
which might be brought to bear upon
after they had left tbe court-room.
Terribli Disaster in Francs. The
eign papers give accounts of a terrible
-if. f .1.. J. ., r.t nrr l?nu
ml J 111 UIV urjiuuuDui w. W .wuwv..4
co il sequence of a powerful storm the burst
ing of water-spout, according to
statements the Lalle mine was flooded,
the sides fell in, burying all the working
men. An explosion of gas took place
tame time, by which a portion of the
was blown np.- The Dumber of me a misting,
and considered as killed by the aecrdent,
nearly thra hundred. There ia a probability
tbat but few caa ba got out alive.
. , Rev. Luther Walcott, pastor 1 the-
parish at G or ham, N. II i
failed to obtain the chaplaincy oft regiment,
has shouldered but : musket -asd, janliateU
.UW CtW Wv. M priTftt
BY TELEGRAPH.
NIGHT DISPATCHES.
Highly Important from Missouri.
FREMONT REMOVED WHILE IN THE
FACE OF THE ENEMY.
A Battle Hourly Expected.
THREATENED REVOLUTION AMONG
THE SOLDIERS.
Patriotic Appeal of General Fremont.
Springfield, Ho.. November 3. Yester
day small bodies Of the enemy came within
twelve miles or us, ana news was received ot
the approach of tbeir advance column, two
thousand eight hundred strong. Prepara
tions were mah log to go ont and attack them,
when ueneral remont received the uncon
ditional order from Washington, relieving
him at once from his command. Simulta
neously came the newspapers announcing
the fact. Tbe intelligence spread like wild
fire through the camps, and created inde
scribable excitement and indignation. Great
numbers of otlicers signified their intention
to resign at once, and many companies laid
down their arms, declaring tbey would nzht
undtr no one but Fremont. The General
spent much of the afternoon expostulating
lib tbe otucers, and urging them, by their
patriotism and tbeir personal regard for him,
cot to abandon their posts. He also Issued
the following farewell order to the troops :
"HEAD QUARTERS, Western Depart.
"SPRINGFIELD, Mo, Nov 2, 1861.
of
at
"Soldiers of the Missittippi Armu: Agree
ably to orders tbis day received, I take leave
of you. Although our army bas been of
endden growth, we have grown up together,
and I have become familiar with the brave
and generous spirits which you bring to tbe
delense ot your country, and which mattes
me anticipate tor yon a brilliant career.
Continue as you have begun, and give to my
successor tbe same cordial aud enthusiastic
support with which you have encouraged
me. Emulate tbe splendid example which
you have already before you, and let me re
main, as I am,, proud of tbe noble army
which 1 bad thus far labored to bring to
gether. Soldiersl I regret to leave you.
Most sincerely I thank you for the regard
and confidence you bave invariably shown
to me. I deeply regret that I shall not have
tbe honor to lead you to tbe victory which
you are just about to win; but I shall claim
to share witn you in mo joy ot every tri
umph, and trust always to be fraternally re
meuibered by my companions in arms.
J. C.
"Major-General United States Army."
of
to
be
to
be
in
but
tbe
tbe
a
Tbe feeling ran intensely high during the
whole of last evening, and there was a meet
ing almost every where. Tbe various bands
serenaded tbe General, and whenever he
appeared be was greeted with cheers.
Though after notifying General Hunter, as
h'S order directed, be bad no longer command
over tbe troops, be spent several hours in
making a personal examination of the ground
about tbe city, to oe prepared tor a battle;
and in accordance with a written request
from all the Brigadier-Generals here, be re
mained through the night, to lead the army
in case of attack. All the troops slept on
tbeir arms, many officers remaining np all
night, and an attack was hourly expected;
but nothing more occurred than the firing
on our pickets on two diuerent roads.
Tbe enemy are now encamped on the old
Wi son Creek battle-ground.
. Utneral t remont is prepared to leave for
St. Lodis, and will go as soon as General Pope
arrives, who has been seLt forward and
will take command till General Hunter gets
here.
Universal gloom prevails throughout the
camps. A battle will undoubtedly occur ere
long. Our troops will meet the enemy
firmly, but tbey are disheartened, and have
lost thi-.ir enthusiasm. The Body-guard,
wbo could not have been induced to remain,
and who will now disband, as the terms
their enlistment permit, accompany General
Fiemont, and also his entire staff, including
General Asbotb, commauder of the First
Division. General Fremont will pt rmtt no
demon: tration from the troops on his de
parture.
From Springfield, Mo.
[Special Dispatch to the Missouri Republican]
will
the
i
iud
tbe
of
Spkikofibld, Mo., November 2. Reliable
information has been received here "from
different sources tbat General Price was
Cascville on Tbuisday with twenty-five
thousand men, and McCnlloeh ten mires this
side of that place with ten thousand more,
with tbe intention of marching on Soring
field and offering us battle on tbe old Wilson
Cnek prouud. McCullbch was expecting
ten thousand additional troops fram Arkan
sas. i . - -
Large numbers of tbe residents of Green,
Jasper and otber adjoining counties recently
joined Price s army, and many of our officers
tbink the rebel force dow numbers nearly
sixty tbonsand. 1
Genera): Fremont has been up nearly the
v.hole of tbe past five nights, making the
most perfect arrangements tor a battle, and
tbe confidence of tbe army in him was never
so great as at present.
Generals Lane and Stnrgis have arrived,
and Pope and McKinstry are hourly expected.
LATER.
j
November 3 General Fremont and staff
left for St. Louis this morning. He is ac
companied by his Body-guard, and will
reach St. Louis Wednesday.
Massachusetts Election.
Is
with
ex
pro
hibited, tried
to
Boston, November -5.-r-Tbe vote at
Massachusetts election was remarkably
small, not much more than half of that
last year. The vole of Boston for Governor
is bb follows : Andrew, 6,917 ; Davis (Dem.),
6.28L - The vote in fifty-two cities and towns
loots up ss follows, Andrew, 18,381 ; Davis,
9,211. Additional towns snow a majority
for Andrew of about two to- one. One
Democrat is probably elected to the Senate
from Boston.- The Legislature is strongly
Republican. , The chief interest was in Bur
liogame's old dis'rict. where Sam Hooker
elected over G. B. Upton (Dem.) by 900 ma
jority. . Charles G. Loring, of Boston, and
Ex-Governor Clifford, of New .Bedford,
elected to the senate on the Kepubucan
ticket ,
Additional by the Persia.
bo
so
be
them
for
New York, November 5 There were re
ports of serious disturbances at Pesth.
tbey were unfounded. " . "
. A pa Irs In Poland were unchanged. ' The
churches continued closed.
The opening of the Spanish Cortes had
been postponed till tbe 8th of November,
account or the death of the Queen's daughter.
Condition of the Treasury.
tome
and
mine
is
Washington, ' November ! 6-. It appears
from tbe official statement that the amount
of drafts upon the Treasury last month
810,600 .000. ot which E6.boo.ooo were drawn
from New York. Tbe unavailable bullion)
fund it t'J02.0W. Tbe balance to the credit
of the United 81ates Treasury In the States
cow under insurrectionary control is stated
at $6,500,000, and after making a deduction
for tbe unavailable gives the available
ance $4,606,000. .
Election at Detroit.
in
;
'' Detroit. Voveraber k At the municipal
election to-day William 0. Duncan (Union
enVvtUt) was ejected Mayor,
From Kentucky and the South Beauregard's
Report of Mousses, etc.
LotnsviLLi, November 5. Buckner has
retired toward Bowling Green, and Stanton
has gone back into Tennessee.
The Federal troops in Kentucky under
Sherman are thus divided: Gen. Schoepff
commands tbe Eastern, General McCook the
Central, and General Crittenden the Wesfern
Division. In the Western Division, Colonel
liurbridge has advanced to Woodbury. The
Central troops have advanced to Bacon
Creek, and it is thought our troops are able
to astume the offensive with all security. -
Southern papers say tbat the loss of tbe
rebels at the Leesbnrg fight was three hun
dred killed and wounded.
One hundred and sixty Federal prisoners
from Leesburg reached Richmond on the
24th nit... The Richmoad papers say General
Evans fought at Leesbnrg contrary to orders.
and is to be court martialed, and that the
Federal loss at the engagement is two thou
sand killed and wounded.
The Knoxvllle.if?otsfT says that the rebel
loss at WtMCat was only five killed and
twenty three wounded.
Colonel Fiehlen asks reinforcements from
Richmond, and fears the Federals will cut off
Prestonburg, Ky., from communication with
Virginia.
Beauregard's official report of the battle of
Manassas says three hundred and ninety
nine rebels were killed, one thousand two
hundred wounded, and that tbe Federals lost
four thousand hre hundred killed, wounded
and prisoners. He says his entire force there
was twenty-eight thousand, of which one
fourth only were engaged.
News from the Fleet.
Philadelphia, November B The steam
gun-boat Florida, one of the naval expedi
tion, bas returned to the navy-yard disabled.
She left the expedition on Friday night, off
Cape Fear. She reports tbat tbe fleet en
countered a heavy gale soon after leaving
Hampton, but it died out on Wednesday, and
again revived on Thursday, from tbe south
east On Thursday night tbe machinery of
tbe Florida was disabled, but not seriously,
and can be repaired in tbree days, when she
will resume her voyage, bhe had no troops
on board.
From St. John.
bave again commenced cutting the telegraph
line. It was cut on Sunday for twenty-five
miles, and again yesterday.
There has been more rioting at Harbor
Grace. One policeman was killed and others
badly wonnded. A man-of war bas gone
there, and a detachment of troops will follow.
A Domestic Editor.
of
at
Everybody will laugh at the following. It
is one of tbe good things tbat Mr. Chandler,
of tbe Adams County ( Wis.) Independent, oc
casionally "gets off:"
Our Shanghai editor is a married man a
very married man, keeps two cows, calf, bens,
hens' husbands. Fautt horse, no dog, gay
sleigh, and sich like quadrupeds, lie believes
in having milk in tbe family; and verily
'twould please thee to witness the farmatorial
airs ht puts on, and ihe editorial airs
he puts olt, as he goes tortu like a nower,
and runneth amoog tbe hens and milketh ye
bovines. Belike his dignity went rapidly
down t'other night. New milch cow taketh
to herself a certain pleasant habit of ex
tending binder hoof with a yank. ..
Editor sat beside lacteaLglands, pail clasped
'twnt bis knees, and thus engaiged in teat
squeezing be was heard to utter, in a very
solemn tone: "Kick not that ye be not
kicked; for with what violence ye kick, yt
shall be kicked; and with what measure ye
eat fiom, it shall be swatted over your coun
tenance." Anon the bossy kicked like forked light
ning, laying out Shanghai Chandler flat on
his back, completely painting him with
foamy cow juice, flipping his hat far to the
leeward, jamming np tbe tin milk-pall like
a stepped on stove-pipe, and causing a white
editor to spout milk from his nose like
porpoise.
And then the wail that was heard was
this: "She hath lain my confidence waste
and barked my shin; she hath made the
mi k-pail clean baaty and cast the milk
away ; tbe front of Shanghai is made jrhits.
Howl, all ye little families 1 Bellow, calf.
crack your cheeks I Had I your tongue and
voice. I'd use tbem so that heaven's vault
should crack I 'Tis g ne forever, 'twill come
no more; never, never, never) Break, heart,
I pray ihee break I I'm very much duyutted;
I'm a body a demnition cold, wet, kicked,
unclean, unpleasant body"
So saying he emote the cow with a terrible
curse, saying, "Darn your skint" Then
kicked her just one kick, with such force
tbat he raid he bad driven his toe-nail close
back to his heel, and went in and asked Mrs.
Editor to wash bim off. Selah.
Gunny Bags.
,
i
'
of
Is
are
on
The inquiry 'is often made of late, "What
Is a gunny bag T"' Tbe London Mechanics
Magazine tells us all about it:
It is a bag made from the coarse spun fibers
of a plant which grows in India, of which
there are many varieties. Oa the Coroman
del coast tbis plant is called Goni, and
"gunny" is a corruption of this name.
The ' cultivation, of the ehuii, jute
"gunny" has been carried on for centuries
Bengal, and gives employment to tens
thousands of inhabitants.
"Men, women, and children," says' Mr.
Henley, "find occupation there. Boatmen,
in their spare moments, plan keen carriers
and domestic servan'S every body, in fact,
be ng Hindoos for Mussurmans suiu cotton
only pass tbeir leisure moments, distaff
hard, spinning gunny twist."
Tbe patient ana despised Hindoo widow
earns ber bread in this way. It is said that
three ' hundred thousand tuns of jute are
grown in India, of which one hundred thou
sand tuns sre exported as gnnny bags, besides
one hundrtd thousand tuns in a raw state.
A London company has established a manu
factory in Calcutta a tan expense of 300,000.
Tbe gunny bag it used tor a great variety
of purposei,. Sugar, coffee, spices, cotton,
drugs indeed, almost every article which
we pack in dry casks and In boxes, ia, in the
East, packed in gunny bags. It is also made
into mats, carpets, ropes, paper, and various
other articles. - '
' It Is related that tbe old gnnny bags
which contained sugar are sold to the beer
makers, who sweeten their beer by boiling
tbe sugar ont of tbe bags and then selling
tbem to the mat makers. - 1
' Some six to ten millions of gunnlnt are ex-
K oi ted to tbis country from India, mostly
orth America, besides some four to
thousand tuns of the rope and raw jute.
There are no manufactories of jute cloth
this country ; though it is here made
bedcurds. &c,
WbtB used for purposes of defense
bags are filled with sand. They are no better
than hemp or flax bags of the same suangth,
but are much cheaper.
was
"Cross11 Examination "Mr. Parks,"
a lawyer to a witness, "I understand you
say tbat the defendant is a professor of
Does bis practice correspond with
profusions" "X never : heard of any corre
spondence or letters passing between them."
You said something about bis propensity
drink. Dues he drink hard?'1 "No, I think
be drinks as easy as any man I ever saw."
"Ont more question, Mr. Parks. Have
known tbe defendant a long time; what
bit habiter-loosa or otherwise?" "Tb
be't got now on, I think, it rather
under the arms, and too short-wanted
b fashion." "You can take your seat,
' ij:.nno'l , ' t i ' - f '
' ' l l'S .' I. will 1 J i t '. . t . - .1 -
ADVERT I SEMEIiTQ
ttitTJ it the rouransa lira I
-. i .,- T : - j 'i -
sesseata, not sxoMdlnf Or. tines (anSark
y". .mTT''-"--B . 9l I fnawHko$l
kasaiMiia. 1 O 1 94 laa irtln a.
La Tar advertleemenU Inserted at the fcUowtai)
rates pet aquae of tea Unset
Da. fnaai tloa,.,
Each additional,
Inaartlows. .. 1
VI iMartleaa,.
I H inearttowe.,M
i Insertion.
.93
1.3
SEWING MACHINES.
WHEELER I WILSOfl S
Cowing - Rlaclii ooa
PB1CK3 RKDUCED!
FIM1B WHEELIa WlLfSOB) a)Ffji
JL"NO-IIACUINS WMPANT , harlnt aiM
.11 th.li .alia at i.w wlta iafrincina aaenSM
rarer., propoM that the pnhll. aba'l be heuebiW
lerelir, and hare aeoorrtlna If RIDIKIRD THE)
PBKJCS of tbeir Hewlng-macklne. .
H.vlnfl .ioo, Sarover ve. yean, tire a-oat a
alar Ftmll, Hewtna-ma hlna In tiie ounntry. aawi
bow ew .Iritis fl.OOO.OO) la their business, anal
siskin ORB UDNDUKD MACUIBBU) pa s
they ar. prepared witn enoa extraordinary Baoas.
H1w .ad evperieneo. jswaratea to tb. pmo'iaaa.
emir satlafaotloa. All oar tteoBlne. as. sasato
anally well, aad an
WARRANTED THRU TEAR!.
Th. diaer.no. la price ha! ni merely a dlffereao. IB
flntsfe.
91.308 Machines sold in ISA., belnt dost ttay
Salee of any other eompany In the Uukrti.
Awarded tbs First Fremitus ia the
o. a. fairs or lass, tsst aid istt.
And at th. Cincinnati Mechanist Institute ft
FOOR NIKXIKHSIVB FIAK8 we h.ve takea Mm
first Premium ovor all ooaipetltor. so the beet
BEST FAMILF SEWIBOHKAOHIBB.
It nse. n 'battle, maa-is th. lock-stitch alike aa,
both aide.' tbe foods, Ikewint mo chain or rKtao
a. th. onder.slde of the sasra;and neea bat BsJI
as moon inrena mm ino onoin-sutcB maoBl.ea.
eena er caii ior a vtrotuar, ooBtanuaa
testimonial., oto.
G WIS. SUMNER s CO., Aranta.
7T "Wesit IT'oTjjrtti-BrtJ
-' riKE'l 0PERA-H0U8R,
deH OIKOI STRATI.
WILLIAMS & OR VIS'S
DOUBLE-TBREAPSD ft'2 FAMILY BBWlBTd
MACHINES
4KR JI'ST THR THING FOR lrIANTJ
iviiikiau eniniere pants, blonses, ate.
Gall and see tbem at 104 Kace at ocSS
T PITIPIrlBKK, KVRKV
IlllllV. THAIS
m m wiLbiAains us
family use can't heb-at.
UVIH'atfewm Machines tor
rrice td.
PJ. 1H4 H&UE-BV
4gl!UBRSJ SIWISCHIAUBim
Great Redaction In Prices I
SINGER'S No. 2 Standard Shuttle Machine,
Reduced from f 100 to 873
SINGER'S No. 1 Standard Shuttle Machine,
Red need from t90 lo 870
SINGER'S Letter A Machln. Is th. best la the
World for Family Sewing and Light Maiiufactar
lnf Parpoees.
Price, with Hammer, Ao., t)3t) oaehv
OIHOIJSNATI OFFICE:
Commercial-office Building',
Corner of Fonrtb tsnd Havo- mtmi
.nil
JAMES HKARDON. A lent.
SHIPPING LIST.
a
or
io
of
in
U. 8. MAIL. STEAMER,
-tOB-
LONDQS.BOUTinMPTON, HlYM
AND nASlBUKG.
rTiniJ BPI.EWDrD IRON MAII. STBAH-
JLr-HiP UHK1HKM will Ball trom
Sew lork to London, boatbamjiton,
arre and Hamburg, on SATUR
DAY, October ft. th
BITES OF PASSAGE.
Flrst-rlsss Stat.-room......
Liwer Saloon ...
Third Class (fuund wiih Cooked Provisions) ......
For freight or passsge apply to
BENNO 8PBYER,
General Western Agent,
oeli.x T d 9 West Third-.
U. S. MAIL STEAMSHIP
OTi vta GOW,
FOXl IilVBTAPOOIi.
TTIB NEW TOR K, PHILADELPHIA
and Liverpool bteanishlp O'.mpauy'fl nrat-olaass
iull-puwertd, i;ide- built, Iran Steamer GLASGOW,
will Sail fn.ni New lork to Liverpool, ou SATUR
DAY, October 26.
RATES OF PASSAGE.
First Cabin ..t7
Steerage .........M...M......m,........M at
For freight or passage, apply at th. onto, of the
Bonipauy, ho. IS Rroadway..
JOHN G. DALE, Aaeat, .
BENNO 8PETER,
oclt-x 1 and 9 West Third-st., UinolnnaN.
FOB CALIFORNIA Tla FAN ASIA,
A FIRST-fX ASM 8TB AIMER WILE,
leave New York on the 1st. lltb. and 21st of
each month, except whea tbeae datea fall on Han
day, w ben tbe day of departure will ba oa th. htesi
day fcilowiu.
For freight or passage, apply at the only offlee, Hav
B Rowling Green. D. R ALLEN, Ageat.
BENNO 8PBTER,
ocU-x T and 9 West Thlrd-st., Cincinnati.
Parcel Express Tor England,
Ireland and Scotland.
ntoK tops
POR FN ISLAND, IRM
ITI.AND will be takaA and an
M LAND and SOOT I.
warded by each SATURDAY', flies roar. Tbe da-
livery and forwarding; or tbeae paokae will be at
tended to by th. Kimpton Exprea. Company, at
Lrtttton. Jjfe.rpool and DuoHn.
Articles must be delivered previous to S P. At. OS
BBNNO BPBYER,
T snd 9 West Third-street.
Foreign Exchange,' ,
FOR SAT F. SIGHT DRAFTS ON EN.
GLAND, Ireland and Scotland, at lua loweeB
ratea, by
BENNO IPITIR,
7 and Wss Third-stnat.
piisiti.i.f1t4
3
DENTAL.
to
fire
in
into
tbe
taid
to
re
ligion. his
for
yon
are
one
tight
for
Mr.
1
fkW WRI.I'i DENTIST (ttTB DKH-
.. uPB 1 Br lUft IB III I Fli 19 OwH '
JK IB lilt, Wit I oU4w.to.jtV MavSSRW
), hawing itiiraed, hu ftr, v Jm
JIT Wwt tfevebAS! ao"
Terms rt8oiiBbl ' 04 xm
I Dautal Siirgvry),
QPIirHl B Umce 4U
CiDCtnimti, unto
D
B . VT 1 R D fj R,
DENTIST.Q
No. 97 West Seventh-street.
. Full upper aets or Teeh InaerUd from IllCto :.
fsslt J ' ' . '
Or.-belknap, n m nw tn
o Teeth extracted la luost eaaea without ""
pais, or tbe leaat danger, by a aiiu.la m-)rri 1
cees practirap by no oilier person. ArtlB.
eial Teeth atTBe, and all operation. pevtinln' to
Dentistry .xecu'ed with prufeetional aaiU. Will
render entire .atiafactioB or no charge
Teeth extracted for th. poor tret. . .
OrvicO J3T Weal koorui-ev., uta., O. oat
FAR. MEREDITH, DKHTI8T.-OKFICB.
MM oa Stxtb-st , between Race and Elm p '
o. IBS, nsac Race -ex. Teeth eatneted
without pain, on a new ptiuolpl withuut
th. use of dross er .ny inj urloue stent, roaltlrely
So haaabsg. Having hai nearly tweuty years' aa
pernuss, ia. th. prautlu. of bia profession in this
oity, he oaa si is ferreoi satiemotloa to all wbs will
tatrrmla bile. Ft W term. .r. so reason! le that
a will save asarip oae-half op oautag sa alas.
Ideal
vn. iu 1:1. , Wsot Foartht J.. '!
" : a ; twosa"w-.Uwt af TIbo-obv,'. , ',
Cnaiajiatt.UBie,
.. 1 'i Mill' 1... . . li-.i. i m'v
, t li.. .... AVW 14

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