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Holmes County Republican. (Millersburg, Holmes Co., O. [Ohio]) 1870-1895, December 26, 1872, Image 2

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Holmes County Republican.
IT. G.mite, T. B, Cnnnlnglin,
ZSIT0S3 ASK PROPRIETORS.
Mixleksbubg, O., : : Dec. 2C, 1872
IN TROUBLE.
Jay Gonld finds himself in trouule
over the suits brought against him
by the Erie Railroad, and counsel
have agreed to withdraw them on
his terms, viz., the payment of nine
million of dollars to the company.
This is perhaps better for all "parties
but it is particularly gratifying to
krnw that Gould has been compell
ed to disgorge his ill-gotten gains.
HUNTING UP THE FOOLS.
The hunting up of foolp who read
no newspapers, and who knownotn
ing, and who, if they do read have
no impression made on their-minds,
is going on in New York city in
jnaking up anotherjury to try. Stokes
for killing Pisk. At last accounts
the requisite number had not been
chased down by the Sheriff. It
would save time and money to
clfa'nge the' venue of that case to an
Idiot Asylum.
ELECTION DAYS AS LEGAL HOLIDAYS.
. i DAYS.
The Legislature-iof India'na'has
before it a bill making all general
election days legal holidays. The
State of New York some time ago
enacted a similar law, which at the
last election was found 'to be produc
tivc of excellent results, the better
class of votexj appearing in much
greater numerical force at the polls
thacihadijfaefbre been customary,
One tf tire dangers to which our in
stitutions'are exposed is absentee
ism from f he polls. Experience has
demonstrated that the observance
of election days as holidays tends
to fring out a much fuller vote
the thrifty, intelligent jind orderly
class of our citizens. The subject
would seem worthy the considers
tion of the Legislature of our own
Commonwealth.
IMPROVED POSTAL CARD.
It is said that the Berlin postofllce
is abont to introduce an improve
merit upon the original postal card
system. Acard is to be provided,
on which a message may be sent and
a reply retained at once. The orig
inal sender,;by paying the trifling
postage' both ways, may thus secure
an answer at once, the person ad
dressed only having p write a line
or so on the card when he receives
it, and return it to tte postman.
This is a great convenience worth
considering in the issue of postal
cards in this country. By the way,
now that congress is in session, wc
ought tohave the cards vcry'soon,
Last session that learned bodyras
guilty of the stupidity of.author
izing'their issue without-providing
for the expense.
LITTLE SAMMY COX.
attempts' sammy
Cox to manufacture public opinion
against the President in regard
the Louisiana trouble, are charac
teristic of that pin-feathered stale
man. He brought forward in the
House a pornpous preamble nd res
olution setting forth "That where
as the State government of Louis
iana was conducted under orders is;
sued from the- Federal courts, sup
ported by Federal bayonets," the
President be requested to commu
nicate why he had interfered.
It need hardly be explained that
he "orders" of the United State
Court were simply its deliberate
judgment in a formal suit, regularly
brought before it, and against which
appeal may be legally taken, and
that the President's "interference"
consisted in his simply directing the
United States troops to aid the Uni
ted States Court if called upon",
executing its judgment. It is diffi
cult for any oneexcepta microscop
ic Democrat, like Sunset, to see how
the President could have well done
more or less than he did in the'mat1
ter. Sammy had adroitly calcula
ted that his resolution would be
mean and offensive that it would
defeated at sight, where there would
De a- cuance to raise tue old war
cries of the Democracy, about ".Bay
onet rule;" "Investigation smother
ed;" "Caesarism rampant;" etc. etc.
The action of the House was sensi
ble and manly. It brushed away
Sammy's little resolution, and then.
passed another. calling for informa
tion in regard, to.the state of affairs
in Louisiana and the part' taken by
the President Sammy blushed and
subsided, as usual,
CREDIT MOBILIER.
The developments made by the
Credit Mobilier Investigation, Com
mitlee so far would appeal-to indi
cate that while members of Con
gress were in some cases stockhold
ers in
1 E venture, no t criminality
attach
noatolhem through such con
necuon. vnat uie .mture- may
make known no one can guess, but
present indications all point to
clear vindication of those charged
with accepting bribes to control
their votes in Congress. We hope
and believe that such will "turn out
to bo the case,
BOUTWELL AND THE SENATE.
Hopes have been enlertained in
many quarters that Mr. Boutwell
would -forego his aspirati jns for the
United States Senate and consent to
remain at the head of the nationa
finances. But the hopes, it appears,
are not to be realized, as it is au
thoritatively announced that Mr.
Boutwell fully intends to be a cand
idate for the Senate; and, ' further
more, that in no event will he re
gain in the Cabinet longer than the
close of Gen. Grant's .present term.
His chances for Senate Wilson's
place-are thought to. be rather'more
than good.
. , , ,
Congress' adjourned on the 20th
till after the holidays.
THE VICE PRESIDENT.
The question is pertinently put
whether the iYicc .President of the
United States can resign and go in
to other business at his will. Ta
ken in connection with the recent
action of some, of the States which
voted for Mr. Greeley, the query is
one of importance. The Vice Pres
ident is elected for four years. He
was ready to accept the situation
provided the-people endoreed-him,-
and was anxious to occupy the chair
as presiding officer of the Senate.
This is an honor, of course, but
rather empty in its nature after all,
unless through the providence of
God the President should be remov
ed, as in the cases of Harrison, Tay
lor and Lincoln, when the Vice
President would become the Exe
cutive officer of the nation.
Ever since the death b'f Mr.
Greeley there have been rumors that
Mr. Colfax- would assume the edi
torial chair of the" Tribune, and re
sign his office. as' Vice President
This.mav. or- "may not be-true, and
just here the question arises, wheth
er a person elected Vice President
can, at his will, resign without de
trimenfrto the majority which elect
ed him. "He 'is chosen, for, four
yearsTand. forthat length ot, time
suouiu De .ab-iniB post, u-uicjieiisw
Chamber,, in accordance with his of
ficial oath, to discharge' the duties'
pertaining to his 'office. In case of
the death of the President he must
take the position vacated.
He is to stand in readiness, for
higher functions, should disease or
violence remove his chief: and ex
perience has taught us that neither
of these dangers is wholly fanciful
The succession to the Presidential
office is perhaps sufficiently secured.
as the Constitution has arranged it
but the defection of the officer who
stands next in the line of promo
tion would introduce too many
risks. It was never contemplated.
and down to this day it has not
been discussed, that so great an of
fice could be resigned by a man
whom the people had so honored
while he was in possession of health
and strength to fulfill his duties,
If the Vice President of the Uni
ted btatcs is allowed to throw up
his trust, for any consideration of
private business, what seal of sanct
ity remains unbroken ,in this land?
To reach' a climax, it only needs
that a President should notify Con
gross that his private interests re
quire him, to resign, and go jnto.a
more lucrative business. The charg
cs so readily made against us by
foreigners, that money takes prece
dence of everything among us,
would receive an all but crowning
proof of its truth, if .Mr. Colfax en
ters the Tribune office before his
term is completed. Of his possible
value to the Tribune we say not a
word; with the interests of the Uni
ted States on one side and those of
any establishment of business on
the other, we cannot hesitate for a
moment. Pittsburgh Dispatch,
TWEED'S TRIAL.
in
The Tweed trial drags its slow,
tortuous, disgraceful length along.
The counsel for the defense, know
ing the direct and positive case
against the prisoner, have deliber
ately settled down to the work of
tiring out the patience of the court
witnesses and all, parties concerned,
Having failed in their motion to
quash the indictment, and being
promptly met in the subsequent dil
atory motions which they made,
they waited until the great chief was
called upon to plead, and then sol
emnly demanded that the indict
ment be read. This is a document
of" 1,050 legal cap pages, but' the
court, under the circumstances, had
no right to' refuse so the reading be
gan and 'will, of course, last several
days. By the time that is finished
the Boss and his lawyers will un
doubtedly have some other legal
crotchet'ready upon which "another
delay can be improvised. All things
must end; however, and it, is confi
dently hoped that by the first of
February, Tweed will know wheth
er ue is a ttnet or not in carrying
the license of pettifoggery so far,
Tweed's lawyers are showing how
far the powers of law'may be made
to shield a criminal, and are giv.
ing various valuable" hints' as to how
those forms of law ought to be re
formed.
RIGHTS OF POSTMASTERS.
a
' Letters sent through. the postofllce
are not,tO;be opened by postmasters
or their employees on any account,
even although the communications
sent are in violation of law. This
is the opinion of the Attorney Gen
eral of the United States and until
reversed jy a, competent court is
law to the department Although
it may give some facilities to swind
ters,. venders of obscene literature,
the decision is a proper one. Any
other would leave the door open to
abuses of what should be regarded
as a sacred trust the sanctity of
private correspondence whilepassing
through the mails. Once give an
evil-inclined or prying officer a dis
cretion as to open letters believed
to be unlawful communications, and
he soon lapse into the habit of sus
pecting letters he may have some
other motive 4pr looking into. Ab
solute .sanctity for all letters is the
only safeguard. As to the swind
lers and venders of obscene litera
ture who sometimes take advantage
of post office facilities to aid them
m tneir nefarious worK, tucre are
other methods of dealing with them,
in the regular course of postal pro
ceedings and by due course of law.
All good postmasters and nostal
employees will be glad to hear of
this decision, and on all others
the restraint will be salutary.
Mile Spitzeder. the bankrupt
bankeress, of Munich, owes only
$5,000,000.
King Oscar, of Sweden, is"
the
tallest monarch in the world.
MARINE DISASTERS.
From Liverpool comes the intelli
gence that lour hundred and niiy
persons have perished by marine
disasters within the past ten days.
This is a fearful loss of life, not
confined to one ship, but to many
vessels wrecked or foundered off the
cost of England. The storms on
the other side of the Atlantic have
been more severe than usual this
winter.anddispatehes tell us of inaiP
dations caused by the high winds,
which have done much damage,
Nottingham, Leicestershire.and Der
by have all suffered by the "rising
of the waters," Landslides have in
terfered with communication with
Dover, and Petersborough, in Not
tingham county, is overflowed,
many of the inhabitants having
to fly to the upper stories of their
dwellings 'to escape drowning.
While we have had fire to plague,
with a scarcity of water, water
seems to be theespecial evil with
our cousins across the Atlantic.
A RAID ON EGG-NOG.
Baltimore' has initiated, a .causade
against egg-nog and liquors so much
in vogue during the Holidays. A
series of meetings are in progess, at
which distinguished temperaace
men '"deliver lectnrcVon ttie evil, tide
main argument being against the
practice so generation. Christmas
and New Year's days, of ladies of
fering their visting friends brim
ming bumpers of egg-nog, or bead
ed glasses of ruby wine. The
movementisa good one. Undoubt
edly there is cause for. this direct
attack upon the enemy which steals
away the brains of men, and during
the holidays appears mostly to hold
supreme revel. The old-time prac
tice of serving callers on ladies
with wine and brandy, is rapidly
passing out of' favor, with good ef
fect Many a young man has been
ruined by it, and the matrons and
daughters of our day begin to real
ize the fact
THE POLICY IN APPOINTING POSTMASTERS.
MASTERS.
The Postmaster General has made
known to Representative Hoar the
policy the administration .had con
eluded to adopt in regard to those
postmasters who are not appointed
by the President Rules, framed
under the Civil Service, are in course
of 'preparation, to 'cover this class of
officers, but as yet are not complete
as regards detail. Meanwhile their
general spirit will be observed, as
far as possible, and appointments
and removals.' will not-hereafter be
made in these cases merely upon
recommendations of members of
Congress. There will be no remov
als solely for opposition to General
Grant during the last campaign
unless accompanied with special
bitterness. Where charges are de
manded on account of local reasons,
or apparent incapacity of occupants.
the facts in each case will be inves
tigatcd by an officer of the Depart
ment before any action is taken.
GRANTING OF LANDS.
The platforms of the National
and State Convention of Republt
cans both take strong ground
against any further grant of public
lands for railroad or other internal
improvements, affirming, and right
ly too, hat the farms of Uucle Sam
belonging, not to monopolies, but
to the brave pioneers who go in ad
vance of civilization, and prepare
the way. .Notwithstanding this em
phatic and emiently proper expres
sion or the wise policy of the party
We learn that the lobby at Wash
ington literally swarms with excit
ed individuals clamoring for gov
ernment aid in lands in support of
hundred odd railroads scattered
over the plains and through the
mountains of the west We hope
Congress will be simply just, and
dismiss every enterprise of thi:
character, and thereby sustain the
promises of the party not only, but
adhere to the wise policy which
holds the public lands open for ac
tual settlement Hands off, gentle
men,no more land grabs for the
present Hereafter lands for the
land les3 pioneers not an acre for
the lackland, monopolies.
FOR INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS
The bill to pay Ohio, Indiana
and Illinois two per cent of the re
ceipts of all public lands sold with
in their borders has passed .the
House. The explanation of the
bill is that Congress failed to ex
pend the amount for internal im
provements within those States
agreed upon in their Enabling acts,
In the case of Ohio, Congress
provided that five per cent of the
proceeds of all public land sold
should be devoted to internal im.
provemedts, three per cent to be
expended by the States, and two
percent, by the general government
to complete the national road
through the State. The road never
was completed, and most of the
money derived from land sales was
spent upon the portion of it lying
in Maryland, Virginia and Penn
sylvania. The Indiana Enabling
act provided that two per cent, of
the land sales should be expended
ty tne general government for the
construction of roads leading to the
State, and that three per cent, be
paid to the State. Illinois was
given three per cent, for the educa
tional purposes, and Congress
agreed to spend two per cent, for
roads in the State. In neither
case was the obligation of the
government fulfilled. Jn 183G the
policy was changed, and States sub
scqucntly admitted were guaranteed
me wuoie nve per cent, to ex
pend as they chose. It is charged
tuat under an act passed in 18oS),
making good to Mississippi the
value of two per cent of her public
lands. Ohio, Indiana and Illinois
are entitled to recoverjbut the law
has never been carried out The
claim of the three States amount to
a little over$1.300.000 divided near
ly equally between them.
The King of Italy, Victor Eman
uel, is sick., t
Great flood s'iu England.
FOR INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS A TERRIBLE OCCURENCE.
FOR INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS A TERRIBLE OCCURENCE. Massacre of French Colonists in Algeria.
The Court of Assizes at Constan-
tina has just tried twenty-one Arabs
of the TJelezma, chaiged -with the
massacre of twelve French, colonists
in April last Tne victims were all
employed at some extensive saw
mill situated in a rorrestaooiit ten
miles from Batan, and .belonging to
Mr Pfnndomme, who was one of
the murdered. The natives had al
ways beeaTOnftiendly tenns"wilh"
the Europeans tnere until auouc tne
month of march, when an insurrec
tion broke out in the province.
The tone of the Arabs suddenly
changed, they became first, more re
served, and then insolent,- boasting
that. France was ruined, and that
all the French would soon disap
pear from .Algeria. Some of the
tribes, however, remained. If not
friendly, at least less hostile. -Lne
revolt had become, almost general,
and on the 21st of April the. Cheik
Brahim of the Halymias informed
the little colony that they were no
longer safe in the forest and offered
to escort them to juatan.- ne .euro-
peans, consisting ol thrleen-men,
one woman named Dorlita; 'and her
four children set out the next morn
ing accompanied by -Brahim1-and
about-forty of; his men; ''They: had
but a short distance, on- theirijour-
ney, when, they jwere warned: not to
proceed further, as.tiie Arabs would
nQt'aUpir.them.to pass.,; After.some
hesitation tucy resoivedjto continue
confining in the, assurances ,of tho
Cheik that they, were under his
charge"; ,Jjut on arriving .in a. ravine
they we'reT suddenly attacked by
large body of 'the rebels. , Six" of
the pa'rty.who were in the rear, suc-
ceeded in escaping, but twelve of
the men were massacred, jume.
Dorliat owed her life to' a native
named Abdallah, at the sawmills,
who on seeing her in tears before
starting, said to her, woman, you
have nothing to fear; no harm will
be done to you or to your children
as for the men, I will answer for
them. As she continued te weep,he
added. Listen, when you see the
guns pointed-at your breast say this
prayerJUlah ! Allah ! .iUahomed ra
coul Allah'!, and you will .be saved.
He also taught the same prayer to
her children. In the .midst of the
slaughter several Arabs had leveled
their fire-arms at her to shoot her,
when she remembered Abdellah's
lesson, and throwing herself on her
knees to them, repeated the invoca
tion.' The murderers stopped, made
her say it over again, and asked,
Do you mean it? On her replyin
in'the affirmative they spared her
but stripped her entirely naked, and
took from her three of her children
she only recovered'them' thirty-two
days latter, and one of tnem died o
a sab.er wound in tue head, receiv.
ed during the fight. The woman's
husband was killed, and although
her life .was saved she was grossly
outraged by an Arab who had of
fered to conduct her to a place
safety. Thcnalives who had start,
ed with the party as an escort either
fled or joined the hostile natives
during the attack. Of the twelve
accused now about to trial, twelve
were condemned to death and three
to hard labor, "the others among
whom was the Cheik Brahim, being
acquitted.
THE LATE EDWIN FORREST AND
HERR DRIESBACH.
"How was he in relation withoth
er actors?"
"Just as he was with everybody
whom he met If they happened to
please him, well and good; if not,
it was uncomfortable for them if
they came in contact with him. To
use a slang word, he was extremely
apt to 'bully' all in the theater, from
the manager down. But he once
met his match. It.was when he
was playing at the old Broadway
Theater, near Pearl Street His
pieces were followed by an' exhibi
tion ot lions Dy tneir tamer, a cer
tain Herr Driesbach the celebrated
lion tamer now living near Wooster,
O. Forrest was one day saying that
be bad never been afraid in all his
life could not imagine the emotion
Driesbach made no remarks at the
time, but in the evening when the
curtain had fallen, invited Forrest
home with him. Forrest assented
and the two, entering a house, walk
ed a long distance throngh many
devious passages all- .dark until
finally Driesbach opening a door,
said, 'I his way.' Mr. Forrest en
tercd, and immediately heard the
door slammed and locked behind
him. He had not time to express
any surprise at this, for at the same
moment he felt something soft rub
bing against his leg, and putting
out his hand touched what felt like
a cat's back. A rasping growl sa
luted the motion, and he saw two
fiery, glaring eyeballs looking uj
at mm. 'Are you afraid,- Mr. For
rest?' asked Driesbach, invisible in
the darkness. 'Not a bit. Dries
bach said something; the growl
deepened and became, hoarser, the
back began to arch and the eyes to
shine more fiercely. Forrest held
out two or three minutes, but the
symptoms became so terrifying that
he owned up in so many words that
he was atraid. '.Now let me out you
infernal scoundrel,' he said, to the
lion-tamer, 'and I'll break every
bone in your bod3' He was im
prudent there, for Driesbach kept
him, not daring to move a finger,
with the lion rubbing against his leg
au tne time, until t orrest promised
not only immunity but a champagne
supper into tne bargain.
Advertisements from the Ould
Country.
The following have been from
time to time clipped from Irish pa
pers: "One pound reward. Lost, a
cameo brooche representing Venus
and Adonis on the Drumcondra
Road, about 10 o'clock on Tuesday
evening. - Advertisement of a wine
merchant: "The advertiser, having
made an advantageous bargain, of
fers for sale, on very low terms,
auout sixty dozen of prime port
wine, lately tue property ot a gen
tleman forty yearsof age, full in the
bod)', and with ahigb bonuet." The
two tonowing emanated from a well
known livery stable keeper: "To be
sold cheap, a mail phaeton, the prop
erty of a gentleman with a movable
head, as good as new." "To be
sold, a splendid gray horse, calcu
lated for a charger, or would carry
lauy witu a switcn tail." "Ten
shillings reward. Lost by a gentle
man,. i white terrier dog, except the
head, which is black. To bo brought
to,' etc. To these Irish advertise
ment may be added one English one,
which was the subject of a humor
ous article in the Saturday Jleview,
some lour or live years since: "To
be, sold. an.Erard grand piano, the
property ol" a lady, about to travel
in a walnut wood caso with carved
legs."
The Modoc tribe of Indians in
Oragon are giving the government
some trouble just now.
[From the Saginaw Courier.]
A BEAR STORY.
a
A good story reaches us now ot
an adventure up in Koscommon
county, a few days ago, wherein a
celebrated Saginaw land looker cuts
a prominent figure. It seems .that
the hunter of lands was out alone
in that -region, viewing the lay of
the land and the heighth of the
timber, and while plodding along he
was attracted by a small mass ot
something blaeK immediately in
Urontof himr which appeared-to be
alive. The black mass turned out
to be a young cub. Land looker
thought he would taue mm into
camp, and having'with him a water
proof overcoat, he at once unrolled
it and in a short time had overhaul
ed the cub and thrown the coat over
it Next, to' secure the little fellow,
the woodsman untied - the straps
around his boots, and proceeded to
strap up the infant bear. While
engaged in this process, the cub,not
used to the confinement ol the cra
dle, or stays, of such nonsense,
squealed, and out ot a patch of
chapparel a few feet, to the rear of
our hero, came a corresponding
squeal, only much .lower, and. more
motherly-like. , Our land-looker
took in. the situation' at a glance,
and in' another glance he. was;in the
top of a six inch basswood, which
mustihave grown there Tonhis.spe
cial. benefit From, his "eyrie"'' nor
lofty restingjriaee in-.the top of the
friendly ;basswoo'd;the land-l6oker
took a last- f on d look- t" his-'water-
proof.-asitiwas converted into .strip's
about-an lnc&nride, by the gentle
mother of- the "untam'bed cub. Nor
until she had released her offspring,
and made a complete -wreck of the
coat, and gone her way, did the
gentleman "up a tree" give vent to
anything louder than suppressed
breathing, and he didn t stop to
pick up his coat, cither, after his
descent from the tree. It is said
that good time was made by him
from the foot of. that basswood to
camp. The land-looker says that
when he firstsaw that cub he thought
it was his. Now he thinks he must
have been mistaken. He says he
never had much of a passion for
cubs no way.
CONGRESS.
In the House of Representatives,
Dec. J 6th, Mr. Monroe, on leave, in
troduced the following bill to re
peal certain stamp duties:
Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives ot the
United States of America in Con
gress assembled, That the stamp
duty' imposed upon bank checks,
drafts, or orders in schedule B of
the internal revenue lawj and the
stamp duty upon friction matches
and upon all other articles named
schedule C, of the same law, be, and
the same are hereby repealed.
Sec. '2. That this act shall take
effect upon the first day of May,
eighteen hundred and seventy-three.
Mr. Monroe also introduced the
following bill to authorize the ex
amination of ccrtaia banks:
Be it enacted by the Senate and
House ot "Representatives of the
United States of America in Con
gress assembled, That the Comp
troller of the Currency, in addition
to the powers now conferred up
on' him by law for the examination
of national banks, is hereby further
authorized, whenever he may deem
it useful, to cause examination to be
made into the condition of all
banks ill the' District- of Columbia"
organized under act of Congress,
The Comptroller, at his discretion
may report to Congress the result of
such examination, buch expense
as may necessarilybe incurred in
the execution of this act shall be
paid out of any 'appropriation made
by Congress for speciaibank-exam
inations.
A new paper is to be started in
Cincinnati shortly a 2 cent, morn
ing one, with Whitelaw Reid at its
head. He will of course run it on
the Liberal principles, and expect to
make a fortune out of Liberal sup
port it'paid him so well in the last
campaign.
The cngagememt of Miss Idia
Greeley with Mr. Hempstead, who
was lost on the Missouri, is denied
by a correspondent of the Chicago
Times. He adds that JUiss Greeley
was wholly ignorant of the engage
ment until she saw it in the newspapers.
New Advertisements.
CLEVELAND LEADER
The Leader publishes more Telegraph news,
Better Selected Miscellany, More Accurate
Market Reports than any other papor in North
ern Ohio, and is a thorough advocate ontcpub-
lican principles. It receires dispatches from
all OTCr the world, and as a family newspaper
cannot be excelled.
OUH NEW
Oliiblbiiig- Scheme.
We hare made nrranirementK withthe nuh.
Ushers of the following periodicals ondpapers
to furnish their publications on terms that will
enable us to club them with The Leader to sub
scribers who wish to tate more than one paper.
TERMS:
Weekly Leader, forone year, Jl
for six months, 75
One cony of Weekly Leader will be sen tin
connection with the
prices named:
louowiug periodicals at
Cost separately.
ITarper's Monthly, one year.
4 25 $5 23
H arper's lUus. Weekly, one yr.
Harper's Bazar, one year,
Atlantic Monthlr. one veer:''
5 25
4 35
4 25
4 25
4 25
4 25
5 25
6 25
4 25
3 25
4
5 25
5 25
S 25
5 25
Scribner's Monthly, one. year,
Appleton's Journal, one year,
Galaxy, one year, -
5 23
6 25
725
525
4 25
4 25
3 23
2 75
3 75
2 75
3 25
r.rery aaiuroay, one year.
North Amer. Kerier. an, rear.
Overland .Monthly, one year,
nome Monthly, one year.
Phrenological Journal, one year, 3 25
Our Young folks, one year, 2 75
American Agriculturist, one year, 2 25
Uural New 1 ortcr, one year, 3 00
New York Times, weekly, one yr., 2 25
New YorlcMethodl&t.nm,vPAr.. S 72
N.Y. Christian Intelligencer, with
vuiuuiv, von Year, 3 WJ
4 25
To each SUbscriher in tlt TAnfir nml f 1rla
tlan Intelligencer, will be sent the beautiful
iiruiuu, iue uieaners.'
Br ftcanninr the above, mm will sec that n
subscriber can save from one to three dollars
ov getting im supply of family reading matter
mrougn us. -ine above list comprises the
choicest magazines and papers in the country.
Attention Is called to the leaturo we have a-
oopiea oi ciuouing with a sound, flrst-class
New 1 ork weekly Republican paper.theTiines
to take the place of the now Democratized and
traitorous Tribune.
Attention is also called to our clubbing with
the Rural New Yorkpr. tlit. hpst Ac-rirnttitr-il
paper In America.
Cleveland
Daily
Leader
Publishes more Telegraphic News than any
other Cleveland pa:e r.
Price per year. JI0; for Six Months 5; for
.inreejuonins, 12 50; for One Month, si.
Cleveland Evening News !
Contains all the matter of tho Daily Morning
jnticr, nuu an additional xciegrapuic
and othernews received dnr
Ing tho day.
Itl the Cheapest Pally Paper In the West !
lerms 6 per Annum: ft forSixMouths;
II 5(1 forThrcc Months.
The Cleveland Trv-Weckly Leader,
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Terms Per vcar 13: sir Ainu I lis J2 ai. Three
Months 11 25.
The Cleveland Leader s Evening News
Have a larger circulation limn all other Eng-
usii iicreiaml Dallies i-oiublncil.
Agents wUhinir tn rot im rhih u-ill nlcase
send for saiuplo copies ot the Wttlty I'itltr.
All subscriptions can be sent byPralt or Money
Orders to the
Leader Printing Company,
CLEVELAND, OJIIO.
The town of Lincoln, R. I. claims
to have the oldest bell. It summons
the operatives of a factory to their
Jaily toil and bears an inscription,
declaring that it was made in
Amsterdam by Peter Least in 1263.
It was brought to tins .country irom
the West' Indies among'a lot of re
fuse metal.
Secretary Boutwell has not aban
doned his wish and hope to ultime
ly found the entire bonded debt of
the nation in consols bearing from,
four to five per cent interest.
DEMMLER BROTHERS,"'
No. 126 Smlthfleld Street, Pittsburg.
Manufacturers pf Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron
Cutlery. Britannia ami Block tin Ware,
Knameletl Hollow ware. Refrigerators,
Ice Chests, Water Coolers, Ice Cream
Freezers, JQinl Cages, Gas Stores,
And IIonse-Knroishing Goods
Generally.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL PROPRIETORS OT THS
Fatsni Adjustable Sto?e Mmt
The most nsefol invention of the.- Sole asrents
for SPEiB'S WOULD KENOWJT and US
RIVALED ANTHRACITE COAL UKATIXG
STOVES.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE
Tom Thomb Carbon Oil Cooking Steve!
This little Store is tho Vondtr. of the Jay,
and the only article of the kind that
will give you entire satisfaction.
. - wc- 31-
Crdcers' Coods a Specialty
MUiersDurg, uec.is-moju- - ys
X Jli w- ,, I 'If
Grocery k Provision Store.
A. HERSHj (
Successor to Charles .Warner.
TTAVING purchased the Provision Store of
I I Charles Warner, is now prepared to rur
nish all who may favor him with tneir patron
age, -with everything in nis line oi irauc, sucn
Coffee, Tea, Sugar, Syrups,
Oranges, Xemons, Jiaisins.
Caiinfd-FrxdtSj Ffy&.ZZl
PicMes, Candies, Nuts,
Crackers, of all kinds.
Oat lTeal, CrackedrWheai,
Lamps and Chimneys,
Tubular Lanterns,
Arqand'Hurners,. rV,
Powder y Lead-A Shot,
All of which will be sold at the
FOR CASH.
f&CGlve him a call 'when you want any-
wing in u uuc.
A. HERSH.
Millersburg, 0 Oct. 17, 187. 9tf
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F U It IT ITU RE .
LEMON & WEISE
The old and well known firm of Lemon and
v, eiso omtts bursa, ra., manufacturers pi-
CaWnet Fnrniture k M
Hare Removed to
No. Ill Fourth Avenue,
Opposite their OIil Stand,- ' t!
Where they continue the business in all its
orancnes. Lima
FUENITURE!
S. CLOSE,
FJtOPBIETOIl OF TIIE
rTUIE subscriber is prepared to fill orders of
i an Kinas in ms line, wun.nroniDtness and
uiiaicu. nc fcci'iis contiaaiij on nana
iLL KINDS OF FDRMT1IRB
From the cheapen nualitv to thefinpnt.ft.lt
tie cheaper than the same article can be tiro.
Bed-Room Furniture
Kept constantly on .hand.
e-ItEl'AIRIXG Xeatly Done on short
nonce..
Special attention given to the business of
UNDERTAKING I
Metallic, Excelsior and Walnut Coffins kaot
constantly on hand. Collins manufactured to
omcr. xtvo gooa iicarscs kept constantly In
20LT
S3. OIiOBB.
CHBOMOS
.Asio lit ns:ini?," :ocd iMsjiwa."'
fXOWERS." "SUMMER FXOWKR3.-1
kTo f UiwaChromm mn Uif U f "Wliki
wmnui waller.
AGENTS,
can taftka betUr Urns a
i WHO UUU VIUUj J
Opposite the Post Office,
v ' SAVE FOR THE
New Layer Raisins atf-
20ats.operEb: Seed
less Raisins at 17 cts.
per;llbTNeyTiiEigs32g
cts. lb., New Dates
12 etsillK'J K!ellyWXs-
laM-Gre
r0;ifince
cts. per lb.', ineVanft
CommoflCandy'GraTi
1 w s
Denies
liindsyaRrunesl3Kts.J
perlpoMfl Sugar'
Santfflardatice,
Suites
rvauisu, v mega.rjricK.-
les by' the barreCat
supy 'Debated Co
coanut, Marvin's
Snaps, Lemon and
Soda'Gra'ckersVCintfa-
mon, Nutmegs, Gin
ger, peppei, spice and
cloves ''C o'l'e" fran i
genuine mustard try
it, .sagpj tapioca oat
meal, cracked wheat,
pearled barley, H. &
M. Ousters5, 'i'1''' 1
A nice Warm Meal
or Lunch at all hours.
4
17tf
IhqtograpliSj
Photographs,
rr
v'Pfi6ttgrapls,
Albums.
Albums,
Album,
CHROMOS,
CHROMOS,. ;
CHROMOS,
STEREdSCOPES, "
STEREOSCOFIClYIEWS
STEREOSCOPES,
Picture Frames,
. Rehire! i'Eraraes5,
j Picture Frames,
. - iF.O.R,SALE- BY
Courtney & Applet on
At,t(ie Bluelfront Gallery,
ntf
IMMENSE
n 3 J 1 1 '
EXCITEMENT
IN MILLERSBURG, O.,,
o . '' -Hi I"
CAUSED BT THE
LOW PRICES
IX
Fall and Winter Djt BooOs,
' I ) is-,
NOTIONS,
CARPETS,
QUEENSWARE,
GROCERIES,&c.,
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. E: KOCEtfr's.
At his Old Stand, on
the
J65Calf early anil secure Jlargajni. ,
"Quick Sales & Small Profits"
IS OUR MOTTO,
ltespectrulljr,
J. E. KOCH,
Jr.
Miltenuurg-, O, Oct. 8, 11
,.jLiemons,.ur-J
.aS'r ,231" ldr.n?H
HJNUtSeJqjtixall
ed
a.
M. B.i COCHRAN & COMFAJNTX,
121 LIBERT? STREET, CORNER FIFTH,
PITTSBURGH, PA.
. t MANUFACTURERS AKD DEALERS IX
IRON AND WOOD,
Manufacturers' Supplies,
Have in store a fall stock of DEANE STEAM PUMPS, JUDSON
GOVERNORS, SASH and DOOR
all, kinds' promptly attended to.
.10. Cants per Tard,
baa it 9'
Eitraordiiiry Bargains for tho Holidays
7 JS 1
Standard 4-4 Brown Sheeting at 12 I -2 Jets, por yard.
Cood " " rro . " i v .
Standard 4-4:Bleached Sheeting at 12 J-2:cts. per yd. -
Lot of Delaines, to close;
Flannel8-aB low as25.dts.
Ticklngstaslow as 12 1-2 cts.
Tycoon Repp's at 20 cfs.
Tip-Top Waterproof at Sl.oo.
Toweling at 10 cts.
; n TTe call special attention to our large stock of .
. Maltese and Point Lace dollars,
. Just the thing for a Christmait Present.
KIT3 GLOVES, from One Dollar up.
Ladies and Gents Neck Wear, Ladles, Gents and Children's FURS at greatly reduced prices.
Largest, Best and Cheapest Stock or
CLOTHS AND CASSIMERES4
Iaiua.,8llvK-yEI.VETS AND VELVETEENS at Bottom Prices. Oar stock of
pAt lower prices than at any time this Beason.
'low fignrea.
juues ana uiuurea
QUEENSWARE, CROCERIES, &c.
LOUIS MAYERS
17tf
MACHINERY, Sec, &c. Repairing of
19ml
lit m nim
at 12 1-2 cts. per ya.
- T
WH ITE &
GREY BLANKETS at Terr
i rtLI a n
KIRTSi very .cheap.
A youth who had
returned from the
city, was asked
by his anxious fa
ther if he had been
guarded in his
conduct while
there. "Oh. yes, I
was guarded by
two policemen
W part of the.time,"
m'aa 4-tin rpnlw.
J.
Just' Received
Another Invoice, of flioae
SPLENDID
BOOTS !
Wliich toe are offering at
$4,50 worth $5.00 1
Two more Cases of those
Splendid
mum CALF SHOES
A.t 3.50.
ONJS CASE AT $2.78.
A FULL LINE OF
BOY'S BQOTS,
All Sixes: and Prices.
Good
v Liana Cheap.
RUBBER GOODS
A Full Line, Just Received.
S.H.GHERSIH0LHE8&G0.
Millersburg, O., Not. 14, XX
HHTATIOIT EAR GOODS.
SWITCHES,. HAIR. ROLLS,
Cliignons, Braids, 0c.
LATEST STYLES I
Very CHKAP for CASH at the
BOOK STORE.
Ladies Call and See Them. New Good
And New Style.
JAIT BE CHIVING !
''Call and see them before buying elsewhere.
Millersburg, Not. 1-m.i.
iy Claim Agency I
OT.DK3T IN THE STATE.
B. F. BROWN & CO.,
lie Smlthfleld Street, Pittsburgh, Penna.
Collect Pensions, Bounty, Prise Money, ae.
Special attention paid to auspenueu aim rejro
claims. Applications by mall attended to
K made iu iicrcn. 15mD
I
In
or
Ilm-rali I Hurrah. 1 1
NEWTOODSI
CAsm cAsmi cashui
THE F1KJI OF
JOHN SPENCER & SONS,
Paint Valley, Ohio,
Will, on and after the 1st day of October. 1873,
sell goods exclusively for the ready pay. By
so doing, we are enabled to sell from 5 to W per
cent, less than on the old system of long credit.
We keep a fulUine or goods such as & usual
ly kept in a flrst-class country Sttore. Such as
Dry Goods, Groceries, .Hardware,
Qaeensware, Boots & Shoes,
Mais fe Caps, Eeady Made
Clothing.for Men fcBoys.
We demonstrate practically. We will sell
A Sugar for 13 cts. per pound, and other grades
proportionally low.
1 ard wide Brown Muslin for 11 X by the bolt.
All wool dress flannels for 40c per yard.
Fine flannel shirting in abundance.
A line assortment of Shoulder and double
Shawls.
Good Kip Boots for (3.
Womens Calf Shoes for
And other things low accordingly.
Come one and all and be convinced that It
pays to buy your goods from those that sell ex
cluslvely forCash.
All kinds of Produce taken in exchange for
goods at the highest Cash prices.
We will pay Cash for all kinks of Prod oca
except Grain, Apples & Potatoes.'
We respecttully solicit a'good share of the
public patronage in the fntnre as ln-the past.
JOHN SPENCER 4 SOX.
Paint Valley, ft, Oct. ?, B.
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IT w Goods.
E. NEGELSPACH,
Has bought at the best time, a full line of
DRY GOODS AlfD NOTIONS
MEN AND t?OY'S
HATS AND CAPS,
KNIT GOODS AND YARNS,
Queensware & Groceries,
Which he offers for
Ca.sk and Trade I
at small morns.
TicM rll ami examine. I flattermrself that
can offer you the cheapeststocx of goods eret
Millersburg. -
miso niTu nod a nrlee for nrodnce. In cash
trade, as the market will allow.
ltf
E. NECELSPACH.

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