OCR Interpretation


Abilene weekly reflector. [volume] (Abilene, Kan.) 1888-1935, August 21, 1913, Image 7

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84029386/1913-08-21/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE 100 DEGREE LINT.
t If ' f -
J The friend-winning prices
A
that we are malting in our siure
will surely interest you. wow
type cannot do justice to wc
extraordinary otienngs. ouy
tog jewelry here means
spending: money ngm.
gtylo mty charge but
our high quality, low price
standard of jeweiry cu
ing remains fixed.
Iter yottwQl find
satisfy Ins atson-
mentoftheworw
best productions
;ln jewtiry.
gems, saver-
; ware, novel
ties. etc.
And the
prices are
saassisa
town ta
awhl. ,
'-AW' 'iTi
MKWW
EM III j
I VrV Sri
Pi
Here's
Your
Chance!
If yon want a
snappy, spark-
liner rem set riner
at a decided price
reduction here's
your opportunity.
Par vouraweetheart mar
ried or otherwise a diamond
artitaire i eminently DTOPer.
Mnthfntf tetter m an eneaee-
... MrtKrfav rlns. Snrmisa Fathtr.
Hatband or Brother with a nic ting. We
k... aniMuUd assortment of (ems in op-to-
tult th tnlnnMI PMi book. n
wtJI Boa rtnrsto aoit ratTena
n.n and woataa ana lints folks. Call
la bow wtails U stock Is aooiplst.
A. BL WARD U
EXCITING CHASE AFTER GREEK
Hassler Pursued Georgopouloe), Who
Leaped From Train.
How Pantigotus Georgopouloe,
the Greek arrested here for being
an illegal resident of the United
States, leaped headlong from the
rear of a train moving fifty miles
an hour, landed in a pile of gravel
unhurt, and was chased for several
miles, is told by Herman , Haasler,
sheriff, who was serving as a relief
suard to P. H. Strctton. United
States immigration inspector, who
was conducting the Greek to St.
Louis.
Two miles this side of Clark, Mo.,
the shackles were removed from
the prisoner, so that he could go to
the toilet. Stretton followed him.
Suddenly he dashed the length of,
the car, and leaped over the railing
on the end of the last car.
Three quarters of a mile farther
on the train was stopped. "He is
deaf," said the conductor, "for he
landed head foremost, in a pile of
gravel."
Hassler left the train before it
stopped completely, and with three
track laborers, rode a hand car back
to the place when the Greek had
scaped. He was just, then running
across the top of a nearby hill.
Hassler gave chase, and pursued
him through pastures and corn
fields for more than three miles,
finally losing him in a patch of
timber.
Stretton. in the meantime, had
gone to Clark, being unable to of
fer pursuit because of a decided
tendency toward corpulency. Offi
cers of all surrounding tows were
notified.
In the morning the pursuit was
Tesumed, and the place was found
where the Greek had eaten his sup
per. His trail was followed for
some time, and it was found which
direction he was following, keeping
always away from the roads.
Then a telegram was received
from R. V. Delaney, deputy sheriff
at Paris. Mo., that the Greek had
"been arrested as he came into town.
A knife and $3 were found in his
pockets, which be had stolen or
legged while he was at liberty. Hag"
aler returned to Abilene and Stret
ton resumed his journey to St.
Louis, from where the Greek will
Te taken to New York with, several
of his countrymen, who are also to
"be deported. . .
the murder which he says Georg
opolous committed' in bis family, the
Greek might now .be shining shoes,
instead of traveling eastward in
shackles.
Bithos passed through Abilene
this morning, bound for New York
City. "I am happy in this part of
the country," be said. And he was
happy, for after a two years' chase,
in half the states of the union, he
had gained revenge.
Georgopoulos will have to stand
trial in Greece for the murders.
Bithos says. The penalt will be
imprisonment in chains a living
death if he is found guilty.
Bithos says that Georgopoulos
murdered his brother-in-law through
love of a Zolohavan girl, who did
not return bis affection. The mur
dered man, according to Bithos, was
a brother of the favored youth.
Tbe other murder, Bithos said,
was that of a twelve-year-old boy,
a ton of the man whose testimony
was Instrumental in sending Georg
opoulos to -jail for- the-' statutory
crime.
Tbe brothers of Georgopoulos,
who swore he had been In this
country several years, were given a
preliminary hearing before United
States Commissioner G. W. Chase in
Junction City yesterday on a charge
I of perjury, and were bound over for
trial by the district court in Topeka
this fall.
DRIED CANTALOUPES
ARE THE NEWEST FRUIT
Pantigotus Georgopoulos, alleged
murderer, and illegal resident of
the .United States, will be returned
to his native land. VP. H. Stretton,
United Skate immigration Inspec
tor from Des Moines, and Herman
Hassler, sheriff of Dickinson county,
took" him from jail this morning,
and left for St Louis, from where
he will be taken to New York for
'deportation.
Pantigotus claimed to have been
in America for four years. Immi
gration record proved that he had
been here but two years and
month.
A statutory offense committed In
Greece. In 1907.. for which Georg
opoulos served four years la prison,
re grounds for the government's
action. The chsrge of John Bithos.
that his countryman committed two
murders, did not Influence the de
cision of the Immigrstloa officers.
But If It "had not beea ths
aatrid of John Bithos'. sad his de
temlnatloa te secure teat esace for
-?'?
The following, under a Los An
geles date line, Ehould Interest
and hill melon growers. Every
year frost takes hundreds of mel
ons left lying in the fields.
With the ' perfection of experi
ments now going on in the Imper
ial valley, California, the world will
be given another luscious dried
frUft the dried cantaloupe.
The" turn into profit of some of
the millions cf email cantaloupes
left in the field every year was a
problem the growers feared would
never be solved, until Thomas D.
McCall of El Centro accidentally
discovered tbe fine qualities of the
dried article. McCall had dumped
a great heap of cantaloupes to one
side, breaking several. These dried
and gave forth "such a fine aroma
that McCall was attracted and he
tasted them.
He found them excellent, and now
cantaloupe growers are drying all
their small melons. The dried var
iety is said to have a much finer
flavor than the fresh fruit.
ESCAPED GREEK CAPTURED.
Jumped from Train at Clark Ar
rested at Paris. '
Paris,' Mo.. Aug. 18. Pantigotus
Georgopoulos, the Greek who es
caped from the custody of W. B.
Stretton. United States immlgrstion
commissioner, at Clark, was captur
ed here yesterday. Inspector Stret
ton left last night with the prisoner
for St. Louis. R. V. Delaney, dep
uty sheriff, assisted In the capture.
Georgopoulos -' Jumped from sn
east bound passenger train at Clark
Saturday morning ' while tbe train
was moving fifty miles an hour. Sur
rounding towns were? telegraphed,
and when the Greek appeared near
Paris he wss at once arrested.
tf you doa't get rear EefleetoT
resaJarlr see fl.
4 .
5 .
6 .
7 .
8 .
9 .
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
May 18.-".
Mty 29....
Msy 30....
Msy 31....
June
July
Jnly
July
July
July
July
July 13
July 14
July 15
July 16
July 17
July 22
July 26
July 27
July 29
July 30
August
August
August
August
August
August
August 9
August 10
August 11
August 12
August 13
August 14
August .15
August 16
August 17
August 18
August 19
a
102
105
104
100
102
101
100
-106
.106
110
.. 100
105
109
100
103
105
101
..........103
102
........101
... 103
103
104
107
108
106
107
103
, 108
. 102
109
108
, 103
106
...105
100
100
102
Special Clearing Bale.
Your cholqe of any "hat" at 11.00
at the millinery store of Miss EIbIo
Priem.'firBt door north of Hub
bard's.: 18d2t
If. c. LITIS TELLS OF MICHIGAN
Tells of the Lake, Where Weather
Is Cool.
Up in Michigan, August 14th
Editor Reflector: Thinking per
haps our friends would like to know
something of upper Michigan will
write what I have learned of the
place. Torch lake lies east of Grand
Traverse bay and is 4 to 6 miles
wide and 18 miles long. It is sit
uated on the upper peninsula and
connects with a chain of lakes at
Clam. On entering Clam lake is a
small outlet which has a bridge that
swings, used for freighting mer
chandise to Clam which has one
store, postortkse and-boat henser.
They get all supplys from Alden,
which is a nice little town on the
P. M. railroad. Small boats go up
to Belaire. When these little steam
ers come to a bridge the whistle
blows three times and a man goes
to the middle of bridge where he
turns the bridge for boats to pass
with a crank. Here we enter Clam
lake which is four miles long, then
enter Grass river which- is eight
miles long and about 30 feet wide,
very crooked. Tbe little eteamer
has all it can do to get through the
turns being so short. Then it enters
Grass lake, about tbe size of Clam
lake. Here we come to a town on
a railroad named Belaire which has
saw mill and a good many stores.
This is as far up as we have been.
The natives are very good farmers
on this peninsula. They are rap-
Idly developing it into the fruit busi
ness. Will have quantities of ap
ples and peaches. All kinds of small
fruits, currants and blackberries are
very plentiful . now. Potatoes and
beans are the money makers. Will
have a great crop of both as It rains
most every other night. Weather
is cool and some days are most too
cool. Last Sunday we sat by fire.
Heavy sweaters are in demand. A
great many people are here from
Oklahoma, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa
and Ohio. There 'are some very
pretty homes on this beautiful lake,
all located as near the shore as pos
sible. We catch pike, pickerel and
black bass.
H. C. LITTS.
FAVOR SHOT IN FIGHT.
Former Dickinson Sheriff Battles
With Mexicans.
According. to a dispatch from
WellingtonJohn 'Favor, deputy
sheriff, was shot in the wrist when
a posse of deputy sheriffs hsd a
pitched battle with a gang of Mex
ican laborers on the Santa Fe road
at Miian. a few miles west of there
Friday. The Mexicans hsd taken a
white woman In their camp away
from the town marshal, who had
arrested here and the officer had
telephoned the sheriff for help. The
officers attempted to disarm some
of the Mexicans when they were st
tscked by their comrades' with
knives snd revolvers. Flllpe Go
mez, the leader of the Mexicans,
was mortally wounded and three
others seriously hurt. The Injured
are la the hospital there. ' '
fl
ft
TT JC
ON OUR NEXT
IscifI(DI fie Eiii&ip
tJsisWsail mm nmmm !TTMI -fu
f ill ippiMli, mm
Special Train to the Lower Rio Grande Valley
Leaving Abilene
Our contract with the Jackson-Vreeland Land Co. enables us to offer any sized
.mn of .n.ooo acres of the most fertile land in the world in the vicinity of and adjoin- jj4
ing Edinburg, the county seat of Hidalgo Co., Texas, at lower prices and Detter
terms than any competitive concern.
Land Sold on Ten Year Terms
A land where crops are planted and harvested every month in the year. No
drbuihs, no crop failures. We show you hundreds of happy and prosperous, people
and afford you every avenue foi the closest investigation. Determine for yourself.
' ' .... 7 t..u..i alfalfa i tn o rutttnps. dealing Sioo
Uorn yielding 50 10 ou uumku "-.. , , - a , m
an acre ; cotton, milo maize, sugar cane,- Egyptian wheat and held crops of all desenp-
! :-l I r..:io 00 tku famnno. Vflllev of the Nile. lv
UOn. OOll aS UUI SIW WimB na hi J , . -
You will see installed and in operation the finest irrigation system money can
StTa2 IS ffi. No extreme heat, no winters, a land of per-
SctTare ptche market earlier than any other productive district in
the UnS" more people are now going and buying homes than any other
country in the world. . , . .
INOw is tne time icgci i - - - . , r
By visiting this valley you will see and leal.ze opportunities offered that 3ou
neVer dI?rAiStl" h. s.en nho ograohs of the $100,000 court house at Edin-
A burg the famous Wm. Jennings Bryan ranch, pumping plant at the river , grape fruit. J
I ZwU Ud, corn producing V75 bushels and worth 75c to $1.00, and other farm
3 SCeneS,Xhe entire trip explained fully. Let nothing prevent vou from making this
trip. Jt is the opponumty P . f. . . to 0d Mexico t0
Manv de lent u siae trips, inuuumg ..-.o ,
the farTousbathing beach at Corpus Chnsti, and a sight-seeing trip over the beautiful
city of San Antonio.
Bring the good wife with you.
. Tram from Abilene via U. P. at n :i3 . and 1 : 10 p. m. Tuesday, Septa.
See me today regarding round trip including railroad fare, meals and sleeper,
etc,
Arrange your affairs to join this excursion.
Let me arrange for your accommodations not later than Tuesday, bept. 2,
m. Office phone 402 ; residence 137,
Klffil(ElWLTCI
PER RING BUILDING, ABILENE, KANSAS
i
jo lilo
m PERRING BUILDING, ABILENE, KANSAS &j
REMONSTRANCE OUT
ON SOUTH BUCKEYE
Several residents of South Buck
eye are exerting every possible ef
fort to secure sufficient signatures
for a paving remonstrance. Ten
days yet remain for a remonstrance
to be presented.
When the paving was petitioned
a majority of the property owners
favored it. Unless some of the peti
tioners can be Induced to sign the
remonstrance the paving will be
ordered installed.
Obituary Mrs. Pertlna Ferris.
Perlina Rohbins-Ferris was born
June 4. 1859 in Decatur county,
Ind., and died Aug. 9, 1913, at her
home In North Dickinson. Mrs. Fer
ris was next to the youngest of a
family of nine children and in early
childhood learned the lesson of per
severance which well fitted her for
the pioneer days of western Kansas.
She was educated in the common
schools of Indiana and at an esrly
age Joined the Methodist church, to
which she remained a faithful mem
ber to the end of her life.
She married James O. Ferris, s
resident of the ssme county. Dec.
Jl. 1877.' In 1879 the young cou
ple went to Wskeeney. Ksnsas. and
wrestled with the problems that al
wsys confront new settlers la a asw
country: Mr.' and Mrs. Ferris mored
to Dickinson county where they have
since resided. Four caUdrea sar
vive her: Leonard, Charles and El
mer and Mrs. Walter Pierce live in
this vicinity. May. -the youngest
daughter, died in early childhood.
Besides ber husband and children
Mrs. Ferris is survived by three
brothers and one sister: James H.
Robblns of Charlton, la.; John H.
Robbins, LItts, Ind.; William F.
Robblns, Greensburg, Ind., and Mrs.
H. H. King. Hope, Ind.
For many years Mrs. Ferris suf
fered much physical pain, but al
ways met the trials with fortitude.
In her death the neighborhood loses
one of its members, whose place will
be impossible to fill.
"" ' "bpon Air Church.
Tha open air meeting . Sunday
night was addressed by Rev. E. L.
Hull of the Bsptlst church. His
sermon, which was very Interesting,
dealt with the subject of disciple
ship. Tbe leading thought was thst
true following of Jesus means daily
crucifixion of selfishness. Miss Sex
ton sang and a selection was given
by the choir from the Baptist church.
Next Sunday nlgnt the meeting will
be under the auspices of the W. C.
Card ef Thaaka.
To the many, friends and neigh
bors who helped us during the Al
ness and death or our loved one,
snd extended"leartTsU sympathy,
we wish to pabllcly express" our
thanks. G. L. PeatlUg snd family.
COMMISSIONERS BACKED UP
ON VACATING ELM STREET
Decided Not to Be 80 Free With
City Property.
The city commissioners will not
vacate any ot Kim sireei 10 bucuiu
modate R.t G. Irey, who recently
purchased three lots bordering the
creek, north Of Third and west of
Elm, formerly a park.
Mr. Irey purposes to erect a mod
ern apartment house and endeavor
ed to have a part of Elm street
vacated. The (commissioner's . de
cided this morning that they would
not grant his wish.
Elm street is now 30 feet wide
just the width of the paving in
take. This is the width provided
in an ordinance passed when Third
street was paved, the usual parking -is
on each side of the street and Is
controlled by the city to the inside
of the sidewalk.
PETITIONS CIRCULATED FOR
PAVING ON SECOND STREET
Petitions for paving Second street
from Mulberry to Elm were put In
circulation late this afternoon. The
circulators say that a majority of
property owners will sign, end ex
pect to encounter little difficulty.
Second street is one of the main
arteries of trsfflc, and Is travelled
as much as any street In town, with
the possible exception ot Buckeye,
la the summer tint It is usually
sxtremely dusty.

xml | txt