OCR Interpretation


Holmes County Republican. [volume] (Millersburg, Holmes Co., O. [Ohio]) 1870-1895, September 19, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028821/1872-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Terms of Advertising.
lin.
3 In.
Xcolj
Kcol
'col
i
tl.OO
l.S0
$2JJ0
$ax
two
SJOO
.too
S.00;
llJOO
1300
fC-00
no
Swk
iJt)
150
3J0
3JJU
ISO
0-50
8S0
li.00
1SJU0
4.W
5.00
&00
8J0
1U0O
16JM
S.W
8-00
1U.UU
1IJ00
17.00
4wk
1 mo
Smo
3 mo
6 mo
9 mo
lyr.
10.00
13.00
15.00
COO
8.00
10.00
6.00
ftflO
SOjOOi
"55
li.00
128.00
35.00
UJO
4M
ED.O0
13-00
18.00
3SJ00
60.001
Deaths and Marriages gratis.
Local Xotices, first insertion, 10-cents per
line; subsequent insertions 6 cents per line.
Special Notices' and Foreign Advertisements
Business Cards, not exceeding S lines, U.
Administrators' and Executors' Kotices $
County Officials.
Common Plea Judge,
Probate Judge. -Proucuttng
A Uorney,
. inuux Bixb.
Thomas Abmok.
. Ij.E.Koiai.in.
- Joitx 8. Ozk.-
voumu vurr.
Auditor, -Treasurer.
- -
. Jims s. sicuom.
Joszrn H.MwioK.
. Jacob chexbyhoucxs-
Seoorder,
CommUeloner,
Surveyor, - -Coroner,
Infirmary Director,
( AlU WOEIJfAX.
(JACOB I ISHXB, .
(DAS'L BAMHHAIf.
Joshua SroKAOLE.
1IEKKT SHAFFKB.
TCILIIK ALU80K,
Joni Shakf.
fWAsniKoiosCoTn.-e.
Railway Time Tables.
Railway Time Tables. Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Delaware R. R.
GOING NORTH.
Ex. A Mall.
Leave Millersbnrg, 534 A.M.
S HolmesvUle, 6:38
" Fredericksburg, 531 "
" Apple Creek, 6JB "
" Orrvilla. 633 ".
" MannaUville, 1:14 "
Akron. 83 "
Arr. at Cleveland, Mao "
Accom'dn.
13:421'. il,
1X13
139
230
3U1
8:00
GOING SOUTH.
Accom'dn.
Leave Cleveland,
- Akron,. 7:18 A.M.
MarshaUville, 91)0 "
" OrrviUe, 3l "
" Apple Creek, 1038 "
" i"relericUb'rg,10a5 "
" IlolmesviUe, 1130 "
Ex. i'MaiL
325 I". M.
5:47
6:48
am
131
7:44
736
11 ua
8:10
R. C. HURD, President.
G. A. JONES, Superintendent.
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & Chicago R. R.
TRAINS GOING WEST.
No. l So. 7 No. S No. 3
Fast Ex. Fac Ex. Mall. Night Ex.
Pittsburg,
Rochester
Alliance,
Orrville,
Mansfield,
1.45A.X. 9.30A.M. 7.10A.M. r.l
iSS 10.43 " &45 " MS
5.05 " l.S5r.Mjl. " CIS
HJS3 " S.S3 " Ui3F.X. 7.47
8J5 ' 5.35 " . " 9.4!
Crestline J
Forest,
ard.05 " 6.10 " 5.00 " 10.10
dilSO " 635 " MOAJf. 10.30
10ja ' 8J3 7J0 . 11.4.1
Lima,
11 SJ0" 1X.43A.V.
IX Wayne, S.10FJI. 1SJ0a.KJ1.40 tS
nvmOUthT 4.17" 3.05 - IS5F.JI. 6.10"
Chlcairo. 1-30 " 6J0 " CJ " 8.S0F.M.
TRAINS GOING EAST.
No.8 No. Xo.6 No.4
MalL Fast Ex. racEx-NightEx.
Chicago, 5.30 i.n. 8J0iJ(-J!5r.K. .ajT.n.
l'lvmocth. 9.10 " 1L03AX. 9.05 " 1z.40a.1I
Ft. Wayne, 12.Kr.lc ljapic
Lima, 'tis " 3.13 '
Forest, 3.43 - 4.14 "
it at ais
lAiAJU, SJJ6',
aso-" .
4J0 " . 8J0 "
X30 " 8.25
5.00 " 9.00 "
7JM " 11.08 "
8J0 " 1.10F.K.
Crestline !
dllJ0A.ic. 5J0
Mansfield, 12.O0fk6.i8"
Orrville, 125 " 8J2 "
Alliance, 4.40 9JS0
Rochester, 7J7
Pittsburgh, 8J5
11 J4AJC 11.05 " - 3.29 "
1J" 12J0F.K. 4.35
No.l, llaily except Monday: Nos. 5, 7, 8 and
J, Bally except Sunday; Not. 3 and 6. Daily;
isaitj CAcepb oai-ujua; inu ouuuu
ST.
F. R. MYERS, Gen Ticket Agent.
C., R. I. & P. Railway.
Golna WetL Goina EaeL
Stations. PacEx. Ex.MaiL AtLEx. x.Mail
No.1. No. 3. No. 2. No.4.
Chicago, 10,00am 10,00pm. 4,15pm 7,00am
Knglewood. 10,35 io,au 3.45 n,J
Joliet, 12,00 m 11,55 2,37 6,03
isau
die,
2,19pm 2,22am. 12,18 2,38
llnrean, 3,20;
O.ll.fiQ.Cros5.4,09
Rockbland, 6,15
Davenport, 7,25f
WUtOn, 8,40
3,20
4,08
11.30am J 10 j
10,27 13,50
8,00 10,30pm
7,45 10,15f
6,15 8,40
5,32 8,00
n,au
7,25
8,40
9.20
1( cat aAUCikl.ffilu
Iowa City, 10,00
10,05
Des Moines. 3.15am 4.10nm
HJ3pm 1,401
Avoca. 8,05 9,05f 7,00 8,05a'
ouncituinssdu iu,v n,uu o,w
Mo.Kltcr,ar.lO,00 11,00 dep.4.45 5,50
Nos. 1 and 4 daily except Sunday; Nos. 2 and
3 daily except Satnrday.
( Breakout. Dinner, f Supper.
Distance 433 miles. Trains arc run by Chi -ago
time.
Connects at Council Bluffs and Omaha with
Missouri Biver Steamers for Benton and all
Upper Missouri BiverTrading Posts and Un
ion Paciflo Railroad.
Church Directorv.
M. E. CHURCH,
G. A. HUGHES, PASTOB, SEBVICE EVERV
Sabbath at KH o'clock, A. A1-, and 7 o'clock,
P.M. Prayer Meeting Thursday evening.
EVANG. LUTHERAN CHURCH.
SERVICES EVERY OTHER SABBATH, AT
lOJtf o'clock A. M. by Rev.M.P. r'ogelsong,
Pastor.
U. P. CHURCH.
REV. Vr. M. GIBSON, PASTOR. HOURS FOR
Service at UK o'clock, A. x. Sabbath school
at 10X: o'clock, a. ij. I"ravermcetiogThurs
day evenings at7f o'clock,
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
REV. A. S. MILHOLL AND, PASTOR. MORN
ing service at 11 o'clock. Sabbath school
Hii o'clock. Evening service 6 o'clock.
Prayer meeting every Wednesday evening at
1)i o'clock.
GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH
SERVICES EVERV SABBATH AT 10 O'
clock, A. K. Sunday School at 9. J. D.Nun
emacner," Pastor.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
Physicians.
Dns. POMEEENE & WISE,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, MILLERS
burg.Ohio. Office Hours Wednesdays,
from 1 to 5 o'clock F. il and on Saturdays
from 9 o'clock a. k. to 3 o'clock r. m. Mtf
3, 17. GUTHRIE, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Oflice in first
building north of Post-office, Wooster, Wayne
County, Ohio. Office hours, Wednesdays and
Saturdays, from 9 to 12 a. K and from 2 to 4
P.U. All accounts considered due as soon
as services rendered.
VT. C STOUT, 31. D.
SUCCESSOR OF E. BARNES, M. Dn ECLEC
tie Physician and Surgeon, Oxford, Holmes
County, Ohio. Special attention given to
Chronic and Female Diseases. Consultation
free. Oflice hours from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M, on
Tuesdays and Saturdays. 39m3
P. P. POMEEENE,
PHYSICIAN
OHIO,
ANP SURGEON,
BERLIN,
ltf
"HT. M. EOSS, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, MILLERS
burg, Ohio. Office First door West of Cor
ner formerly occupied by Mulvane. Resi
dence, second door south of T. B. RailTs
corner. Office days, Wednesday and Satur
day afternoons. jtf
DE.S.'ftTXSOX,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, OFFICE AND
Residence, West Liberty Street, Wooster, O.
All accounts considered due as soon as servi
ces are rendered. 8t9
J. G. BIGHAM, M. D,
PHYSICIAN Jt RITRnTrnv VIT T VUCDrrtn
Ohio. Office and Residence, at South part of
t uiusguin sireeu j tf
DE. JOHN LEHJIAX,
German Physician- Treats Chronic Diseases,
especially Female Complaints, with great
success. Office on East Liberty btreet, Woos
ter, O.
Dentists.
T. L. PIEBCE,
PRACTICAL OPERATIVE DENTIST, Up
stairs opposite the Book Store. All work ex
ecuted In thelicst manner, and warranted
ta gTP satlslaptiou. ltf
VT. E. P05IEE0Y,
MECHANICAL & OPERATIVE DENTIST.
MiUersburg. Ohio. Office Two doors West
oi ixnumerciai in oca. itr
Attorneys.
DAVID F. EWIKG,
ATTORNEY AT LAW Office 3 doors east of
the national llauk. 35tf
G. W. EVEBETT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MILLERSBURG,
OHIO. - Stf
h. d. 'Mcdowell,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MILLERSBURG, O
Oflice Second floor in McDowell's building
west of the Court House. ltl
JOHK W. VOBHES,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MILLERSBURG, O,
Office over the Book Store. ltf
A. J. 'BELL,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE COLLECTIONS
promptly made. Office above Lon g, Brown
A Co.'s Bank. ' 1lr
J. M. EOBINSON,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOIt AT LAW
MILLERSBURG, O. Office over Mayer's
store, uppuaiu. uic uuih Aiuuse. SGtf
L. E. HOAGLAND,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
jUUjblUDUIUIfU. 2Q11
Miscellaneous.
JOSHUA SPOITAGLE,
COUNTY SURVEYOR, can be found' at hit
residence, in Ripley township. Post Office
aaaress, snrevc, y ujixa ua., u.
Holmes
Old
Sorioai,
Yol. XXIX.
-
-A JPolitk ut ami
i
.Jfaj..
Family Journal, Devoted
'
MlLLERSBURG, HOLMES GoimTYjlOvfrHURSDAY SEPT. 19, 1872.
to the Interests ,pf, Holmes
County, and Local and General Intelligence.
.'"""' .
if;
i. . t
Bor-io0,.
Yol. ni, No. 5
Miscellaneous. Hotels.
jUUKD HOUSE, 7
ORRriKLE, tiVNOUTII OF It. Hi 11EWITV
llEWl
AlTin llarcrolt, prop'r. trains guiu north
in the mornin ton thirtv iniaute. for
Ilireakfast. Th& Hurd House i 'fitted up
fin imf-ciass- styie ana'isrone ttt line ie.t
fhousescmtha P, F. W. SC. It R. (Country
!)eone,-wiuwia it to tncirintejesitofiopat
,mis couscy , ; 3 g f , j i. t
" 'EJIPIKE HOUSE,"
A. .1. HAMPSON, Proprietor. Passengers
eonveyeil to and from the Cars, free of charge.
nwruenf rai ataze ucicc. in
ltUTLEE HOUSE,
WEST END MAIN STREET. MILLERS-
burg, Ohio, Joseph jiutleb, rroprietor.
Tnls llom.e is in goou onier, ana lis gueM
will be well carctffor. . I i i -"T ltf
DRUGS.
teli
h
NTANV M
Or anything that is kept in a s
,4 j VI vnv u
Pirst-Class Drug Store !
CO TO
ISAHNDEBSQ A ft
J 1!
FOR THEM.
THEY HAVE TnF.
Verv Best of Evervthiner In
J.
Si.G. (ADAMS,
3 on'
BANK EES.
uo a uenerai Banning, uracouni una
Deposit Business,
VAirie rnT.T.Trrrinvs a vn rft.t. rrv.
ENUB STAMPS. v.Jf
OFFICE IX T. B. KAIFF'S COEXEE,
MiUersburg, Ohio.
Of the latest Styles at the
OF-
Hoxworthand Wolgamot.
Ther hare everTllilntr in the line of Mill in-
cry Goods. rarticnUr attention given to
;ampin, Ztress Ualdsg, Fatisms, k
A full stock of poods kent constantlr on
hands.
- i . . A i
Slain St. directly opposite the Postofflce
ryiintburhlor--
Hurrah, Here.
A "A
li
THAT ;EITSJ
11 lit J
")Yierq .d4-T9W get; it ?i'3 h
jjk ,isliuO :3o
"How niiicli did it cost ?"
"Guess."' tJ '
"Twentv Dollars?" fi U
"Oh, no ! only Twelve Dollars."
"That is Cheap." 1
"He sells . everything -cheap.
He lias a Big Stock" and more
coming. He says he' can t be
be undersold by "any . one. He
keeps store Opposite Commer
cial Block, MiUersburg, 0.
Another Large Invoice of
- . . t m
NEW G-OODS,
R0TTMAN7S?
BENTON.y
OHIO.
Beautiful Designs In
Prints, Gingham's, Dress Goods
and Uottonades,-
Ali of which has jut been opened.
L. Rottman.
t
-
&ew grocery
PROVISION STORE!
Saeees hose
HitKG rUltCHASKD THE GROCERY
aftttrrovisionfcioreof C- i Leety. Alain
btret-t?ftTt(! having refitted the rooms in fnK
ttyle,anl attdeil lnrjrtlrto the stock, anj it
nowif ared to furnish all who may favor
hlra-Jtf their patronage vUU everything in
hit line of trade, sucJi as
Coffee, Tea,
Sugar, Syrups,
Oranges, Lemons
Canned Fruits. Figs,
(Extracts, Raisins.
Kl&c. &c. &c. &c,
f All of which will be sold at the
Lowest. Market Price
-FOR CASH.
-
Haabo keeps the very bet braulcof-
Wges and Liquors
Snitable for medicinal purposes, which he will
not ell by the drink.
Give4im a call when yon want anything in
111.
---P CHARLES HOSE.
." At the old "llerrer Corner."
Mniersburg.O Aug. 1, 1STI. cotr
MILLERSBURG MILLS
G. FEHRENBAOiT,
Has Purchased the Mlllershnrir Mill and
now in readiness to accommodate all irhomay
istiur uiin Miw
CUSTOM WORK
The 31 ill is one of the verv best, ami no ef-
lurnviii dc ypareu to piease cusiomers.
price paiu lor
i4flliEin(lofrain. 4
O. FEnitENBACH.
Millersbnrg, 0.i , t 24tf
MiUersburg Iiime IQln !
1 MILE: BAST'. OF. TOWN,
ON THE MAXWELL FARM.
MiaiUUl
fTMIE undersigned would respectfully an
.a. nuunce w inv
c public that they have con-
btantiy on nana,
ity of
u mcir aiui, superior quai
lilmc S
sz-
And are prepared to All all orders promptly.
3 HECKER tX BURNET.
A Trip to California
Can be made by buying your
Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods,
Notions Fancy Trimmings, Car-
pe'fe, Queensware and Groceries
from J. E. KOCH, Jr., at, a low
price. '
'Your' choice of new, stvles.of
i t 3 i if L
Dress Goods, Plain and Fancy
Poplins, Dolly Varden's of all
descriptions, Bishop and Victoria
Lawns, Nainsooks, Swisses, Jaco
nets, Organdies, Paris Muslins,
j ) ' . ; I
is;uicuaAiu ouiucu iiuucs.
? i t s i t t . -3 r
ill put down .to prices which de-
w .A W 3L J . X I
fy competition.
Bleached and Brown Muslins,
Shee'tingsJ Ta'ple linens; Towels,
Crasli, Ribbons, Silk Laces, Cot
ton, Silk and Kid Gloves. Hose
at lO-'and 12i-cents pen pair. iLat
eies all-linen1 Handkerchiefs,- CJ
cents: "In "factj'a full line of any-thiri'g"necessary-
'to takeont' a
Summer trip.
Jeans, Cottonades, Cassimeres,
Cloths, &c, for Men and Boys.
A full stock, to be sold'low. -11.
"A.11 those de'sirous'of Bargains,
will please give us a fair trial.
f E KOCH, Jr.
Mniersburg,0, Jun'eao,lSK.1 ' r J
FOR SALE 1 "
; AT
John, WBiiCBr Son's Store,
Paiut Tnlley, Ohio.
JDKY GOODSi,
GllOCERIBS?
Q TJEE2TS WARE,, ,
Boots', Shoes & Gaiters,
BZats Caps,
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
TheMillershurg I'lows & l'oints, at Millers
hnrg urice. ETcrythlng in fact munlly kept
In a flrst-cass Country Store. All of which
are to be sold low. We allow none to under,
sell us.
Thehlghest Price jiald for country Produce
JOHN SPENCER & SON.
Paint Valley, O May, 1SI2. 38tf.
FOR GOOD MATCHES,
GO'TO THE
Boole Store.
MiUersburg, Sept. 15, ISIS. 4w4
pew in
NEW STORE,
JfEVV GOODS,
NEW FIIMM",
AND
"New Prices.
S. Tidball & Son,
Are now opening one of the largest and
flner-t -stock of guols efer before slioivn in
'Hieir stock soasint i STAPLE &. FANCY"
DUV GOIS, NOTION'S,
REM-3UDB ILMKO,
JtafS eSr Caps,
Boots & Shoes,
Hardware
Queensware.
Groceries, &c,
all of which will lie sol.1 low, for CASH or
I'RODUCE. Don't lail to call and sec our
good "and prices before purchasing.
,,, i,, ..WANTED.,-
100,000 lbs. of Wool
delivered at our ftore in BLOOMFIELD, O,
lor which the highest pi ice in cash will be paid.
S. TIDBALL & SON.
CIjARES I'. Om Junefi, 18B. 43m
Flour, Feed,
-AND-
PROvtslON STORE!
o j Hc";iiir: a
J. P: IAEBIEKf
HAVISG removed ray store toonedoorwest
ofX. r. McCorrnicl's'stora, I intend to
eep a llrst-class Flour, Feed and Prorision
store.
I haTe purchased a stock of
Such as Coffee, Tea, Sugar, Syrup, Carlmn Oil,
Kentucfiy lloruiny, rca, Currants, Or
anges Lemons, Raisins Figs,
extract, SpicesStarch
Also, Marvin's-celebrated SUGAR, I.EMO
CRACKERS.
tlngdrijSnaps.
Cigars, of the lest hianuja'cture.
Tobacco, oil kinds, at wholesale
and retail.
All roods sold at Email urotU anil flolivpmi
to any part of the town. '
HIGHEST ritfCE PAID FOR
Feb. 0. 1871.-Mtf j. p. LARIMER.
R;ea d"T h. i s ll
THE0LD RELIABLE
C ARE I AGE
ir.i
SHIRESriSNYDERl& KOMS!
MILLERSBURG, O.
WOULD respectfully inform the citizens of !
Holmes- and adfoinin? eoi.ntfec - 'thAfr!
they are prepared to floalLkinds of work of the
On short notice, and at prices to suit custom
er. We we none but the very best material,
and no not hesitateto warrant ererr job that
goesouol)thefhop. " - ' T
SHIRES, SNYDER & HORNS.
Family Groceries,
rxovisioirs, Ac.
MAIX STREET.
'MiUersburg, O.
IF YOUW AST THE
SOW IK USE,
Call on THORNTON BOLINC,
XASHVII.LE,OIIIO,
Agent for the
Aultanan Sc. Taylor Machines,
- Of ManVfielVO. 'I
Mtr
J A. AW II UlUj AlUJUUj
HEDCE PLANTS!
Nursery Stool:! rruitandFlcwer-Plates!
Address F. K. PHOENIX,
Bloommgton Nursery, 111.
COO Acres
21st year! 12(reenhoues. Apple
1.0U) 1 5 r.. a: S rr.
Catalogues l0ceiut
m; sjrr.,f in; 4 y,
Sliveve Tailoi Sliop.
W. 0. FLOT,
IlAS-rnnored Eat ofIepotl-irhere-hr'Wl
make
Garments Cheap !
CUT GARMENTS OK SlioUTXOTIUK.
Every article warranted to lit and give en
tire satisfaction
Shcovo,
May 10-J8tf.
. GEORGE SCHNORR, , p
Wayne Co. Ohio.
a
THE VETERAN EXPLAINS.
Vou ast a little too miichf Cap;
I don't sec how we'JtBgree,
For the thing looks mlg"-ty different
To yon than it does to mo..
Tlitt-e Jonnies foupht us well. Cap.
I Lnowlhut 1 told 'emtSO. '
And ook their hands, when they stacked
meir arms in
Atthe front, seven years ago.
nUh.ke the hand of axWier
Who lights as he thinks is right.
And when the war it over , ,.
1 wfllingrtogire up the' light;
Cut this 'aliaV.e,OTer the bloodr chasm"
Means a ditTerentthfng, yoa know.
From f h.ikinz hands wi(M ragged wreb
At the front, seven years ago.
w
We let 'em off too easy. Cap;
In this I think voull a?ree
That ome of 'em should Irave said their
prayers
t tho Toot of the gallow? tree;
For pardoned the whblc caboodle,- '
1 he leaders n well as the, men t
And now. I ?e)they aretrjlDg a game
,To get into power agaiiu
Theyled the Democrat before the war
And ther want to dn It asrain:
Got! help the North tvithrofliees filled
With Day i and that sort or men;
Ton fa n't win the game; without the Southy
iou mow verr wen yon can't,
An mnt count the! cost! of the Southern
vote
To help you In beating Grant.
. , i. ,
I find no fault with thifrL,e Cap,
For money is asy ana free.
And plenty of odd jobs going'
For a played-out "ret" like me;
And the country seems to prosper.
The debt is fast being paid;
I don't think a change lor better
Could very well bejnade.
I kowther Ami fault with Grant, Cap,
They say he lores horse and smoke;1
But then, an angel from heareu
Wouldn't suit that s-ort of folks.
I hare loo Led at the matter careful.
And find that the trouhte grow
From the tart that thoe lobby fellows
Can't lead liim hy the nose.
I nercrlikeilHorace Greeley,
And I tell you fair and square,
God nerer made such a man as he
To till the President's chair;
For he failed in the hour of trouble.
When things looked a little dark.
And such a captain as that ain't lit
To handle the Cnlon bark.
And now it sounds mighty suspicious
To hear thee fellows rant.
Call him honet Uncle Horace
And all that Fort of cant.
Why, it ain't hard to remember
llow Greeley ued to blow.
And call them thieve and traitors,
Not a dozen years ago.
There's only one thing more, Cap,
That I hare got to sar
I won't Iielp put into office
The leaders who wore the gray;
For the grares are In between us,
Of the boys who wore the blue,
Anddiedin fighting thoe rebels,
Now rotlug along with youv
And "across the bloody chasm"
The North .will never shake o'er.
Till the crimson hands of the leaders
Arc clean on theother shore.
You may w in the light in Xorember
I hope and trut you can't
"Out the soldiers rote you'll nerer get
To help in beating Grant.
you
Loxctil Courier,
A STORY OF THE TIMES.
Or, Pay as You Go.
"Ho, Iiuni," sighed William Taylor,
as he seated himself by the stove, and
propped up his head with both hi:
hands.
He had ju?t made the Are. It was six
o'clock on a winter, morning the '1st
day ot January and his wifehad.be-
gun to get breakfast.
William Taylor was an under clerk in
the oflice of the Bagg Corporation, a
large manufacturing establishment in a
Xew England village. He had been
married about two years, hut life went
hard enough with him. Though he did
the best lie knew how to do, he could
not make both cuds of the year meet.
It is true, he hud some notions abouthis
social standing that were not exactly in
keeping with his position, and especial
ly not with his salary, which was only
three hundred dollars a year.
Dollars and cents were the most un
manageable commodities he was called
upon to handle. Tliey were slippery,
and would not stay between his lingers;
all he could do. He had not devoted
much attention to the subject of linancc
and in consequence it became one of
the many trial of his life.
"Whut is the matter, William?"
asked his wife, touched with his deep
sigh.
" This is pay-day," replied the "hus
band, with another deep sigh.
"What of' it? You look as though
you had not a friend in'the world."
" I am miserable, Ellen."
" Miserable?"
"I am indeed." -
.". W.uat, because it ls.pay-day J ..
" Yes".-'
"People, generally feel rejoiced at
such times."
" I don't know. I have been awake
half the night thinking of it."
; Why, William; why should you feel
so unhappy?"
" I owe more than I can pay"
" Yon do?"
Ellen who was no financier, any, more
than her husband, had never given the
subject a thought. She was not n' little
surprised at the abrupt announcement.
' I do Ellen ; and I am fearful that I
shall have trouble with it."
"What sort of trouble?"' asked El
len, frightened, hut having no definite
idea ol what to dread.
" Perhaps some one will sue me, trus
tee my salary, or something of that
kind."
" Why did you not tell me of this be
fore, William? I would rather live on
crust of bread and wear acalico to
church; than make you unhappy, or
have you sued or trusteed. Will they
put you in jail?" and the young wife
actually trembled at the thought of
such a catastrophe.
" I think not ; but they may put me
to a great deal of trouble."
" Why did you not tell me before?"
" I did not know It myself. Last
Tuesday I made a few figures and found
that I owed about one hundred and' fif
ty dollars. Jly quarter's salary Is only
seventy-five."
" But some of them will wait. Wc
will retrench."
"I went to Spike; but he refused to
wait beyond the lirst of January."
"Wo have been extravagant, Wil
liam." "I am afraid we have."
"How much do you owe Spiko?"
".About thirty dollars.-'
" Yes, Mich hills count up fast."
"We ought to not owe him a cent.
Wc ought to not ride at all, though I
enjoy riding very much."
"So do I, and Spike was always will
ing to trust me."
Spike kept the livery stable of the
village, and was generally willing to
run long bills with those of whom there
was any chance of getting his pay.
" I am sorry."
" 1 had no idea the bill was so tnucl)
till he sent it in about three weeks
ago."
" We must stop riding.
"It will bo hard to do so. After I
get done at the oflice, it is so pleasant
to drive half-a-dozen miles; but I didn't
think had ridden so much."
"Perhaps he'll wait."
"2Jo; he said he would not."
to
"What shall be done?"
"I don't know'."'
" Can't you borrow some money?"
"Perhaps I can."
" W'on't Mr. ilason lend you some
He has been very kind to you, and seems
to be very much interested in you
" t shduldri't like to ask him."
''Whjrnot?"
"I should have to expose my affairs
to him.
I'll tell you what I'll do."
"What?"
" I' win write to Aunt Hannah. You
know how fond she, is of me. I will
ask, her to. lend me a hundred dollars,
She is rich, and perhaps she'll give It to
me."
William did not like to have her do
so, bufthe perils fn his path finally in
duced him to consent. On the strengtli
of the letter he colild put Spike off
week or, two.
There was something to hope for, at
least, and Willian ate his breakfast and
felt much 'easier. 'He did not consider
that borrowlnghe money tdpay-adebt
was only transferring not cancelling It
But he looked only to escape his im
portunate creditors this time,he did not
fear for the future.
It was a quarter of eight by the
clock, and he was required to be in the
otllce.as soon as tho porters opened the
gate, v
Ir. Mason was the agent of the Bagg
Corporation, and a man of large.heart
and excellent feelings. He was a little
eccentric in some of his ways. He had
views and opinions of his own think'
ing; and perhaps that was what made,
him seem so odd to some people.
He had found William Taylor in a
store tying dp bundles for twenty dol
lars'.! month. He' had taken a fancy to
him, .ami knowing him to be a prompt
and correct accountant', industrious and
attentive to business, and of excellent
character, he had given him his pres
ent situation. AVilliam had been mar
ried over a year then, and was the fa-
ther' of a little boy.
Three hundred dollars a year looked
like great wages to William. So he
took a better house, put a few articles of
neat furniture into it;- opened accounts
with the butcher, and grocer, the baker,
and the keeper of the livery stable,
On his present salary, he made up his
mind that he could live handsomely;
and once or twice a week he took Ellen
ride, ne was entirely devoted to her,
and she enjoyed riding so much that it
never occurred to him to count the cost.
Mr. Mason, a careful man, did count
the cost, and, made up his mind that
William was a.little too fast. His sus
picions were confirmed by the livery
stable keeper, who came one day to en
quire if the corporation owed William
anything. Others had asked the same
question. They did not say much, but
enough for Mr. Mason to understand
that his protege was In debt.
Only a few of the employees on the
corporation were paid quarterly. On
the first day.of .lanuary, as Mr.. Mason
went to the, .factory just :fore eight
'clock, he saw the deputy Sheriff
standing at the gate. He was waiting
there, probably, so that' he could rush
in and Serve his writ upon the corpora
tion, before the employees were paid.
Mr. Mason thoughtof William when
he saw the sheriff. So he went into the
oflice, opened the safe, took out some
money, and with the pay-roll under his
arm left the place.
Just as our hero was putting on his
hat to go out, Mr. Mason entered his
little parlor.
"Here William, are aeventy-five dol
lars, your quarter's salary. Write your
name on the pay-roll," said Mr. "Ma
son.
"Yes, sir; but "
".Never, mind; sign your name."
"What does this mean, sir? I hope
"Xothing of the sort. There, that
ill do. Pleasant morning, Mrs. Tay
lor."
"Beautiful, sir."
Mr. Mason took the pay-roll under
bis arm again and departed.
William was astonished, and so was
his wife. It looked mysterious. Why
Mr. Mason do it? They- could not
it
to
up
to
of
imagine.-
On his way .over, AVilliam paid the
butcher, the baker and grocer, and had
twenty dollars left, which would just
pay the doctor's bill. As the clock
truck eight the porter opened the gate.
and he took his place at the desk: Mr.
Mason sat by the stove, reading the
Boston paper.
The first person that entered the pub
side, of the counting-room was the
deputy sheriff. The head clerk had just
taken out the pay-roll, and prepared to
pay off tne employees.
The sheriff read the writ.
" Who ?" asked Mr. Kason .
" Spike rerstu ,Bagg Corporation all
money due to Wm.;Taylor," replied the
heriil.
"We don't owe Taylor anything,"
replied the agent, turning to his paper
alu.
"Don't you ?"
" Show me the pay-roll."
The head clerk turned to the roll, and
his surprise found William's signa
ture there.
"Very well;" nodded the sheriff, "I
thought I1 was soon enough."
Of course Spike -was mad when the
sheriff reported to him. He was con
fident that, the business had not been
conducted luJ 'the usual maimer at the
oflice; so ho decided to see Mason nt
once.
That, gentleman received .him very
kindly, and took him into his private
oflice.
" You have been playing some game
upon me," said Mr. Spike, a little ex
cited. "We don't play games," replied the
agent, with dignity.
" Did you not pay Taylor before the
usual time, so as to help him cheat me
out of my bill?"
" No, sir."
" Hut he' was paid off before the of
fice was opened."
" He was."
"Well; what did you deny it for just
now?" ''
" I did not."
"Yes you did."
"Be civil, Mr. Spike, or I' shall have
nothing to say to you. I say we did not
pay Mr. Taylor before' the'tlmc, to help
lilm to cheat you."
'" I've got a bill against him."
" That Is your lookout."
"And tho law allows me to collect it."
And I don't object."
' He won't pay me. He's a scoun
drel and a swindler."
" There we differ. He is a young
man of. excellent character. If there
any, swindling about It, you have swin
died him."
"I never got a dollar out of him
"You will; he is honest, and will pay
you."
"I doubt it, If he has you to keep him
out of difliculty."
"I shallndeavor to keep him out
trouble."
"You shall."
" How much does he owe you ?"
"Thirty dollars."
"And you trusted for fifty?"
"Sixty."
" Very well. Taylor is honest. He
means to pay all his debts. Now is It
right to lock up nearly all his salary for
weeks, perhaps months,"
"But he don't mean to pay."
"Has he told you so."
" NOj'but he asked me to wait, which
is the same thing."
" Which only proves his honesty
If he intended to swindle you, he
would not have gone-to see you about
it. This debt and credit business is all
wrong, Mr. Spike; and if I had the
making of "the laws, I would not allow
a debt to be collected by a legal pro
cess, unless an intention to tleirauu
could be shown, or fairly supposed."
"numph! You would let us be cheat
ed out of our property."
" I would let you cheat yourself out
of your property if you choose to do
so. Look at it; here is a young man
on a salary of three hundred dollars a
year. Iou let him horses; you trust
him along for two or three months, and
thus encourage him to spend his inon
cy upon what he cannot afford, and
which, if he had to pay for it on the
spot, he would not have. Biding is a
useless luxury. You have led this young
man along till.be has run up a bill of
thirty dollars one tenth of his s;dary
for a year. 2Jbw, do you suppose if you
had made him pay for his horse when
he had him, he would or could, have
ridden n quarter part of what he has ?"
"I suppose not; but that is his look
out.?'
And yours to get your pay. Now,
f he had paid your bill to-day, he could
not have paid his butcher or his baker,
probably, and they would refuse to
trust him, and then perhaps his family
might sutler."
"No business to have a family."
"Nay, I commend him for that; and
he can support them decently, if any
one would teach him the valueof money,
A, B and C trust him, and he lives be
yond his means."
" That is his look out, and not mine."
" It there were no laws by which you
could collect this debt, Taylor would
have been better off to-day. The cred
system, properly restrained, is well
enough ; but I do not like to see a young
man placed in your power, perhaps
hampered for life because you desire to
do a large business which induces yon
run up long bills."
" numpt"
" Mr. Spike, give me your receipt for
this bill, and I will pay it."
"And the costs?"
" No; only the face of the bill."
"But I shall have to pay the Sher
"
" Very well, you may pay him. Tay
lor shall not."
Spike thought, and concluded to ac
cept Mr. Mason's proposition.
John Randolph said that "pay as
you go, is the philosopher's stone, Mr.
Spike: When Taylor rides any more
make him pay on the spot."
shall," and Spike leltnot very well
satisfied. But William did not ride any
more, and a few days after, Mr. Mason
ery kindly pointed out to him the phil
osopher's stone. The young man owned
all Mr. Mason had suspected. A few
days after, a letter came from Aunt
Hannah. The old lady was very sorry
the young folks had got into trouble,
as glad they called upon her, enclosed
check for five hundred dollars for them
commence anew, and entreated them
not to get trusted for anything.
They followed all this good advice,
and William and Helen are now models
thrift.
A Flock of Sheep Capture a
Store.
Thirty or forty sheep were being
driven down Walnut street yesterday
noon, when a leader, a sagacious look
ing old ram saw his reflection in one of
the large plate-glass windows ofMilo
Dodd & Co's. Safe store. Without
instant's hesitation the old fellow-
lowered his head and started for the
glass full tilt. Just as he reached it he
gave a tremendous jump, evidently ex
pecting to meet with allvely resistance.
His expectations were dashed, as was
the glass, it being smashed to atoms,
while the ram started on a run to the
back part of the store. The drove see
ing their leader disappearing, Imme
diately followed in his wake, and the
entire number jumped through the win
dow, and very nearly knocked down
and trampled upon two or three em
ployes. Amazed at the sudden and
startling attack they fled from the store,
leaving the drove in full possession.
Several of the sheep were badly cut by
broken glass, and bled over the floor;
bile the blood, the broken glass from
the window, and an overturned and
qroken show-case, gave the appearance
of being a total wreck. It was nearly
an hour before the sheep could be driv
en out and order restored. The drove
belonged to Mr. Mullhall.
ui
in
Addition and Subtraction.
This game will be lound very inter
esting to croquet players, and even to
those who don't play croquet. Eight
ickct-s are placed in a line, about one
Inch apart, and a post driven Into the
round In front ot the two middle wick
ets; from this post a convenient dis
tance is measured off, and a ball placed
n a straight direction from It, as seen
below: '
S3
&
....... g
o
S3
S3
P
The player is allowed four strikes.
If hi ball hits the stick, he wins ten;
if it Koes through the first wicket on
cither side of tho post, he wins " eight ;
If tho second, six; If tho third, four; If
the fourth, two. If he falls to get
through any of them, ho subtracts five
i what he has already won.
An Enoch Arden of Lucas
County, Ohio.
A lady recently died in Lucas county,
Ohio, says the Toledo Blade, whose hus
band, having started to Philadelphia
with aU the money he could raise, some
eighteen years ago, did not return, was
not heard from, and was finally suppos-
ed to he dead. She, however, was slow
to believe this, and not until nine years
were passed could she be induced, after
much urging on the part of family and
friends, to marry a wealthy gentleman
of the neighborhood. Several years
went by, when one night her eldest son
(the only child by her first husband)
came in and reported having seen a
strange man near the house, It was ru-
moretl, too, in the neighborhood that a
stranger had been inquiring about the
lady in question, whom he spoke of bv
her former name. The husband and
wife heard of these rumors, which had
been associated with the lost husband's
name; she was troubled, but her bus-
baud treated. the juattexlightly. Three
years now passed, when the wife siul-
denly received a dispatch from New-
castle, Pennsylvania, urging her to
come there at once if she would see her
rightful husband alive. She went, in
company with the second husband, and
next day, ministered to by her, the first
husband died in her arms. He explain
ed how, on reaching Philadelphia so
long ago, and losing everything in the
speculation for which he visited that
city, he had embarked in a AA'est India
adventure, previously writing a letter,
which she did not receive, to Ids wife.
The voyage was disastrous, the vessel
was wrecked, and he only escaped with
his life. Then determining not to re
turn home until he had retrieved his for
tune, lie went as a common sailor to
T7r,lon.T. . -I1...M .1
", ".-- - A,...,a.m SU aS
tosseuaoout in tne iour quarters of the
6,1,uvj wiatii no nun scuurcuu, ruasuu.iuie
,u.0-u.H-uaLurtM.
ed home, where, on .nquiry, he learned
of liis wife's long waiting and subse-
quent happy marriage. He now imi-
tated Enoch Arden, going by night to
take one last glimpse at his long-lost
wiie, wnen lie startlctl the boy, his own
son, as mentioned above. Afterthis he
departed, and only betrayed himselt on
ins ucatn l;u. sy ins will his property
was Ulviuecl among his wife's children,
l
Greeley's Letter of Acceptance
—Revised Edition.
We call especial attention of the Gree
ley-Brown Committee on "Addresses
to the People" to the following revised
letter of Father Greeley. AVe trust they
will not fall to sandwich it among their
pabulum which they propose to tlirow
out to the people who are thirsting their
knowledge :
I -
NEW YORK, July 20.
"Gextlemek of the Democratic
Coxvextiox: It is the happiest mo-
moment of my life when I am informed
of my nomination to the Presidency by
sucn a lot ot thieves and black-legs as
you arc. As l nave frequently re-
... 1 1 1 , , , I
uiurjveu, yuii iiam ciiuot-uouse3 aim
wnere tney are pretty thm you are pret-
ty thick. You are propagated in sinks
ot iniquity, and begotten m festering
rum noles ; tliererore your approbation
thnlls my bosom with pride. I loathe
your contaminating presence, as I said
beforc. You rill the jails, and P.epub-
licans support tiicm, as I remarked in
the Tribune of last September. As I
said on January 7, 'C9, 'every one who
choose to live by pugilism, or gambling,
with nearly every keeper of a tippling
house, is politically a Democrat. A
purely selfish interest attaches the lewd,
ruffianly criminal and dangerous class-
es to the Democratic party, by the in-
tinct of self-preservation. Therefore
my heart throbs witli delight at this
manifestation of of Here his pen fal-
tcred with emotion. Recovering him-
self, he proceeded: You have not elect-
ed me to anything very often. Laugh-
ter. It seems to me a good deal like
going home. Because as I recently said
UieT6-w,poiiit where you please to
an election district which you will pro
nounce morally rotteii given up in a
great pare to ueoauclicry ami vice
hose voters subsist mainly by keeping
policy oiiiccs, gambling houses grog
shops,and darker dens of infamy and
that district will befoundgivingalarge
majority for which it styles it self the
A.emocrauC party. - mere you see
yourselves, ooys, as in a glass, 'llns is
uu-t-u-tnuDu-muiuuik a nuiie jib-
publicans will not doubt my sincerity
nncn a cast, iiiy seii into me cmoraces
sucn :t set oi jau uirus as you are.
!Noir then, all together move forward
t.injL-snj lurruiurm.
,, t e i
x uuns uuMiuiiiiHuousiv.uut ucvoieu-
j
it
hu,
is
az
it
"HORACE GREELEY."
Singular Accident—An Old
Blast Explodes after Twenty
Blast Explodes after Twenty-Two Years' Neglect.
The Lexington, Ky., Press savs: The
dreadful accident of a few days' since,
hich may result In the death of two
unfortunate men, call to mind an oc-
currence of a similar character which
took place some years ago, on the Lex-
ington and Harrodsburgpike. Itseems
that to construct the winding road down
the hill near the Kentucky llivcr, blast-
ing was necessary to assist in the re-
nioval of the rock. On one occasion the
blast failed to explode. The workmen
raided it for some time, and, as it was
finally determined to widen the road at
that place after it should be completed
its length , the old blast was altogeth-
neglected.
After a lapse of twenty-one J cars the
long delayed Improvement was com-
menced. The old blast was forgotten;
orkmen set to work to drill new holes
near where the old one had been made,
Three men were thus engaged one day,
hen suddenly the rocks were torn
asunder. One Gonnlcy, standing on a
loose rock, was thrown fifty feet into
the air, and was saved from death only
falling upon an elevated bank. Ihe
other two were blown down the hill-
side. None were killed, but all were
badly woundcil, Gonnlcy losing an eye.
The explosion of neglected blasts is
by no means uncommon, and some
method ought to Iks adopted to render I
tho power In such cases non-explosive,
and thus protect human life from such
terrible risks. It would seem to us that
some chemical preparation might be in-
ented to answer the purpose we have
mentioned.
Nathan house on uth Avenue In New
York, having stood vacant since the
murder, is now offered for sale at $'-30,-
000.
ws
In
It
in
he
Ion,
to
I Holmes Co. Eepnlilican,
! Dedicated to the interests of the Republican
Ii any, iu ijoiinc uinnij, ana to jocai ana gen
eral news.
WHITE & CUNNINGHAM.
EDIT0K3 AND PROPRIETORS.
I OFFICE Commercial Block, over Mulvane'a
iiry uoous auire.
MILLERSBURG.'OUIO.
Terms of. Subscription :
I One year (in advance)
Six months
I.OO
'HSuip'
TheRrprBLlCAXJrth TrltiIn(.nffira is one
I of the best furnished country offices in tho
State. '
A SAD STORY.
A Sick Mother Loses her Child
Overboard—Conductor Refuses
to stop the Train.
The Fort' Scott, Kansas, Monitor, re-
lates the following sad story of an ac-
cident on the Missouri, Kansas & lcxas
Bailroad last week: "A train bound
for Texas had on board a large number
travelers and emigrants, among them a
la(lj" with a little boy aged seven' years,
who had the ague. AVhen abont Sixty
miles below the State line the Utile boy,
who had been walking about the car
during the evening, fell off. This was
not known by mother until the train
n-1'1 Sone 'wo milesnd the lady sought
lle conductor and asked him to back
the train, which he refused to do. The
IaJy "'"1 asked him to stop the train
an" lct ner on- which lie also reiuseu to
(l0 an(1 !n sPite of ''cr tears and' en-
treaties, carried her down to the next
station, where she was compelled, to
staJV91"Sr night "'L-WaiirJu.tne.ralfe-
tram the next morning. On return the
by was found, ne had crawled np
tlie embankment among the grass, and
resting his head among the wild flowers,
and,drenched with the terrible thunder
storm ot i-riuay nigut, ne was ueau."
Josh Billings on Marriage.
Sum marry for love, without a cent
in their pocket nor a drop of pedigree.
This looks desperate, but it iz the
strength of Jthe game. Sum marry be
cause they think wimmin willbescarce
next year, and live tew wonder how
the crop holds out. Sum marry tew
get rid of themselves, and discover that
the game was one that two could play
at, and neither ov them win. Sum
mnrpr flirt cnnnml limo ton frAr. VFn.
" " " O
an(J finJ it a tabling gamethe more
tiey pHt (tm.n :he ,css tUcytakeup.
c., i.
oil hi iAianj iu in; '"J.'l'j y anu iiut Jiiiu-
j jt j, wou(,ers wherc aUthe
ilappiness goes tew when it dies. Sum
marrv thev can't tell whr,andUveUiey
can't tell how. Almost everybody gits
inarricd, and it iz agoodjoKc. Sum
marry in haste, and then set down and
think it carefuny over. Sum think It
carcfullv over fust, and then set down
ami lnarry. Both ways are right if
thcy hit the mark. Some marry co-
quetts. This is like buying a poor farm,
heavily mortgaged, and working the
balance ov yure days to clear oph the
mortgages. But, after all, married life
iz full as certain as the dry goods busi
ness. Kno man kan swear exactly whar
ho wiu fetch "P when he touches call-
- T- i . 1 , .... 1. . . ,
co, Alio man kan tell list what calico
has made up its mind to do next. Cali
co don't know herself. Dry goods ov
all kinds iz the child ov circumstansls.
The man who stands on the bank shiv
ering, and dusseut, iz more apt to ketch
cold than him who pitches his head fust
into the river. If ennybody asks you
whi you got married (if it needs be),
tel1 Ilim you don't recollekt.
Billings' Wit and Wisdom.
HOARSE SHOT.
yu see a wus
travels on the iumn. yu ken bet he is
looking for a job.
The bulk o v mankiuk are mere imita-
tors of every poor originals.
It iz a grate deal eazier tew be a phi-
losopher after a man haz had a warm
meal then it izwhenhedon'tknowhare
he iz going tew git one.
Most men lament their condishun in
life, but there are- but phew, after all,
wi10 are superior to it.
To never despair may be God-like,but
ain't human.
Aflektashun looks well in a monkey,
Tricing tewjdefine love is like trleinz
tew tell how vu kum tew brake thru
the ice; all yu kno about it iz, yu fell
ana "Ot ducked.
The principal importans ova mystery
the mystery itself. AVhat makes a
ghost so respektable a karaktcr iz that
nobody ever saw one.
The pedigree that we receive from our
ancestors iz like the money we receive
from them ; we are not expekted tew
live on the principle, but on the accu-
mulashun, and transmit the principle
unimpaired,
A weak man wants az much watching
a bad one.
It iz hard work tew define human
happiness; the real possessor ov it iz
the very one who kant define it.
Wealth is on -ruard airainst vlllanr
hare iz az mutch ininnlM- -inii.n th
r!cu az aralll, ,he poor, ackonling tew
their numbers.
;.,.,,..,.. .,.,:.. i.
mncIl nor a 1Il0ol so i;ttiP.as ,vhpn
alone
Avarice iz az hungry az the jrrave.
There iz a great deal ov virtewin this
world that Iz like jewelry, more for or
nament than use.
I am satisfied that courage in men iz
more often the eflekt to konstitushun
an ov principle.
Auout tne best thing that cxpcrienco
kan teach us iz tew bear mlsfotins and
sorrows with kompozure.
Man's neeessitys are phew, but hiz
hva"t are endless.
There arc menny people who not only
believe that this world revolves on its
axis, but they believe that they are the
axis.
Selt-made men are most alwus apt to
a lectle too proud ov the job.
1 think thar iz az menny old phools
this world az there is young onesyind
tharc iz tin-? difference between them:
the young ones may outgrow their phol-
but the old ones never do.
I he ambishun ov ! men out ov 10, if
should receive no check, would end
thclrdcstrukshun.
A genuine aphorism iz truth done up
a small package.
A vi.-hin old man Iz a terrible sight,
displsed on earth and hated in heaven.
The avarishus man iz like the grave;
takes all that he can lay his hands
and gives nothing back.
Uashfulncss iz either the click ov Ig-
noranco or modesty if it Iz Ignorance,
cdukashun changes It into impertinenco
if it iz modesty, It will kllng tew a
man az long az he haz one single virtew
licit.
Marrying for buty is a poor spekula-
shun, for enny man who sees yure wife
haz got just about az much In her az
you ha v,
The fish In Oneida Lake. N. Y.. are
dying by thousands from the bite of a
little white bug which attacks thera
under the scales.
ladles in Paris are purchas
ing all manner of pretty things in which
shine resplendent next winter on
Broadway and Fifth Avenue.

xml | txt