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The historic times. [volume] (Lawrence, Kansas) 1891-1891, November 07, 1891, Image 1

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By The Historic Times Publishing Co.
THE RESULT.
£ OW th© States Voted at the Late
Elections.
Hower Elected in’ New York and McKin
ley i« Ohio—The Result in Massa
chusetts, lowa and Other
States.
New York.
Uf,w York, Nov. 5. —Roswell P.
Flower was elected Tuesday as gov
ernor of New York to succeed David B.
uni His nluralitv is estimated at over
40,000
Fassett did not
carry Elmira, his
own city, Flower
beating him by 504
, votes.
’ This city gave
| Flower 58,000 plur
ality and Brooklyn
\gave him 14,000.
Returns received
S-from districts out
roswellp. flower side New York and
King's county indicate that Fassett has
been meeting Folgcr's fate. In
Jefferson, Clinton, Essex, Montgomery
and Wyoming counties he was far lie
hind the vote for Miller. Flower’s
gains on a decreased vote were ahead
of Hill’s. Watertown’s four wards
show a gain of 500 for Flower.
The vote iu this city was very light.
It had been expected that out of the
registration of 201,532 at least 240,000
ballots would be polled. But only
about 220,000 persons voted. In the
Hill-Miller campaign more than 271,000
votes were cast. Comparatively, 1 lower
ran as well as Gov. Hill, whose plural
ity was 69,000, and who was elected by
19,000.
Sheehan did not do as well as Flower,
but his election is assured.
LATER RETURNS. 5
New York, Nov. 5. —Latest returns
place the plurality of Roswell I*. ,
Flower for governor at 43,834.
At midnight the Associated press re- (
turns from New York state showed fif
teen democrats elected to senate
and seventeen republicans, there is
some doubt about two democrats and
one republican in the assembly, but
there is a tie at sixty-four. On these
figures the republicans have two ma
jority on joint ballot of the legislature.
Complete returns from Kings county
gives Flower a plurality of 16,185.
Brooklyn elected Boody, democrat,
mayor by a plurality of 7,800. ,
Erie county, with one ward in Buffa
lo missing, gives Flower a plurality of
1,306. The missing ward gives a demo
cratic majority of about 400 on the
other offices. For state senator, En
dres, democrat, has an apparent major
ity of 84. The democrats elect the
sheriff, county clerk, keeper of poor
house and coroner on the county
ticket The republicans elect the
superintendent of the poor. On the
- city ticket the democrats elected the
mayor, Charles F. Bishop, (re-elected),
the comptroller, commissionr of pub
lic works, assessor, judge of munic
ipal court and justice of the peace. The
republicans elected the judge of the
superior court and the overseer of the
poor. The select council, a new’ body,
under the new charter will stand, eight
democrats and one republican. The
board of aidermen will stand, thirteen
democrats and twelve republicans.
The Herald’s returns from the state
confirm these figures as to the senate,
but in the assembly 59 seats are given
to the democrats and 69 to the repub
licans, thus giving the latter 12 major
ity on joint ballot Flower’s plurality
is given as 46,446.
Ohio
Columbus, 0., Nov. s.—At midnight
Gov. Campbell conceded the election of
Maj. McKinley by 15,000 plurality.
Chairman Neal, of the democratic
state central committee, concedes Mc-
Kinley’s election by
10,000 plurality and
the election of a re
publican legislat
ure.
The democrats
have carried Colum
bus and Franklin
county by a major
ity of from 1,200 to
1,500 and elected
the entire ticket,
wm. m’kinley. with the exception
of Walcott, republican, for the legis
lature, who will have a plurality of
about 200. .
At Niles, McKinley’s birthplace, the
republicans made a net gain of 200.
The vote for Gov. Campbell in his
own county showed a gain over his
own majority two years ago. The
Australian ballot was not greatly rel
ished by the German voters in Hamil
ton, where the vote was less than was
anticipated. Campbell, however,
gained in every precinct except one.
In the county at large his majority will
be between 8,000 and 4,700. His gam
is from the republicans,
m’kinley's majority.
Cincinnati, Nov. 5.-There is noth
ing in returns from missing precincts
that have been heard from to alter the
result already reported from Ohio.
The indications are that McKinleys
plurality will be about 19,000 and the
legislature as already reported—a re
publican majority of 35 on joint ballot.
Full returns from Hamilton county
give the following results: McKinley,
republican, 37,484; Campbell, democrat,
31,502; Ashenhurst, prohibition, 409;
Beitz, people’s, 3,773. McKinley’s plur-
ality, 5,922; McKinley’s majority, 1,-
740.
Complete returns from Cleveland and
its county give McKinley 1,394 plural
ity over Campbell. The republicans
elected the entire legislative delegation
of three senators and four representa
tives and the entire state and county
ticket with one exception, with plu
ralities ranging from 1,900 to 3,300.
Silbert, republican, for common pleas
judge is defeated by Noble, democrat,
by 1,200.
Massacli usetts.
Boston, Nov. 5. —On account of the
new iaw passed by the last legislature
requiring votes to be counted by two
different officials in order to secure
correctness, the re
turns are coming in
more slowly from
all sections of the
state than ever be
fore, although the
electoral machinery
has never been in
I more perfect condi
tion than in the
j present ele cti o n.
Vfhe returns from
country towns
* show a net repub
lican gain of 70b, or
14 per town over
wm. k. RUBSKLL. last year. On this
basis the republican gain in the 253
towns of the state would be 4,642.
RUSSELL ELECTED.
Boston, Nov. 5. —There are still four
towns that have not been heard of at
all in the associated returns, and sev
eral others whose complete vote has
not been received. The footings of the
governor votes at hand give: Allen,
148,200; Russell, 153,491; Kimball, pro
hibition, 8,156; Winn, people’s, 1,318;
Russell’s plurality, 5,291. The four
missing towns last year gave Russell a
plurality of 138, which will increase his
plurality in the state to 5,429.
In the legislature the republicans
will have a majority in both branches,
probably four or five in the senate and
about six in the house.
The entire state republican ticket ex
cept governor is elected by majorities
ranging from 8,000 to 12,000.
The returns for the legislature is
very complete. Of twenty-six complete
returns from the senate seventeen are
republican, among the surpris
es being the defeat of Rob
ert Howard, of Fall river. The senate
will be republican. The house has
complete returns from 127 members, a
little more than one-half, and these
stand 82 republicans and 45 democrats.
Speaker Barrett is re-elected by twice
his last year’s plurality.
lowa.
Des Moines, la., Nov. 5. —Both com
mittees here claim the election of gov
ernor. Chairman Mack, of the repub
i:said that the returns
were still incom
plete but careful
estimates place
Wheeler’s plural
ity at from 2,500
to 3,000. Later
precincts it is be
lieved, will show
greater republican
frgains, as they will
! be from country
’ districts. Chair
man Fuller, of the
lIORACK BOIES. democratic com
mittee, said: “I claim the state for
Boies by the same plurality as two
years ago —5,500. he have nothing
definite upon which to base the esti
mate for the rest of the ticket and
legislature.”
BOIES CHOSEN.
Des Moines, la., Nov. s.—Gov. Boies
arrived in Des Moines last night from
Waterloo and found the streets crowd
ed with excited people shouting for
him. , . x
At the Register office complete re
turns from eighty-three counties had
been received at a late hour, showing
a net democratic gain over two years
ago of 806. If the gain is kept up in
the remaining sixteen counties Gov.
Boies’ plurality will be in the neigh
borhood of B,ooo—a gain of 2,000 over
two vears ago.
The returns on the other state officers
are scattering, and if Boies’ plurality
is 8,000, as it now promises to be, the
rest of the democratic ticket will be
elected by small pluralities, ’lhe re- |
publicans have some hope for Van i
Houten, lieutenant-governor, who is |
running ahead of Wheeler in the pre
cincts that have reported. They also
claim Sabin, superintendent Of public
instruction. The democrats claim the
whole state ticket is elected. It wul ,
take fuller returns than can now be ob
tained to decide the fate of the ticke
below governor.
In the lower house the republicans
have gained Audubon, Adair, Adams,
Boone, Decatur, Floyd, Poweshiek and
Kossuth counties, while the democrats
have gained Marion, O'Brien and Sioux.
The parties were equally divided two
years ago and the republicans will
therefore have a clear majority. The
senate is conceded to be democratic by
one or two votes. The Farmers' Alli
ance candidate, Westfall, for governor,
received 15,000 votes in the state.
The alliance carried one county for
governor—Monona, one for representa
tive— Montgomery, and the Montgom
ery-Mills senatorial district
rennivlvania-
Philadelphia, Nor. &—At midnight
returns from twenty-one counties in
cluding Allegheny, but excluding 1 bib
adelpbia, show a net republican gam
, for Gregg, republican, for aud.tor-
LAWRENCE, KANSAS, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER ", 1891.
general and about the same
for Morrison, republican, for state
treasurer. Philadelphia county re
turns are coming quite slowly, but one
fourth of the wards being in at this
hour. These indicate, however, that
the republicans will carry the city by
about 20,000 and the republican major- j
ity in the entire state will be less than
40,000.
At 2 a. m. the whole state has been
heard from, not a county missing.
Gregg, republican, for auditor general,
has 50,833 plurality over Wright, dem
ocrat, and Morrison, republican, for !
state treasurer, has 47,467 plurality
over Tilden, democrat.
Nebraska.
Omaha, Neb., Nov. s.—Returns from
Nebraska up to 1 o’clock this morning
are meager. The Australian ballot
has proved a hard one to count and the j
result is that the returns are later com
ing in than ever before, even in this ;
proverbially slow state. Rough esti
mates made from the returns at hand,
including those from Omaha and Doug
las county, indicate that Judge Post
has carried the state by at least 5,000
majority.
Omaha, Neb., Nov. 5.-—Sixteen coun
ties out of ninety, exclusive of Douglas
and Lancaster, gave Post, republican,
for supreme judge, 15,950; Edgerton,
independent, 15,732. Lancaster county,
estimated, gives Post 1,300 majority
and Douglas county 6,000 majority.
This indicates that Post’s plurality in
the state will be over 7,000.
Virginia.
Richmond, Va., Nov. 5. —About thrcc
fourQis of the state has been heard
from which show’s that sixteen senatoi
ial districts have elected demo
crats with four districts to hear
from. This with nineteen
democrats who hold over makes the
senate stand 35 democrats to 1 repub
lican who holds over. In sixty-five
cities and counties heard from the
democrats elect every candidate
save McCandlish of Middlesex county,
who is elected by 80, an independent
alliance candidate. The democrats
w’ill have more than two-thirds major
ity in the next legislature.
Mississippi.
Jackson, Miss., Nov. 5. —The election
in this state was held for three railway
commissioners, the entire legislature
and district attorney. W. S. Laurin,
J. B. Askew aud J. F. Sessions were
the democratic nominees for railroad
commissioners and had no opposition.
The general legislature will be over
whelmingly democratic with the most
of the members pledged for the return
of Messrs. George aud Walthall to the
United States senate.
New Jersey.
Trenton, N. J., Nov. 5. —The returns
up to 1 o’clock this morning indicate
the election of the entire democratic
senatorial ticket in New Jersey and
forty-one out of sixty assemblymen.
This will give the democrats a ma
jority of thirty-three on joint ballot,
probably the largest majority ever held
by either party in the legislature.
South Lakota.
Yankton, S. D., Nov. s.—lnformation
received at the headquarters of the
democratic state central committee in
this city is to the effect that South
Dakota will give Jolly, republican, a
majority of about 3,500 over Smith, in
dependent, and that Woods, democrat,
is defeated by a larger plurality than
was Quigley, democrat, last year.
Colorado.
Denver, Col., Nov. s.—The election
law delayed the returns so it will be
impossible even to-night to give the
exact results. Sufficient, however, lias
been received to determined that Judge
Helm, republican, has been chosen
chief justice by from 7,000 to 10,000 ma
jority.
.Maryland.
Baltimore. Md., Nov 6. I rank
Brown, democratic candidate for gov
ernor, has a majority of between 15,000
and 20.000 as figured out at the demo
cratic headquarters.
Kansas.
Topeka. Nov. 4.—Election returns
ndicate general republican gams
throughout the state.
Republicans Sweep Chicago.
Chicago, Nov. s.—Complete returns
from every district in Cook county
show that the entire republican ticket
was elected Tuesday. The repub
lican candidates for county commission
ers in the city district appear to have
received majorities varying from 7.000
to 14.000. Mr. Eckhart, republican
candidate for drainage trustee, re
ceived 5.000 more votes than any other
candidate for that office. The only
democrat elected was Lyman E. Cooley,
drainage trustee, who comes in as
the minority representative. It is one
of the most sweeping republican vic
tories in Cook county and is largely
due to continued dissensions in the
democratic ranks. A significant feature
of the election is that nearly every
man indorsed by the American oi
‘•Know-Nothing ’ association was elect
ed.
Effect of Readme Ilulwer Lytton.
Kansas City, Mo., Nov. 5. Charles
I Henry Durgin, aged 25 years, had l>eer
an earnest reader of Bulwer Lyttons
works. Some gloomy chapter of th*,
great novelist affected him deeply,fits oi
melancholia followed and this morning
, he took a dose of strychnine with suf
cidal intent Durgin was employed a«
cutter in a St Louis shoe factory unit
a few days ago, when he came to Kan
sas Citv and put up at a lodging horst
at 1040 Union avenua.
ELECTION RETURNS.
How the Various Counties of the
State Voted.
Carry Most of the Counties and
Elect Nearly All the District Judges—
The Alliance E'ect Two Judges
and Democrats One.
Topeka, Kan., Nov. 5. —In Neosho
county the republicans made a clean
sweep on the county ticket, electing
every man by good majorities. Repub
licans make an average gain of 600 over
last year.
In Crawford county the republicans
have elected the whole county ticket
In Ellsworth county the republicans
elected the full county ticket by an
average majority of over 400.
In Franklin county complete returns
show the election of the entire repub
lican county ticket There was a great
falling off in the alliance vote.
In Clay county the republicans made
big inroads on the alliance vote and
succeeded in splitting the ticket with
them. The republicans elected the
sheriff and county commissioner and
the alliance the other officers.
In Wichita county full returns show
a republican victory.
In Miama county every republican on
the countv ticket was elected by an
average majority of 400 over the alli
ance ticket
In Coffey county the full republican
ticket was elected by satisfactory ma
jorities.
In Dickinson county indications point
the election of republican candidates
for every office except that of sheriff,
which the alliance probably gets.
In Riley county almost complete re
turns show that the republicans have
elected the full county ticket
In Labette county the vote on the
county ticket is very close with both
republicans and alliance claiming the
victory.
In Atchison county the returns show
conclusively that every man on the. re
publican ticket is elected by majorities
ranging from 200 to 700. The alliance
got one county commissioner.
In Linn county complete returns
show the election of the full republican
ticket
In Jefferson county the figures re
cord a republican triumph, every man
on the ticket being elected.
In Cherokee county the indications
are that the alliance county ticket is
elected.
In Nemaha county returns from all
but one precinct indicate the election
of the entire republican ticket over the
democratic-alliance fusion.
In Waubaunsee county the returns
arc all in and show the election of the
republican ticket by majorities ranging
from 150 to 500.
In Greenwood county returns are in
complete, but the alliance ticket has
probablv pulled through.
In Anderson county complete returns
show the election of the full republican
ticket by majorities ranging from 3 to
375.
In Lyon county official returns give
an average majority of 550 for every
candidate on the republican ticket
In Lincoln county the republicans
carried two of their men through by 15
majority.
In Hodgeman county the vote on the
register of deeds stands: Republican,
354: democrat, 106; people’s, 63. Re
publicans carried the county by I*9
majority.
In Sherman county, on the county
ticket, republicans elected register,
clerk and surveyor; alliance elected
sheriff, treasurer and coroner.
In Sedgwick countv the entire re
publican ticket is elected by pluralities
ranging from 100 to 300.
In Reno county the entire republican
ticket is elected by majorities ranging
from 150 to 403.
In Geary county the union republican
and democratic ticket elected every
man except commissioner, by majori
ties from 353 to 577. Geary gave Judge
Humphrey a majority of 271; Dickinson
county gave Humphrey 230 and Morris
200, making his majority .
In Wilson county the election passed
quietly with a full vote and the same
interest as a national election. Ihe
republicans elected their entire ticket
by majorities of from 80 to 200, except
countv clerk. V. L. Polson, democrat,
was elected by seven majority. Dis
trict Judge Stillwell carried the countv
by 4 0 majority and is re-elected in the
distinct by near I.OOu.
In Johnson county the returns show
a republican victory. Three tickets
were in the field, except for sheriff. On
this office the fight was between the
alliance and ropub icans. Easdale, re
publican, w as elected by about 590 ma
jority. the remainder of the ticket by
pluralities of from 3<h> to 500.
In Rawlins county the alliance eie.ts
sheriff, the democrats treasurer and re
publicans all other county officers by
majorities ranging from 50 to 290. Re
publican senator gets 200 majority.
In Jewell county the alliance elected
their entire ticket
In Rice county the whole republican
ticket is elected by majorities from 50
to 200. ...
In Washington county the republic
ans elected their whole county ticket,
except sheriff, by majorities ranging
from 345 down to a few votes.
In Douglas county complete returns
show the electi n of the entire repub
lican ticket The majorities are: Cox.
for treasurer, 6<>; Hindman, for sheriff,
1.100: RUtciks, for county clerk, 1,297:
Brooks, for register of deeds, Bs3;
' Horner, for coroner, 795, and Hoskin-
I son, for commissioner, 267.
In Trego county the entire republic
an ticket is elected by majorities rang
ing from 75 to 300.
In Republic county the republicans
elect full ticket, except county com
missioner, by pluralities ranging from
17 to 225. ,
In Butler county the offices are di
vided about equally between the peo
ple’s and the republican parties.
The Judicial Oatlook.
Including two judges in Wyandotte
county and one in Shawnee county
there were twelve judges voted for in
Kansas on Tuesday.
In the Sixth district, composed of
Crawford, Bourbon and Linn counties
Judge West, republican, is undoubtedly
elected over Allen, alliance, by at least
1,000 majority, carrying all of the three
counties.
In the Seventh district, composed ol
Woodson, Neosho and WilstMi counties,
Stillwell, republican, carries every
county and his election by a safe ma
jority is conceded by the alliance lead
ers.
In the Eighth district, composed of
Dickinson, Geary and Morris counties,
there was a warm fight between
Nicholson, the alliance nomination,
and Judge Humphrey, who was
supported by both republicans and
democrats. This is an alliance strong
hold and they were confident of elect
ing Nicholson bv a large majority, but
the returns show that Humphrey has
carried the three counties and is elected
by at least 1,000 majority.
The Ninth district includes Reno and
Harvey counties and there were three
candidates in the field. In the triangu
lar fight F. L. Martin, republican, is
elected by a majority of about 500, car
rying both counties.
Wichita constitutes the Eighteenth
judicial district and each of the three
parties had a candidate in the field.
Judge Reed, republican, is elected by a
plurality of not less than 1,000 votes.
The Twenty-fifth district, made up
of McPherson, Marion and Chase coun
ties, is where the most hotly contested
battle of all was waged. The alliance
candidate was Judge Doster. Repub
licans and democrats combined, nomi
nating Lucien Earle, of McPherson
county. The returns show Earle elect
ed by a plurality approximating 900.
In the Twenty-sixth district, com
posed of Butler and Greenwood coun
ties, the race has been a very close one
between Cloggaton, republican, and
Shaun, alliance. At an early hour yes
terday morning the election of the lat
ter was claimed by a majority of 100.
Returns from the Twenty-seventh
and Twenty-eighth districts are very
incomplete, but are sufficient to sho w
the election of Abbott, republican, in
the former, and Bashore, alliance, in
the latter.
In Wyandotte county Judges Alden
and Anderson were re-elected by large
pluralities, and in Shawnee county
Johnson, the fashion republican and
democratic candidate, is elected.
ATTEMPTED LYNCHING.
A Mob of 5.000 Person* Hunt Fruitlessly
For a Topeka Murderer.
Topeka, Kan., Nov. s.—Frank Mc-
Lain, who makes his living cleaning
alleys and acting as general scavenger,
was arrested yesterday afternoon for
the murder of the nine-months-old s »n
of his wife, to whom he was married
last August, and last night two mobs
made vain searches for him in order to
lynch him.
Monday evening Mrs. Hargrave and
Mrs. Stewart, two neighbors, were
called in by McLain, who told them
that the baby was dying. They found
that its left leg had been broken just
below the hip and its body was cov
ered with bruises and cuts. Yesterday
morning the child died and McLain ap
pealed to the county for aid in burying
it and a coffin was furnished.
McLa’n had three daughters by a
former wife. His children told in
school yesterday that their father had
| taken the baby bv the heels and pound
ed it against the door. The story was
spread by the school children and the
police were notified and arrived at the
i house just in time to find McLain mak
ing preparations for burying the child
himself without calling in an under
taker.
The body wax taken in charge by the
police and a post mortem examination
proved beyon 1 a doubt that the child
had been treated in th*' most brutal
manner imaginable. 'I he face was
covered with scars; both legs were
broken; the left ear was deeply gashe i
on the inner side, and the body was
bruised in several places.
News of the brutal crime spread rap
id'.v over the citv, and shortly after
dark excited crowds began to gatbe*
about the county jail and city prison
and at S o’clock over 3.003 angry rm n
Ml rrounded the two prisons, which al
- each other. The doors of both
were guarded by officers, who informed
trie mob that tha murderer was in
neither. .
Most of the mob then quietly dis
persed, but a portion went to the coun
it courthouse. it haring been rumored
that the prisoner was confined in the
basement, which had formerly been
used as a jail.
Here the mob rapidly increased- At
10 o’clock there were fully V AW peop c
in the streets about the courthouse.
Finally the front door forced
open, torcues were procured and
keys t > the old ce.s were foand in tn«
.sheriff’s d>. ■■ A thoru b-tr hv s
made, but the prisoner could not be
I found.
VOL. I. NO. 18.
KANSAS STATE NEWS.
Destructive fires were lately reported
to be raging in Gray and Ford counties.
Patents lately issued to Kansas in
renters: Bolting machine. S. A. Nor
lyke, Kansas City; covering for cable
conduits, 11. Hughes, Abilene.
J. E. Harden, a farmer living near
lola, fell from his horse into an open
ivell nine feet deep the other day and
was drowned. He left a wife and teu
children.
Fire at lola recently burned the Tin
nery & Ewart's hardware store, Cul
bertson’s furniture store and several
other stores in the same block and also
the Register office.
Ex-President McGrath, of the Farm
ers’ Alliance, declares the published in
terview, in which he was quoted as
saying that the alliance had fallen off
in one year from 140,000 to less than
60,000 members, to be “unauthentic and
false in fact”
A spark from a Santa Fe engine
started a prairie fire near Argonia the
other night, which caused a large loss
of property and the death of Mrs.
Charles Twining, wife of a farmer. A
large quantity of grain and hay and
many head of stock were reported lost
The president has respited Benson,
the Mettman murderer who was to
have been hanged at Leavenworth No
vember 5, until February A When
the news was communicated to the
prisoner he laughed and said: Ah,
well, I will get my Christmas dinner
now.”
Edward J. Seymour, a young man
who removed to Topeka recently from
Eskridge with his young wife, was ar
rested the other morning charged with
the attempted murder of his child,
which was born the day before, and
was an unwelcome addition to his
family.
A second attempt was made the other
night to hold up the conductor of a
streetcar at the terminus of the electric
road on the Quindaro boulevard, Kan
sas City, Kan., but the conductor (Bas
sett) drew his pistol and commenced
firing at the two masked men, when
| they beat a hasty retreat
| M ichael Grace, a U nion Pacific switch
man, while scuffling with John Nich
ols, a member of the same crew,
fell from a car at Armstrong the other
I morning and received injuries which
resulted fatally. As there were con
flicting stories about the affair, Nichols
was held pending an investigation.
While W. R. Sharp and wife wcra
driving recently across the Santa le
tracks at Pittsburgh, they were struck
by a switch engine, which destroyed
the buggy and threw the old couple
out Mrs. Sharp was pitched on to the
ends of the cross ties and her skull
fractured, her right shoulder broken
and other internal injuries inflicted.
The post office at Turner, was robbed
the other night of over SUM) in money
and stamps. Robberies of this kind
have been so frequent in Wyandotte
county, and in fact the whole Missoni i
valley, that detectives are kept on the
ground most of the time by the po t
office department, but they do not
have much success in running down
the robbers.
Michael Wilkin.% one of the oldest
and wealthiest farmers in the county,
was killed by a Santa Fe train a mile
west of Atchison the other afternoon.
He and his wife had been trading in
Atchison and in returning home at
tempted to drive across the railroad
tracks when the wagon was struck by
an engine. He was reported to be
worth $75,000.
Rudolph Muller, an old bachelor, was
found dead in bed in his bouse at Wich
ita the other evening. Il was supposed
■ to be a case of suicide by poison. In
the bed was found a note to the effect
that the writer was old and unable
longer to earn a living and he wa* bet
ter dead. A post mortem examination
revealed arsenic in the stomach, but
nothing could be found about the room
which had contained arsenic. The
note also bore evidence of being a
forgery and there was strong suspicion
that the old German hail been mur
dered for money supposed to be secreted
about the premises.
J. W. Smith, the owner of a farm for
the breeding of fine Norman horses three
miles from Leavenworth, was found
dead in his room in the Phillips house,
Kansas City, Ma, the other afternoon.
Smith went to the Phillipa house the
night before, engaged a room, and
while going to it be was seized with a
fainting spell, becoming unconscious
for a time. When partially revived be
laid to his attendant: “J m all right
aow, I gneas, bat I don’t know nh»’
was the matter. 1 never had anything
>f the kind before.” Nt appearing
next day the door wav forced open »« 1
he wm found dead He was abort
forty years of age and report* 1 to b
worth $lOO,OOO.
The annual report of the D *l/ <
Montezuma A Trini »ad rai.r I r •
nany, which operates a line of twenty
mx miles in length, running Irom
Dodge City to Montezuma, was file I
with the state board of ra.iroad co •»-
miss toners recently. Tins is the o <■<
railroad in Kansas which has no l*» d
ed indebtedness It is owned by -
son Son), son of the hop bitters manu
facturcr of the same name. Thrrater
prise does not seem !-» be a profitable
one. The report shows that the t »•’
of operating were S'.’-' 53 and U .«»
$4 01AM. while the total receipts o.
operation were 51.X7A *l7. showing a net
iuas of SlO,7<Kk3X It will be seco tuat
the company pays out nearly four u.nr
its gr- ss earning*

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